Date   

Yizkor Book Report for December 2005 #france

Joyce Field
 

December 2005 was again a busy month, during which we posted two new
books, four new entries, and 18 updates. All yizkor book
translations are accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. Through this site
you can also link to the Yizkor Book Database and also donate money
to fund various translation projects and purchase a memorial plaque.

New books:

-Druya, Belarus
-Turek, Poland

New entries:

-Cegled, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Jasienica Rosielna, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 3
-Kezmarok, Slovakia: Pinkas HaKehillot Slovakia
-Rozan, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 3

Updates:

-Belchatow, Poland
-Brest, Belarus
-Bukowina: Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina, volume 2, pp. 157-162
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Pinkas Latvia and Estonia: Table of Contents
-Pochayev, Ukraine
-Radzyn Podalski, Poland
-Rakow,Belarus
-Rogatin (Rohatyn) Ukraine
-Rokiskis, Lithuania
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Suchowola, Poland
-Zloczew, Poland

Thanks are due to the translators who donate their translations, the
project coordinators who coordinate the details of getting material
translated and submitting it to us, and to the wonderful Yizkor Book
Team (Lance Ackerfeld, Max Heffler, and Osnat Ramaty), who work
tirelessly to get translations htmled and online rapidly. This team
work has resulted in another successful year for the Yizkor Book
Project. More can be accomplished if we receive additional financial
donations for projects
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
and additional donations to JewishGen's General Fund, which provides
the infrastructure for all services.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


French SIG #France Yizkor Book Report for December 2005 #france

Joyce Field
 

December 2005 was again a busy month, during which we posted two new
books, four new entries, and 18 updates. All yizkor book
translations are accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. Through this site
you can also link to the Yizkor Book Database and also donate money
to fund various translation projects and purchase a memorial plaque.

New books:

-Druya, Belarus
-Turek, Poland

New entries:

-Cegled, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Jasienica Rosielna, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 3
-Kezmarok, Slovakia: Pinkas HaKehillot Slovakia
-Rozan, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 3

Updates:

-Belchatow, Poland
-Brest, Belarus
-Bukowina: Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina, volume 2, pp. 157-162
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Pinkas Latvia and Estonia: Table of Contents
-Pochayev, Ukraine
-Radzyn Podalski, Poland
-Rakow,Belarus
-Rogatin (Rohatyn) Ukraine
-Rokiskis, Lithuania
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Suchowola, Poland
-Zloczew, Poland

Thanks are due to the translators who donate their translations, the
project coordinators who coordinate the details of getting material
translated and submitting it to us, and to the wonderful Yizkor Book
Team (Lance Ackerfeld, Max Heffler, and Osnat Ramaty), who work
tirelessly to get translations htmled and online rapidly. This team
work has resulted in another successful year for the Yizkor Book
Project. More can be accomplished if we receive additional financial
donations for projects
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
and additional donations to JewishGen's General Fund, which provides
the infrastructure for all services.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


JEWISH CEMETERIES IN LUXEMBOURG #france

B. Frederics <picturethisfilm@...>
 

Bonjour,

I'm a member of GerSig, but this doesn't fall into their pervue. My
great-grandfather was born in Consdorf, Luxembourg, as were his
siblings.
His parents moved there >from Bosen, DE in 1860. I'll be visiting
Consdorf in late April and was sincerely hoping to find where my
ancestors were buried, those that didn't emigrate to the US in 1886.
I can't find any information online about any Jewish cemeteries or
where Jews would have been buried in LU. I wrote to the LU consulate
in the US but they only told me that all cemeteries are handled by
the state.

I would be most appreciative if someone could tell me how I can find out
this information. I'll only be in Consdorf for a day and would like to
take photos of the headstones in the cemetery for participation in the
Jewishgen cemetery project. For edification, Consdorf is near Echternacht.

Merci in advance.

