Date   

Yizkor Book Project, October 2012 #gdansk #germany #poland #danzig

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

At the outset of this report, I would like to say that my thoughts, like
many, are with the people have just undergone a tormentful time though
Sandy's onslaught on cities in the United States and Canada. I can only hope
that for all those affected by this storm, that life for them soon returns
to being very normal and very tranquil.

About the Yizkor Book Project - we continue to plug on. I believe that
October can be characterized by a large number of updates to existing
projects, some of which are drawing close to completion. For some of our
updates, we've been working on the addition of tables of contents for
existing projects that, up until now have been without. Immeasurable help
in carrying out these translations is being provided by the Yocheved
Klausner and Sara Mages. Our aim is to continue add in table of contents to
projects without, in order to indicate to you, the readers, of the "gems"
that these Yizkor Books contain. As we translate an article, a blue
hyperlink will be added to the contents and for those main pages that don't
have blue links, it's probably because no one has stepped forward to
coordinate the translation of the particular Yizkor Book. So what are you
waiting for? <g>

Our project, as I'm sure you're aware, relies on the help of a great many
volunteers in the fields translating, transliterating, editing, picture
scanning and typing and we never have too many people involved in our aim of
seeing these books completely translated into English. I'm pleased to note
that apart >from English, we have a small but growing contingent of books
being translated into other languages. For instance, this past month has
seen the addition of Polish translations >from the Staszow book, which has
already translations in English and Hebrew. The addition of these
translations means that more and more people with no knowledge of Hebrew or
Yiddish (the main languages of the Yizkor Books) can now freely access the
important information these books contain in a language that is convenient
for them to read in.

Now to facts and figures - as far as the October figures go, during this
last month we have added these 3 new projects:

- Aleksandrow Lodzki, Poland (Aleksandrow - near Lodz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Aleksandrow_Lodzki/Aleksandrow_Lodzki.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Resurrection and Destruction in Ghetto Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa4/Czestochowa4.html

- Topolcany, Slovakia (The story and source of the Jewish community of
Topoltchany) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Topolcany/Topolcany.html

Added in 3 new entries:

- Balti, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00336.html

- Kdyne, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh437.html

- Levoca, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo288.html

We have continued to update 29 of our existing projects:

- Ashmyany, Belarus (Oshmana Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/oshmyany/oshmyany.html

- Briceva, Moldova (Memorial Book of Brichevo)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bricheva/Bricheva.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd book; A memorial to the Jewish community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goworowo, Poland (Govorowo memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Goworowo/Goworowo.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On The Banks Of The Vylia; In memory of the
destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Michalovce, Slovakia (The Book of Michalovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michalovce/Michalovce.html

- Minsk, Belarus (Minsk, Jewish Mother-City, a memorial anthology)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/minsk/minsk.html

- Molchadz, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Oradea, Romania (A city and yesterday; memorial book to the Jews of
Grosswardein) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/oradea/oradea.html

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Praga, Poland (Praga book; dedicated to the memory of the martyrs of our
town) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/praga/praga.html

- Przedborz, Poland (Przedborz Memorial Book: 33 Years Since the Destruction
of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Przedborz/Przedborz.html

- Radoshkovichi, Belarus (Radoshkowitz, A Memorial to the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/radoshkovichi/radoshkovichi.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rafalovka/rafalovka.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszow.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowp.html [Polish]

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Tighina, Moldova (Bendery Community Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bender/Bender.html

- Tluszcz, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of Tluszcz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tluszcz/tluszcz.html

- Tomaszow-Lubelsk, Poland Memorial book of Tomaszow Lubelski)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Tomaszow-Lubelski/Tomaszow-Lubelski.html

- Zabludow, Poland (Chosen Pages >from The Zabludow Yizkor Book - Holocaust
Chapter) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zabludow/Zabludow.html

- Zaglembia, Poland (Memorial book of Zaglembie)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zaglembia/Zaglembie.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them. Please also note that there are a quite a few books that are
being translated by professional translators and would welcome your
financial support. A list of these projects can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Yizkor Book Project, October 2012 #dna

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

At the outset of this report, I would like to say that my thoughts, like
many, are with the people have just undergone a tormentful time though
Sandy's onslaught on cities in the United States and Canada. I can only hope
that for all those affected by this storm, that life for them soon returns
to being very normal and very tranquil.

