Date   

Re: Nyirbakta Jewish records #hungary

Robert Neu
 

According to the 1877 Hungarian Gazettteer and now
"The Genealogical Gazetteer of the Kindom of Hungary"
just published by Avotaynu there were 111 Jews in
Nyirbakya and they worshipped im (Nyir)Mada.

THe FHL catalog available on line:
www.familysearch.org
Has the following entry:

Title Anyakönyvek, 1851-1895
Authors Izraelita Hitközseg, Mada (Szabolcs) (Main
Author)

Notes Az eredeti iratok mikrofilmrevétele Budapesten a
Magyar Országos Levéltárban történt.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Registers of Jewish births, marriages and deaths for
Mada, later called Nyírmada.


Subjects Hungary, Szabolcs, Mada - Jewish records


Format Manuscript (On Film)
Language Hungarian
German
Publication Salt Lake City, Utah : Filmre vette a
Genealogical Society of Utah, 1965
Physical 1 mikrofilmtekercs ; 35 mm.

Title Anyakönyvek, 1851-1895
Authors Izraelita Hitközseg, Mada (Szabolcs) (Main
Author)

Note Location
Film
Születtek, házasultak, halottak 1880-1885 Születtek
1885-1895 Házasultak 1851-1876, 1886-1895 Halottak
1886-1895 Születtek, házasultak, halottak 1883-1895
FHL INTL Film
642914



--- Miriam Klein <mpklein@...> wrote:

Has anyone located the Kehilla records of Nyirbakta
in any of the LDS
microfilms? I'm interested in marriage records of
the 1870s and 1880s.

Thanks.


Re: Keen to hear your opinion on it - was it the same person? #hungary

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

Dear Andras,
In many cases Mozes was Mor and/or Moritz, Sara was Saly, Jakab was Ignacz
in everyday life. The Hebrew name was used only in the synagogue. The
initial letters are the same, but even that is not necessary, My father
Moshe (born 1894) was Jeno", his brother David was Erno", another brother
Menachem was Gyula. My grandfather Yehuda was Ignacz (the same emroidered
monogram for both names, also for Ignacz and Jakab). I have two names in
Hebrew: Yosef and Meir but in Hungarian only Jozsef. The same case might be
in your Mayer.
Shabbat Shalom ve-Chag Sameach
Yosef Meir

Dr. Joseph M. Schwarcz
Dr. Ida Selavan Schwarcz

-----Original Message-----
From: Andras Koltai [mailto:kolamcg@...]
Sent: Tuesday, April 26, 2005 1:16 PM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Keen to hear your opinion on it - was it the same person?


Dear HSiggers,

I have just discovered a brother to my gg-grandfather
in Zemplen county in the second half of the 19th
century. The problem is that it may be two brothers -
or is it the same person? I would be glad to hear your
opinion on it.

The family was called Hechtmann, which is a very rare
name. There was only one single Hechtmann family
living in Hungary in appr. 1850 and they were living
in Vasarhely, Zemplen. (This way I very rarely find
anything about this branch of my family, but when I
do, it is surely related to my family.) Jakab
Hechtmann had two sons I had known about. But there
was a third one, too:

According to the Vasarhely birth-, marriage- and death
records Moses Hechtmann and Sara Scheindl had a son
named Ignac Mayer in 1868, had another named Samuel in
1872. Then Moses Hechtmann died in 1873 aged 28.

According to the Vasarhely census dated 1870, there
was a Moritz Hechtmann living there (born in 1839).
His wife was Sali Kornhauser and they had a son called
Jakab, who was born in 1868.

I just cannot decide whether Mor and Moses were the
same person.

The reasons why I think they were: 1) people having
the Jewish name Moses were usually called in Moritz in
official papers 2) there was only one Hechtmann
family, there is no evidence whatsoever that TWO
families called Hechtmann were living in Vasarhely
paralelly 3) my gg-grandfather had a son called Mayer
Jakab, too, 4) Mayer and Jakab were both born in 1868.

