Date   

Lyakhovichi Site and Records you can use for your own town #belarus

Deborah Glassman <dgg2020@...>
 

I am the Webmaster for the Lyakhovichi shtetl website on Jewishgen which our
ancestors called Lechovitz in Yiddish or Lachowicze in Polish. Please take a
look at the site today - we have just finished a huge update! These are just
some of the materials that were expanded since our last update; you will
also find photos and new research tools and articles. We have listed this
month:
1. Emigrants with last residences in Lyakhovichi who passed thru Ellis
Island, Philadelphia, and Boston. Other Ports including Baltimore,
Galveston, San Francisco, Canadian cross-border entries are being worked on
now, as are Castle Garden records.

2. An "Expanded List of Lyakhovichi emigrants thru Ellis Island with
Surnames Starting with A-E" where each record was individually examined and
then notated for details on detentions, destination towns, naturalization
verifications, and Third Parties named by the emigrant (relatives in the old
country and at destination, etc.). We will move through the rest of the
alphabet in coming months so that each Lyakhovichi émigré will have been
documented in detail with access to name changes and relatives and traveling
companions!
3. THIRD PARTY INDEXES - People named in the records of former residents
of Lyakhovichi, including relatives who never came to the US and those who
changed their last names in the US. So far the index covers everyone who
entered through Philadelphia and Boston and those whose surnames start with
A-E for Ellis Island.
4. Lyakhovichi Jews in the records of: Poor Jews Temporary Shelter in
London; Riga Passport Lists of 1900; and in a first look at the records of
other Russian Empire cities.
5. Lyakhovichi Jews in the records of the United States World War I Draft
Registration. This is an ongoing project, which currently has around 100
names and growing.
You do not have to know of a Lyakhovichi connection to value the images in
an article on using the Minsk Vedemostii; or the article on Church Records
in our part of Belarus; or one that details online databases on tens of
thousands of Russian Jews >from Belarus and Lithuania held by Denmark and
Finland. There are dozens of other materials that can give you clues to
records of your own towns. If you are working on the materials of another
Belarus town, I have some suggestions learned >from our Lyakhovichi
esearch - Don't sit on your laurels. If someone has extracted a list of
emigrants >from Steve Morse's wonderful One Step materials, its time to look
at them again. We began our site with a good number of Lyakhovichi people
through Ellis Island and then used a handwriting mis-read pattern to find
another 400. (The letter S and the letter L are often confused in
handwriting interpretation as are F and J. This gives an index with a huge
number of people named Lore and Fankel who should have been read by the
indexer as Sore and Jankel - for Lyakhovichi that meant we had to look for
"Sechowitz" variations as well as Lechowitz.) When you have gone through
Steve Morse's Blue Page, move on to his other forms because the first only
lists those designated as "Hebrews." Revision Lists can be re-examined,
too. Each has a Signature Pages listing the names of Rabbis and Kahal
leaders, now we are re-checking every document that we have used before.
And finally, online material gives you a chance to do some repeat searches
from a new perspective. If you have previously completed Directory Searches
via a database, go back and look at the image of the actual page. You will
find that the page will refer you down to smaller dependent villages and up
to the nearby larger units that were the home of the telegraph office and
the railroad station, and the district court. Go and look at those pages:
merchants, tradesmen, and professionals, often served a larger area than you
might think. Then compare years in one directory to the another. >from 1926
to 1929 we had almost a hundred and fifty new businesses in our town alone
and as we went through each of the dependent towns and learned even more!

We have new research being done right now. Email me at
historian2020@comcast.net to learn about what is happening with the 1784
Grand Duchy of Lithuania Census for Lyakhovichi and for more than fifty
dependent towns around it. I will also tell you about the Property Lists
from the 1870s to the early 1900s that we hope to publish shortly. Email me
anyway, to tell me what you think of our site. Thanks!

Deborah Glassman
historian2020@comcast.net
Lyakhovichi Webmaster

ATTENTION BELARUS NEWSLETTER MANAGER
The email address at the bottom is the registered address for managing the
Lyakhovichi website, but I am registered for this newsletter with my home
email. If you have any discretion on which gets posted, I would prefer it to
be the historian2020@comcast.net address. Thanks for whatever you can do!
And apologies for the length of this post.


