Date   

Re: Name of synagogue on the Lower East Side #general

Paul NMN B
 

Mark Ross,

You asked about a synagogue on Rivington Street, between Lewis and
Goerick Streets; according to 'Lower Eastside Tourbook' by Israelowitz,
the buildings on Rivington Street between Lewis and Goerick have
address' >from 304-321.

The books listing of synagogues on Rivington Street go no higher than
building # 263. The book covers the time period you mention in your
inquiry.

Paul Baranik
Searching: AGATA/AGATER, BAUM, GLASSMAN: Klimontow, Staszow, Warsaw,
Ostrowiec, Lodz

Mark Ross wrote:

Dear Genners:

I'm trying to learn the name of the synagogue that used to be located on
Rivington St., between Lewis and Goerick Street (closer to Goerick). I know
it was there in the 1930's and l940's, possibly in the l950's as well. I
don't know about the later periods.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Name of synagogue on the Lower East Side #general

Paul NMN B
 

Mark Ross,

You asked about a synagogue on Rivington Street, between Lewis and
Goerick Streets; according to 'Lower Eastside Tourbook' by Israelowitz,
the buildings on Rivington Street between Lewis and Goerick have
address' >from 304-321.

The books listing of synagogues on Rivington Street go no higher than
building # 263. The book covers the time period you mention in your
inquiry.

Paul Baranik
Searching: AGATA/AGATER, BAUM, GLASSMAN: Klimontow, Staszow, Warsaw,
Ostrowiec, Lodz

Mark Ross wrote:

Dear Genners:

I'm trying to learn the name of the synagogue that used to be located on
Rivington St., between Lewis and Goerick Street (closer to Goerick). I know
it was there in the 1930's and l940's, possibly in the l950's as well. I
don't know about the later periods.


Re: Hungarian help on Viewmate #hungary

Gabriela Svatos
 

I could not make out the name on the right side...looks like Menyhert
Osvegy??

Here is the address:

Fany Szrulovics
Zavadka
pp Zaluzice (maybe Zaluzicz) zupa Uzhorod
Europa, Slovensko

Good luck with your research,
Gabi

Gabriela Svatos
Richmond Hill, Ontario

E-mail: gsvatos@...
Skype: agawabooks
Business E-mail: bookstore@...
Business URL: www.agawa.com

From: Eloedfamily@...
Reply-To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@...>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@...>
Subject: Re: [h-sig] Hungarian help on Viewmate
Date: Wed, 31 May 2006 12:43:48 EDT

It appears to be in Slovakian, not Hungarian.

In a message dated 5/29/2006 12:39:34 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
ssroth@... writes:
Hi all,

I was wondering if any of you out there are able to read this Hungarian
address and names(?), which I've posted on Viewmate VM7887. You can get
there directly at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7887


Please respond privately to me if you are able to translate this. Thanks
so
much in advance for any help you can give me.

Sincerely,
Sheree Roth
Palo Alto, CA
ssroth@...


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Hungarian help on Viewmate #hungary

Gabriela Svatos
 

I could not make out the name on the right side...looks like Menyhert
Osvegy??

Here is the address:

Fany Szrulovics
Zavadka
pp Zaluzice (maybe Zaluzicz) zupa Uzhorod
Europa, Slovensko

Good luck with your research,
Gabi

Gabriela Svatos
Richmond Hill, Ontario

E-mail: gsvatos@...
Skype: agawabooks
Business E-mail: bookstore@...
Business URL: www.agawa.com

From: Eloedfamily@...
Reply-To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@...>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@...>
Subject: Re: [h-sig] Hungarian help on Viewmate
Date: Wed, 31 May 2006 12:43:48 EDT

It appears to be in Slovakian, not Hungarian.

In a message dated 5/29/2006 12:39:34 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
ssroth@... writes:
Hi all,

I was wondering if any of you out there are able to read this Hungarian
address and names(?), which I've posted on Viewmate VM7887. You can get
there directly at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7887


Please respond privately to me if you are able to translate this. Thanks
so
much in advance for any help you can give me.