The reasons why I think they were not: 1) their
birthyears differ 2) their wives had different names
3) Mayer and Jakab are two different names, too.

Could it be that Sara Scheindl was the Jewish name of
Sali Kornhauser, Ignac Mayer was the Jewish name of
Jakab and that the birthyears differ as they so often
do in those old papers?

I would be interested to hear you comments on my
gg-grandfather and his difficult family.

Thank you and kind regards,
Andras Koltai
Budapest


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Nyirbakta Jewish records #hungary

Robert Neu
 

According to the 1877 Hungarian Gazettteer and now
"The Genealogical Gazetteer of the Kindom of Hungary"
just published by Avotaynu there were 111 Jews in
Nyirbakya and they worshipped im (Nyir)Mada.

THe FHL catalog available on line:
www.familysearch.org
Has the following entry:

Title Anyakönyvek, 1851-1895
Authors Izraelita Hitközseg, Mada (Szabolcs) (Main
Author)

Notes Az eredeti iratok mikrofilmrevétele Budapesten a
Magyar Országos Levéltárban történt.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Registers of Jewish births, marriages and deaths for
Mada, later called Nyírmada.


Subjects Hungary, Szabolcs, Mada - Jewish records


Format Manuscript (On Film)
Language Hungarian
German
Publication Salt Lake City, Utah : Filmre vette a
Genealogical Society of Utah, 1965
Physical 1 mikrofilmtekercs ; 35 mm.

Title Anyakönyvek, 1851-1895
Authors Izraelita Hitközseg, Mada (Szabolcs) (Main
Author)

Note Location
Film
Születtek, házasultak, halottak 1880-1885 Születtek
1885-1895 Házasultak 1851-1876, 1886-1895 Halottak
1886-1895 Születtek, házasultak, halottak 1883-1895
FHL INTL Film
642914



--- Miriam Klein <mpklein@...> wrote:

Has anyone located the Kehilla records of Nyirbakta
in any of the LDS
microfilms? I'm interested in marriage records of
the 1870s and 1880s.

Thanks.


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Keen to hear your opinion on it - was it the same person? #hungary

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

Dear Andras,
In many cases Mozes was Mor and/or Moritz, Sara was Saly, Jakab was Ignacz
in everyday life. The Hebrew name was used only in the synagogue. The
initial letters are the same, but even that is not necessary, My father
Moshe (born 1894) was Jeno", his brother David was Erno", another brother
Menachem was Gyula. My grandfather Yehuda was Ignacz (the same emroidered
monogram for both names, also for Ignacz and Jakab). I have two names in
Hebrew: Yosef and Meir but in Hungarian only Jozsef. The same case might be
in your Mayer.
Shabbat Shalom ve-Chag Sameach
Yosef Meir

Dr. Joseph M. Schwarcz
Dr. Ida Selavan Schwarcz

-----Original Message-----
From: Andras Koltai [mailto:kolamcg@...]
Sent: Tuesday, April 26, 2005 1:16 PM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Keen to hear your opinion on it - was it the same person?


Dear HSiggers,

I have just discovered a brother to my gg-grandfather
in Zemplen county in the second half of the 19th
century. The problem is that it may be two brothers -
or is it the same person? I would be glad to hear your
opinion on it.

The family was called Hechtmann, which is a very rare
name. There was only one single Hechtmann family
living in Hungary in appr. 1850 and they were living
in Vasarhely, Zemplen. (This way I very rarely find
anything about this branch of my family, but when I
do, it is surely related to my family.) Jakab
Hechtmann had two sons I had known about. But there
was a third one, too:

According to the Vasarhely birth-, marriage- and death
records Moses Hechtmann and Sara Scheindl had a son
named Ignac Mayer in 1868, had another named Samuel in
1872. Then Moses Hechtmann died in 1873 aged 28.

According to the Vasarhely census dated 1870, there
was a Moritz Hechtmann living there (born in 1839).
His wife was Sali Kornhauser and they had a son called
Jakab, who was born in 1868.

I just cannot decide whether Mor and Moses were the
same person.

