Date   

Re: given name HERSCHEL LEIB #lithuania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

At 10:21 AM 10/19/2004 -0400, Judy Segal wrote:
I have been told that the first names of HERSCHEL TZVI (or, alternatively,
TZVI HERSCHEL) and ARYEH LEIB are fairly common combinations, and much has
been written to this Sig about the meanings of these names.

Yet in my branch of the SEGAL family, hailing >from Czarist Lithuania, c.
1880 (our calendar), there apparently is the first name of HERSCHEL LEIB.

Has anyone else heard of this particular combination?
The two Yiddish names Hersh and Leyb were both kinuim in Lithuania for
several Hebrew names: Naftali and Tsvi (for Hersh), and Arye and Yehuda
(for Leyb). This means that for a person having the two names Tsvi and
Hersh, he would be called to the Tora in an aliya as Tsvi Hersh ben Ploni
(where Ploni was his father's legal name). The same for Arye Leyb.

In Judy's case, her ancestor apparently had the two names Hersh/Hershl and
Leyb (Judy gave the German secular spelling of these names). This suggests
that he might also have had one of the two Hebrew names Naftali or Tsvi
(>from Hersh), and one of the two Hebrew names Arye or Yehuda (>from
Leyb). Occasionally, such Yiddish kinuim were given separately without
their Primary Hebrew name, but this was not the norm. And also
occasionally, one found that the order of the Hebrew and Yiddish names was
reversed, i.e., Leyb Arye.

It was not unusual for a Jew to have more than one Yiddish name. In fact,
many Jews in Europe collected many more than just two such names, using
them in different venues according to their need (i.e., to keep the tax
collector and the army draft at bay). There were cases where people has as
many as 30 to 40 such names, although this was unusual. Thus, it certainly
could have happened that the particular combination Hershl Leyb was
possessed by her ancestor, but I would not have thought this to be a
special case, except in that both of these names were very popular in
Lithuania.

And then, there were also those Yiddish names that were stand-alone names
and were not attached to any specific Hebrew name -- this was particularly
true for women (e.g., Beyle, Blume, or Brayne) who really had no need for a
Hebrew name, as did a man.

Shabbat shalom

Jerry

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: given name HERSCHEL LEIB #lithuania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

At 10:21 AM 10/19/2004 -0400, Judy Segal wrote:
I have been told that the first names of HERSCHEL TZVI (or, alternatively,
TZVI HERSCHEL) and ARYEH LEIB are fairly common combinations, and much has
been written to this Sig about the meanings of these names.

Yet in my branch of the SEGAL family, hailing >from Czarist Lithuania, c.
1880 (our calendar), there apparently is the first name of HERSCHEL LEIB.

Has anyone else heard of this particular combination?
The two Yiddish names Hersh and Leyb were both kinuim in Lithuania for
several Hebrew names: Naftali and Tsvi (for Hersh), and Arye and Yehuda
(for Leyb). This means that for a person having the two names Tsvi and
Hersh, he would be called to the Tora in an aliya as Tsvi Hersh ben Ploni
(where Ploni was his father's legal name). The same for Arye Leyb.

In Judy's case, her ancestor apparently had the two names Hersh/Hershl and
Leyb (Judy gave the German secular spelling of these names). This suggests
that he might also have had one of the two Hebrew names Naftali or Tsvi
(>from Hersh), and one of the two Hebrew names Arye or Yehuda (>from
Leyb). Occasionally, such Yiddish kinuim were given separately without
their Primary Hebrew name, but this was not the norm. And also
occasionally, one found that the order of the Hebrew and Yiddish names was
reversed, i.e., Leyb Arye.

It was not unusual for a Jew to have more than one Yiddish name. In fact,
many Jews in Europe collected many more than just two such names, using
them in different venues according to their need (i.e., to keep the tax
collector and the army draft at bay). There were cases where people has as
many as 30 to 40 such names, although this was unusual. Thus, it certainly
could have happened that the particular combination Hershl Leyb was
possessed by her ancestor, but I would not have thought this to be a
special case, except in that both of these names were very popular in
Lithuania.

And then, there were also those Yiddish names that were stand-alone names
and were not attached to any specific Hebrew name -- this was particularly
true for women (e.g., Beyle, Blume, or Brayne) who really had no need for a
Hebrew name, as did a man.

