Date   

Hungarian Films at the SFJFF #hungary

viviankahn@...
 

The 29th San Francisco Jewish Film Festival runs >from July 23 to
August 10, which means that I will miss most of the films while I'm at
the IAJGS conference in Philly. Fortunately, the SFJFF is showcasing
some of its finds on-line, including a 14-minute film by Hungarian
director Laszlo Nemes. You can watch his film With a Little Patience
on-line at http://fest.sfjff.org/film/detail?id=4788

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA
vkahn@kmort.com
http://web.mac.com/lmort/Vivian_Kahn_Family_Website/Home_.html

Researching families including:
BAL/BERKOVICS/BERKOWITZ/ROTH/Orasu Nou,
Seini, Rom., GROSZ/Orasu Nou, Rom., KAHAN/Sighet, Rom.; KOHN/
Zbehnov, Slov.;
MOSKOVITS/Sobrance, Michalovce, Slov.; NEUMANN/Sobrance, Michalovce,
Kristy, Slov.; POLACSEK/Sobrance, Slov.; ROSENBERG/Ungvar; VERO/
SEGAL/ZEGAL/Sighet, Rom


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian Films at the SFJFF #hungary

viviankahn@...
 

The 29th San Francisco Jewish Film Festival runs >from July 23 to
August 10, which means that I will miss most of the films while I'm at
the IAJGS conference in Philly. Fortunately, the SFJFF is showcasing
some of its finds on-line, including a 14-minute film by Hungarian
director Laszlo Nemes. You can watch his film With a Little Patience
on-line at http://fest.sfjff.org/film/detail?id=4788

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA
vkahn@kmort.com
http://web.mac.com/lmort/Vivian_Kahn_Family_Website/Home_.html

Researching families including:
BAL/BERKOVICS/BERKOWITZ/ROTH/Orasu Nou,
Seini, Rom., GROSZ/Orasu Nou, Rom., KAHAN/Sighet, Rom.; KOHN/
Zbehnov, Slov.;
MOSKOVITS/Sobrance, Michalovce, Slov.; NEUMANN/Sobrance, Michalovce,
Kristy, Slov.; POLACSEK/Sobrance, Slov.; ROSENBERG/Ungvar; VERO/
SEGAL/ZEGAL/Sighet, Rom


INTRO - researching HELLER, MANDELBAUM family from Dennenlohe, Bavaria #germany

Chuck Koplik
 

Hello GerSig,
I just joined the group. I have been doing genealogy research for two years.
I consider myself to be a novice in doing German Jewish Genealogy research.
I live in suburban Lexington, Massachusetts, USA. My native language is English.
I consider myself expert in using a computer. My experience in using the Internet
is extensive.

I have identified the names and birth and death dates of 4 of my
grandparents, 8 of my great grandparents and 16 of my great great grandparents.
My primary research goals now are to find out my familiy history on
my father's mother's side in Germany.

The family names and towns that I am researching are:
HELLER, MANDELBAUM, SILBERLOSS, LEHMAN - Dennenlohe, Bavaria (near
Wassertrudingen).

My ggg grandfather and grandmother were Isaac Kallman HELLER
(b. Jan 7, 1780, d. 29 Dec 1857 in New Haven, Connecticut) and

Leah MANDELBAUM (b. 1791, d. ??) both of Dennenlohe;
and my ggg grandfather and grandmother Hirsch SILBERLOSS/LEHMAN and
Sarah also of Dennenlohe.

I am seeking birth, marriage, death records for Jewish residents at that
time in Dennenlohe. I do have the Jewish Registers for 1813-1861 for Middle
Franconia.

STERN - Nackenheim (or Nachenheim), Hesse-Darmstadt. My gg
grandfather Nathan STERN was born in Nackenheim in 1801 (died
1846). Nathan was married to Magdeline Falker (b. 1809 in Mussbach,
d. 25 May 1859 in NYC). Nathan's father Samuel STERN was born in
Holland July 3, 1760 (died in Darmstadt, 25 May 1859, remains at
Dalsheim). I am looking for any information on the Stern family in Nackenheim.

