Date   

INTRO - searching for BENJAMIN SINGER #germany

Albert Singer <al2chris@...>
 

Hello GerSig
I just joined the group and I will explain why,,,I have been doing
genealogy for about 10 years but mostly in the Russian or Belarus area. I am
not an expert either with the computor or with geneaology. I live in
suburban New York State and speak only English.

For all of these years I have been searching for where my grand father Benjamin
SINGER came >from and when he got here...It has been a long and confusing
journey with a lot of misinformation,inaccurate records and somewhat less
then good help >from some public officials..

Benjamin settled in Philadelphia PA, married Rebecca GOLDSTEIN in 1893 and
was a tailor. He died in 1897 when my father Natjan was 2 years old.

His marraige certificate says he was born in Russia and his death
certidicate (he is buried in Gladwyne PA) says he was born in Germany
Incidently there were two Benjamin SINGERs that l;eft Hamburg for the USA
within two weeks of each other one on the SS Silesa and the other on the
SS Wieland.

With the help of a woderful person at linkto your roots who searched the
Hamburg State Archives, office of emigration I think I may have identified
the real Benjamin I am lookig for. The report says on August 15,1880
Benjamin SINGER >from Schrimm, Posen embarked on the SS Silesia for New York
under Capt. Albers he travled steerage. He traveled together with Martin
Grutzmacher aged 33,worker.

If this information is familiar to any one please contact me.

Albert Singer Schenectady,New York <al2chris@worldnet.att.net>

MODERATOR NOTE- The moderator has edited the text above to correct many errors
in grammar and punctuation. Our list rules require that messages >from native
English speakers observe conventional rules for writing English. Unlike many
discussion groups, GerSIG does not allow internet slang in this Forum.
Only the last names (family names / surnames) of research subjects and their
relatives may be typed in ALL CAPITAL LETTERS. MOD 1 Our list rules
are stated in the Intro / Welcome letter sent to all new members and found
at our website: http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/email.htm MOD 1


German SIG #Germany INTRO - searching for BENJAMIN SINGER #germany

Albert Singer <al2chris@...>
 

Hello GerSig
I just joined the group and I will explain why,,,I have been doing
genealogy for about 10 years but mostly in the Russian or Belarus area. I am
not an expert either with the computor or with geneaology. I live in
suburban New York State and speak only English.

For all of these years I have been searching for where my grand father Benjamin
SINGER came >from and when he got here...It has been a long and confusing
journey with a lot of misinformation,inaccurate records and somewhat less
then good help >from some public officials..

Benjamin settled in Philadelphia PA, married Rebecca GOLDSTEIN in 1893 and
was a tailor. He died in 1897 when my father Natjan was 2 years old.

His marraige certificate says he was born in Russia and his death
certidicate (he is buried in Gladwyne PA) says he was born in Germany
Incidently there were two Benjamin SINGERs that l;eft Hamburg for the USA
within two weeks of each other one on the SS Silesa and the other on the
SS Wieland.

With the help of a woderful person at linkto your roots who searched the
Hamburg State Archives, office of emigration I think I may have identified
the real Benjamin I am lookig for. The report says on August 15,1880
Benjamin SINGER >from Schrimm, Posen embarked on the SS Silesia for New York
under Capt. Albers he travled steerage. He traveled together with Martin
Grutzmacher aged 33,worker.

If this information is familiar to any one please contact me.

Albert Singer Schenectady,New York <al2chris@worldnet.att.net>

MODERATOR NOTE- The moderator has edited the text above to correct many errors
in grammar and punctuation. Our list rules require that messages >from native
English speakers observe conventional rules for writing English. Unlike many
discussion groups, GerSIG does not allow internet slang in this Forum.
Only the last names (family names / surnames) of research subjects and their
relatives may be typed in ALL CAPITAL LETTERS. MOD 1 Our list rules
are stated in the Intro / Welcome letter sent to all new members and found
at our website: http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/email.htm MOD 1


Re: The name "Baba" #romania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Claire Stuart posted as follows on the rom-sig mailing list:

"In searching Kishinev birth records, I found the
birth of a baby girl
named Baba, born the same day as my great-uncle to
the same named
parents, so presumably she was a twin."