About the Yizkor Book Project - we continue to plug on. I believe that
October can be characterized by a large number of updates to existing
projects, some of which are drawing close to completion. For some of our
updates, we've been working on the addition of tables of contents for
existing projects that, up until now have been without. Immeasurable help
in carrying out these translations is being provided by the Yocheved
Klausner and Sara Mages. Our aim is to continue add in table of contents to
projects without, in order to indicate to you, the readers, of the "gems"
that these Yizkor Books contain. As we translate an article, a blue
hyperlink will be added to the contents and for those main pages that don't
have blue links, it's probably because no one has stepped forward to
coordinate the translation of the particular Yizkor Book. So what are you
waiting for? <g>

Our project, as I'm sure you're aware, relies on the help of a great many
volunteers in the fields translating, transliterating, editing, picture
scanning and typing and we never have too many people involved in our aim of
seeing these books completely translated into English. I'm pleased to note
that apart >from English, we have a small but growing contingent of books
being translated into other languages. For instance, this past month has
seen the addition of Polish translations >from the Staszow book, which has
already translations in English and Hebrew. The addition of these
translations means that more and more people with no knowledge of Hebrew or
Yiddish (the main languages of the Yizkor Books) can now freely access the
important information these books contain in a language that is convenient
for them to read in.

Now to facts and figures - as far as the October figures go, during this
last month we have added these 3 new projects:

- Aleksandrow Lodzki, Poland (Aleksandrow - near Lodz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Aleksandrow_Lodzki/Aleksandrow_Lodzki.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Resurrection and Destruction in Ghetto Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa4/Czestochowa4.html

- Topolcany, Slovakia (The story and source of the Jewish community of
Topoltchany) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Topolcany/Topolcany.html

Added in 3 new entries:

- Balti, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00336.html

- Kdyne, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh437.html

- Levoca, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo288.html

We have continued to update 29 of our existing projects:

- Ashmyany, Belarus (Oshmana Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/oshmyany/oshmyany.html

- Briceva, Moldova (Memorial Book of Brichevo)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bricheva/Bricheva.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd book; A memorial to the Jewish community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goworowo, Poland (Govorowo memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Goworowo/Goworowo.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On The Banks Of The Vylia; In memory of the
destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Michalovce, Slovakia (The Book of Michalovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michalovce/Michalovce.html

- Minsk, Belarus (Minsk, Jewish Mother-City, a memorial anthology)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/minsk/minsk.html

- Molchadz, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Oradea, Romania (A city and yesterday; memorial book to the Jews of
Grosswardein) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/oradea/oradea.html

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Praga, Poland (Praga book; dedicated to the memory of the martyrs of our
town) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/praga/praga.html

- Przedborz, Poland (Przedborz Memorial Book: 33 Years Since the Destruction
of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Przedborz/Przedborz.html

- Radoshkovichi, Belarus (Radoshkowitz, A Memorial to the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/radoshkovichi/radoshkovichi.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rafalovka/rafalovka.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszow.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowp.html [Polish]

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Tighina, Moldova (Bendery Community Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bender/Bender.html

- Tluszcz, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of Tluszcz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tluszcz/tluszcz.html

- Tomaszow-Lubelsk, Poland Memorial book of Tomaszow Lubelski)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Tomaszow-Lubelski/Tomaszow-Lubelski.html

- Zabludow, Poland (Chosen Pages >from The Zabludow Yizkor Book - Holocaust
Chapter) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zabludow/Zabludow.html

- Zaglembia, Poland (Memorial book of Zaglembie)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zaglembia/Zaglembie.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them. Please also note that there are a quite a few books that are
being translated by professional translators and would welcome your
financial support. A list of these projects can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Yizkor Book Project, October 2012 #germany #poland #danzig #gdansk

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

At the outset of this report, I would like to say that my thoughts, like
many, are with the people have just undergone a tormentful time though
Sandy's onslaught on cities in the United States and Canada. I can only hope
that for all those affected by this storm, that life for them soon returns
to being very normal and very tranquil.