Charles M. Koplik cmkoplik@alum.mit.edu Lexington, Massachusetts, USA


German SIG #Germany INTRO - researching HELLER, MANDELBAUM family from Dennenlohe, Bavaria #germany

Chuck Koplik
 

Hello GerSig,
I just joined the group. I have been doing genealogy research for two years.
I consider myself to be a novice in doing German Jewish Genealogy research.
I live in suburban Lexington, Massachusetts, USA. My native language is English.
I consider myself expert in using a computer. My experience in using the Internet
is extensive.

I have identified the names and birth and death dates of 4 of my
grandparents, 8 of my great grandparents and 16 of my great great grandparents.
My primary research goals now are to find out my familiy history on
my father's mother's side in Germany.

The family names and towns that I am researching are:
HELLER, MANDELBAUM, SILBERLOSS, LEHMAN - Dennenlohe, Bavaria (near
Wassertrudingen).

My ggg grandfather and grandmother were Isaac Kallman HELLER
(b. Jan 7, 1780, d. 29 Dec 1857 in New Haven, Connecticut) and

Leah MANDELBAUM (b. 1791, d. ??) both of Dennenlohe;
and my ggg grandfather and grandmother Hirsch SILBERLOSS/LEHMAN and
Sarah also of Dennenlohe.

I am seeking birth, marriage, death records for Jewish residents at that
time in Dennenlohe. I do have the Jewish Registers for 1813-1861 for Middle
Franconia.

STERN - Nackenheim (or Nachenheim), Hesse-Darmstadt. My gg
grandfather Nathan STERN was born in Nackenheim in 1801 (died
1846). Nathan was married to Magdeline Falker (b. 1809 in Mussbach,
d. 25 May 1859 in NYC). Nathan's father Samuel STERN was born in
Holland July 3, 1760 (died in Darmstadt, 25 May 1859, remains at
Dalsheim). I am looking for any information on the Stern family in Nackenheim.

Charles M. Koplik cmkoplik@alum.mit.edu Lexington, Massachusetts, USA


Seeking long time GerSIG member Ronald Wallace #germany

jplowens@...
 

List mail to Ronald Wallace ronald@thewallaces.net began bouncing
on July 19th.

A private email to that address also bounced.

We appreciate the ongoing participation of our long-term GerSIG members.
If anyone can help us update this email address or let me know why mail
to the address is bouncing please reply privately to:

Gersigmod@gmail.com

GerSIG Moderator and Membership chair JP Lowens


German SIG #Germany Seeking long time GerSIG member Ronald Wallace #germany

jplowens@...
 

List mail to Ronald Wallace ronald@thewallaces.net began bouncing
on July 19th.

A private email to that address also bounced.

We appreciate the ongoing participation of our long-term GerSIG members.
If anyone can help us update this email address or let me know why mail
to the address is bouncing please reply privately to:

Gersigmod@gmail.com

GerSIG Moderator and Membership chair JP Lowens


Re: SELIGMANN family from Wangen and Konstanz #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Liz James schrieb:
I am trying to find the exact birth dates and or location of the children of
Emmanuel SELIGMANN born Wangen, 3 April 1852 and Jeanetta WEIL born 23 Jun
1853 Lengnau, Switzerland ...

In particular I am looking for the place of birth of Friedl and Henny, and
as I plan to be in Germany in the next few weeks I would like to ask advice
as to what archives I should contact to locate the above birth dates and
locations of the family members?
Dear Liz,

note that, apart >from Konstanz, all the places you mention are in
SWITZERLAND, not in Germany

with kind regards

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany


German SIG #Germany Re: SELIGMANN family from Wangen and Konstanz #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Liz James schrieb:
I am trying to find the exact birth dates and or location of the children of
Emmanuel SELIGMANN born Wangen, 3 April 1852 and Jeanetta WEIL born 23 Jun
1853 Lengnau, Switzerland ...