The reasons why I think they were: 1) people having
the Jewish name Moses were usually called in Moritz in
official papers 2) there was only one Hechtmann
family, there is no evidence whatsoever that TWO
families called Hechtmann were living in Vasarhely
paralelly 3) my gg-grandfather had a son called Mayer
Jakab, too, 4) Mayer and Jakab were both born in 1868.

The reasons why I think they were not: 1) their
birthyears differ 2) their wives had different names
3) Mayer and Jakab are two different names, too.

Could it be that Sara Scheindl was the Jewish name of
Sali Kornhauser, Ignac Mayer was the Jewish name of
Jakab and that the birthyears differ as they so often
do in those old papers?

I would be interested to hear you comments on my
gg-grandfather and his difficult family.

Thank you and kind regards,
Andras Koltai
Budapest


Visiting Pidvolocysk #galicia

robert fraser <robertandginafraser@...>
 

I'm starting to plan for a possible trip to include Pidvolocysk (now in
Ukraine, formerly Podwolocyska in Galicia) some time next year and would be
very glad to hear privately >from people who have visited this place, and
what their experiences - good and bad - were. How did you get there, what
was transport like, what was local accomodation, what were official
formalities like etc. It'll be part of a larger trip, either on the way
from or on the way to Latvia, travelling via Vienna. I don't yet know how
much time we'll have available:

I have explored what on-line information is available, but personal
experiences would be most useful.

Mant thanks

Robert Fraser
Dianella, Western Australia
robertandginafraser@...
Searching:
NOWAK - Moravia, Austria/Vienna - >
EISINGER - Moravia - >
FINKELSTEIN - Galicia, Poland
NAGEL - Austria
KRAUTERBLUTH - ? Galicia


[MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately]


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Visiting Pidvolocysk #galicia

robert fraser <robertandginafraser@...>
 

I'm starting to plan for a possible trip to include Pidvolocysk (now in
Ukraine, formerly Podwolocyska in Galicia) some time next year and would be
very glad to hear privately >from people who have visited this place, and
what their experiences - good and bad - were. How did you get there, what
was transport like, what was local accomodation, what were official
formalities like etc. It'll be part of a larger trip, either on the way
from or on the way to Latvia, travelling via Vienna. I don't yet know how
much time we'll have available:

I have explored what on-line information is available, but personal
experiences would be most useful.

Mant thanks

Robert Fraser
Dianella, Western Australia
robertandginafraser@...
Searching:
NOWAK - Moravia, Austria/Vienna - >
EISINGER - Moravia - >
FINKELSTEIN - Galicia, Poland
NAGEL - Austria
KRAUTERBLUTH - ? Galicia


[MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately]


Yale Reisner May Tour #galicia

Marlene <mlbishow@...>
 

SAVE THE DATE!!!!!!

The Jewish Genealogy Societies of Washington, DC, Boston, Philadelphia,
Atlanta and Miami have combined resources to sponsor a speaking tour
featuring Yale Reisner. The title of his presentation will be: A MOST
EXTRAORDINARY SITUATION -- GENEALOGICAL ADVENTURES IN POLAND

BOSTON AREA
Thursday, May 19 7:00 PM
Temple Reyim
1860 Washington Street (Route 16)
West Newton, MA

WASHINGTON DC AREA
Sunday, May 22 2:00 PM
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Rubenstein Auditorium
100 Raoul Wallenberg Place SW,
Washington, DC 20006

PHILADELPHIA AREA
Monday, May 23 7:45 PM
Gratz College - Newman Building
Old York Road (Route 611) & Melrose Ave.
Melrose Park, PA

ATLANTA AREA
Tuesday May 24 7:30 PM
The Breman Jewish Heritage Museum
1440 Spring Street NW (@ 18th Street)
Atlanta, GA 30309

MIAMI AREA
Wednesday, May 25 7:00 PM
Aventura Turnberry Jewish Center
20400 NE 30th Avenue
Aventura, FL

Yale will present dramatic, moving and sometimes amusing accounts of the
work of the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation Genealogy Project in Warsaw as it
helps Jews of Polish origin and Poles of Jewish origin rediscover and sort
out their often twisted roots and complex backgrounds. He will tell of
child survivors and their offspring, of family ties lost and found and of
new potential sources of information. Come and hear of your distant and
perhaps not-so-distant cousins who remain in the lands of your ancestors,
how you can help them and how they might help you.