Regards,
Bonnie Frederics
Tucson, AZ
picturethisfilm@email.com

Seeking: GOTTLIEB (Consdorf, LU)


French SIG #France JEWISH CEMETERIES IN LUXEMBOURG #france

B. Frederics <picturethisfilm@...>
 

Bonjour,

I'm a member of GerSig, but this doesn't fall into their pervue. My
great-grandfather was born in Consdorf, Luxembourg, as were his
siblings.
His parents moved there >from Bosen, DE in 1860. I'll be visiting
Consdorf in late April and was sincerely hoping to find where my
ancestors were buried, those that didn't emigrate to the US in 1886.
I can't find any information online about any Jewish cemeteries or
where Jews would have been buried in LU. I wrote to the LU consulate
in the US but they only told me that all cemeteries are handled by
the state.

I would be most appreciative if someone could tell me how I can find out
this information. I'll only be in Consdorf for a day and would like to
take photos of the headstones in the cemetery for participation in the
Jewishgen cemetery project. For edification, Consdorf is near Echternacht.

Merci in advance.

Regards,
Bonnie Frederics
Tucson, AZ
picturethisfilm@email.com

Seeking: GOTTLIEB (Consdorf, LU)


Re: area of hung. immigrants in manhattan #hungary

Judy and Gary Floam <gfloam@...>
 

It was and is still called "Yorkville". It had Hungarian, German and Czech
residents (among others). There is a famous Hungarian food store in the
neighborhood called "Paprikas Weiss".

----- Original Message -----
From: ilona lerman <phililona2001@yahoo.com>
To: H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, January 06, 2006 3:50 AM
Subject: re:[h-sig] area of hung. immigrants in manhattan


I remember my mother telling me she grew up in an area
of Manhattan which was "settled" mainly by Hungarians,
in the period around 1920. I found on the census for
that year that their address was East 77th. St. She
told me how her brother swam in the East River. My mom
gave the area a name -something "ville" but I may be
mistaken.
Does anyone know what this section of Manhattan was
called at that period of time?
Thanks for any help.
Ilona Lerman
Beerot Yitzchak

Moderator: Yorkville was the name of this neighborhood of Hungarians,
Germans, and Czechs.


Re: Bonyhad #hungary

Suzanne Kemeny <suzucchini@...>
 

I don't know much about the place Bonyhad, but I do
have an ancestor whose last name was Bonyhadi and I
have seen her name written as Bonjhard (other
variations included Bonihat, Bonjhad, etc. in various
records, depending on the person who was doing the
recording).

--- Joan and Sam Kraus <jnskraus@cox.net> wrote:

In my great-grandfather Bernhard Krauss's marriage
records >from
Hunsdorf, he said he was auf Bonhard. There is a
possibility he may
have come >from Bonyhad. Has anyone who researches
Bonyhad found a
record of a person who spoke German using the name
Bonhard for Bonyhad?

In a military record, he was said to come >from the
Bansag. I think this
is a military or frontier region. Was Bonyhad
considered to be a part
of such a region, especially in the early 1800's?

Any help will be much appreciated.

Samuel Kraus
Rancho Palos Verdes, California


Re: WEISZ/Nyiregyhaza area #hungary

glosonc@...
 

Hi,
Any Lefkovics or Lefkovits relatives originating >from Olaszliszka or
Hajdusamson?
George Losonci
West Bloomfield,MI
glosonc@aol.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: re:area of hung. immigrants in manhattan #hungary

Judy and Gary Floam <gfloam@...>
 

It was and is still called "Yorkville". It had Hungarian, German and Czech
residents (among others). There is a famous Hungarian food store in the
neighborhood called "Paprikas Weiss".