In particular I am looking for the place of birth of Friedl and Henny, and
as I plan to be in Germany in the next few weeks I would like to ask advice
as to what archives I should contact to locate the above birth dates and
locations of the family members?
Dear Liz,

note that, apart >from Konstanz, all the places you mention are in
SWITZERLAND, not in Germany

with kind regards

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany


PACHTER from Warsaw #france

tina levine
 

Dear Genners

A few months ago I discovered what I believe to be the grave of a first cousin
of my great grandfather at the online database of the Warsaw Jewish Cemetery.
The deceased's name was Yosef PACHTER, son of Avraham. He died in 1927 at the
age of 75 and was >from Siemiatycze. (my great great grandfather was Yisroel
PACHTER; he had a brother named Avraham Yitzhak and the family was >from
Siemiatycze) .

At the moment I am searching for his descendants, if any do exist. I have no
idea if children/grandchildren survived the war or if they left before 1939
and went to Israel, Western Europe, the USA, or Central and South America.

If any readers know anyone with the family name Pachter who came >from Warsaw
please have them get in touch with me.

Any suggestions re: surviving records that might exist in Warsaw and could
shed more light on this man or his offspring would be greatly appreciated as
well. thank you in advance for your assistance.

Tina Pachter Levine
New York City
Searching PACHTER - siemiatycze, Bransk and Warsaw


French SIG #France PACHTER from Warsaw #france

tina levine
 

Dear Genners

A few months ago I discovered what I believe to be the grave of a first cousin
of my great grandfather at the online database of the Warsaw Jewish Cemetery.
The deceased's name was Yosef PACHTER, son of Avraham. He died in 1927 at the
age of 75 and was >from Siemiatycze. (my great great grandfather was Yisroel
PACHTER; he had a brother named Avraham Yitzhak and the family was >from
Siemiatycze) .

At the moment I am searching for his descendants, if any do exist. I have no
idea if children/grandchildren survived the war or if they left before 1939
and went to Israel, Western Europe, the USA, or Central and South America.

If any readers know anyone with the family name Pachter who came >from Warsaw
please have them get in touch with me.

Any suggestions re: surviving records that might exist in Warsaw and could
shed more light on this man or his offspring would be greatly appreciated as
well. thank you in advance for your assistance.

Tina Pachter Levine
New York City
Searching PACHTER - siemiatycze, Bransk and Warsaw


Galician births to unmarried parents #poland

Suzan Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Judith Elam has asked about why a father would need to attest to his
paternity to secure the heritage of his children. The government required
civil marriage but relatively few Jews had such marriages for a variety of
reasons. Civil marriage was taxed, yes, but the rabbis performing religious
marriages were supposed to report marriages to the government so that the
"chuppah" tax could be applied in those cases as well. Failure to report a
religious marriage was a violation and the rabbi could be fined. The vast
majority of Galitzianers were Chasidic before WWI and most of the leadership
of the kehillot districts were as well. The leaders were united in their
prohibition of civil marriage....government involvement in marriage was
unwanted for many reasons but the biggest reason was that the government
imposed rules for rabbis performing civil marriage that undermined Judaism
in their view. Rabbis had to take classes in basic secular subjects, learn
German, read a book that was written by an apostate Jew and pass a test.
This was a struggle that went on well into the 20th century. Some Chasidic
rabbis actually excommunicated people for having civil marriages but
certainly, the threat was there.

After 1877, when the Jewish community was given the authority and
responsibility for collecting and maintaining Jewish birth, marriage and
death records, registrars had to record births as illegimate when there was
no proof of a civil marriage. The law provided an opportunity for fathers to
appear with two witnesses to attest to paternity. If the father did that,
the child was supposed to be known by the father's surname or a combination
of the mother's and father's surnames. If the father did not attest to
paternity, the child carried the mother's surname. There was no tax involved
with registration or paternity attestation.