Since 1994, Yale S. Reisner has been assisting individuals and families in
uncovering their family histories. The Lauder foundation is a non-profit
Jewish educational foundation active in 15 Central and East European
countries. Mr. Reisner holds degrees in East Central European Regional
Studies >from Columbia College and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy
and has studied at Hebrew University, the Jewish Theological Seminary of
America, Villanova University, the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, and
the U. S. National Archives. He has spoken at IAJGS conferences and has
published articles in the USA, Canada, and Poland.

Regards,
Marlene Bishow
Vice President, Programs
Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Yale Reisner May Tour #galicia

Marlene <mlbishow@...>
 

SAVE THE DATE!!!!!!

The Jewish Genealogy Societies of Washington, DC, Boston, Philadelphia,
Atlanta and Miami have combined resources to sponsor a speaking tour
featuring Yale Reisner. The title of his presentation will be: A MOST
EXTRAORDINARY SITUATION -- GENEALOGICAL ADVENTURES IN POLAND

BOSTON AREA
Thursday, May 19 7:00 PM
Temple Reyim
1860 Washington Street (Route 16)
West Newton, MA

WASHINGTON DC AREA
Sunday, May 22 2:00 PM
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Rubenstein Auditorium
100 Raoul Wallenberg Place SW,
Washington, DC 20006

PHILADELPHIA AREA
Monday, May 23 7:45 PM
Gratz College - Newman Building
Old York Road (Route 611) & Melrose Ave.
Melrose Park, PA

ATLANTA AREA
Tuesday May 24 7:30 PM
The Breman Jewish Heritage Museum
1440 Spring Street NW (@ 18th Street)
Atlanta, GA 30309

MIAMI AREA
Wednesday, May 25 7:00 PM
Aventura Turnberry Jewish Center
20400 NE 30th Avenue
Aventura, FL

Yale will present dramatic, moving and sometimes amusing accounts of the
work of the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation Genealogy Project in Warsaw as it
helps Jews of Polish origin and Poles of Jewish origin rediscover and sort
out their often twisted roots and complex backgrounds. He will tell of
child survivors and their offspring, of family ties lost and found and of
new potential sources of information. Come and hear of your distant and
perhaps not-so-distant cousins who remain in the lands of your ancestors,
how you can help them and how they might help you.

Since 1994, Yale S. Reisner has been assisting individuals and families in
uncovering their family histories. The Lauder foundation is a non-profit
Jewish educational foundation active in 15 Central and East European
countries. Mr. Reisner holds degrees in East Central European Regional
Studies >from Columbia College and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy
and has studied at Hebrew University, the Jewish Theological Seminary of
America, Villanova University, the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, and
the U. S. National Archives. He has spoken at IAJGS conferences and has
published articles in the USA, Canada, and Poland.

Regards,
Marlene Bishow
Vice President, Programs
Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington


SINGER, then FELDMANN, then GINSBERG #germany

Adam Yamey <adamandlopa@...>
 

In about 1842 my great great grandfather Nathan
GINSBERG (1814-1890) married a Mrs. FELDMANN, a widow
with two daughters. Her maiden name was SINGER. I do
not know her first name. Nathan and his wife had one
child, a son called Leo who was born in about 1844.
Nathan's wife died about 1846, a young lady.

I do not know where the couple met. Nathan had just
completed his doctorate at the University of Halle in
mid-1841, and may possibly have returned to his place
of birth Breslau - but I don't have any firm evidence
for this.

On the basis of this scanty information, can anyone
throw any more light on to the identity of widow
Feldmann, born Singer? What became of her daughters?