About the Yizkor Book Project - we continue to plug on. I believe that
October can be characterized by a large number of updates to existing
projects, some of which are drawing close to completion. For some of our
updates, we've been working on the addition of tables of contents for
existing projects that, up until now have been without. Immeasurable help
in carrying out these translations is being provided by the Yocheved
Klausner and Sara Mages. Our aim is to continue add in table of contents to
projects without, in order to indicate to you, the readers, of the "gems"
that these Yizkor Books contain. As we translate an article, a blue
hyperlink will be added to the contents and for those main pages that don't
have blue links, it's probably because no one has stepped forward to
coordinate the translation of the particular Yizkor Book. So what are you
waiting for? <g>

Our project, as I'm sure you're aware, relies on the help of a great many
volunteers in the fields translating, transliterating, editing, picture
scanning and typing and we never have too many people involved in our aim of
seeing these books completely translated into English. I'm pleased to note
that apart >from English, we have a small but growing contingent of books
being translated into other languages. For instance, this past month has
seen the addition of Polish translations >from the Staszow book, which has
already translations in English and Hebrew. The addition of these
translations means that more and more people with no knowledge of Hebrew or
Yiddish (the main languages of the Yizkor Books) can now freely access the
important information these books contain in a language that is convenient
for them to read in.

Now to facts and figures - as far as the October figures go, during this
last month we have added these 3 new projects:

- Aleksandrow Lodzki, Poland (Aleksandrow - near Lodz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Aleksandrow_Lodzki/Aleksandrow_Lodzki.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Resurrection and Destruction in Ghetto Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa4/Czestochowa4.html

- Topolcany, Slovakia (The story and source of the Jewish community of
Topoltchany) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Topolcany/Topolcany.html

Added in 3 new entries:

- Balti, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00336.html

- Kdyne, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh437.html

- Levoca, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo288.html

We have continued to update 29 of our existing projects:

- Ashmyany, Belarus (Oshmana Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/oshmyany/oshmyany.html

- Briceva, Moldova (Memorial Book of Brichevo)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bricheva/Bricheva.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd book; A memorial to the Jewish community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goworowo, Poland (Govorowo memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Goworowo/Goworowo.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On The Banks Of The Vylia; In memory of the
destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Michalovce, Slovakia (The Book of Michalovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michalovce/Michalovce.html

- Minsk, Belarus (Minsk, Jewish Mother-City, a memorial anthology)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/minsk/minsk.html

- Molchadz, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Oradea, Romania (A city and yesterday; memorial book to the Jews of
Grosswardein) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/oradea/oradea.html

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Praga, Poland (Praga book; dedicated to the memory of the martyrs of our
town) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/praga/praga.html

- Przedborz, Poland (Przedborz Memorial Book: 33 Years Since the Destruction
of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Przedborz/Przedborz.html

- Radoshkovichi, Belarus (Radoshkowitz, A Memorial to the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/radoshkovichi/radoshkovichi.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rafalovka/rafalovka.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszow.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowp.html [Polish]

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Tighina, Moldova (Bendery Community Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bender/Bender.html

- Tluszcz, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of Tluszcz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tluszcz/tluszcz.html

- Tomaszow-Lubelsk, Poland Memorial book of Tomaszow Lubelski)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Tomaszow-Lubelski/Tomaszow-Lubelski.html

- Zabludow, Poland (Chosen Pages >from The Zabludow Yizkor Book - Holocaust
Chapter) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zabludow/Zabludow.html

- Zaglembia, Poland (Memorial book of Zaglembie)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zaglembia/Zaglembie.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them. Please also note that there are a quite a few books that are
being translated by professional translators and would welcome your
financial support. A list of these projects can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


DNA Research #DNA Yizkor Book Project, October 2012 #dna

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

At the outset of this report, I would like to say that my thoughts, like
many, are with the people have just undergone a tormentful time though
Sandy's onslaught on cities in the United States and Canada. I can only hope
that for all those affected by this storm, that life for them soon returns
to being very normal and very tranquil.