Until Emancipation in 1869, Jews rarely had to consider the many sanctions
the government imposed on children they considered illegitimate. After 1869,
Jews could attend university, obtain a business license, move up in society
in new ways and then, Jews began to travel for business, pleasure and
emigration. They needed travel papers and their status was written on their
passports and visas. Gradually, very gradually in small towns, there were
reasons for having a civil marriage that overrode the religious pressures
against civil marriage. Emigration was a major incentive. Admitting
countries might frown on admitting children that the Austrian government
considered illegitimate.

Suzan Wynne
author, The Galitzianers: The Jews of Galicia, 1772-1918


Photos accompanying article in Miami Herald on NOWY SACZ, POLAND #poland

Howard Orenstein
 

A wonderful article, but in order to see the photos, you need to
go to the link below for the Spanish version of he Miami Herald:

http://www.elnuevoherald.com/ultimas-noticias/story/500644.html


--
Howard Orenstein, Ph.D.
Westminster,MD
horenstein@mcdaniel.edu
Explore Your Jewish Heritage in Wyszk=F3w,Poland:
http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHWyszkow3.html
Jewish Heritage in Serock,Poland:
http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHSerock3/Welcome.html
Searching for:
ORENSTEIN -- Serock, Wyszkow, Pultusk, Plonsk, Poland
HOLLAND (GOLAND), PIENIEK, OSTROWIAK -- Serock, Wyszkow, Poland
BLUM (BLOOM) -- Wyszkow, Poland; London, England


JRI Poland #Poland Galician births to unmarried parents #poland

Suzan Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

Judith Elam has asked about why a father would need to attest to his
paternity to secure the heritage of his children. The government required
civil marriage but relatively few Jews had such marriages for a variety of
reasons. Civil marriage was taxed, yes, but the rabbis performing religious
marriages were supposed to report marriages to the government so that the
"chuppah" tax could be applied in those cases as well. Failure to report a
religious marriage was a violation and the rabbi could be fined. The vast
majority of Galitzianers were Chasidic before WWI and most of the leadership
of the kehillot districts were as well. The leaders were united in their
prohibition of civil marriage....government involvement in marriage was
unwanted for many reasons but the biggest reason was that the government
imposed rules for rabbis performing civil marriage that undermined Judaism
in their view. Rabbis had to take classes in basic secular subjects, learn
German, read a book that was written by an apostate Jew and pass a test.
This was a struggle that went on well into the 20th century. Some Chasidic
rabbis actually excommunicated people for having civil marriages but
certainly, the threat was there.

After 1877, when the Jewish community was given the authority and
responsibility for collecting and maintaining Jewish birth, marriage and
death records, registrars had to record births as illegimate when there was
no proof of a civil marriage. The law provided an opportunity for fathers to
appear with two witnesses to attest to paternity. If the father did that,
the child was supposed to be known by the father's surname or a combination
of the mother's and father's surnames. If the father did not attest to
paternity, the child carried the mother's surname. There was no tax involved
with registration or paternity attestation.

Until Emancipation in 1869, Jews rarely had to consider the many sanctions
the government imposed on children they considered illegitimate. After 1869,
Jews could attend university, obtain a business license, move up in society
in new ways and then, Jews began to travel for business, pleasure and
emigration. They needed travel papers and their status was written on their
passports and visas. Gradually, very gradually in small towns, there were
reasons for having a civil marriage that overrode the religious pressures
against civil marriage. Emigration was a major incentive. Admitting
countries might frown on admitting children that the Austrian government
considered illegitimate.