The Yiddish name Baba/Boba/Buba/... was the term/name used for a
grandmother. In cases where a newborn infant girl was born, and her health
was poor, or some other related reason applied, the name was given to her
in order to ward off bad occurrences. The term was widely used throughout
Eastern Europe, and some other parts of Europe as well, sometimes being
used as a kinui (legal alias) for a Hebrew name -- AnyHebrewName haMechuna
Baba ("haMechuna" means "alias").

There may also have been other reasons why this name was given to a newborn
girl, and one of them might have been applicable here.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Romania SIG #Romania Re: The name "Baba" #romania

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Claire Stuart posted as follows on the rom-sig mailing list:

"In searching Kishinev birth records, I found the
birth of a baby girl
named Baba, born the same day as my great-uncle to
the same named
parents, so presumably she was a twin."

The Yiddish name Baba/Boba/Buba/... was the term/name used for a
grandmother. In cases where a newborn infant girl was born, and her health
was poor, or some other related reason applied, the name was given to her
in order to ward off bad occurrences. The term was widely used throughout
Eastern Europe, and some other parts of Europe as well, sometimes being
used as a kinui (legal alias) for a Hebrew name -- AnyHebrewName haMechuna
Baba ("haMechuna" means "alias").

There may also have been other reasons why this name was given to a newborn
girl, and one of them might have been applicable here.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Re: German American Heritage Society of Pittsburgh,PA #germany

Dov & Varda <yknow@...>
 

Pat Weinthal wrote: <Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is home to diverse cultural
groups, including a large and vibrant community with German heritage.
This article in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette describes the activities,
which includes genealogical lectures, offered by the local chapter of the
German-American National Congress or Deutsches-Amerikanisches National Kongress.>

This article has no references to Jewish German heritage, so I'm not sure
this genealogy group has value for those researching Jewish roots in Germany.

Varda Epstein Efrat Israel <yknow@netvision.net.il>


German SIG #Germany Re: German American Heritage Society of Pittsburgh,PA #germany

Dov & Varda <yknow@...>
 

Pat Weinthal wrote: <Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is home to diverse cultural
groups, including a large and vibrant community with German heritage.
This article in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette describes the activities,
which includes genealogical lectures, offered by the local chapter of the
German-American National Congress or Deutsches-Amerikanisches National Kongress.>

This article has no references to Jewish German heritage, so I'm not sure
this genealogy group has value for those researching Jewish roots in Germany.

Varda Epstein Efrat Israel <yknow@netvision.net.il>


BAMBERGER - Frankfurt #germany

ddshapiro@...
 

I have been reviewing my records, and I see that I have overlooked a
very important detail in my BAMBERGER line.

My ggggrandfather was Isaac (son of) Abraham BAMBERGER. Born April 1806.

In 1851 he and his family left Bavaria and settled in Syracuse, N.Y.
His wife Caroline is recorded in her headstone as Grenele bas
Eliyahu, born 9 May 1809 in Frankfurt. (I have been told that there
was no Jewish birth recorded in Frankfurt for that date, so she may
have been >from a small town in the vicinity). I have learned that at
least one of Isaac's two children was born in Himmelstadt, and I had
assumed that Isaac was also >from that town in Unterfranken. (Lower Franconia)

His two brothers, Raphael born 1816 in Bavaria, and Samson born 1811
in Bavaria preceded Isaac to Syracuse.