About the Yizkor Book Project - we continue to plug on. I believe that
October can be characterized by a large number of updates to existing
projects, some of which are drawing close to completion. For some of our
updates, we've been working on the addition of tables of contents for
existing projects that, up until now have been without. Immeasurable help
in carrying out these translations is being provided by the Yocheved
Klausner and Sara Mages. Our aim is to continue add in table of contents to
projects without, in order to indicate to you, the readers, of the "gems"
that these Yizkor Books contain. As we translate an article, a blue
hyperlink will be added to the contents and for those main pages that don't
have blue links, it's probably because no one has stepped forward to
coordinate the translation of the particular Yizkor Book. So what are you
waiting for? <g>

Our project, as I'm sure you're aware, relies on the help of a great many
volunteers in the fields translating, transliterating, editing, picture
scanning and typing and we never have too many people involved in our aim of
seeing these books completely translated into English. I'm pleased to note
that apart >from English, we have a small but growing contingent of books
being translated into other languages. For instance, this past month has
seen the addition of Polish translations >from the Staszow book, which has
already translations in English and Hebrew. The addition of these
translations means that more and more people with no knowledge of Hebrew or
Yiddish (the main languages of the Yizkor Books) can now freely access the
important information these books contain in a language that is convenient
for them to read in.

Now to facts and figures - as far as the October figures go, during this
last month we have added these 3 new projects:

- Aleksandrow Lodzki, Poland (Aleksandrow - near Lodz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Aleksandrow_Lodzki/Aleksandrow_Lodzki.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Resurrection and Destruction in Ghetto Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa4/Czestochowa4.html

- Topolcany, Slovakia (The story and source of the Jewish community of
Topoltchany) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Topolcany/Topolcany.html

Added in 3 new entries:

- Balti, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00336.html

- Kdyne, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh437.html

- Levoca, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo288.html

We have continued to update 29 of our existing projects:

- Ashmyany, Belarus (Oshmana Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/oshmyany/oshmyany.html

- Briceva, Moldova (Memorial Book of Brichevo)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bricheva/Bricheva.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd book; A memorial to the Jewish community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goworowo, Poland (Govorowo memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Goworowo/Goworowo.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On The Banks Of The Vylia; In memory of the
destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Michalovce, Slovakia (The Book of Michalovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michalovce/Michalovce.html

- Minsk, Belarus (Minsk, Jewish Mother-City, a memorial anthology)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/minsk/minsk.html

- Molchadz, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Oradea, Romania (A city and yesterday; memorial book to the Jews of
Grosswardein) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/oradea/oradea.html

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Praga, Poland (Praga book; dedicated to the memory of the martyrs of our
town) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/praga/praga.html

- Przedborz, Poland (Przedborz Memorial Book: 33 Years Since the Destruction
of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Przedborz/Przedborz.html

- Radoshkovichi, Belarus (Radoshkowitz, A Memorial to the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/radoshkovichi/radoshkovichi.html

- Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New
Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rafalovka/rafalovka.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszow.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowp.html [Polish]

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Tighina, Moldova (Bendery Community Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bender/Bender.html

- Tluszcz, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of Tluszcz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tluszcz/tluszcz.html

- Tomaszow-Lubelsk, Poland Memorial book of Tomaszow Lubelski)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Tomaszow-Lubelski/Tomaszow-Lubelski.html

- Zabludow, Poland (Chosen Pages >from The Zabludow Yizkor Book - Holocaust
Chapter) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zabludow/Zabludow.html