Adam Yamey, London, UK<adamandlopa@...>


German SIG #Germany SINGER, then FELDMANN, then GINSBERG #germany

Adam Yamey <adamandlopa@...>
 

In about 1842 my great great grandfather Nathan
GINSBERG (1814-1890) married a Mrs. FELDMANN, a widow
with two daughters. Her maiden name was SINGER. I do
not know her first name. Nathan and his wife had one
child, a son called Leo who was born in about 1844.
Nathan's wife died about 1846, a young lady.

I do not know where the couple met. Nathan had just
completed his doctorate at the University of Halle in
mid-1841, and may possibly have returned to his place
of birth Breslau - but I don't have any firm evidence
for this.

On the basis of this scanty information, can anyone
throw any more light on to the identity of widow
Feldmann, born Singer? What became of her daughters?

Adam Yamey, London, UK<adamandlopa@...>


Jewish Communities from Alsace, Bas-Rhin to Rheinland-Pfalz #germany

Ernest Kallmann
 

Places including Jewish communities around the fortress of Landau
belonged to France (Kingdom, then Republic, then Empire), eventually in
the Departement du Bas-Rhin (Lower Rhine) until 1815, when they were
granted to Bavaria and finally became part of the German Empire.

The towns and villages where Jews lived and took permanent family names
in 1808 are listed below to my best knowledge. This does not mean that
the name adoption lists survive. Only few have been located.

Altdorf, Arzheim, Bergzabern, Billigheim, Busenberg, Dahn, Erlenbach,
Eschbach, Essingen, Freisbach, Gommersheim, Hagenbach, Herxheim bei
Landau, Heuchelheim, Ingenheim (there is another Ingenheim in Alsace),
Klingen, Klingenmuenster, Landau, Muehlhofen, Niederhochstadt,
Pleisweiler, Rohrbach,Ruelzheim,Venningen. (here ue stands for u+Umlaut)

Please check the exact spelling of the place you are interested in, as
there are many similar names (e.g. Ingenheim is not Ingelheim, Herxheim
is not Hessheim, etc.)

For several of these places, genealogical information can be found in
the 1784 census of the Jews in Alsace and in A.A. Fraenckel's book of
pre-marriage contracts in Alsace during the 18th century, both available
through Cercle de Genealogie Juive in Paris at www.genealoj.org (the
website has an English version)

Ernest Kallmann Cercle de Genealogie Juive, Paris, France www.genealoj.org


German SIG #Germany Jewish Communities from Alsace, Bas-Rhin to Rheinland-Pfalz #germany

Ernest Kallmann
 

Places including Jewish communities around the fortress of Landau
belonged to France (Kingdom, then Republic, then Empire), eventually in
the Departement du Bas-Rhin (Lower Rhine) until 1815, when they were
granted to Bavaria and finally became part of the German Empire.

The towns and villages where Jews lived and took permanent family names
in 1808 are listed below to my best knowledge. This does not mean that
the name adoption lists survive. Only few have been located.

Altdorf, Arzheim, Bergzabern, Billigheim, Busenberg, Dahn, Erlenbach,
Eschbach, Essingen, Freisbach, Gommersheim, Hagenbach, Herxheim bei
Landau, Heuchelheim, Ingenheim (there is another Ingenheim in Alsace),
Klingen, Klingenmuenster, Landau, Muehlhofen, Niederhochstadt,
Pleisweiler, Rohrbach,Ruelzheim,Venningen. (here ue stands for u+Umlaut)

Please check the exact spelling of the place you are interested in, as
there are many similar names (e.g. Ingenheim is not Ingelheim, Herxheim
is not Hessheim, etc.)

For several of these places, genealogical information can be found in
the 1784 census of the Jews in Alsace and in A.A. Fraenckel's book of
pre-marriage contracts in Alsace during the 18th century, both available
through Cercle de Genealogie Juive in Paris at www.genealoj.org (the
website has an English version)

Ernest Kallmann Cercle de Genealogie Juive, Paris, France www.genealoj.org


Document Translation Help Needed #belarus

Teresa Delikat <flott_genealogy@...>
 

Dear List Members,

I have scanned and posted a document that I am unable
to translate. I believe it is written in Russian. The
document (2 sides) belonged to my Friends
Father-in-law and it’s the only document in his papers
that we are unfamiliar with.