Now I have noticed that in both the 1880 census and in cemetery
records, Isaac's birthplace is given as Frankfurt. Previously I had
seen each of these separately and assumed that it was an erroroneous
assumption since his wife was >from Frankfurt. Now seeing the two
records together suggests to me that they may be correct, and other
records mentioning Bavaria were referring to his last residence in
Europe rather than his place of birth. If this is correct then
Isaac's parents left Frankfurt for Bavaria between 1806 and 1811.

So can anyone suggest where I could find information on a BAMBERGER
family >from Frankfurt for that period, or a listing of births in
Frankfurt for 1806 (and 1809)?

David Shapiro Jerusalem ddshapiro@bezeqint.net


German SIG #Germany BAMBERGER - Frankfurt #germany

ddshapiro@...
 

I have been reviewing my records, and I see that I have overlooked a
very important detail in my BAMBERGER line.

My ggggrandfather was Isaac (son of) Abraham BAMBERGER. Born April 1806.

In 1851 he and his family left Bavaria and settled in Syracuse, N.Y.
His wife Caroline is recorded in her headstone as Grenele bas
Eliyahu, born 9 May 1809 in Frankfurt. (I have been told that there
was no Jewish birth recorded in Frankfurt for that date, so she may
have been >from a small town in the vicinity). I have learned that at
least one of Isaac's two children was born in Himmelstadt, and I had
assumed that Isaac was also >from that town in Unterfranken. (Lower Franconia)

His two brothers, Raphael born 1816 in Bavaria, and Samson born 1811
in Bavaria preceded Isaac to Syracuse.

Now I have noticed that in both the 1880 census and in cemetery
records, Isaac's birthplace is given as Frankfurt. Previously I had
seen each of these separately and assumed that it was an erroroneous
assumption since his wife was >from Frankfurt. Now seeing the two
records together suggests to me that they may be correct, and other
records mentioning Bavaria were referring to his last residence in
Europe rather than his place of birth. If this is correct then
Isaac's parents left Frankfurt for Bavaria between 1806 and 1811.

So can anyone suggest where I could find information on a BAMBERGER
family >from Frankfurt for that period, or a listing of births in
Frankfurt for 1806 (and 1809)?

David Shapiro Jerusalem ddshapiro@bezeqint.net


Re: Slovakian Death records #hungary

Bob Lenk
 

Dear Sam,

I just heard >from the Slovak Consulate that for older records (before
about 1895) you do need to send the application for "Genealogical
Research" directly to the archives. Apparently they sent my request to
Slovakia, and heard back.

The woman who called did not know about returning the payment I sent
them. She said she will check with the finance people and call me back.

I hope I did not create extra work or delay for you, and apologize if I did.

Bob Lenk


Sam Schleman wrote:

Dear Bob;

Thanks so much for your response. This was very helpful and I will be
sending off my form shortly.

Best wishes,

Sam

----- Original Message ----- From: "Bob Lenk" <boblenk@frii.com>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2006 1:40 AM
Subject: Re: [h-sig] Slovakian Death records


At the website of the Slovak Embassy (to the US) there are
applications for birth, marriage, and death certificates. These can
be sent with payment and a photocopy of your driver's licence or
passport, to the Embassy or one of the Consulates, depending on where
in the US you live (instructions are on the forms). These forms
require that you know the date and location of the
birth/death/marriage. Otherwise, there is a form for genealogical
research, which is a different process (form sent to the archives, who
bill you before sending results).

Links to all these forms are at:

http://www.slovakembassy-us.org/application%20for.html

The forms are in English and Slovak. I recently sent in a request for
a birth certificate. I asked how long it would take, and they told me
about 3 months.

Bob Lenk
Greeley, Colorado, US

Sam Schleman wrote:

Hello all;

I need to obtain the death record of someone >from the town of Vel'ka
Ida, which was in Hungary, but now is part of Slovakia, >from near
Kosice/Kassa. The record in question is >from the period 1896-99.

I have an address, but am wondering what is the protocol? It is
acceptable to write the letter requesting the record in English? Do I
include money now or will I be asked for money at some subsequent point?

