Date   

JC archives #unitedkingdom

Sarah hyams <shyamsdc@...>
 

I suggest people try libraries. I know for sure that the library at the US
Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC has the Jewish Chronicle on
microfilm.

Sarah Hyams


JC archives #unitedkingdom

Sarah hyams <shyamsdc@...>
 

It may be worth checking your local library for copies of the Jewish
Chronicle. Here in Washington, DC, one can view past editions on microfilm
at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum library. No way to search,
unfortunately.

Sarah Hyams
Washington, DC


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom JC archives #unitedkingdom

Sarah hyams <shyamsdc@...>
 

I suggest people try libraries. I know for sure that the library at the US
Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC has the Jewish Chronicle on
microfilm.

Sarah Hyams


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom JC archives #unitedkingdom

Sarah hyams <shyamsdc@...>
 

It may be worth checking your local library for copies of the Jewish
Chronicle. Here in Washington, DC, one can view past editions on microfilm
at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum library. No way to search,
unfortunately.

Sarah Hyams
Washington, DC


TRAVNICSEK=MEZEI #hungary

Patricia J Weisshaus <patjw28@...>
 

When I was researching a family in Kalocsa,in the Family History Library
microfilms, I found people with the surname Travnicsek, but in the margin,
it was written that the name was changed to Mezei and gave the date of 1895
for the changes and the registration number. The Mezei name is a very
common name in Hungary, and Travnicsek is a Czech name. The father probably
wanted to sound more Hungarian and thus the official name change.

When the marriage between Jozef Furst and Regi Travnicsek took place in
1893, she is listed as "Travnicsek also known as Mezei," and her father is
shown as Bernad "Mezei."

Pat Weisshaus
New Hampshire

At 08:25 AM 3/3/2006, Tom Venetianer wrote:
Dear Georges and all,

The best way to check similar spellings or pronouncing is to submit them
to Soundex codes comparison. In this case:

TSARFATI
Daitch-Mokotoff: 497300
NARA: T261

SARFATI
Daitch-Mokotoff: 497300
NARA: S613

SZARVADY
Daitch-Mokotoff: 497300
NARA: S613

In other words, there is a *high possibility* that both surnames belonged
to the same family, BUT...

... but, we all know that the "hungarization" of foreign names didn't
follow any logical rules. So, even given the evidence above, I would
suggest that your friend searches for documentation that this change
indeed occurred.

The Mormons have a film of the book below:
Sza'zadunk Ne'vva'ltoztata'sai
(this century's changes of names)
a book published by Viktor Hornyanszky in 1895, which contains thousands
of surnames of people who "hungarized" their names >from 1800 to 1893.

Regards
<snip>

Moderator: Moderator has revised subject line to reflect the content of the message. Please use appropriate subject lines and make sure to capitalize all surnames.


Hungary SIG #Hungary TRAVNICSEK=MEZEI #hungary

Patricia J Weisshaus <patjw28@...>
 

When I was researching a family in Kalocsa,in the Family History Library
microfilms, I found people with the surname Travnicsek, but in the margin,
it was written that the name was changed to Mezei and gave the date of 1895
for the changes and the registration number. The Mezei name is a very
common name in Hungary, and Travnicsek is a Czech name. The father probably
wanted to sound more Hungarian and thus the official name change.

When the marriage between Jozef Furst and Regi Travnicsek took place in
1893, she is listed as "Travnicsek also known as Mezei," and her father is
shown as Bernad "Mezei."

Pat Weisshaus
New Hampshire

At 08:25 AM 3/3/2006, Tom Venetianer wrote:
Dear Georges and all,

The best way to check similar spellings or pronouncing is to submit them
to Soundex codes comparison. In this case:

TSARFATI
Daitch-Mokotoff: 497300
NARA: T261

SARFATI
Daitch-Mokotoff: 497300
NARA: S613

SZARVADY
Daitch-Mokotoff: 497300
NARA: S613

In other words, there is a *high possibility* that both surnames belonged
to the same family, BUT...