To view both sides of the document (VM5989 and
VM5990):

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5989
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5990

Please respond privately to my email address.

Thank you so much,
Teresa Delikat
Pennsylvania, USA


__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus Document Translation Help Needed #belarus

Teresa Delikat <flott_genealogy@...>
 

Dear List Members,

I have scanned and posted a document that I am unable
to translate. I believe it is written in Russian. The
document (2 sides) belonged to my Friends
Father-in-law and it’s the only document in his papers
that we are unfamiliar with.

To view both sides of the document (VM5989 and
VM5990):

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5989
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5990

Please respond privately to my email address.

Thank you so much,
Teresa Delikat
Pennsylvania, USA


__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


Yizkor Book Project for April 2005 #rabbinic

Joyce Field
 

Because of the Pesach holiday, April 2005 was a "short" month and
our production reflects that. One new book and 14 updated books
went online. All translations can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html and the current
additions have been flagged to make the search easier.

I would like to remind all new researchers that you can find whether
a yizkor book has been written about a particular town at the Yizkor
Book Database, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html. You
can search the Necrology Index at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/. Our index to this
database says the following:


"The JewishGen Yizkor Book Necrology Database indexes the names of
persons in the necrologies -- the lists of Holocaust martyrs --
published in the Yizkor Books appearing on the JewishGen Yizkor Book
Translation Project. This database is only an index of names; it
directs researchers back to the Yizkor Book itself, where more
complete information may be available.

This database allows the surnames to be searched via soundex.
Because most of these names were transliterated >from Hebrew and
Yiddish, the spellings of the surnames may not be as you are used to
seeing them in Latin-alphabet sources."

This database currently contains over 165,000 entries >from the
necrologies of 177 different yizkor books. Remember that not all
yizkor books have necrologies.

New book:

"With a rifle in my hand and Eretz Israel in my heart" by Dov Levin,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/dovlevin1/dovlevin1.html.

Updated books:

-Belchatow, Poland, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow/Belchatow.html
-Belchatow, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow_ann/Belchatow_ann.html
-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Brest, Belarus, volume 2
-Bukowina book
-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
-Maramures Region
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radomsko, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine

As always, we wish to thank all the donors of material and the
project coordinators for their donations of translations and their
precious time. Nothing can be accomplished without your interest in
the Yizkor Book Project. We are always interested in new material
and look forward to hearing >from researchers wanting to start a new
translation project.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project
JewishGen V.P., Data Acquisition
jfield@...


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Yizkor Book Project for April 2005 #rabbinic

Joyce Field
 

Because of the Pesach holiday, April 2005 was a "short" month and
our production reflects that. One new book and 14 updated books
went online. All translations can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html and the current
additions have been flagged to make the search easier.

I would like to remind all new researchers that you can find whether
a yizkor book has been written about a particular town at the Yizkor
Book Database, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html. You
can search the Necrology Index at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/. Our index to this
database says the following:


"The JewishGen Yizkor Book Necrology Database indexes the names of
persons in the necrologies -- the lists of Holocaust martyrs --
published in the Yizkor Books appearing on the JewishGen Yizkor Book
Translation Project. This database is only an index of names; it
directs researchers back to the Yizkor Book itself, where more
complete information may be available.

This database allows the surnames to be searched via soundex.
Because most of these names were transliterated >from Hebrew and
Yiddish, the spellings of the surnames may not be as you are used to
seeing them in Latin-alphabet sources."

This database currently contains over 165,000 entries >from the
necrologies of 177 different yizkor books. Remember that not all
yizkor books have necrologies.

New book:

"With a rifle in my hand and Eretz Israel in my heart" by Dov Levin,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/dovlevin1/dovlevin1.html.