Re: [h-sig] BERNSTEINNE and matav addresses #hungary

Frank Valoczy
 

Ms. Blum Anna
Nádasdy Kálmán utca 17 /1/4
HU-1046 Budapest
Hungary
Actually, that is perfectly fine: 17 is the building number/street
address, the 1 signifies 1st floor, and the 4 is the apartment number.



FYI
Bernstein(ne) means Mrs Bernstein, so the family name
is "Bernstein".
The address looks funny, as there is no house number
and "Budapest IV"
means Kerulet(district) 4, and the street name should
probably be "Nadasdy Kalman utca"(street).

I would try

Anna Blum
Budapest 1046
Nadasdy Kalman utca
Hungary

--- "Gábor Hirsch" <g_hirsch@gmx.ch> wrote:

If you activate in the MATAV result the red
underlined world, you get
additionally the housenumber too. I believe you can
let out the IV districh
as it is already specified in the postal (ZIP) code,
so I would adress it
the following way, but there may be different
suggestions too.

Ms. Blum Anna
Nádasdy Kálmán utca 17 /1/4
HU-1046 Budapest
Hungary

Best regards
Gabor hirsch

--- Ursprüngliche Nachricht ---
Von: Vicki Vigil <aev@juno.com>
An: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Betreff: [h-sig] BERNSTEINNE and matav addresses
Datum: Sun, 31 Jul 2005 07:59:30 -0400

Hi all,

The Matav on-line directory lists addresses in
this way:
Blum, Anna Budapest IV, kerulet 1046
Nadasdy Kalman utca
So should a letter to her be addressed
like this:
Anna Blum
Kalman utca
1046 Nadasdy
Kerulet, Budapest IV
Hungary

Or differently?

Also looking for anyone with information on Dr.
Regina BERNSTEINNE who
lived at
Sziv-u 69, VI Budapest in 1927. She was an
"educator"


Vicki Blum Vigil
Cleveland Ohio USA


Belarus SIG #Belarus Lyakhovichi Site and Records you can use for your own town #belarus

Deborah Glassman <dgg2020@...>
 

I am the Webmaster for the Lyakhovichi shtetl website on Jewishgen which our
ancestors called Lechovitz in Yiddish or Lachowicze in Polish. Please take a
look at the site today - we have just finished a huge update! These are just
some of the materials that were expanded since our last update; you will
also find photos and new research tools and articles. We have listed this
month:
1. Emigrants with last residences in Lyakhovichi who passed thru Ellis
Island, Philadelphia, and Boston. Other Ports including Baltimore,
Galveston, San Francisco, Canadian cross-border entries are being worked on
now, as are Castle Garden records.

2. An "Expanded List of Lyakhovichi emigrants thru Ellis Island with
Surnames Starting with A-E" where each record was individually examined and
then notated for details on detentions, destination towns, naturalization
verifications, and Third Parties named by the emigrant (relatives in the old
country and at destination, etc.). We will move through the rest of the
alphabet in coming months so that each Lyakhovichi émigré will have been
documented in detail with access to name changes and relatives and traveling
companions!
3. THIRD PARTY INDEXES - People named in the records of former residents
of Lyakhovichi, including relatives who never came to the US and those who
changed their last names in the US. So far the index covers everyone who
entered through Philadelphia and Boston and those whose surnames start with
A-E for Ellis Island.
4. Lyakhovichi Jews in the records of: Poor Jews Temporary Shelter in
London; Riga Passport Lists of 1900; and in a first look at the records of
other Russian Empire cities.
5. Lyakhovichi Jews in the records of the United States World War I Draft
Registration. This is an ongoing project, which currently has around 100
names and growing.
You do not have to know of a Lyakhovichi connection to value the images in
an article on using the Minsk Vedemostii; or the article on Church Records
in our part of Belarus; or one that details online databases on tens of
thousands of Russian Jews >from Belarus and Lithuania held by Denmark and
Finland. There are dozens of other materials that can give you clues to
records of your own towns. If you are working on the materials of another
Belarus town, I have some suggestions learned >from our Lyakhovichi
esearch - Don't sit on your laurels. If someone has extracted a list of
emigrants >from Steve Morse's wonderful One Step materials, its time to look
at them again. We began our site with a good number of Lyakhovichi people
through Ellis Island and then used a handwriting mis-read pattern to find
another 400. (The letter S and the letter L are often confused in
handwriting interpretation as are F and J. This gives an index with a huge
number of people named Lore and Fankel who should have been read by the
indexer as Sore and Jankel - for Lyakhovichi that meant we had to look for
"Sechowitz" variations as well as Lechowitz.) When you have gone through
Steve Morse's Blue Page, move on to his other forms because the first only
lists those designated as "Hebrews." Revision Lists can be re-examined,
too. Each has a Signature Pages listing the names of Rabbis and Kahal
leaders, now we are re-checking every document that we have used before.
And finally, online material gives you a chance to do some repeat searches
from a new perspective. If you have previously completed Directory Searches
via a database, go back and look at the image of the actual page. You will
find that the page will refer you down to smaller dependent villages and up
to the nearby larger units that were the home of the telegraph office and
the railroad station, and the district court. Go and look at those pages:
merchants, tradesmen, and professionals, often served a larger area than you
might think. Then compare years in one directory to the another. >from 1926
to 1929 we had almost a hundred and fifty new businesses in our town alone
and as we went through each of the dependent towns and learned even more!