----- Original Message -----
From: ilona lerman <phililona2001@yahoo.com>
To: H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, January 06, 2006 3:50 AM
Subject: re:[h-sig] area of hung. immigrants in manhattan


I remember my mother telling me she grew up in an area
of Manhattan which was "settled" mainly by Hungarians,
in the period around 1920. I found on the census for
that year that their address was East 77th. St. She
told me how her brother swam in the East River. My mom
gave the area a name -something "ville" but I may be
mistaken.
Does anyone know what this section of Manhattan was
called at that period of time?
Thanks for any help.
Ilona Lerman
Beerot Yitzchak

Moderator: Yorkville was the name of this neighborhood of Hungarians,
Germans, and Czechs.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Bonyhad #hungary

Suzanne Kemeny <suzucchini@...>
 

I don't know much about the place Bonyhad, but I do
have an ancestor whose last name was Bonyhadi and I
have seen her name written as Bonjhard (other
variations included Bonihat, Bonjhad, etc. in various
records, depending on the person who was doing the
recording).

--- Joan and Sam Kraus <jnskraus@cox.net> wrote:

In my great-grandfather Bernhard Krauss's marriage
records >from
Hunsdorf, he said he was auf Bonhard. There is a
possibility he may
have come >from Bonyhad. Has anyone who researches
Bonyhad found a
record of a person who spoke German using the name
Bonhard for Bonyhad?

In a military record, he was said to come >from the
Bansag. I think this
is a military or frontier region. Was Bonyhad
considered to be a part
of such a region, especially in the early 1800's?

Any help will be much appreciated.

Samuel Kraus
Rancho Palos Verdes, California


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: WEISZ/Nyiregyhaza area #hungary

glosonc@...
 

Hi,
Any Lefkovics or Lefkovits relatives originating >from Olaszliszka or
Hajdusamson?
George Losonci
West Bloomfield,MI
glosonc@aol.com


Re: Memorial wall #hungary

Gábor Hirsch <g_hirsch@...>
 

In the last days there are two messages praising but also criticizing the
“Memorial Wall” in Budapest and Yad Vashem. My impressions are mixed about
both institutions. I try to describe my experiancies.

What I would like as a survivor, that the names should be grouped according
the last residence and I should be able to browse and rediscover – without a
search for a specific name – friends, neighbours relatives etc. I would like
also that each place where Jews were deported from, shold have a memorial
erected with the names of the perished ones.

***About Budapest:
I went in the past years to my hometown, visited archives and collected from
the so called “Halalfelveteli nyinvantartas (death registration)” some 850
records entered between 1946-51. It was known and used in my hometown and in
November 2004 the hdke asked for them as well as for a list I prepared of
the Hungarian women transported >from Ausxchwitz and registered in Stutthof
on the 27 September 1944. The transport my mother was sent to Stutthof.
Neither at my visit in June nor in September 2005 in Budapest were the lists
presented.

***About Yad Vashem:
In 1981 I filled out a questionary of Yad Vashemabout the death of my
mother, according of survivors, who were with her. Later in 1998 I found out
based on ITS documents, that the selection I was told, was selection for KZ
Stutthof, she was listed also in the “Names (Nevek) of Hungarian Jewish
Women in the Stutthof Concentration Camp”, edited by Yad Vashem, even so
they didn’t made a remark of her registration, stay or death in Stutthof.
My surviving friend Otto, his twinbrother Ferenc and her sister Agnes were
recorded dead probably based on the “Names of the deported Jews >from Hajdu,
County” may be by a well meaning person, the parents were entered by their
surviving daughter Agnes 1987.

60 years or 15 years after fall of the Iron Curtain were not enough to
collect the names of the victims, it is still an adventure to find your way
in “The Central Database of Shoah Victims' Names” >from Yad Vashem. I tried
to use information on a person I loaded down a long time ago, but I was
unable to get any result. One of my friends claimed that since a year, when
he provided several dozen names to Yad Vashem, no names were put on Yad
Vashem's list. So you see impressions can be quite different.

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch


--- Ursprüngliche Nachricht ---
Von: "levinson" <levinson@bezeqint.net>
An: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Betreff: [h-sig] Memorial wall
Datum: Fri, 6 Jan 2006 09:23:15 +0200

Dear All,
I visited in the Hungarian center and it was a great disappointment for
me.
Nothing in Hebrew - our national language; poor collection; the memorial
forms were in Hungarian only; the fonts on the wall were so small and the
wall is so high that I could not see the names of my poor grandparents.
Yad Vashem is thoughtful and you can download the testimony pages in many
languages and fill them up. The sooner the better!