- Zaglembia, Poland (Memorial book of Zaglembie)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zaglembia/Zaglembie.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them. Please also note that there are a quite a few books that are
being translated by professional translators and would welcome your
financial support. A list of these projects can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


list of hungarian ww1 units #hungary

tom
 

In a short bio of my grandfather, i found a
cryptic, one-sentence reference to his military
career: "A 10. gy. e. kotelekeben harcolt az
orosz es olasz fronton, megsebesult." most of it
is easy to understand, but i had no idea where to
find the "10. gy. e.". (presumably "10th
infantry regiment".) until now.

i found a web site:
<http://www.austro-hungarian-army.co.uk/hungland.htm>
which lists the hungarian units mobilized in
1914. (including the "Miskolczi 10. honvéd
gyalogezred" - bingo! since he was already an
established citizen of mezotur at the time the
bio was written, it helps to know that he
enlisted at miskolc, where he went to school, and
learned a trade.)

hopefully, this will help anybody else with
deciphering military unit numbers of the k&k army.


....... tom klein, toronto


Hungary SIG #Hungary list of hungarian ww1 units #hungary

tom
 

In a short bio of my grandfather, i found a
cryptic, one-sentence reference to his military
career: "A 10. gy. e. kotelekeben harcolt az
orosz es olasz fronton, megsebesult." most of it
is easy to understand, but i had no idea where to
find the "10. gy. e.". (presumably "10th
infantry regiment".) until now.

i found a web site:
<http://www.austro-hungarian-army.co.uk/hungland.htm>
which lists the hungarian units mobilized in
1914. (including the "Miskolczi 10. honvéd
gyalogezred" - bingo! since he was already an
established citizen of mezotur at the time the
bio was written, it helps to know that he
enlisted at miskolc, where he went to school, and
learned a trade.)

hopefully, this will help anybody else with
deciphering military unit numbers of the k&k army.


....... tom klein, toronto


Looking for Howie Glaser #general

Pesha Lea
 

I am looking for Howie Glaser. He was born in 1959, in New Jersey. He lived in
Encino and in Pasadena for a time when we were both in Junior High. His Grandmother
Tina Glaser and my Grandfather Morris Estis were siblings. I am in touch with
descendants of all of my Grandfathers siblings except this branch.

Does anyone have any suggestions on how to find him?

Debbie Estis
Murrieeta, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for Howie Glaser #general

Pesha Lea
 

I am looking for Howie Glaser. He was born in 1959, in New Jersey. He lived in
Encino and in Pasadena for a time when we were both in Junior High. His Grandmother
Tina Glaser and my Grandfather Morris Estis were siblings. I am in touch with
descendants of all of my Grandfathers siblings except this branch.

Does anyone have any suggestions on how to find him?

Debbie Estis
Murrieeta, CA


JGSCT Program, Sunday, November 18, 2012, 1:00 pm, Middletown, CT #general

gkreynolds
 

FINDING YOUR JEWISH ANCESTORS

MAXIMIZING YOUR SUCCESS

A Jewish Genealogy Workshop, Part II

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut presents Part II of a two-part
Genealogy Workshop for its members on November 18, 2012. Part II includes
presentations on vital records, city directories, cemeteries, newspapers, and how
to approach brick walls in your genealogical research. Each topic will be presented
in depth so that more experienced members can also benefit. There will be a time
for questions and help. Reservations are necessary: non-members may sign-up ahead
of time and pay for membership at the door.