We have new research being done right now. Email me at
historian2020@comcast.net to learn about what is happening with the 1784
Grand Duchy of Lithuania Census for Lyakhovichi and for more than fifty
dependent towns around it. I will also tell you about the Property Lists
from the 1870s to the early 1900s that we hope to publish shortly. Email me
anyway, to tell me what you think of our site. Thanks!

Deborah Glassman
historian2020@comcast.net
Lyakhovichi Webmaster

ATTENTION BELARUS NEWSLETTER MANAGER
The email address at the bottom is the registered address for managing the
Lyakhovichi website, but I am registered for this newsletter with my home
email. If you have any discretion on which gets posted, I would prefer it to
be the historian2020@comcast.net address. Thanks for whatever you can do!
And apologies for the length of this post.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Re: [h-sig] BERNSTEINNE and matav addresses #hungary

Frank Valoczy
 

Ms. Blum Anna
Nádasdy Kálmán utca 17 /1/4
HU-1046 Budapest
Hungary
Actually, that is perfectly fine: 17 is the building number/street
address, the 1 signifies 1st floor, and the 4 is the apartment number.



FYI
Bernstein(ne) means Mrs Bernstein, so the family name
is "Bernstein".
The address looks funny, as there is no house number
and "Budapest IV"
means Kerulet(district) 4, and the street name should
probably be "Nadasdy Kalman utca"(street).

I would try

Anna Blum
Budapest 1046
Nadasdy Kalman utca
Hungary

--- "Gábor Hirsch" <g_hirsch@gmx.ch> wrote:

If you activate in the MATAV result the red
underlined world, you get
additionally the housenumber too. I believe you can
let out the IV districh
as it is already specified in the postal (ZIP) code,
so I would adress it
the following way, but there may be different
suggestions too.

Ms. Blum Anna
Nádasdy Kálmán utca 17 /1/4
HU-1046 Budapest
Hungary

Best regards
Gabor hirsch

--- Ursprüngliche Nachricht ---
Von: Vicki Vigil <aev@juno.com>
An: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Betreff: [h-sig] BERNSTEINNE and matav addresses
Datum: Sun, 31 Jul 2005 07:59:30 -0400

Hi all,

The Matav on-line directory lists addresses in
this way:
Blum, Anna Budapest IV, kerulet 1046
Nadasdy Kalman utca
So should a letter to her be addressed
like this:
Anna Blum
Kalman utca
1046 Nadasdy
Kerulet, Budapest IV
Hungary

Or differently?

Also looking for anyone with information on Dr.
Regina BERNSTEINNE who
lived at
Sziv-u 69, VI Budapest in 1927. She was an
"educator"


Vicki Blum Vigil
Cleveland Ohio USA


Re: old photos #poland

Lena Einhorn <lena.einhorn@...>
 

In that case, I would like to take the opportunity to let you know about
our family webpage -- the Rubin and Wygodzki families >from Bialystok. The
webpage contains both trees and a photoalbum:
http://home.nycap.rr.com/wrwebsite/
Best regards,
Lena Einhorn
Stockholm,
Sweden

-----Ursprungligt meddelande-----
Från: Mark Halpern [mailto:bialystoker@comcast.net]
Skickat: den 1 augusti 2005 00:23
Till: BIALYGen: Bialystok Region Jewish Genealogy Group
Ämne: Re:[bialystok] old photos


The BIALYGen website is a good place to showcase and tell a story about
your old photos of ancestors >from the Bialystok area. We would be happy
to help you create a webpage that would be part of our Photo Album
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/bialygen/Photo_Album.htm.