Sincerely,
Sheree Roth
Palo Alto, CA
ssroth@...


Re: words indicating relationships #hungary

Peter <thidas@...>
 

On 30-May-06, at 4:56 PM, Suzanne Kemeny wrote:

Could anyone tell me what the following Hungarian
words mean? (they are in family documents, and I
believe have to do with the relationships between the
individuals) I may have misspelled them, since the
handwriting is not always easy to read and I had to
leave out the accent marks. I hope you can make sense
of this and appreciate any help you can give.

****************
batyja
his/her (older) brother
occse
his/her (younger) brother
nagybatyja
his/her uncle
neje
his wife
unohatestoere
his/her cousin
lanyak anyosa
probably lanyuk anyosa
their daughter mother-in-law
lanyak feljouk? (can't read it)
their daughter's ??
also feleseje
also?? wife
lanyuk sogor
their daughter's son-in-law
unok
could read as unoka=grandchild
unokaoccse
his/her nephew
sogornoje
his/her sister-in-law

********************
Thanks so much for all of your help. I really
appreciate it.

Sincerely,

Suzanne Kemeny Riddle
United States

Moderator: Check the H-SIG archives for info about on-line
translation aids such as http://consulting.medios.fi/dictionary/

Peter I. Hidas
Mississauga, Ontario,
Canada.

thidas@...
peterhidas@...
www3.sympatico.ca/thidas
http://community.webshots.com/user/peterhidas


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: words indicating relationships #hungary

Peter <thidas@...>
 

On 30-May-06, at 4:56 PM, Suzanne Kemeny wrote:

Could anyone tell me what the following Hungarian
words mean? (they are in family documents, and I
believe have to do with the relationships between the
individuals) I may have misspelled them, since the
handwriting is not always easy to read and I had to
leave out the accent marks. I hope you can make sense
of this and appreciate any help you can give.

****************
batyja
his/her (older) brother
occse
his/her (younger) brother
nagybatyja
his/her uncle
neje
his wife
unohatestoere
his/her cousin
lanyak anyosa
probably lanyuk anyosa
their daughter mother-in-law
lanyak feljouk? (can't read it)
their daughter's ??
also feleseje
also?? wife
lanyuk sogor
their daughter's son-in-law
unok
could read as unoka=grandchild
unokaoccse
his/her nephew
sogornoje
his/her sister-in-law

********************
Thanks so much for all of your help. I really
appreciate it.

Sincerely,

Suzanne Kemeny Riddle
United States

Moderator: Check the H-SIG archives for info about on-line
translation aids such as http://consulting.medios.fi/dictionary/

Peter I. Hidas
Mississauga, Ontario,
Canada.

thidas@...
peterhidas@...
www3.sympatico.ca/thidas
http://community.webshots.com/user/peterhidas


Book about "The Tragedy of the Jews of Slovakia" #hungary

g_hirsch@...
 

Some of you might be interested, during my visit in Auschwitz-Birkenau in April, I found a Book published by Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum and Museum of the Slovak National Uprising "The Tragedy of the Jews of Slovakia."
ISBN 83-88526-15-4

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch


the continuing saga of Shimshon Shmuel Frischman and Josef (Shmulowitz) Schwartz #hungary

yehuda frischman
 

Dear Friends,

Thanks for all the helpful leads. I have now
ascertained the following with some degree of
certainty:

On the Frischman side:

1. My Frischman GGGF and my grandfather were both my
Yehuda Frischman, and that makes me the third.

2. Shimshon Shmuel's wife and mother were each named
Mary Ackerman, implying that they were cousins, named
after the same person.


On the Shmulowitz side:

1. There appears to have been at least five siblings
that lived in Scranton:

1. Josef Schmulowitz Schwartz who though born
Schmulowitz, chose to change his name to his wife
Resi's maiden name, Schwartz.