The workshop will start Sunday, November 18 at 1pm at Godfrey Memorial Library, 134
Newfield Street, Middletown, CT 06457. For reservations, please email
gwhaken@gmail.com or call (203) 397-3253.=20

For additional information, go
to www.jgsct-jewish-genealogy.org/programs.html

Gail K Reynolds


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSCT Program, Sunday, November 18, 2012, 1:00 pm, Middletown, CT #general

gkreynolds
 

FINDING YOUR JEWISH ANCESTORS

MAXIMIZING YOUR SUCCESS

A Jewish Genealogy Workshop, Part II

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut presents Part II of a two-part
Genealogy Workshop for its members on November 18, 2012. Part II includes
presentations on vital records, city directories, cemeteries, newspapers, and how
to approach brick walls in your genealogical research. Each topic will be presented
in depth so that more experienced members can also benefit. There will be a time
for questions and help. Reservations are necessary: non-members may sign-up ahead
of time and pay for membership at the door.

The workshop will start Sunday, November 18 at 1pm at Godfrey Memorial Library, 134
Newfield Street, Middletown, CT 06457. For reservations, please email
gwhaken@gmail.com or call (203) 397-3253.=20

For additional information, go
to www.jgsct-jewish-genealogy.org/programs.html

Gail K Reynolds


JGSI - Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois - Sunday, Nov. 4, meeting notice #general

News Releases JGSI-Events <jgsi-events@...>
 

Subject: JGS of Illinois Nov. 4, 2012, Meeting
Date: Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, Time: 2 p.m.
Place: Temple Beth Israel 3601 W. Dempster Street Skokie, Illinois
Topic: We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust

Author, translator and playwright Ellen Cassedy will speak about her newest book,
We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust, at 2 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012,
at the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois meeting in Temple Beth Israel, 3601
W. Dempster St., Skokie. The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth Israel will
open at 12:30 p.m. to accommodate members/guests who want to use genealogy library
materials, get help with genealogy websites on the Internet, or ask genealogical
questions before the main program begins. For more information, visit
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsi or phone (312) 666-0100. Cassedy, a former columnist
for the Philadelphia Daily News and the author of two books for working women, has
been exploring the world of the Lithuanian Holocaust for ten years. Her latest
book began as a personal journey to connect with her Jewish forebears, but soon
expanded into a larger quest, into how people in Lithuania Jews and non-Jews are
engaging with their Nazi and Soviet pasts to move forward into the future.

Originally, Cassedy had set off into the former Jewish heartland of Lithuania to
study Yiddish and connect with her ancestry. Then her uncle, a Holocaust survivor,
told her a surprising story about his experience in a Lithuanian ghetto, and an
elderly man in her ancestral town made an unsettling request. Old certainties began
to dissolve, and her Jewish heritage tour took on new meaning.

Ellen Cassedy is a regular contributor to VilNews, an international web magazine
based in Vilnius, Lithuania. Her articles have also been published by Huffington
Post, Lilith, Hadassah, Haaretz, the Jewish Telegraph Agency, The Jewish Daily
Forward and other publications. We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust
was published by the University of Nebraska Press in March 2012.

PLEASE NOTE: Daylight Saving Time ends this weekend. Remember to turn your clocks
back one hour Saturday night so that you will get to this meeting on time.

For additional information please visit http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsi or phone
(312) 666-0100.

Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity, JGSI


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSI - Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois - Sunday, Nov. 4, meeting notice #general

News Releases JGSI-Events <jgsi-events@...>
 

Subject: JGS of Illinois Nov. 4, 2012, Meeting
Date: Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, Time: 2 p.m.
Place: Temple Beth Israel 3601 W. Dempster Street Skokie, Illinois
Topic: We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust

Author, translator and playwright Ellen Cassedy will speak about her newest book,
We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust, at 2 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012,
at the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois meeting in Temple Beth Israel, 3601
W. Dempster St., Skokie. The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth Israel will
open at 12:30 p.m. to accommodate members/guests who want to use genealogy library
materials, get help with genealogy websites on the Internet, or ask genealogical
questions before the main program begins. For more information, visit
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsi or phone (312) 666-0100. Cassedy, a former columnist
for the Philadelphia Daily News and the author of two books for working women, has
been exploring the world of the Lithuanian Holocaust for ten years. Her latest
book began as a personal journey to connect with her Jewish forebears, but soon
expanded into a larger quest, into how people in Lithuania Jews and non-Jews are
engaging with their Nazi and Soviet pasts to move forward into the future.