And about how long a process is it to obtain such a record?

Your help is greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

Sam Schleman
Malvern, PA
Samara99@comcast.net


Slovak Archives Correspondence - VM7585 #hungary

Rebecca Fenning <rutabegatree@...>
 

Hi all,

I received a letter >from the Slovak Archives in response to my
research request, but am not really sure what it says. I have posted
it at ViewMate (VM7585; http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/
viewmateview.asp?key=7585 )
and would appreciate any help in translating it.

Please respond privately.

Thank you,
Rebecca Fenning
Boston, Mass.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Slovakian Death records #hungary

Bob Lenk
 

Dear Sam,

I just heard >from the Slovak Consulate that for older records (before
about 1895) you do need to send the application for "Genealogical
Research" directly to the archives. Apparently they sent my request to
Slovakia, and heard back.

The woman who called did not know about returning the payment I sent
them. She said she will check with the finance people and call me back.

I hope I did not create extra work or delay for you, and apologize if I did.

Bob Lenk


Sam Schleman wrote:

Dear Bob;

Thanks so much for your response. This was very helpful and I will be
sending off my form shortly.

Best wishes,

Sam

----- Original Message ----- From: "Bob Lenk" <boblenk@frii.com>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2006 1:40 AM
Subject: Re: [h-sig] Slovakian Death records


At the website of the Slovak Embassy (to the US) there are
applications for birth, marriage, and death certificates. These can
be sent with payment and a photocopy of your driver's licence or
passport, to the Embassy or one of the Consulates, depending on where
in the US you live (instructions are on the forms). These forms
require that you know the date and location of the
birth/death/marriage. Otherwise, there is a form for genealogical
research, which is a different process (form sent to the archives, who
bill you before sending results).

Links to all these forms are at:

http://www.slovakembassy-us.org/application%20for.html

The forms are in English and Slovak. I recently sent in a request for
a birth certificate. I asked how long it would take, and they told me
about 3 months.

Bob Lenk
Greeley, Colorado, US

Sam Schleman wrote:

Hello all;

I need to obtain the death record of someone >from the town of Vel'ka
Ida, which was in Hungary, but now is part of Slovakia, >from near
Kosice/Kassa. The record in question is >from the period 1896-99.

I have an address, but am wondering what is the protocol? It is
acceptable to write the letter requesting the record in English? Do I
include money now or will I be asked for money at some subsequent point?

And about how long a process is it to obtain such a record?

Your help is greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

Sam Schleman
Malvern, PA
Samara99@comcast.net


Hungary SIG #Hungary Slovak Archives Correspondence - VM7585 #hungary

Rebecca Fenning <rutabegatree@...>
 

Hi all,

I received a letter >from the Slovak Archives in response to my
research request, but am not really sure what it says. I have posted
it at ViewMate (VM7585; http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/
viewmateview.asp?key=7585 )
and would appreciate any help in translating it.

Please respond privately.

Thank you,
Rebecca Fenning
Boston, Mass.


Re: thanks for everyone's help with Jewish business inquiry #germany

Chloe2000@...
 

I wanted to thank everyone who responded to my inquiry about Jewish businesses in
Berlin. I have received many wonderful responses leading me to other interesting
information that have opened doors to new family history information. I am most
grateful for everyone's help and their direction to previously unknown resources.

Due to this wonderful assistance, I have been able to locate the listing of the
business in several years worth of the Berlin address directories online. This is
very exciting and I am now on a search for further information and maybe a photo.

Thanks again. Jill Newmark, Washington, DC Chloe2000@aol.com


Re: New Film-Hungarian Holocaust --- OH NO !!! Not Fateless - Sorstalan #hungary

Eloedfamily@...
 