Suzan Wynne
author, The Galitzianers: The Jews of Galicia, 1772-1918


JRI Poland #Poland Photos accompanying article in Miami Herald on NOWY SACZ, POLAND #poland

Howard Orenstein
 

A wonderful article, but in order to see the photos, you need to
go to the link below for the Spanish version of he Miami Herald:

http://www.elnuevoherald.com/ultimas-noticias/story/500644.html


--
Howard Orenstein, Ph.D.
Westminster,MD
horenstein@mcdaniel.edu
Explore Your Jewish Heritage in Wyszk=F3w,Poland:
http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHWyszkow3.html
Jewish Heritage in Serock,Poland:
http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Psychology/HBO/JHSerock3/Welcome.html
Searching for:
ORENSTEIN -- Serock, Wyszkow, Pultusk, Plonsk, Poland
HOLLAND (GOLAND), PIENIEK, OSTROWIAK -- Serock, Wyszkow, Poland
BLUM (BLOOM) -- Wyszkow, Poland; London, England


Boer War keepsake #southafrica

N C <girl_from_l6@...>
 

Hi all,

My great-grandfather Benzion FAERBER came to South Africa >from Tukums,
Latvia in 1896. I found the following record in the 'SA Jews in the Boer
War' database:

'Arrived S.A. 1896 In Service of N.Z.A.S.M. Commandeered on outbreak of war.
On Bridge duty at Vereeniging and later at P.O.Ws of Waterval Bovin. Later sent to
Lourenco Marques on Commissariat duty. On commissariat duty British POW camp,
Watervalbowen, captured'

After his son died recently, we found a medal in an old box which appears to
be a gold-plated 2-shilling piece >from 1897. I've taken some pictures which
can be viewed here:

http://www.thenoodlebowl.com/genealogy/crest-side.jpg
http://www.thenoodlebowl.com/genealogy/kruger-side.jpg

Can anyone shed any light on what this is? Was it an official medal or is it
some kind of unofficial keepsake? Any help would be much appreciated.

Many thanks,

Natasha Condon
London, UK

Researching: FAERBER/FERBER >from Tukums (Latvia), WEINBRENN/VAYNBREN and
WANDERMAN/VANDERMANN >from Anyksciai and elsewhere (Lithuania), ROTHSCHILD
and STOCKHAUSEN >from Harmuthsachsen and surroundings (Germany), all of these
names in South Africa also.


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Boer War keepsake #southafrica

N C <girl_from_l6@...>
 

Hi all,

My great-grandfather Benzion FAERBER came to South Africa >from Tukums,
Latvia in 1896. I found the following record in the 'SA Jews in the Boer
War' database:

'Arrived S.A. 1896 In Service of N.Z.A.S.M. Commandeered on outbreak of war.
On Bridge duty at Vereeniging and later at P.O.Ws of Waterval Bovin. Later sent to
Lourenco Marques on Commissariat duty. On commissariat duty British POW camp,
Watervalbowen, captured'

After his son died recently, we found a medal in an old box which appears to
be a gold-plated 2-shilling piece >from 1897. I've taken some pictures which
can be viewed here:

http://www.thenoodlebowl.com/genealogy/crest-side.jpg
http://www.thenoodlebowl.com/genealogy/kruger-side.jpg

Can anyone shed any light on what this is? Was it an official medal or is it
some kind of unofficial keepsake? Any help would be much appreciated.

Many thanks,

Natasha Condon
London, UK

Researching: FAERBER/FERBER >from Tukums (Latvia), WEINBRENN/VAYNBREN and
WANDERMAN/VANDERMANN >from Anyksciai and elsewhere (Lithuania), ROTHSCHILD
and STOCKHAUSEN >from Harmuthsachsen and surroundings (Germany), all of these
names in South Africa also.


LANDSMAN, CHORNY (from Paberze, Vilna) #lithuania

MandJMeyers <mandjmeyers@...>
 

I'm slowly homing in on my LANDSMAN family >from Vilna. Earlier this
year I found my first ever vital record listing my great-grandparents
Abram and Feiga (bat Eliasz FINBERG >from Gelvan) LANDSMAN in Vilna
for a previously unknown sibling of my grandmother (presumably this
child died young).

Key information was that the family was said to have come >from Paberzhe
and that Abram's father was named Girsh.