Originally, Cassedy had set off into the former Jewish heartland of Lithuania to
study Yiddish and connect with her ancestry. Then her uncle, a Holocaust survivor,
told her a surprising story about his experience in a Lithuanian ghetto, and an
elderly man in her ancestral town made an unsettling request. Old certainties began
to dissolve, and her Jewish heritage tour took on new meaning.

Ellen Cassedy is a regular contributor to VilNews, an international web magazine
based in Vilnius, Lithuania. Her articles have also been published by Huffington
Post, Lilith, Hadassah, Haaretz, the Jewish Telegraph Agency, The Jewish Daily
Forward and other publications. We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust
was published by the University of Nebraska Press in March 2012.

PLEASE NOTE: Daylight Saving Time ends this weekend. Remember to turn your clocks
back one hour Saturday night so that you will get to this meeting on time.

For additional information please visit http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsi or phone
(312) 666-0100.

Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity, JGSI


Re: "Schutzbuerger" #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Thank you, Gerhard, for the explanation of what the word "Schutz" implied.

But we do need an English term, and I'm not sure that "protected" is
that far off the mark. After all, there were not only Schutzjuden but
ungeschuetzte (unprotected) Juden in many places. Perhaps "sanctioned" is better.

In Prussia there were degrees of sanction for Jews:
Ordinaerer Schutzjude: Jews with this status had a hereditary patent to
reside in a particular place. One son (or son-in-law, grandson, etc. as
necessary) could inherit the rights guaranteed in the patent. Other
sons could be "established" if they had enough money and/or contributed
to industry.
Extraordinaerer Schutzjude: no automatic inheritance, but
"establishment" of offspring was possible (at the right price).
Tolerierter Jude: Lifetime residence only.
Publique-Bediente: cantor, gravedigger, shammes, shochet,
etc.--permitted to reside as long as they were employed by the rest of
the community.
Schutzbediente: an employee or servant of a member of the two upper
classes. Often married and with offspring; not unusually a younger son
or a son-in-law of the Schutzjude. The number of Schutzbediente a
Schutzjude could have was limited.
Professionist: someone with a generally useful trade; again, residence
tied to their practicing their trade.

There were a few other categories. For instance, the Prussian state did
not expel the elderly as long as the community could care for them. And
then there were the Emigranten--Jews whose emigration was desired. See
my next posting with regard to them.

So, however we translate it, it's clear that many Prussian Jews a) lived
in Prussia, b) did not fear expulsion in the short term, and c) had a
relationship to the Prussian government that could not be described as
"Schutz."

Another 20 years or so and I'll begin to understand this stuff!

Best, Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA Research co-ordinator, GerSIG

On 10/31/2012 3:26 PM, Gerhard Buck wrote:
The prefix "Schutz-" was not restricted to Jews. Until the 19th
century, it was used for those male, adult inhabitants of a locality,
who had minor rights and whose obligations were different >from those
of the majority. It is a typical word of the age of inequality. The
Catholic minority belonged to this group in Lutheran states and
Lutherans in Catholic ones. Everywhere, the Jews stood outside this
system based upon religion.

People could be in this group because of certain jobs or because of
small property . Its members were called "Schutzgenossen" or
"Schutzverwandte".

A literal English translation "Protected Relatives" is senseless. A
Jewish
genealogist should know that in such tax lists for people standing
outside
the local community he or she can find Jews and Gentiles together.

In the era in which most of us do their research (17th - 19th
century), the old term "Schutz" had lost its original, medieval
meaning. The English translations "protection, protected" are
misleading, because they do not render the meaning of the word
"Schutz" in this legal context at this time.


German SIG #Germany Re: "Schutzbuerger" #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Thank you, Gerhard, for the explanation of what the word "Schutz" implied.

But we do need an English term, and I'm not sure that "protected" is
that far off the mark. After all, there were not only Schutzjuden but
ungeschuetzte (unprotected) Juden in many places. Perhaps "sanctioned" is better.