I saw the film. I read the book both in Hungarian and English. It baffles
me, how this ever received the Nobel prize.
His Hungarian style is below literary values. His portrayal of the entire
Holocaust experience to me sounds like someone elses memories recalled. The
Film: a low budget unrealistic portrayal.
My overall impression: Author Kertesz who spent large part of his life in
Germany, created something here that is both anti-Hungarian, and a
justification for those who deny that the Holocaust ever happened. I wonder,.....

There are many well written stories, realistically dealing with the subject
in books and in films about the effect of the Holocaust on the Hungarian
Jewish life. "Fateless" / "Sorstalansag" is the worst by any definition.

Leslie Eloed
California, USA
leloed @ aol.com

In a message dated 2/6/2006 10:41:02 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
gsvatos@hotmail.com writes:
Today the film "Fateless" opens in Canada. It is based on the book
(Fatelessness) by Imre Kertesz... about his experiences in the camps. So
far it has had very positive reviews.

Gabi

Gabriela Svatos
Richmond Hill, Ontario
E-mail: gsvatos@hotmail.com
Business E-mail: bookstore@agawa.com
Business URL: www.abe.com/home/GSVATOS

Moderator: I have approved this message as a response to the initial comments regarding positive reviews of this film. Please limit future comments to evaluations of the film as a resource for those doing Hungarian Jewish family research.


German SIG #Germany re: thanks for everyone's help with Jewish business inquiry #germany

Chloe2000@...
 

I wanted to thank everyone who responded to my inquiry about Jewish businesses in
Berlin. I have received many wonderful responses leading me to other interesting
information that have opened doors to new family history information. I am most
grateful for everyone's help and their direction to previously unknown resources.

Due to this wonderful assistance, I have been able to locate the listing of the
business in several years worth of the Berlin address directories online. This is
very exciting and I am now on a search for further information and maybe a photo.

Thanks again. Jill Newmark, Washington, DC Chloe2000@aol.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: New Film-Hungarian Holocaust --- OH NO !!! Not Fateless - Sorstalan #hungary

Eloedfamily@...
 

I saw the film. I read the book both in Hungarian and English. It baffles
me, how this ever received the Nobel prize.
His Hungarian style is below literary values. His portrayal of the entire
Holocaust experience to me sounds like someone elses memories recalled. The
Film: a low budget unrealistic portrayal.
My overall impression: Author Kertesz who spent large part of his life in
Germany, created something here that is both anti-Hungarian, and a
justification for those who deny that the Holocaust ever happened. I wonder,.....

There are many well written stories, realistically dealing with the subject
in books and in films about the effect of the Holocaust on the Hungarian
Jewish life. "Fateless" / "Sorstalansag" is the worst by any definition.

Leslie Eloed
California, USA
leloed @ aol.com

In a message dated 2/6/2006 10:41:02 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
gsvatos@hotmail.com writes:
Today the film "Fateless" opens in Canada. It is based on the book
(Fatelessness) by Imre Kertesz... about his experiences in the camps. So
far it has had very positive reviews.

Gabi

Gabriela Svatos
Richmond Hill, Ontario
E-mail: gsvatos@hotmail.com
Business E-mail: bookstore@agawa.com
Business URL: www.abe.com/home/GSVATOS

Moderator: I have approved this message as a response to the initial comments regarding positive reviews of this film. Please limit future comments to evaluations of the film as a resource for those doing Hungarian Jewish family research.