I have just today discovered that Abram died in 1915 in Vilna at age 69,
with the record again saying he had come >from Paberzhe. Previously I had
bracketed his death between 1914 (when my grandmother's brother emigrated)
and 1920 (when my father was named for him).

At this point I have not found the birth records of my grandmother or
any of her brothers/sisters in the 1880s and 1890s, so am now assuming these
were most likely in Paberzhe and hopefully reside in the untranslated BMD
records that cover 1881+.

One more clue, once pointed towards Paberzhe, is the 1851 revision list
which shows a Girsh LANTZMAN (son of Morduhk, age not given) living with
a CHORNY family, Iovnash ben Eliasz and his wife Shora bat Girsh. I assume
that Shora is the daughter of Girsh and that Girsh was living with his
son-in-law. Since the CHORNY's were ages 37/36, I assume Girsh was 55
or older in 1851. Given the age differences, it is not clear if this Girsh
is the father of Abram or not. I have found almost 20 different Girsh
LANDSMAN in the Vilna area, so this is a very common given name in the
family.

If any of the sounds familiar, please contact me privately at
<MandJMeyers@gmail.com>

Marty Meyers
Montclair, NJ


Hoppenstein/Imber/Kramer/Jacobson/Green family #southafrica

Michelle Essers
 

Hi

I am looking for Eileen and Ruben Hoppenstein. They apparently lived
in South Africa for a while and then went to America.

Also looking for Eileen's sister Brenda who married Baily Imber (not
sure of the spelling). Again they were in South Africa at one time
and then went to America.

Their parents were Sarah/Sylvia and Harry Prowser.

They are somehow related to my Kramer/Jacobson/Green family.

Thanks

Michelle


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania LANDSMAN, CHORNY (from Paberze, Vilna) #lithuania

MandJMeyers <mandjmeyers@...>
 

I'm slowly homing in on my LANDSMAN family >from Vilna. Earlier this
year I found my first ever vital record listing my great-grandparents
Abram and Feiga (bat Eliasz FINBERG >from Gelvan) LANDSMAN in Vilna
for a previously unknown sibling of my grandmother (presumably this
child died young).

Key information was that the family was said to have come >from Paberzhe
and that Abram's father was named Girsh.

I have just today discovered that Abram died in 1915 in Vilna at age 69,
with the record again saying he had come >from Paberzhe. Previously I had
bracketed his death between 1914 (when my grandmother's brother emigrated)
and 1920 (when my father was named for him).

At this point I have not found the birth records of my grandmother or
any of her brothers/sisters in the 1880s and 1890s, so am now assuming these
were most likely in Paberzhe and hopefully reside in the untranslated BMD
records that cover 1881+.

One more clue, once pointed towards Paberzhe, is the 1851 revision list
which shows a Girsh LANTZMAN (son of Morduhk, age not given) living with
a CHORNY family, Iovnash ben Eliasz and his wife Shora bat Girsh. I assume
that Shora is the daughter of Girsh and that Girsh was living with his
son-in-law. Since the CHORNY's were ages 37/36, I assume Girsh was 55
or older in 1851. Given the age differences, it is not clear if this Girsh
is the father of Abram or not. I have found almost 20 different Girsh
LANDSMAN in the Vilna area, so this is a very common given name in the
family.

If any of the sounds familiar, please contact me privately at
<MandJMeyers@gmail.com>

Marty Meyers
Montclair, NJ


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Hoppenstein/Imber/Kramer/Jacobson/Green family #southafrica

Michelle Essers
 

Hi

I am looking for Eileen and Ruben Hoppenstein. They apparently lived
in South Africa for a while and then went to America.

Also looking for Eileen's sister Brenda who married Baily Imber (not
sure of the spelling). Again they were in South Africa at one time
and then went to America.

Their parents were Sarah/Sylvia and Harry Prowser.

They are somehow related to my Kramer/Jacobson/Green family.

Thanks

Michelle