2. It appears that the five siblings were: Josef,
Toni, Resi, Harry, and possibly Morris Schmulowitz.

3. Josef's father was Baruch Shmulowitz.

4. Coincidentally, Josef's wife's mother's maiden
name was Toba Schmulowitz.

Were Toba and Baruch siblings and yet another case of
cousins marrying each other?

I will keep you informed about any news on the
Frischman, Shmulowitz and Schwartz research front.

Thanks again.

Yehuda Frishcman, L.Ac.
LOS ANGELES


Hungary SIG #Hungary Book about "The Tragedy of the Jews of Slovakia" #hungary

g_hirsch@...
 

Some of you might be interested, during my visit in Auschwitz-Birkenau in April, I found a Book published by Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum and Museum of the Slovak National Uprising "The Tragedy of the Jews of Slovakia."
ISBN 83-88526-15-4

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch


Hungary SIG #Hungary the continuing saga of Shimshon Shmuel Frischman and Josef (Shmulowitz) Schwartz #hungary

yehuda frischman
 

Dear Friends,

Thanks for all the helpful leads. I have now
ascertained the following with some degree of
certainty:

On the Frischman side:

1. My Frischman GGGF and my grandfather were both my
Yehuda Frischman, and that makes me the third.

2. Shimshon Shmuel's wife and mother were each named
Mary Ackerman, implying that they were cousins, named
after the same person.


On the Shmulowitz side:

1. There appears to have been at least five siblings
that lived in Scranton:

1. Josef Schmulowitz Schwartz who though born
Schmulowitz, chose to change his name to his wife
Resi's maiden name, Schwartz.

2. It appears that the five siblings were: Josef,
Toni, Resi, Harry, and possibly Morris Schmulowitz.

3. Josef's father was Baruch Shmulowitz.

4. Coincidentally, Josef's wife's mother's maiden
name was Toba Schmulowitz.

Were Toba and Baruch siblings and yet another case of
cousins marrying each other?

I will keep you informed about any news on the
Frischman, Shmulowitz and Schwartz research front.

Thanks again.

Yehuda Frishcman, L.Ac.
LOS ANGELES


Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #latvia

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Latvia SIG #Latvia Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #latvia

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Best DNA Testing Service for Ashkenazi Jews #dna

roe kard
 

A male family member has agreed to have Mitochondrial and Y Chromosome
Genealogical Testing done. I notice in looking at a few of the
companies offering this testing that they check results against other
people who have done this. I assume this aspect happens within the
company itself and so the sample with which it is compared is not that
large and that it is important to do the testing with a service that
has the most people >from your area. Is this true? I am interested in
anyone's experience with this testing: which service would be best?
Why? Any downside to testing? Anything i should be asking them? I
assume siblings >from the same parents would have the same results and
so it is not important to ask this person's male sibling if they would
agree to be tested as well. Please excuse my ignorance and feel free to
point me in a direction of something already written if that is
easiest..

Thank you,
B'shalom,
Karen Rosenfeld Roekard


DNA Research #DNA Best DNA Testing Service for Ashkenazi Jews #dna

roe kard
 

A male family member has agreed to have Mitochondrial and Y Chromosome
Genealogical Testing done. I notice in looking at a few of the
companies offering this testing that they check results against other
people who have done this. I assume this aspect happens within the
company itself and so the sample with which it is compared is not that
large and that it is important to do the testing with a service that
has the most people >from your area. Is this true? I am interested in
anyone's experience with this testing: which service would be best?
Why? Any downside to testing? Anything i should be asking them? I
assume siblings >from the same parents would have the same results and
so it is not important to ask this person's male sibling if they would
agree to be tested as well. Please excuse my ignorance and feel free to
point me in a direction of something already written if that is
easiest..

Thank you,
B'shalom,
Karen Rosenfeld Roekard


R' David Moses Avraham of Rohatyn #rabbinic

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone with information about or an
interest in the family of R' David Moses Avraham of Rohatyn (also
known as R' Avraham David Moses?), also known as Rabbi Adam, author
of "Mirkevet Hamishne," a contemporary of the Baal Shem Tov (Rabbi
David Moses Avraham supposedly met the Baal Shem Tov and died
shortly before him), and an opponent of the Frankists.