This offer applies to all BIALYGenners with photos, documents, a story,
and a desire to share these with others.

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator

----- Original Message -----
Hi
I am looking for some tips on where to send photos taken either before
or just after the war. They are of my late grandmother's family,
ZACHAREWICZ, Malka >from Zawady (Lomza). She had some family in
Tykocin,
Bialystok and also Strenkowa Gora. The quality is not great as I have
taken a photo of the originals.

thanks
Anna Ryan


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland SV: old photos #poland

Lena Einhorn <lena.einhorn@...>
 

In that case, I would like to take the opportunity to let you know about
our family webpage -- the Rubin and Wygodzki families >from Bialystok. The
webpage contains both trees and a photoalbum:
http://home.nycap.rr.com/wrwebsite/
Best regards,
Lena Einhorn
Stockholm,
Sweden

-----Ursprungligt meddelande-----
Från: Mark Halpern [mailto:bialystoker@comcast.net]
Skickat: den 1 augusti 2005 00:23
Till: BIALYGen: Bialystok Region Jewish Genealogy Group
Ämne: Re:[bialystok] old photos


The BIALYGen website is a good place to showcase and tell a story about
your old photos of ancestors >from the Bialystok area. We would be happy
to help you create a webpage that would be part of our Photo Album
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/bialygen/Photo_Album.htm.

This offer applies to all BIALYGenners with photos, documents, a story,
and a desire to share these with others.

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator

----- Original Message -----
Hi
I am looking for some tips on where to send photos taken either before
or just after the war. They are of my late grandmother's family,
ZACHAREWICZ, Malka >from Zawady (Lomza). She had some family in
Tykocin,
Bialystok and also Strenkowa Gora. The quality is not great as I have
taken a photo of the originals.

thanks
Anna Ryan


Conclusion: Interpreting Russian Orthodox verses Hebrew date in Archive Record. #lithuania

Yehudh bn Shlmo
 

Dear Group,

Thank you for all the replies. It seems that the
current date would be 11/09/1914. This survivor will
be happy to know that he is 13 days younger.

Yehudah BenShlomo
U.S.A.

There are 2 dates on a Keidan archive records for a
birth. The Russian Orthodox date is 10/27/1914, but
the Hebrew date is 20 Heshvan 5675 which is actually
11/09/1914. I was told that the Russian Orthodox
dates during this time could be 13 days behind our
current Julian Calendar. Is this correct? The Julian
date is 13 days off in this record.
MODERATOR'S NOTE: Since this question has been thoroughly
answered, this thread is now closed.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Conclusion: Interpreting Russian Orthodox verses Hebrew date in Archive Record. #lithuania

Yehudh bn Shlmo
 

Dear Group,

Thank you for all the replies. It seems that the
current date would be 11/09/1914. This survivor will
be happy to know that he is 13 days younger.

Yehudah BenShlomo
U.S.A.

There are 2 dates on a Keidan archive records for a
birth. The Russian Orthodox date is 10/27/1914, but
the Hebrew date is 20 Heshvan 5675 which is actually
11/09/1914. I was told that the Russian Orthodox
dates during this time could be 13 days behind our
current Julian Calendar. Is this correct? The Julian
date is 13 days off in this record.
MODERATOR'S NOTE: Since this question has been thoroughly
answered, this thread is now closed.


Re: Interpreting Russian Orthodox verses Hebrew date in Archive Record. #lithuania

Meri-Jane Rochelson <rochelso@...>
 

Yes, that is correct. We always celebrated my father's birthday on
August 19, and then years later learned that on our Western calendar he
was born Sept. 1. The Hebrew date, of course, remains the same and is a
sure guide.

With best wishes,
Meri-Jane Rochelson
Miami, FL

Yehudh bn Shlmo wrote:

There are 2 dates on a Keidan archive records for a
birth. The Russian Orthodox date is 10/27/1914, but
the Hebrew date is 20 Heshvan 5675 which is actually
11/09/1914. I was told that the Russian Orthodox dates
during this time could be 13 days behind our current
Julian Calendar.

Is this correct?


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Interpreting Russian Orthodox verses Hebrew date in Archive Record. #lithuania

Meri-Jane Rochelson <rochelso@...>
 

Yes, that is correct. We always celebrated my father's birthday on
August 19, and then years later learned that on our Western calendar he
was born Sept. 1. The Hebrew date, of course, remains the same and is a
sure guide.