Esther Levinson
Beer Sheva, Israel
Dear Group,
I'm quite new here.
I don't exactly know what's been going on, so sorry if I'm writing about
something you've already discussed.
The Holocaust Memorial Center opened last April in Budapest. They have a
memorial wall, where they would like to write the names of all of the
Hungarian Jewish people who perished in the holocaust.
Their site is www.hdke.hu, and there is an English section.
At the moment there are just about 93 thousand names out of the over
500,000, so there's a lot to be done. I started doing my family tree about a
year ago, been going to the archives, looking for relatives both living and
dead.
A relative of mine living in Israel has already given some names to Yad
Vashem, but I have found others. I'd like to provide the museum with the
names of everybody who died >from my family.
If you feel like the same, please do so, too.

All the best,
Peter


Re: WEISZ/Nyiregyhaza area #hungary

moishe@langsam.com <moishe@...>
 

Hello,

I have Weiss family >from Nyirbator. My g-g-gm was Malka
Hertz, nee WEISS. She passed away in Nyirbator in 1942.
This is the tree:
Descendants of Herschel Weiss

1 Herschel Weiss
.. +Tzirel Deutsch
........ 2 Malka Weiss 1867 - 1942
............ +Dovid Dov "Berel Hertz" Hertz 1860 - 1910
................... 3 Tzirel "Shprintze Hertz" Hertz 1895
- 1944 Nagy Karoly, Romania
....................... +Shlomo Frank
................... 3 Alter Chaim Hertz 1889 - 1944
....................... +Perel Greenfeld - 1944
................... 3 Chaya Hertz 1891 - 1944 Nyirbator,
Hungary
....................... +Pinchas Schonfeld 1888 - 1944
................... 3 Menashe Hertz 1902 - 1944
....................... +Irma Brach 1904 - 1944
................... 3 Esther Hertz Szerencs, Hungary
....................... +Chaim Perlstein 1900 -
................... 3 Rochel Hertz
....................... +Ferenc Schreiber
If you need more detail, please contact me offline.

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn, NY
moishe@langsam.com




On Fri, 6 Jan 2006 12:30:33 -0500
"Judy Zimlichman" <h.zimlichman@securenet.net> wrote:
From: Judy Zimlichman
To: h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org
Sent: Friday, January 06, 2006 9:57 AM

Hi,

Iam looking for families, with names WEISZ, WIEDER,
WIDER, VIDER, LEFKOVICS, who were living in Nyirbogat,
Nyirbeltek, Nyirbator, Nyiregyhaza area.
My father's name was WEISZ IGNATZ (Yitzchok) (Born:1913);
his parents' name were Weisz Samuel and Wieder Julianna.
My mother's name was Ella (Gabriella) Weisz (Born:1922);
her parents' name were Weisz Herman (Yehuda Zvi) and
Lefkovics Rosalia (Rifka).
If nayone knew them or maybe knows a contact person from
that area, please contact me. Thank You.
MODERATOR: Moderator has changed subject line to reflect
message content. If you want to receive responses to the
messages your post, PLEASE include a subject line that
relates to the message.


Translation from german please #hungary

Dr Andrew Gal <drgal@...>
 

I would be grateful for the translation of this document, written in German:

ViewMate site
(http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate) - as file - VM7336

It mentions the name of my GGparents, but apart >from that I can not decipher
its contents.
Please contact me off-list.

Andrew Gal
Sydney Australia


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Memorial wall #hungary

Gábor Hirsch <g_hirsch@...>
 

In the last days there are two messages praising but also criticizing the
“Memorial Wall” in Budapest and Yad Vashem. My impressions are mixed about
both institutions. I try to describe my experiancies.

What I would like as a survivor, that the names should be grouped according
the last residence and I should be able to browse and rediscover – without a
search for a specific name – friends, neighbours relatives etc. I would like
also that each place where Jews were deported from, shold have a memorial
erected with the names of the perished ones.