Re: Seeking information on Viss, Hungary #hungary

Doug Cohen
 

According to Where Once We Walked, Viss Hungary had a prewar Jewish
population of 19. located 56 km ENE of Miskolc at 48o13'/21o31'


Doug Cohen
Lexington, MA
dmc@dmcohen.com

----- Original Message -----
From: "Leslie Weinberg" <lbw50@optonline.net>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2006 2:04 AM
Subject: [h-sig] Seeking information on Viss, Hungary


I have just learned that my maternal great-grandfather came to Oradea,
Romania, >from Viss, Hungary. Can anyone tell me where this is and what it
is like? Thank you, Leslie Weinberg


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Seeking information on Viss, Hungary #hungary

Doug Cohen
 

According to Where Once We Walked, Viss Hungary had a prewar Jewish
population of 19. located 56 km ENE of Miskolc at 48o13'/21o31'


Doug Cohen
Lexington, MA
dmc@dmcohen.com

----- Original Message -----
From: "Leslie Weinberg" <lbw50@optonline.net>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2006 2:04 AM
Subject: [h-sig] Seeking information on Viss, Hungary


I have just learned that my maternal great-grandfather came to Oradea,
Romania, >from Viss, Hungary. Can anyone tell me where this is and what it
is like? Thank you, Leslie Weinberg


Re: Klein vs Kohn #hungary

Katz, Itzik <Itzik.Katz@...>
 

The most common variations for Kohanim surnames are (but not limited
to):
Kohn
Kun
Kohen
Kahan
Cahan
Kahanov
Cahanov
Ha'Kohen
Katz
Kacs
Kagan
Kaplan
Caplan
Kaplanski
Kaplansky
Katzman
Katzmann
Katzanelson
Katzenelson
Katzenbaum

And so on and so forth.

I have learned that sometimes, although not so common, during the
surname Gremanization process Kohanim picked other surnames that don't
sound or remind the Kohen name such as, Gottdiener, Kardos, Kovacs to
name a few. For example, Rabbi Shimson Eliezer Katz Gottdiener who appears in "Shem Hagdolim" by
Pinhas Zelig Schwartz.

Samuel Katz Kardos, husband of Johana Benet (Daughter of Rabbi Marcus
Bendeickt aka Mordechai Benet) Joel Kovacs >from my family and a relative of the reputable Bela Kun (who
led the Communist revolution in Hungary in 1919) whose original surname
was Kun but he changed it to sound more Hungarian.

Although Klein is often coming >from the German word for "small" or
"short" there are few Klein who are also Kohanim.

Isaac Katz
Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: SFeuerstein [mailto:ethnoca@yahoo.ca]=20
Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2006 9:37 AM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Klein vs Kohn

Subject: Re: Hajduboszormeny
From: tom klein <h-sig@ecologicaltech.com>
=20
among other theories, it probably originated as a
version of "hakohen", so you might find that your
KLEIN family are kohanim.
Theoretically possible, but not too probable. Klein
means small or short, very common in Germanic areas,
just as Kis(s) is very common in Hungary. I found
that kohanim were overwhelmingly called Kohn's.

Sarah Feuerstein


Re: Female first name(s) of "Katrina"/"Rina" #hungary

Gábor Hirsch <g_hirsch@...>
 

In my "Magyar Utonevek (Hungarian givennames)" book >from Lado Janos neither
Rina nor Katrina or Katarina are mentioned, but Kata and Katalin where they
are both mentioned as the abreviation or modification of the German
Katharina, nickname was Kati.

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch

--- Ursprüngliche Nachricht ---
Von: HeyJudy123@aol.com
An: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Betreff: [h-sig] Female first name(s) of "Katrina"/"Rina"
Datum: Tue, 28 Feb 2006 16:03:27 EST

George FARKAS asks about the use of the first name(s) "Katrina" and/ or
"Rina" for Hungarian Jewish women, as well as any Hebrew equivalents.

I believe that "Katie" was a very popular name for Jewish women in
Hungary, and "Katie" easily could be a nickname for "Katrina."

We had several women named "Katie" on the Hungarian side of my mother's
family.

All of them bore the Hebrew/ Yiddish name of "Gittie" (or "Gittel") in
addition.

Interestingly, some of these women changed their first names >from
"Katie" to "Gisella," presumably to modernize, and also in what
presumably is an allusion to the Hebrew/ Yiddish name of "Gittie."

Judy SEGAL
New York City USA