With best wishes,
Meri-Jane Rochelson
Miami, FL

Yehudh bn Shlmo wrote:

There are 2 dates on a Keidan archive records for a
birth. The Russian Orthodox date is 10/27/1914, but
the Hebrew date is 20 Heshvan 5675 which is actually
11/09/1914. I was told that the Russian Orthodox dates
during this time could be 13 days behind our current
Julian Calendar.

Is this correct?


JFRA Israel: Special guest Joel Ratner of Litvak SIG, August 10 #lithuania

Micha Reisel
 

All researchers are cordially invited to JFRA Israel's
Ra'anana branch meeting to welcome visiting guest
speaker Joel Ratner (Boston, MA), who will present a
computer-based program on the Litvak SIG Vital Records
Indexing Project, including many examples of records,
followed by Q&A.

Doors open 7pm, English program begins 7.30pm
Wednesday, August 10
at Bet Fisher, 5 Klausner St, Ra'anana
(off Ahuza, adjacent to the Ra'anana Municipality).

Joel has served as Litvak SIG's Vilna District Group
coordinator almost since its inception in 1998.
Its main project is the 1858 Revision List for the
city of Vilna. Translations are distributed as
completed; some 80% has been finished.
Already distributed: the 1915 Vilna City Directory and
the 1943 Vilna Ghetto District records.
Altogether some 40,000 records covering 80 years
have been completed.
Currently, the group is coordinating vital records
indexing for Lithuania, covering 100 towns included
in Mormon-filmed microfilms, totalling some
500,000-800,000 records
A native New Yorker, Joel is an electrical engineer
and lives in Boston with his family.

Information/reservations: contact JFRA Ra'anana
chair Ingrid Rockberger, ingrid@genealogy.org.il

Admission: JFRA members, NIS 5; others, NIS 15.

Micha Reisel
Vice President, JFRA Israel
micha@genealogy.org.il


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania JFRA Israel: Special guest Joel Ratner of Litvak SIG, August 10 #lithuania

Micha Reisel
 

All researchers are cordially invited to JFRA Israel's
Ra'anana branch meeting to welcome visiting guest
speaker Joel Ratner (Boston, MA), who will present a
computer-based program on the Litvak SIG Vital Records
Indexing Project, including many examples of records,
followed by Q&A.

Doors open 7pm, English program begins 7.30pm
Wednesday, August 10
at Bet Fisher, 5 Klausner St, Ra'anana
(off Ahuza, adjacent to the Ra'anana Municipality).

Joel has served as Litvak SIG's Vilna District Group
coordinator almost since its inception in 1998.
Its main project is the 1858 Revision List for the
city of Vilna. Translations are distributed as
completed; some 80% has been finished.
Already distributed: the 1915 Vilna City Directory and
the 1943 Vilna Ghetto District records.
Altogether some 40,000 records covering 80 years
have been completed.
Currently, the group is coordinating vital records
indexing for Lithuania, covering 100 towns included
in Mormon-filmed microfilms, totalling some
500,000-800,000 records
A native New Yorker, Joel is an electrical engineer
and lives in Boston with his family.

Information/reservations: contact JFRA Ra'anana
chair Ingrid Rockberger, ingrid@genealogy.org.il

Admission: JFRA members, NIS 5; others, NIS 15.

Micha Reisel
Vice President, JFRA Israel
micha@genealogy.org.il


Re: Optical Character Recognition #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 3 Aug 2005 13:26:22 UTC, AllanDolgow@aol.com opined:

I am looking for optical character recognition (OCR) software for Hebrew.
There are a few pages in a Yizkor book I want to translate.
The New York Public Library said I could print-out the selected pages I want
from the Yizkor book and then use OCR for translation. However my OCR
program does not handle Hebrew.

You can reply directly.

Allan Dolgow
Stockton, CA
allandolgow@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately
I would think this problem is not unique to this questioner, and hope
that the moderator will pass my short reply for that reason.

Do a Google search on "ocr hebrew" (without the quotes). You will get
lots of hits. I am familiar with one of the companies that you will
see there. In order not to run afoul of the concerns of JewishGen's
lawyers, I won't give the name here, but you or anyone can contact me
(see below), and I will tell you what I know.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Optical Character Recognition #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 3 Aug 2005 13:26:22 UTC, AllanDolgow@aol.com opined:

I am looking for optical character recognition (OCR) software for Hebrew.
There are a few pages in a Yizkor book I want to translate.
The New York Public Library said I could print-out the selected pages I want
from the Yizkor book and then use OCR for translation. However my OCR
program does not handle Hebrew.