Shabbat shalom

Jerry

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Re: jri-pl digest: October 20, 2004 #poland

Jacqueline Cole <jacquelinecole@...>
 

Would anyone have any information pertaining to the Polish composer LUDWIK
ZUK SKARSZEWSKI, who was a comrade of SZYMON LAKS 1901-1983?
They met in Auschwitz Birkenau in July 1942, both survived.
I would be so grateful of someone could let me know.

Thanks a lot!

Sincerely,

Jacqueline Cole
Director
Viktor Ullmann Foundation
http://www.viktorullmannfoundation.org.uk

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland RE: jri-pl digest: October 20, 2004 #poland

Jacqueline Cole <jacquelinecole@...>
 

Would anyone have any information pertaining to the Polish composer LUDWIK
ZUK SKARSZEWSKI, who was a comrade of SZYMON LAKS 1901-1983?
They met in Auschwitz Birkenau in July 1942, both survived.
I would be so grateful of someone could let me know.

Thanks a lot!

Sincerely,

Jacqueline Cole
Director
Viktor Ullmann Foundation
http://www.viktorullmannfoundation.org.uk

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Liba Kirsch/Abram Goodman #poland

Susan Tait Porcaro <suetaitporcaro@...>
 

Hello
I recently discovered more info on my husband's ancestors.
His great grandmother was Yetta Goodman, born in Poland, daughter of
Liba Kirsch and Abram Goodman. I think Yetta and her father emigrated in
1892 through Ellis Island. They lived in Boston. Yetta married Isadore
Kriegsman in 1893-4. He died between 1910-1920. Yetta died in 1928.
Yetta and her parents are buried in the Independent Pride of Boston
cemetery in Woburn, Mass.

Liba Kirsch was daughter of Reb Aaron Kirsch and Abram was son of Aryeh
Lieb Goodman. This is per their gravestones, translated by JCAM. I would
love to connect to any relatives of these families and find out where in
Poland they came from. There is a Yetta Goodman in the Ellis Island
database and I'm going to check that one out.

Thank you
Sue
Windsor, CT

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland Liba Kirsch/Abram Goodman #poland

Susan Tait Porcaro <suetaitporcaro@...>
 

Hello
I recently discovered more info on my husband's ancestors.
His great grandmother was Yetta Goodman, born in Poland, daughter of
Liba Kirsch and Abram Goodman. I think Yetta and her father emigrated in
1892 through Ellis Island. They lived in Boston. Yetta married Isadore
Kriegsman in 1893-4. He died between 1910-1920. Yetta died in 1928.
Yetta and her parents are buried in the Independent Pride of Boston
cemetery in Woburn, Mass.

Liba Kirsch was daughter of Reb Aaron Kirsch and Abram was son of Aryeh
Lieb Goodman. This is per their gravestones, translated by JCAM. I would
love to connect to any relatives of these families and find out where in
Poland they came from. There is a Yetta Goodman in the Ellis Island
database and I'm going to check that one out.

Thank you
Sue
Windsor, CT

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Genealogy Course - Weekly from NOW until 13 December #unitedkingdom

Laurence Harris <Laurence@...>
 

There are still some places available on the course below and there are many
more interesting sessions to come.

Laurence Harris
Member of Council
Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

INTERESTING GENEALOGY TALKS IN RADLETT

Monday evenings >from 11 October till 13 December 2005.

Richard Pearlman, Vice President of JGSGB, presents a series of talks on
Jewish Genealogy at Radlett and Bushey Reform Synagogue, Watling Street,
Radlett.

COLLECTING DEAD RELATIVES

Lecturers and experts will surprise you with GOSSIP, VIOLENCE, SCANDAL, SEX
& DEATH and all in the cause of plotting your family trees.

There will be fascinating evenings with specialists on Poland, Lithuania and
South Africa, interactive story-telling and sessions on COMPUTERS in
GENEALOGY.

One of the highlights will be a session with David Jacobs, founder member
and Vice President of JGSGB.

First session FREE, then £45 for the course or £5 each session.
For more information contact RICHARD PEARLMAN at < richard@pearlman.co.uk >


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Genealogy Course - Weekly from NOW until 13 December #unitedkingdom

Laurence Harris <Laurence@...>
 

There are still some places available on the course below and there are many
more interesting sessions to come.