Updated books:

-Belchatow, Poland, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow/Belchatow.html
-Belchatow, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belchatow_ann/Belchatow_ann.html
-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Brest, Belarus, volume 2
-Bukowina book
-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Jewish Music in Poland between the World Wars
-Maramures Region
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radomsko, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine

As always, we wish to thank all the donors of material and the
project coordinators for their donations of translations and their
precious time. Nothing can be accomplished without your interest in
the Yizkor Book Project. We are always interested in new material
and look forward to hearing >from researchers wanting to start a new
translation project.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project
JewishGen V.P., Data Acquisition
jfield@...


Document Translation Help Needed #poland

Teresa Delikat <flott_genealogy@...>
 

Dear List Members,

I have scanned and posted a document that I am unable
to translate. I believe it is written in Russian. The
document (2 sides) belonged to my Friends
Father-in-law and it&#8217;s the only document in his papers
that we are unfamiliar with.

To view both sides of the document (VM5989 and
VM5990):

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5989
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5990

Please respond privately to my email address.

Thank you so much,
Teresa Delikat
Pennsylvania, USA


JRI Poland #Poland Document Translation Help Needed #poland

Teresa Delikat <flott_genealogy@...>
 

Dear List Members,

I have scanned and posted a document that I am unable
to translate. I believe it is written in Russian. The
document (2 sides) belonged to my Friends
Father-in-law and it&#8217;s the only document in his papers
that we are unfamiliar with.

To view both sides of the document (VM5989 and
VM5990):

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5989
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5990

Please respond privately to my email address.

Thank you so much,
Teresa Delikat
Pennsylvania, USA


Re: cemetery records accuracy #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

You have several issues with this group of cemetery records, and
hopefully I can help with at least some.

In New York State, at least, according to the State Director in charge
of cemetery regulation, it is legal to 'stack' 2 or 3 bodies in a grave,
so you might have more than one in your plots - but I don't think it
has been common, at least in the areas I am familiar with. That is
the easiest part of the answer.

The cemetery doesn't care whose name is on a stone. You make
arrangements with a company to make and install a stone; whether
it has the name of the person buried there is no concern of the cemetery.
I would think it unlikely that someone would buy a stone for 'Sam''s
grave which said 'Abe' - unless the person had a double name and was
sometimes called Abe and sometimes Sam (like my gr grandfather
Abraham Samuel). Double stones for a husband and wife are usually not
carved with the living spouse's name when the other dies, so it is
possible that, for example, the wife remarried and let cousin It be
buried in the double because 20 years later she decided
she wants to be buried with her second husband. In that case, perhaps
she would want her name eventually put on the stone with her first
husband's even if she is buried elsewhere.

At the turn of the 20th century and before, deaths of young
children were common, so it wouldn't surprise me at all to find that a
young child is buried with no mention of who's child it was. My Mother
and Aunts never mentioned to me that there was another sister, Harriet,
who died at 6 months of age - until I happened on her birth record;,
then they all knew about her, 'Oh, yes, Harriet'. I don't know where
she is buried, other than the cemetery, because, although the family
was not poor there is no stone in the family plot.

Your marker for grave 2 indicates a married name, so the person was old
enough to marry and wasn't a child. If the girl married a Christian,
the family certainly wouldn't put the Christian's surname on a stone
even if they went to the expense of getting a stone - but I doubt they
would do that either. I suspect the 'non-Jewish' name was simply the
Americanized version of a Jewish name or perhaps her married surname
if she married a Christian, but the grave is probably hers.

I have a friend who was trying to organize the records of a small
cemetery belonging to her synagogue. She had a dozen plots where
someone was buried but no record of who(one was probably my 2nd gr
grandfather whose death certificate says he was buried there), a dozen
plots which probably don't have anybody buried there but have stones
for somebody, and several names of people who were supposed to be buried
there, but there is no record. And none of this includes stones
with the wrong information, because they did not care what the stones said.