You can reply directly.

Allan Dolgow
Stockton, CA
allandolgow@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately
I would think this problem is not unique to this questioner, and hope
that the moderator will pass my short reply for that reason.

Do a Google search on "ocr hebrew" (without the quotes). You will get
lots of hits. I am familiar with one of the companies that you will
see there. In order not to run afoul of the concerns of JewishGen's
lawyers, I won't give the name here, but you or anyone can contact me
(see below), and I will tell you what I know.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


Re: BAMBERG - Origins of this family name? #germany

MBernet@...
 

MODERATOR NOTE: Responses to Dr. Bernet's essay should be sent to him
by private E-mail with the possible exception of those which are of
importance to all GerSIG members. We will not entertain extended
discussion of any of Dr. Bernet's points in this Forum.

In a message dated 8/2/2005 hans-martinunger@freesurf.ch writes:
"I'm looking for an explanation of the family-name. BAMBERG or
BAMBERGER.
I asssume the explanation is that anybody choose this name after
the town Bamberg according to the decree of Napoleon in 1808 or 1810?"

Bamberg is an ancient and venerable city in Upper Franconia (north
Bavaria), a port on the River Main. It had a Jewish community way
back in the Middle Ages. It was unique in that it and its surrounding
villages were the feudal property of the Catholic Bishop, who was at
the same time a Prince.

Bamberg was the center of a dense Jewish life in wide collection of
villages and country towns. Jews were expelled >from Bamberg at
various times, and not officially permitted back until the 19th
century. Because of that, a nearby village, Zeckendorf, served as
"home" for generations of Bamberg rabbis.

Almost every village with a Jewish community had a Bamberger
family, i.e. a family that had taken its appellation >from an ancestor
who had once lived in, or close to, the city of Bamberg.

The Jews >from the Bamberg region were prominent among Jewish
settlers in the USA after 1840, especially in Cincinnati, Cleveland,
Columbus, and other sites in Ohio and the Middle West. Many
families named Bamberger rose >from being peddlers to being
owners of major commercial firms, or to the ranks of politicians.

One major Bamberger family is that of Rabbi Seligman Baer [Yitzhak
Dov Halevy] Bamberger (1807E280931878) of Wuerzburg, a leader of
19th century German Orthodox Judaism. He fathered an enormously
large family of rabbis, scholars, authors, publishers and booksellers,
who are still prominent in the 21st century.

This group has a well-organized family organization that has published
histories and genealogies of the family. Unfortunately, no one (as last I
heard about 3 years ago) can trace the family history beyond the rabbi of
Wuerzburg's grandfather and teacher, known only as Nathan of
Wiesenbronn--a village that lies relatively distant >from Bamberg--
and no one knows why the "Wuerzburger Rov" took the Bamberger name.
(My wild guess is that he conside red himself descended >from one
of the rabbis-scholars of Bamberg in the 17th or 18th century, who
had lived in Zeckendorf)

Of course there were people who took the Bamberger name without
any connection to the city and its region, simply because they liked it

Michael Bernet, New York, < _www.mem-Ber.net_ (http://www.mem-Ber.net)


German SIG #Germany Re: BAMBERG - Origins of this family name? #germany

MBernet@...
 

MODERATOR NOTE: Responses to Dr. Bernet's essay should be sent to him
by private E-mail with the possible exception of those which are of
importance to all GerSIG members. We will not entertain extended
discussion of any of Dr. Bernet's points in this Forum.

In a message dated 8/2/2005 hans-martinunger@freesurf.ch writes:
"I'm looking for an explanation of the family-name. BAMBERG or
BAMBERGER.
I asssume the explanation is that anybody choose this name after
the town Bamberg according to the decree of Napoleon in 1808 or 1810?"

Bamberg is an ancient and venerable city in Upper Franconia (north
Bavaria), a port on the River Main. It had a Jewish community way
back in the Middle Ages. It was unique in that it and its surrounding
villages were the feudal property of the Catholic Bishop, who was at
the same time a Prince.

Bamberg was the center of a dense Jewish life in wide collection of
villages and country towns. Jews were expelled >from Bamberg at
various times, and not officially permitted back until the 19th
century. Because of that, a nearby village, Zeckendorf, served as
"home" for generations of Bamberg rabbis.