Laurence Harris
Member of Council
Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

INTERESTING GENEALOGY TALKS IN RADLETT

Monday evenings >from 11 October till 13 December 2005.

Richard Pearlman, Vice President of JGSGB, presents a series of talks on
Jewish Genealogy at Radlett and Bushey Reform Synagogue, Watling Street,
Radlett.

COLLECTING DEAD RELATIVES

Lecturers and experts will surprise you with GOSSIP, VIOLENCE, SCANDAL, SEX
& DEATH and all in the cause of plotting your family trees.

There will be fascinating evenings with specialists on Poland, Lithuania and
South Africa, interactive story-telling and sessions on COMPUTERS in
GENEALOGY.

One of the highlights will be a session with David Jacobs, founder member
and Vice President of JGSGB.

First session FREE, then £45 for the course or £5 each session.
For more information contact RICHARD PEARLMAN at < richard@pearlman.co.uk >


JRI-Poland coming to Washington, DC area #poland

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

"What's New in Jewish Records Indexing - Poland"
and
"Interpreting Galician Vital Records In The JRI-Poland Database."

On Sunday, November 21, the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington
(JGSGW) will sponsor a dual presentation by Mark Halpern entitled "What's
New in Jewish Records Indexing - Poland" and "Interpreting Galician Vital
Records In The JRI-Poland Database." This is a combined presentation of two
of the three JRI-Poland lectures that were featured at the IAJGS Conference
in Jerusalem this summer. The meeting will be held at Congregation Har
Shalom, Falls Road, Potomac, MD. A schmooze session will start at 1:30 PM
and the program will follow at 2:00 PM.

JRI-Poland is continuing to expand its online searchable database to the
indices of available Jewish Records >from current and former territories of
Poland. With more than 2.4 million indices, this database has helped in
countless genealogical searches, enabling researchers to trace their
families' growth and migration inside Poland. The JRI-Poland database has
also been a resource in genetic and family health research and in efforts by
those in Poland today to trace their Jewish heritage. The presentation will
outline the new developments in the project as well as the many other
initiatives being launched and planned by JRI-Poland, and will include
examples of the family connections that have resulted >from using the
JRI-Poland database. It will also cover recent developments in the
JRI-Poland Order Processing System, launched in November 2003. This point
and click "shopping basket system" enables researchers to order records >from
the Polish State Archives via JRI-Poland's Order Processing Center and
credit card facilities.

The presentation will continue with the language of the records, the
geography of Galicia, a short history of the Jews in Galicia, and a review
of the history of civil record keeping in Galicia with specific emphasis on
the effect on the Jewish community. Pages containing sample vital record
from periods between the 1820s and 1920s will be reviewed. The headings of
the columnar forms used for Galician record keeping will be shown along with
translations so that Galician researchers can understand the records they
acquire.

Researchers with limited resources always must make decisions on how to
spend their research dollars. Strategies for acquiring vital records with
the most relevant genealogical information will be presented - which types
of records and which years as well as other important hints. The type of
information and the quality of that information varies depending on the
timeframe of the record and the town of that record. Specific record will be
presented that show the wide variety of information that could be available.

Mark Halpern has been actively researching his Polish and Galician roots for
the last eight years. Mark is a board member of Jewish Records Indexing -
Poland. He coordinates the JRI-Poland ordering process, the indexing of
eastern Galician records at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw and the indexing at
the Bialystok Archives. He is also President of the Jewish Genealogical
Society of Greater Philadelphia (JGSGP). He is the originator and
coordinator of BIALYGen, the Bialystok Region Jewish Genealogy Group and
coordinates a project to index and restore the Jewish Cemetery in Bialystok,
Poland. Mark has written many articles concerning Galician records for The
Galitzianer.

For directions to Har Shalom and additional information regarding JGSGW, see
out website at http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw/.

Marlene Bishow
VP - Programs

KATZ: Zhuravno, Galicia > NYC
DEUTSCHER, NUSSBAUM: Rozniatow, Galicia > NYC
SINGER: Belarus (Grodno?) > NY > CT
SOMMERS: Lithuania > Wales > York PA, Baltimore
HANTMAN/GANTMAN: Smilovichi & Novy Sverzhn' Belarus >NYC > CT
BISHOW (BJOVSKY) : Russia (Ukraine?) > New Orleans > Baltimore
KULPE: Siauilai, Lithuania>Philadelphia PA & Birmingham, AL
SATTENSTEIN: Papile, Lithuania >Philadelphia


JRI Poland #Poland JRI-Poland coming to Washington, DC area #poland

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

"What's New in Jewish Records Indexing - Poland"
and
"Interpreting Galician Vital Records In The JRI-Poland Database."