... but, we all know that the "hungarization" of foreign names didn't
follow any logical rules. So, even given the evidence above, I would
suggest that your friend searches for documentation that this change
indeed occurred.

The Mormons have a film of the book below:
Sza'zadunk Ne'vva'ltoztata'sai
(this century's changes of names)
a book published by Viktor Hornyanszky in 1895, which contains thousands
of surnames of people who "hungarized" their names >from 1800 to 1893.

Regards
<snip>

Moderator: Moderator has revised subject line to reflect the content of the message. Please use appropriate subject lines and make sure to capitalize all surnames.


Hungarian Jews in Theresienstadt #hungary

Henry Wellisch <henry.kelwel@...>
 

The recently published book on Austrian Jews who were deported to
Theresinstadt has a list of Jews >from Hungary who arrived there in the
last days of the war. They had originaly been deported to Austria.
1072 arrived in Theresienstadt on March 8, 1945 >from a labour camp in
Strasshof, near Vienna
77 arrived in Theresienstadt on April 15, 1945 >from Amstetten in Lower
Austria 70 miles west of Vienna.
Of these 1149 persons 13 died in Theresienstadt, 1134 survived and the
fate of two is not clear. These people came mostly >from the Ghettos of
Szolnok, Szeged, Baja and Debrecen.
Starting around April 15, 1945 about 15,000 Persons arrived in
Theresienstadt >from concentration camps, which had been evacuated by
the Germans. There may have been Hungarian Jews amongst therm, but it
is not clear if lists of these people exist.

Henry Wellisch
Toronto


Conference Resource Room material request #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

This message is posted on behalf of the IAJGS Conference Committee.

The Jewish Genealogical Society of NYC, Inc., will host the 26th Annual
Conference on Jewish Genealogy in New York City, August 13 - 18, 2006.
A highlight of the Conference will be the Resource Room located at the
Conference hotel. In addition to providing the Conference attendees
with an "on-site" basic research library, the Resource Room will
showcase research projects >from Jewish genealogical organizations and
societies, their members, and independent researchers throughout the
world. The Resource Room Committee is requesting contributions of
genealogical materials, which would be useful and informative to the
Conference attendees, especially those that are unique or unusual,
including works-in-progress and pre-release databases. In particular,
the Committee is requesting printed or computerized copies of indexes,
databases, unpublished manuscripts and private collections, in addition
to commercially published books and maps.

All hard-copy materials loaned to the Resource Room should be bound
(i.e. no loose papers) and will be returned immediately after the
Conference has ended. Material in electronic form and computer
databases should be compatible with Microsoft Office programs. If you
have materials to contribute to the Resource Room, please send a
description of those items to the Committee at resources@jgsny2006.org
or the address below as soon as convenient so we can proceed with our
planning. The Resource Room Committee will contact all contributors
regarding arrangements to obtain the materials prior to the Conference
and to return them afterwards. Be assured that appropriate security
measures will be taken to protect all loaned resources, however please
provide copies of your material, not the originals.

The Resource Room will also host the volunteer translators. If you can
spend a few hours during the Conference to help attendees translate
their materials, please let us know which languages you can translate,
and we will set up a schedule convenient to you.

Any further inquiries should be addressed to the Resource Room
Committee at resources@jgsny2006.org
Stew Driller,
Michael Pertain,
Co-Chairman, Resource Room Committee


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian Jews in Theresienstadt #hungary

Henry Wellisch <henry.kelwel@...>
 

The recently published book on Austrian Jews who were deported to
Theresinstadt has a list of Jews >from Hungary who arrived there in the
last days of the war. They had originaly been deported to Austria.
1072 arrived in Theresienstadt on March 8, 1945 >from a labour camp in
Strasshof, near Vienna
77 arrived in Theresienstadt on April 15, 1945 >from Amstetten in Lower
Austria 70 miles west of Vienna.
Of these 1149 persons 13 died in Theresienstadt, 1134 survived and the
fate of two is not clear. These people came mostly >from the Ghettos of
Szolnok, Szeged, Baja and Debrecen.
Starting around April 15, 1945 about 15,000 Persons arrived in
Theresienstadt >from concentration camps, which had been evacuated by
the Germans. There may have been Hungarian Jews amongst therm, but it
is not clear if lists of these people exist.