***About Budapest:
I went in the past years to my hometown, visited archives and collected from
the so called “Halalfelveteli nyinvantartas (death registration)” some 850
records entered between 1946-51. It was known and used in my hometown and in
November 2004 the hdke asked for them as well as for a list I prepared of
the Hungarian women transported >from Ausxchwitz and registered in Stutthof
on the 27 September 1944. The transport my mother was sent to Stutthof.
Neither at my visit in June nor in September 2005 in Budapest were the lists
presented.

***About Yad Vashem:
In 1981 I filled out a questionary of Yad Vashemabout the death of my
mother, according of survivors, who were with her. Later in 1998 I found out
based on ITS documents, that the selection I was told, was selection for KZ
Stutthof, she was listed also in the “Names (Nevek) of Hungarian Jewish
Women in the Stutthof Concentration Camp”, edited by Yad Vashem, even so
they didn’t made a remark of her registration, stay or death in Stutthof.
My surviving friend Otto, his twinbrother Ferenc and her sister Agnes were
recorded dead probably based on the “Names of the deported Jews >from Hajdu,
County” may be by a well meaning person, the parents were entered by their
surviving daughter Agnes 1987.

60 years or 15 years after fall of the Iron Curtain were not enough to
collect the names of the victims, it is still an adventure to find your way
in “The Central Database of Shoah Victims' Names” >from Yad Vashem. I tried
to use information on a person I loaded down a long time ago, but I was
unable to get any result. One of my friends claimed that since a year, when
he provided several dozen names to Yad Vashem, no names were put on Yad
Vashem's list. So you see impressions can be quite different.

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch


--- Ursprüngliche Nachricht ---
Von: "levinson" <levinson@bezeqint.net>
An: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Betreff: [h-sig] Memorial wall
Datum: Fri, 6 Jan 2006 09:23:15 +0200

Dear All,
I visited in the Hungarian center and it was a great disappointment for
me.
Nothing in Hebrew - our national language; poor collection; the memorial
forms were in Hungarian only; the fonts on the wall were so small and the
wall is so high that I could not see the names of my poor grandparents.
Yad Vashem is thoughtful and you can download the testimony pages in many
languages and fill them up. The sooner the better!

Esther Levinson
Beer Sheva, Israel
Dear Group,
I'm quite new here.
I don't exactly know what's been going on, so sorry if I'm writing about
something you've already discussed.
The Holocaust Memorial Center opened last April in Budapest. They have a
memorial wall, where they would like to write the names of all of the
Hungarian Jewish people who perished in the holocaust.
Their site is www.hdke.hu, and there is an English section.
At the moment there are just about 93 thousand names out of the over
500,000, so there's a lot to be done. I started doing my family tree about a
year ago, been going to the archives, looking for relatives both living and
dead.
A relative of mine living in Israel has already given some names to Yad
Vashem, but I have found others. I'd like to provide the museum with the
names of everybody who died >from my family.
If you feel like the same, please do so, too.

All the best,
Peter


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: WEISZ/Nyiregyhaza area #hungary

moishe@langsam.com <moishe@...>
 

Hello,

I have Weiss family >from Nyirbator. My g-g-gm was Malka
Hertz, nee WEISS. She passed away in Nyirbator in 1942.
This is the tree:
Descendants of Herschel Weiss

1 Herschel Weiss
.. +Tzirel Deutsch
........ 2 Malka Weiss 1867 - 1942
............ +Dovid Dov "Berel Hertz" Hertz 1860 - 1910
................... 3 Tzirel "Shprintze Hertz" Hertz 1895
- 1944 Nagy Karoly, Romania
....................... +Shlomo Frank
................... 3 Alter Chaim Hertz 1889 - 1944
....................... +Perel Greenfeld - 1944
................... 3 Chaya Hertz 1891 - 1944 Nyirbator,
Hungary
....................... +Pinchas Schonfeld 1888 - 1944
................... 3 Menashe Hertz 1902 - 1944
....................... +Irma Brach 1904 - 1944
................... 3 Esther Hertz Szerencs, Hungary
....................... +Chaim Perlstein 1900 -
................... 3 Rochel Hertz
....................... +Ferenc Schreiber
If you need more detail, please contact me offline.