On Sunday, November 21, the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington
(JGSGW) will sponsor a dual presentation by Mark Halpern entitled "What's
New in Jewish Records Indexing - Poland" and "Interpreting Galician Vital
Records In The JRI-Poland Database." This is a combined presentation of two
of the three JRI-Poland lectures that were featured at the IAJGS Conference
in Jerusalem this summer. The meeting will be held at Congregation Har
Shalom, Falls Road, Potomac, MD. A schmooze session will start at 1:30 PM
and the program will follow at 2:00 PM.

JRI-Poland is continuing to expand its online searchable database to the
indices of available Jewish Records >from current and former territories of
Poland. With more than 2.4 million indices, this database has helped in
countless genealogical searches, enabling researchers to trace their
families' growth and migration inside Poland. The JRI-Poland database has
also been a resource in genetic and family health research and in efforts by
those in Poland today to trace their Jewish heritage. The presentation will
outline the new developments in the project as well as the many other
initiatives being launched and planned by JRI-Poland, and will include
examples of the family connections that have resulted >from using the
JRI-Poland database. It will also cover recent developments in the
JRI-Poland Order Processing System, launched in November 2003. This point
and click "shopping basket system" enables researchers to order records >from
the Polish State Archives via JRI-Poland's Order Processing Center and
credit card facilities.

The presentation will continue with the language of the records, the
geography of Galicia, a short history of the Jews in Galicia, and a review
of the history of civil record keeping in Galicia with specific emphasis on
the effect on the Jewish community. Pages containing sample vital record
from periods between the 1820s and 1920s will be reviewed. The headings of
the columnar forms used for Galician record keeping will be shown along with
translations so that Galician researchers can understand the records they
acquire.

Researchers with limited resources always must make decisions on how to
spend their research dollars. Strategies for acquiring vital records with
the most relevant genealogical information will be presented - which types
of records and which years as well as other important hints. The type of
information and the quality of that information varies depending on the
timeframe of the record and the town of that record. Specific record will be
presented that show the wide variety of information that could be available.

Mark Halpern has been actively researching his Polish and Galician roots for
the last eight years. Mark is a board member of Jewish Records Indexing -
Poland. He coordinates the JRI-Poland ordering process, the indexing of
eastern Galician records at the AGAD Archives in Warsaw and the indexing at
the Bialystok Archives. He is also President of the Jewish Genealogical
Society of Greater Philadelphia (JGSGP). He is the originator and
coordinator of BIALYGen, the Bialystok Region Jewish Genealogy Group and
coordinates a project to index and restore the Jewish Cemetery in Bialystok,
Poland. Mark has written many articles concerning Galician records for The
Galitzianer.

For directions to Har Shalom and additional information regarding JGSGW, see
out website at http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw/.

Marlene Bishow
VP - Programs

KATZ: Zhuravno, Galicia > NYC
DEUTSCHER, NUSSBAUM: Rozniatow, Galicia > NYC
SINGER: Belarus (Grodno?) > NY > CT
SOMMERS: Lithuania > Wales > York PA, Baltimore
HANTMAN/GANTMAN: Smilovichi & Novy Sverzhn' Belarus >NYC > CT
BISHOW (BJOVSKY) : Russia (Ukraine?) > New Orleans > Baltimore
KULPE: Siauilai, Lithuania>Philadelphia PA & Birmingham, AL
SATTENSTEIN: Papile, Lithuania >Philadelphia


Re: What's my Hebrew/Yiddish name? #general

Hank Mishkoff
 

Based on these two posts I would guess your Hebrew name is Chanoch Henoch
(these two names go together very often)...

Do you know why the two names often go together? Is it something like Aryeh and
Leyb, where they mean the same thing in Hebrew and Yiddish?

Hank Mishkoff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: What's my Hebrew/Yiddish name? #general

Hank Mishkoff
 

Based on these two posts I would guess your Hebrew name is Chanoch Henoch
(these two names go together very often)...