Henry Wellisch
Toronto


Hungary SIG #Hungary Conference Resource Room material request #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

This message is posted on behalf of the IAJGS Conference Committee.

The Jewish Genealogical Society of NYC, Inc., will host the 26th Annual
Conference on Jewish Genealogy in New York City, August 13 - 18, 2006.
A highlight of the Conference will be the Resource Room located at the
Conference hotel. In addition to providing the Conference attendees
with an "on-site" basic research library, the Resource Room will
showcase research projects >from Jewish genealogical organizations and
societies, their members, and independent researchers throughout the
world. The Resource Room Committee is requesting contributions of
genealogical materials, which would be useful and informative to the
Conference attendees, especially those that are unique or unusual,
including works-in-progress and pre-release databases. In particular,
the Committee is requesting printed or computerized copies of indexes,
databases, unpublished manuscripts and private collections, in addition
to commercially published books and maps.

All hard-copy materials loaned to the Resource Room should be bound
(i.e. no loose papers) and will be returned immediately after the
Conference has ended. Material in electronic form and computer
databases should be compatible with Microsoft Office programs. If you
have materials to contribute to the Resource Room, please send a
description of those items to the Committee at resources@jgsny2006.org
or the address below as soon as convenient so we can proceed with our
planning. The Resource Room Committee will contact all contributors
regarding arrangements to obtain the materials prior to the Conference
and to return them afterwards. Be assured that appropriate security
measures will be taken to protect all loaned resources, however please
provide copies of your material, not the originals.

The Resource Room will also host the volunteer translators. If you can
spend a few hours during the Conference to help attendees translate
their materials, please let us know which languages you can translate,
and we will set up a schedule convenient to you.

Any further inquiries should be addressed to the Resource Room
Committee at resources@jgsny2006.org
Stew Driller,
Michael Pertain,
Co-Chairman, Resource Room Committee


Re: Female first name(s) of "Katrina"/"Rina" #hungary

George Farkas <gfarkas@...>
 

Thank you to all who answered.

In my mother's family which came >from Slovakia, most members were trilingual
speaking Hungarian and German as well as Slovak. In my father's family which
comes >from eastern Hungary and Transylvania, there was less German and no
Slovak, but a greater tendency to have a familiarity (if not fluency)
in yiddish.

There seems to be a rather low relationship between Jewish (Hebrew and Yiddish)
names and the non-Jewish (Slovak, Hungarian and German) names.

Today, when most of the family has emigrated >from that region, the
younger generation
is trying to name children after members of the family without become loyal
to the actual name. E.g., Gittel became Tova, Katarina became Rina, Mordecai
became Morris.

This is a conclusion based on selective family evidence and not on
real statistical basis.
I do not think that this conflicts with the answers I have received.
Any comments?

George

George Farkas
Montreal, Canada


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re:Female first name(s) of "Katrina"/"Rina" #hungary

George Farkas <gfarkas@...>
 

Thank you to all who answered.

In my mother's family which came >from Slovakia, most members were trilingual
speaking Hungarian and German as well as Slovak. In my father's family which
comes >from eastern Hungary and Transylvania, there was less German and no
Slovak, but a greater tendency to have a familiarity (if not fluency)
in yiddish.

There seems to be a rather low relationship between Jewish (Hebrew and Yiddish)
names and the non-Jewish (Slovak, Hungarian and German) names.