Bottom line is that almost anything is possible, and if nobody in your
family actually remembers who is buried where, it is unlikely that the
current cemetery employees know anything other than what the records
tell them.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ

"I've just finished several visits to a Phila. cemetary to photograph=20
grave markers for one branch of my family. The cemetary management=20
provided me with copies of their records concerning these graves. Much=20
to my surprise, I've found these records innacurate, if not downright=20
misleading. I'm wondering how unusual this kind of situation is... In =
plot 1
there was a written record for grave 2e for a stillborn, with=20
no name of parents, and only a DOD of 1903. The marker for grave 2 shows =

the name of a child in the family with no inscription other than maiden=20
name and an attached married name, like Jane Smith Johnson. The marker=20
is the size typically used for a child, but the child named lived to=20
adulthood as far as I can determine. The current cemetery management was =

unable to tell me what the designation 2e meant, instead of 2.

In plot 3, grave 4, the cemetery records show a "John"; instead the=20
grave marker is for his wife "Mary". There is no marker for John."


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: cemetery records accuracy #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

You have several issues with this group of cemetery records, and
hopefully I can help with at least some.

In New York State, at least, according to the State Director in charge
of cemetery regulation, it is legal to 'stack' 2 or 3 bodies in a grave,
so you might have more than one in your plots - but I don't think it
has been common, at least in the areas I am familiar with. That is
the easiest part of the answer.

The cemetery doesn't care whose name is on a stone. You make
arrangements with a company to make and install a stone; whether
it has the name of the person buried there is no concern of the cemetery.
I would think it unlikely that someone would buy a stone for 'Sam''s
grave which said 'Abe' - unless the person had a double name and was
sometimes called Abe and sometimes Sam (like my gr grandfather
Abraham Samuel). Double stones for a husband and wife are usually not
carved with the living spouse's name when the other dies, so it is
possible that, for example, the wife remarried and let cousin It be
buried in the double because 20 years later she decided
she wants to be buried with her second husband. In that case, perhaps
she would want her name eventually put on the stone with her first
husband's even if she is buried elsewhere.

At the turn of the 20th century and before, deaths of young
children were common, so it wouldn't surprise me at all to find that a
young child is buried with no mention of who's child it was. My Mother
and Aunts never mentioned to me that there was another sister, Harriet,
who died at 6 months of age - until I happened on her birth record;,
then they all knew about her, 'Oh, yes, Harriet'. I don't know where
she is buried, other than the cemetery, because, although the family
was not poor there is no stone in the family plot.

Your marker for grave 2 indicates a married name, so the person was old
enough to marry and wasn't a child. If the girl married a Christian,
the family certainly wouldn't put the Christian's surname on a stone
even if they went to the expense of getting a stone - but I doubt they
would do that either. I suspect the 'non-Jewish' name was simply the
Americanized version of a Jewish name or perhaps her married surname
if she married a Christian, but the grave is probably hers.

I have a friend who was trying to organize the records of a small
cemetery belonging to her synagogue. She had a dozen plots where
someone was buried but no record of who(one was probably my 2nd gr
grandfather whose death certificate says he was buried there), a dozen
plots which probably don't have anybody buried there but have stones
for somebody, and several names of people who were supposed to be buried
there, but there is no record. And none of this includes stones
with the wrong information, because they did not care what the stones said.

Bottom line is that almost anything is possible, and if nobody in your
family actually remembers who is buried where, it is unlikely that the
current cemetery employees know anything other than what the records
tell them.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ

"I've just finished several visits to a Phila. cemetary to photograph=20
grave markers for one branch of my family. The cemetary management=20
provided me with copies of their records concerning these graves. Much=20
to my surprise, I've found these records innacurate, if not downright=20
misleading. I'm wondering how unusual this kind of situation is... In =
plot 1
there was a written record for grave 2e for a stillborn, with=20
no name of parents, and only a DOD of 1903. The marker for grave 2 shows =

the name of a child in the family with no inscription other than maiden=20
name and an attached married name, like Jane Smith Johnson. The marker=20
is the size typically used for a child, but the child named lived to=20
adulthood as far as I can determine. The current cemetery management was =

unable to tell me what the designation 2e meant, instead of 2.

In plot 3, grave 4, the cemetery records show a "John"; instead the=20
grave marker is for his wife "Mary". There is no marker for John."