Do you know why the two names often go together? Is it something like Aryeh and
Leyb, where they mean the same thing in Hebrew and Yiddish?

Hank Mishkoff


Re: What's my Hebrew/Yiddish name? #general

hfpjc
 

Well, Hank, it appears to me that your first name is Hanoch Chanoch-a common
first-name combination. As for Chazkel, to the best of my knowledge it is a
Yiddish version of the Hebrew name Yechezkel.

Hope I was of some assistance.
Good Luck!

Toby Mendlowitz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Re: What's my Hebrew/Yiddish name? #general

hfpjc
 

Well, Hank, it appears to me that your first name is Hanoch Chanoch-a common
first-name combination. As for Chazkel, to the best of my knowledge it is a
Yiddish version of the Hebrew name Yechezkel.

Hope I was of some assistance.
Good Luck!

Toby Mendlowitz


Re: What's my Hebrew/Yiddish name? #general

seforimlover
 

Based on these two posts I would guess your Hebrew
name is Chanoch Henoch (these two names go together
very often) Hatzkel (shortened form of Yechezkel).

Best wishes,

Yehuda Herskowitz


--- "Scheimer, Deborah" <Deborah.Scheimer@fnf.com>
wrote:

My husband's grandfather's name was Henry Jacobson.
His Yiddish name was
(I'm taking liberty with the spelling) Chanoch, with
the gutteral 'ch'
at the beginning and the end.

Scheimer Deborah
My given names are Henry Charles, I was named after
my two grandfathers.

When I first went to Hebrew School (nearly 50 years
ago), my teacher
asked us to ask our parents what our "Jewish" names
were. I have a
memory that is pretty strong (but may be inaccurate
just the same) that
my Mom said that my name was something like "Hinay
Anoch Haskel."
<snip>

Hank Mishkoff <<


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: What's my Hebrew/Yiddish name? #general

seforimlover
 

Based on these two posts I would guess your Hebrew
name is Chanoch Henoch (these two names go together
very often) Hatzkel (shortened form of Yechezkel).

Best wishes,

Yehuda Herskowitz


--- "Scheimer, Deborah" <Deborah.Scheimer@fnf.com>
wrote:

My husband's grandfather's name was Henry Jacobson.
His Yiddish name was
(I'm taking liberty with the spelling) Chanoch, with
the gutteral 'ch'
at the beginning and the end.

Scheimer Deborah
My given names are Henry Charles, I was named after
my two grandfathers.

When I first went to Hebrew School (nearly 50 years
ago), my teacher
asked us to ask our parents what our "Jewish" names
were. I have a
memory that is pretty strong (but may be inaccurate
just the same) that
my Mom said that my name was something like "Hinay
Anoch Haskel."
<snip>

Hank Mishkoff <<


How to Graft branch to your family tree. #general

Reuben Gross <reubendgross@...>
 

Many people responded to my request for help on grafting branches >from one
family tree to another. Thanks to all of you.Many more asked me for the
solution I received. Here is the deal:
Most important, make sure you have a backup copy of your tree before you
start monkeying around.
1. Open up the file that you want to take the branch >from and create a
descendent tree >from the oldest ancestor you want to include.
2. >from the File menu click "Copy/ export individuals on descendant tree"
You'll need to give it a new name.
3. Go to tree that you want to graft this branch onto and Merge the file
with the newly created file

Reuben Gross


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen How to Graft branch to your family tree. #general

Reuben Gross <reubendgross@...>
 

Many people responded to my request for help on grafting branches >from one
family tree to another. Thanks to all of you.Many more asked me for the
solution I received. Here is the deal:
Most important, make sure you have a backup copy of your tree before you
start monkeying around.
1. Open up the file that you want to take the branch >from and create a
descendent tree >from the oldest ancestor you want to include.
2. >from the File menu click "Copy/ export individuals on descendant tree"
You'll need to give it a new name.
3. Go to tree that you want to graft this branch onto and Merge the file
with the newly created file

Reuben Gross


JewishGen Holocaust Database - Update #hungary

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce the addition of 100,000
new records to the JewishGen Holocaust Database
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

There are ten new datasets, and two updated datasets.
The ten new datasets are:

* "Sharit HaPlatah":
Names of 61,387 Jews who survived the Holocaust, published in 1946
by the "Central Committee of Jews in Bavaria" in Munich.