Today, when most of the family has emigrated >from that region, the
younger generation
is trying to name children after members of the family without become loyal
to the actual name. E.g., Gittel became Tova, Katarina became Rina, Mordecai
became Morris.

This is a conclusion based on selective family evidence and not on
real statistical basis.
I do not think that this conflicts with the answers I have received.
Any comments?

George

George Farkas
Montreal, Canada


Re: SZARVADY #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

I guess anything is possible, but...

(others on the list have already covered the likely origin of SZARVADY >from a place name of szarvad.)

the other half of the question is the name TSARFATI: in hebrew it translates as "french" (which is probably at least part of georges' interest in it), and i believe it was used predominantly among sephardic jews to denote a person that came >from an ashkenazic background, since france ("tsarfat") and germany ("ashkenaz") were the roots of ashkenazic jewry. like so many other names, it would only have been applied where the majority were something other, so in this case, it is mainly found in sephardic communities. (but people did not stay in one place forever, so it can, and probably does, occur elsewhere.)

in light of the simpler toponymic explanation, i don't think it's very likely to be the origin, but anything is possible. (such as my KLEIN family changing their name to KOSZEGI or KUTI, for example, even though they didn't live anywhere near koszeg or kut.)


....... Tom Klein, Toronto

Georges [mailto:georges.graner@wanadoo.fr] wrote:

Hello Siggers,
One of my French friends asks whether SZARVADY is or might be a
magyarization of TSARFATI ?
What do you think ?

Georges GRANER (Paris, France)


Re: Grauer/Takobotiz in Homonna/Humenne #hungary

Julie or Tom Lockwood <Mahana@...>
 

My grandmother was born in or around Homonna in 1867 to Moritz Grauer and
Lara (Sara) Takobovitz. This summer I plan to go to Slovakia to Humenne.
I'm seeking suggestions as to how best to locate what might have been the
Jewish quarter in the mid 1800s, and how best to look for information with
respect to Grauer and Takobovitz. (Also, if anyone has traveled >from
Budapest to Humenne information in that regard would also be helpful.)
Researching GRAUER, TAKOBOVITZ, KIRSCH, FINKELMAN.

Julie Lockwood


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: SZARVADY #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

I guess anything is possible, but...

(others on the list have already covered the likely origin of SZARVADY >from a place name of szarvad.)

the other half of the question is the name TSARFATI: in hebrew it translates as "french" (which is probably at least part of georges' interest in it), and i believe it was used predominantly among sephardic jews to denote a person that came >from an ashkenazic background, since france ("tsarfat") and germany ("ashkenaz") were the roots of ashkenazic jewry. like so many other names, it would only have been applied where the majority were something other, so in this case, it is mainly found in sephardic communities. (but people did not stay in one place forever, so it can, and probably does, occur elsewhere.)

in light of the simpler toponymic explanation, i don't think it's very likely to be the origin, but anything is possible. (such as my KLEIN family changing their name to KOSZEGI or KUTI, for example, even though they didn't live anywhere near koszeg or kut.)


....... Tom Klein, Toronto

Georges [mailto:georges.graner@wanadoo.fr] wrote:

Hello Siggers,
One of my French friends asks whether SZARVADY is or might be a
magyarization of TSARFATI ?
What do you think ?

Georges GRANER (Paris, France)


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re:Grauer/Takobotiz in Homonna/Humenne #hungary

Julie or Tom Lockwood <Mahana@...>
 

My grandmother was born in or around Homonna in 1867 to Moritz Grauer and
Lara (Sara) Takobovitz. This summer I plan to go to Slovakia to Humenne.
I'm seeking suggestions as to how best to locate what might have been the
Jewish quarter in the mid 1800s, and how best to look for information with
respect to Grauer and Takobovitz. (Also, if anyone has traveled >from
Budapest to Humenne information in that regard would also be helpful.)
Researching GRAUER, TAKOBOVITZ, KIRSCH, FINKELMAN.