According to the online translation of the Rohatyn yizkor book, his
father was Rabbi Tzadok ASHKENAZI, and R' David Moses Avraham
claimed in his abovementioned manuscript that his father was a
descendant of Troyes, Germany. Is anything else known about this
claim? An image of the frontispiece of this work can be found at
http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=1847 on image #78 (corresponding
to page 74 of the yizkor book).

I understand that, among his descendants in Rohatyn, some bore the
surnames NAGELBERG and SHPIEGEL. My interest is that an ancestor of
mine who had a child in Rohatyn in 1829 also bore the name David
Moses, surname BORNFELD. I wonder whether they might have been
related. At least one of David Moses BORNFELD's sons was a rabbi
(who, supposedly, founded yeshivas in Brooklyn), and a suspected son
was married to a NAGELBERG, though I do not know whether she was a
descendant of R' David Moses Avraham.

Thanks very much and best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
near Washington, D.C.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic R' David Moses Avraham of Rohatyn #rabbinic

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone with information about or an
interest in the family of R' David Moses Avraham of Rohatyn (also
known as R' Avraham David Moses?), also known as Rabbi Adam, author
of "Mirkevet Hamishne," a contemporary of the Baal Shem Tov (Rabbi
David Moses Avraham supposedly met the Baal Shem Tov and died
shortly before him), and an opponent of the Frankists.

According to the online translation of the Rohatyn yizkor book, his
father was Rabbi Tzadok ASHKENAZI, and R' David Moses Avraham
claimed in his abovementioned manuscript that his father was a
descendant of Troyes, Germany. Is anything else known about this
claim? An image of the frontispiece of this work can be found at
http://yizkor.nypl.org/index.php?id=1847 on image #78 (corresponding
to page 74 of the yizkor book).

I understand that, among his descendants in Rohatyn, some bore the
surnames NAGELBERG and SHPIEGEL. My interest is that an ancestor of
mine who had a child in Rohatyn in 1829 also bore the name David
Moses, surname BORNFELD. I wonder whether they might have been
related. At least one of David Moses BORNFELD's sons was a rabbi
(who, supposedly, founded yeshivas in Brooklyn), and a suspected son
was married to a NAGELBERG, though I do not know whether she was a
descendant of R' David Moses Avraham.

Thanks very much and best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
near Washington, D.C.


New book about Jewish immigration #galicia

Andrew Miller <adamiller25@...>
 

Dear Galicia moderator

Subject: New book about Jewish immigration

Readers of this list may be interested in a book I have written, which is
called The Earl of Petticoat Lane and is published by Random House in the
UK. It is mainly about my grandparents, Jewish immigration to London, and
assimilation among British Jews in the first half of the twentieth century;
but it also describes my family's emigration >from what were then Russian
Poland and Galicia, which I visited as part of my research, and the fates of
relatives who did not emigrate. The families mentioned in the book are
FRIEDMAN/FREEDMAN and KANFER >from Galicia, and PIECHOTA and ERLICH >from
Kalisz, Poland.

Best wishes

Andrew MILLER
London, England


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia New book about Jewish immigration #galicia

Andrew Miller <adamiller25@...>
 

Dear Galicia moderator

Subject: New book about Jewish immigration

Readers of this list may be interested in a book I have written, which is
called The Earl of Petticoat Lane and is published by Random House in the
UK. It is mainly about my grandparents, Jewish immigration to London, and
assimilation among British Jews in the first half of the twentieth century;
but it also describes my family's emigration >from what were then Russian
Poland and Galicia, which I visited as part of my research, and the fates of
relatives who did not emigrate. The families mentioned in the book are
FRIEDMAN/FREEDMAN and KANFER >from Galicia, and PIECHOTA and ERLICH >from
Kalisz, Poland.

Best wishes

Andrew MILLER
London, England