* Displaced Persons >from Bergen-Belsen to Sweden:
Data on 1,600 DPs >from various countries in Bergen-Belsen and
moved to Sweden, 24 July 1945. >from U.N. documents.

* Tirgu Mures Deportation List, 1944:
Over 4,000 Jews deported >from Tirgu Mures (Maros-Vasarhely) in 1944.

* Tirgu Mures Ghetto List, 1945:
Over 2,000 residents of the Tirgu Mures ghetto, as of Jan 8 1945.

* Transnistria: Jews Receiving and Sending Support:
Lists of Jews >from the Regat (pre-WWI Romania) who sent money
to Jews in the ghettos of Transnistria.

* Jews murdered near Sabac, Serbia:
Data on over 1,000 members of the Hechalutz Zionist youth
group murdered in Zasavica near Sabac (Serbia).

* Jewish Women who lived in Dortmund, Germany:
Data on 877 Jewish women who lived in Dortmund, Germany
between 1930 and 1943.

* Polish Children Survivors:
Data on Polish children >from Lucjan Dobroszycki's
"Survivors of the Holocaust in Poland".

* The Tehran Children:
Data on over 2,000 Polish refugee children in
Persia, >from "Dzieci Syjonu, The Children of Zion".

* Hungarian Jewish KMSZ (Military Forced Laborer) List:
List of 4,497 Jews who died while serving in the Munkaszolgalat
(Civilian Labor Service) during World War II.

We've also updated the following two datasets:

* Dachau Indexing Project:
Over 11,000 records added, for a total of over 128,000 records.

* North Bavarian Jews:
Now over 6,000 records total.

Thanks to all the volunteers who have made these possible,
especially project coordinators Nolan Altman and Mike Kalt.


The JewishGen Holocaust Database is a collection of 74 datasets,
containing over 900,000 entries about Holocaust victims and survivors.
It can be searched at < http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

Warren

Warren Blatt
JewishGen Editor-in-Chief
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


Hungary SIG #Hungary JewishGen Holocaust Database - Update #hungary

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce the addition of 100,000
new records to the JewishGen Holocaust Database
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

There are ten new datasets, and two updated datasets.
The ten new datasets are:

* "Sharit HaPlatah":
Names of 61,387 Jews who survived the Holocaust, published in 1946
by the "Central Committee of Jews in Bavaria" in Munich.

* Displaced Persons >from Bergen-Belsen to Sweden:
Data on 1,600 DPs >from various countries in Bergen-Belsen and
moved to Sweden, 24 July 1945. >from U.N. documents.

* Tirgu Mures Deportation List, 1944:
Over 4,000 Jews deported >from Tirgu Mures (Maros-Vasarhely) in 1944.

* Tirgu Mures Ghetto List, 1945:
Over 2,000 residents of the Tirgu Mures ghetto, as of Jan 8 1945.

* Transnistria: Jews Receiving and Sending Support:
Lists of Jews >from the Regat (pre-WWI Romania) who sent money
to Jews in the ghettos of Transnistria.

* Jews murdered near Sabac, Serbia:
Data on over 1,000 members of the Hechalutz Zionist youth
group murdered in Zasavica near Sabac (Serbia).

* Jewish Women who lived in Dortmund, Germany:
Data on 877 Jewish women who lived in Dortmund, Germany
between 1930 and 1943.

* Polish Children Survivors:
Data on Polish children >from Lucjan Dobroszycki's
"Survivors of the Holocaust in Poland".

* The Tehran Children:
Data on over 2,000 Polish refugee children in
Persia, >from "Dzieci Syjonu, The Children of Zion".

* Hungarian Jewish KMSZ (Military Forced Laborer) List:
List of 4,497 Jews who died while serving in the Munkaszolgalat
(Civilian Labor Service) during World War II.

We've also updated the following two datasets:

* Dachau Indexing Project:
Over 11,000 records added, for a total of over 128,000 records.

* North Bavarian Jews:
Now over 6,000 records total.

Thanks to all the volunteers who have made these possible,
especially project coordinators Nolan Altman and Mike Kalt.


The JewishGen Holocaust Database is a collection of 74 datasets,
containing over 900,000 entries about Holocaust victims and survivors.
It can be searched at < http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >.

Warren

Warren Blatt
JewishGen Editor-in-Chief
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>