Julie Lockwood


Re: *re: SZARVADY #hungary

Robert Neu
 

Though I don't have the reference handy, this book is
also available on line.

Robert Neu

--- Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@uol.com.br> wrote:

Dear Georges and all,

The best way to check similar spellings or
pronouncing is to submit them to Soundex codes
comparison. In this case:

TSARFATI
Daitch-Mokotoff: 497300
NARA: T261

SARFATI
Daitch-Mokotoff: 497300
NARA: S613

SZARVADY
Daitch-Mokotoff: 497300
NARA: S613

In other words, there is a *high possibility* that
both surnames belonged to the same family, BUT...

... but, we all know that the "hungarization" of
foreign names didn't follow any logical rules. So,
even given the evidence above, I would suggest that
your friend searches for documentation that this
change indeed occurred.

The Mormons have a film of the book below:
Sza'zadunk Ne'vva'ltoztata'sai
(this century's changes of names)
a book published by Viktor Hornyanszky in 1895,
which contains thousands of surnames of people who
"hungarized" their names >from 1800 to 1893.

Regards
Tom

At 00:00 -0600 03.03.2006, georges.graner@wanadoo.fr
wrote:
Subject: SZARVADY
From: georges <georges.graner@wanadoo.fr>
Date: Thu, 02 Mar 2006 08:34:06 +0100
X-Message-Number: 2

Hello Siggers,
One of my French friends asks whether SZARVADY is
or might be a
magyarization of TSARFATI ?
What do you think ?

Georges GRANER (Paris, France)
georges.graner@wanadoo.fr
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: *re: SZARVADY #hungary

Robert Neu
 

Though I don't have the reference handy, this book is
also available on line.

Robert Neu

--- Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@uol.com.br> wrote:

Dear Georges and all,

The best way to check similar spellings or
pronouncing is to submit them to Soundex codes
comparison. In this case:

TSARFATI
Daitch-Mokotoff: 497300
NARA: T261

SARFATI
Daitch-Mokotoff: 497300
NARA: S613

SZARVADY
Daitch-Mokotoff: 497300
NARA: S613

In other words, there is a *high possibility* that
both surnames belonged to the same family, BUT...

... but, we all know that the "hungarization" of
foreign names didn't follow any logical rules. So,
even given the evidence above, I would suggest that
your friend searches for documentation that this
change indeed occurred.

The Mormons have a film of the book below:
Sza'zadunk Ne'vva'ltoztata'sai
(this century's changes of names)
a book published by Viktor Hornyanszky in 1895,
which contains thousands of surnames of people who
"hungarized" their names >from 1800 to 1893.

Regards
Tom

At 00:00 -0600 03.03.2006, georges.graner@wanadoo.fr
wrote:
Subject: SZARVADY
From: georges <georges.graner@wanadoo.fr>
Date: Thu, 02 Mar 2006 08:34:06 +0100
X-Message-Number: 2

Hello Siggers,
One of my French friends asks whether SZARVADY is
or might be a
magyarization of TSARFATI ?
What do you think ?

Georges GRANER (Paris, France)
georges.graner@wanadoo.fr
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Re: Seeking information on Viss, Hungary #hungary

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

Hi,

Viss is a village in Zemplen county, SE of Satoraljujhely with about 750
inhabitants.

HTH
Actually Viss is in Szabolcs County. The vital records for Viss were kept by
the Rabbi >from Gava (now Gavavenscello) and have recently been added to the
AHD.

Sam Schleman
Malvern, PA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: re:Seeking information on Viss, Hungary #hungary

Sam Schleman <Samara99@...>
 

Hi,

Viss is a village in Zemplen county, SE of Satoraljujhely with about 750
inhabitants.

HTH
Actually Viss is in Szabolcs County. The vital records for Viss were kept by
the Rabbi >from Gava (now Gavavenscello) and have recently been added to the
AHD.

Sam Schleman
Malvern, PA