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn, NY
moishe@langsam.com




On Fri, 6 Jan 2006 12:30:33 -0500
"Judy Zimlichman" <h.zimlichman@securenet.net> wrote:
From: Judy Zimlichman
To: h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org
Sent: Friday, January 06, 2006 9:57 AM

Hi,

Iam looking for families, with names WEISZ, WIEDER,
WIDER, VIDER, LEFKOVICS, who were living in Nyirbogat,
Nyirbeltek, Nyirbator, Nyiregyhaza area.
My father's name was WEISZ IGNATZ (Yitzchok) (Born:1913);
his parents' name were Weisz Samuel and Wieder Julianna.
My mother's name was Ella (Gabriella) Weisz (Born:1922);
her parents' name were Weisz Herman (Yehuda Zvi) and
Lefkovics Rosalia (Rifka).
If nayone knew them or maybe knows a contact person from
that area, please contact me. Thank You.
MODERATOR: Moderator has changed subject line to reflect
message content. If you want to receive responses to the
messages your post, PLEASE include a subject line that
relates to the message.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Translation from german please #hungary

Dr Andrew Gal <drgal@...>
 

I would be grateful for the translation of this document, written in German:

ViewMate site
(http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate) - as file - VM7336

It mentions the name of my GGparents, but apart >from that I can not decipher
its contents.
Please contact me off-list.

Andrew Gal
Sydney Australia


Yorkville #hungary

peter bakos <pgbakos@...>
 

Dear fellow SIGgers;

At last a subject with which I am intimately acquainted.

Yorkville was where my aunt had her house and art academy on East 85th
street betwen York and First. I remember taking the train >from Bronxville
and then the Subway >from 125th street to 86th Street and walking. We would
pass under the El on third avenue. There were actually stores with signs
indicating that they spoke English! The neighborhood was German, Slovak and
Chech and Hungarian. There was a sizeable Jewish community north of 86th
famously the home of the Marx brothers.

On 82nd street where I lived in the sixties and seventies, we had the Magyar
Haz, the Reformed Church and St. Stephens RC church, all Hungarian. A few
blocks away was St. Elisabeth which was Czech. At the corner of 79th and
Second is a large Synagogue, but I think it was not necessarily ethnically
oriented.

Across second avenue was the importer Paprikas Weiss (my friend Tim Huber in
California now owns the catalogue) a wonderful place where one could smell
and touch and taste the flavors of Hungary. On 77th street is still
Orwasher the baker where one could get Salt Stangli and Hungarian Potato
Bread. At 82nd and third was Mrs. Herbst the Strudel house. Second avenue
was lined for some blocks with Hungarian stores of various types, a lot of
them having to do with food, none of which was Kosher, to my recollection.

For some years I was a part of the Hungaria Folk Dance Ensemble (not as a
dancer!) which was made up of young Hungarians as well as assimilated
Americans, and people >from various backgrounds, including a Jewish couple
and an excellent Greek violinist. Yorkville was a special place. Two
things killed it.

First was the development of high rise high cost apartment buildings. The
pressure of develpment drove out the low cost cold water tenements which
were the homes of many immigrant and first generation families.

Second was the American problem (not really a problem) of assimilation which
Hungarians seem to do easily. By the third generation people had
intermarried and moved to the suburbs and remembrances of Mom's cooking
became a dim memory as no one could even read the recipes anymore. The
ethnic shops first became curiosities to the middle class and then no longer
interesting as the food is certainly not healthy.

I think Jewish families in the U.S. have also experienced this problem of
assimilation and loss of neighborhood. It is sad for the culture, and the
religion too, but I suppose it is the price of progress.