Almost every village with a Jewish community had a Bamberger
family, i.e. a family that had taken its appellation >from an ancestor
who had once lived in, or close to, the city of Bamberg.

The Jews >from the Bamberg region were prominent among Jewish
settlers in the USA after 1840, especially in Cincinnati, Cleveland,
Columbus, and other sites in Ohio and the Middle West. Many
families named Bamberger rose >from being peddlers to being
owners of major commercial firms, or to the ranks of politicians.

One major Bamberger family is that of Rabbi Seligman Baer [Yitzhak
Dov Halevy] Bamberger (1807E280931878) of Wuerzburg, a leader of
19th century German Orthodox Judaism. He fathered an enormously
large family of rabbis, scholars, authors, publishers and booksellers,
who are still prominent in the 21st century.

This group has a well-organized family organization that has published
histories and genealogies of the family. Unfortunately, no one (as last I
heard about 3 years ago) can trace the family history beyond the rabbi of
Wuerzburg's grandfather and teacher, known only as Nathan of
Wiesenbronn--a village that lies relatively distant >from Bamberg--
and no one knows why the "Wuerzburger Rov" took the Bamberger name.
(My wild guess is that he conside red himself descended >from one
of the rabbis-scholars of Bamberg in the 17th or 18th century, who
had lived in Zeckendorf)

Of course there were people who took the Bamberger name without
any connection to the city and its region, simply because they liked it

Michael Bernet, New York, < _www.mem-Ber.net_ (http://www.mem-Ber.net)


Re: Zrenjanin #hungary

Robert Neu
 

The FHL catalog does not show any Jewish records for
Nagy Becserek/Zrenjanin, even though the Gazetteer
does show there was a Jewish community with records
there.

The Jewish records of Szerbmodos would have been in
Nagy Becserek.

Robert

--- Ted Grossman <tgrossman@islandssounder.com> wrote:

Please keep me posted about this. My grandparents
and father lived in
what was then Nagy Beckerek during World War I,
where my grandfather was
a chaplain, and my grandparents served kosher food
to the soldiers.
Ted Grossman
Eastsound, Washington
On Jul 29, 2005, at 8:52 AM, peter bakos wrote:

Hello >from Budapest.

I have been in touch with a person >from a Serbian
Genealogy group (I
am new to it aned do not know much about what goes
on in Serbia,
genealogy wise) who informed me that the Jewish
community in Serbia
keep their own documents. Is this true? Does any
one know about
Jewish Registers for Zrenjanin (Nagy Beckerek), or
Yasi Tomic (Modos)?
Please let me know before I go there for no
apparent reason.

Peter Bakos


Translation of name needed #hungary

Henry Lifton <henlif@...>
 

Could some one tell me what the Hungarian equivalent of the Hebrew name
Chia? I don't know if that is the correct transliteration, but it is the
best I can do.

Thanks

Henry Lifton
Boca Raton, FL
henlif@elsfl.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Zrenjanin #hungary

Robert Neu
 

The FHL catalog does not show any Jewish records for
Nagy Becserek/Zrenjanin, even though the Gazetteer
does show there was a Jewish community with records
there.

The Jewish records of Szerbmodos would have been in
Nagy Becserek.

Robert

--- Ted Grossman <tgrossman@islandssounder.com> wrote:

Please keep me posted about this. My grandparents
and father lived in
what was then Nagy Beckerek during World War I,
where my grandfather was
a chaplain, and my grandparents served kosher food
to the soldiers.
Ted Grossman
Eastsound, Washington
On Jul 29, 2005, at 8:52 AM, peter bakos wrote:

Hello >from Budapest.

I have been in touch with a person >from a Serbian
Genealogy group (I
am new to it aned do not know much about what goes
on in Serbia,
genealogy wise) who informed me that the Jewish
community in Serbia
keep their own documents. Is this true? Does any
one know about
Jewish Registers for Zrenjanin (Nagy Beckerek), or
Yasi Tomic (Modos)?
Please let me know before I go there for no
apparent reason.

Peter Bakos


Hungary SIG #Hungary Translation of name needed #hungary

Henry Lifton <henlif@...>
 

Could some one tell me what the Hungarian equivalent of the Hebrew name
Chia? I don't know if that is the correct transliteration, but it is the
best I can do.

Thanks

Henry Lifton
Boca Raton, FL
henlif@elsfl.com