Peter Bakos
Paris (one more week) and Sarasota, Florida
researching Moskovits, Rosenber/Racz/Rona/Ronai >from Kassa/Szina
Schuster >from Gyor/Papa
Podvinecz >from any place


Hungary SIG #Hungary Yorkville #hungary

peter bakos <pgbakos@...>
 

Dear fellow SIGgers;

At last a subject with which I am intimately acquainted.

Yorkville was where my aunt had her house and art academy on East 85th
street betwen York and First. I remember taking the train >from Bronxville
and then the Subway >from 125th street to 86th Street and walking. We would
pass under the El on third avenue. There were actually stores with signs
indicating that they spoke English! The neighborhood was German, Slovak and
Chech and Hungarian. There was a sizeable Jewish community north of 86th
famously the home of the Marx brothers.

On 82nd street where I lived in the sixties and seventies, we had the Magyar
Haz, the Reformed Church and St. Stephens RC church, all Hungarian. A few
blocks away was St. Elisabeth which was Czech. At the corner of 79th and
Second is a large Synagogue, but I think it was not necessarily ethnically
oriented.

Across second avenue was the importer Paprikas Weiss (my friend Tim Huber in
California now owns the catalogue) a wonderful place where one could smell
and touch and taste the flavors of Hungary. On 77th street is still
Orwasher the baker where one could get Salt Stangli and Hungarian Potato
Bread. At 82nd and third was Mrs. Herbst the Strudel house. Second avenue
was lined for some blocks with Hungarian stores of various types, a lot of
them having to do with food, none of which was Kosher, to my recollection.

For some years I was a part of the Hungaria Folk Dance Ensemble (not as a
dancer!) which was made up of young Hungarians as well as assimilated
Americans, and people >from various backgrounds, including a Jewish couple
and an excellent Greek violinist. Yorkville was a special place. Two
things killed it.

First was the development of high rise high cost apartment buildings. The
pressure of develpment drove out the low cost cold water tenements which
were the homes of many immigrant and first generation families.

Second was the American problem (not really a problem) of assimilation which
Hungarians seem to do easily. By the third generation people had
intermarried and moved to the suburbs and remembrances of Mom's cooking
became a dim memory as no one could even read the recipes anymore. The
ethnic shops first became curiosities to the middle class and then no longer
interesting as the food is certainly not healthy.

I think Jewish families in the U.S. have also experienced this problem of
assimilation and loss of neighborhood. It is sad for the culture, and the
religion too, but I suppose it is the price of progress.

Peter Bakos
Paris (one more week) and Sarasota, Florida
researching Moskovits, Rosenber/Racz/Rona/Ronai >from Kassa/Szina
Schuster >from Gyor/Papa
Podvinecz >from any place


Re: Bonyhad #hungary

Eckart Großmann <ec.grossmann@...>
 

Dear Samuel,

Yes, Bonhard is the German name of Bonyhad in Hungary. Look to
<http://www.wernau.de/Partnerschaft_mit_Ungarn_content.frame.html>, D 73249
Wernau/Germany is a twin town of Bonyhad.

Greetings

Eckart Grossmann, St. Augustin, Germany


Bonyhad #hungary

Peter <thidas@...>
 

Begin forwarded message:

From: Peter <thidas@sympatico.ca>
Date: January 8, 2006 8:05:07 AM EST (CA)
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: Re: [h-sig] Bonyhad


On 6-Jan-06, at 3:08 PM, Joan and Sam Kraus wrote:

In my great-grandfather Bernhard Krauss's marriage records >from =20
Hunsdorf, he said he was auf Bonhard. There is a possibility he =20
may have come >from Bonyhad. Has anyone who researches Bonyhad =20
found a record of a person who spoke German using the name Bonhard =20=
for Bonyhad?

In a military record, he was said to come >from the Bansag. I think
this is a military or frontier region. Was Bonyhad considered to
be a part of such a region, especially in the early 1800's?
Bonyhad was part of Hungary proper and not the Military District.

Peter I. Hidas
Mississauga, Ontario,
Canada.

thidas@sympatico.ca
peterhidas@yahoo.com
www3.sympatico.ca/thidas
http://community.webshots.com/user/peterhidas