In Prussia there were degrees of sanction for Jews:
Ordinaerer Schutzjude: Jews with this status had a hereditary patent to
reside in a particular place. One son (or son-in-law, grandson, etc. as
necessary) could inherit the rights guaranteed in the patent. Other
sons could be "established" if they had enough money and/or contributed
to industry.
Extraordinaerer Schutzjude: no automatic inheritance, but
"establishment" of offspring was possible (at the right price).
Tolerierter Jude: Lifetime residence only.
Publique-Bediente: cantor, gravedigger, shammes, shochet,
etc.--permitted to reside as long as they were employed by the rest of
the community.
Schutzbediente: an employee or servant of a member of the two upper
classes. Often married and with offspring; not unusually a younger son
or a son-in-law of the Schutzjude. The number of Schutzbediente a
Schutzjude could have was limited.
Professionist: someone with a generally useful trade; again, residence
tied to their practicing their trade.

There were a few other categories. For instance, the Prussian state did
not expel the elderly as long as the community could care for them. And
then there were the Emigranten--Jews whose emigration was desired. See
my next posting with regard to them.

So, however we translate it, it's clear that many Prussian Jews a) lived
in Prussia, b) did not fear expulsion in the short term, and c) had a
relationship to the Prussian government that could not be described as
"Schutz."

Another 20 years or so and I'll begin to understand this stuff!

Best, Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA Research co-ordinator, GerSIG

On 10/31/2012 3:26 PM, Gerhard Buck wrote:
The prefix "Schutz-" was not restricted to Jews. Until the 19th
century, it was used for those male, adult inhabitants of a locality,
who had minor rights and whose obligations were different >from those
of the majority. It is a typical word of the age of inequality. The
Catholic minority belonged to this group in Lutheran states and
Lutherans in Catholic ones. Everywhere, the Jews stood outside this
system based upon religion.

People could be in this group because of certain jobs or because of
small property . Its members were called "Schutzgenossen" or
"Schutzverwandte".

A literal English translation "Protected Relatives" is senseless. A
Jewish
genealogist should know that in such tax lists for people standing
outside
the local community he or she can find Jews and Gentiles together.

In the era in which most of us do their research (17th - 19th
century), the old term "Schutz" had lost its original, medieval
meaning. The English translations "protection, protected" are
misleading, because they do not render the meaning of the word
"Schutz" in this legal context at this time.


Cherkassy maps #general

Esther <remarc1@...>
 

Subject: Cherkassy maps
From: Esther Rechtschafner <remarc@ein-zurim.co.il>
Summary: I would like maps of Cherkassy >from before WWII, or even earlier , If you
have any old maps of Cherkassy or any other information about Cherkassy, please
forward it to me..
Thanks, ESTHER
ID: 115429

Esther Rechtschafner

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately. When submitting a message to the
JewishGen Discussion Group, please make sure that your subject line is meaningful.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cherkassy maps #general

Esther <remarc1@...>
 

Subject: Cherkassy maps
From: Esther Rechtschafner <remarc@ein-zurim.co.il>
Summary: I would like maps of Cherkassy >from before WWII, or even earlier , If you
have any old maps of Cherkassy or any other information about Cherkassy, please
forward it to me..
Thanks, ESTHER
ID: 115429

Esther Rechtschafner

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately. When submitting a message to the
JewishGen Discussion Group, please make sure that your subject line is meaningful.


Raducaneni Romania #romania

marcelg@...
 

Raducaneni Romania
Earlier in the year I took digital photos of all the Raducaneni Civil
Records - birth, marriage, and death, for the town of Raducaneni >from 1882
to 1912.
I have now compiled a comprehensive index of the Jewish records for each
year.
Shortly I will have all the earlier records.
If you are interested in Raducaneni please contact me
marcelg@netvision.net.i
Marcel Glaskie - Ra'anana Israel.


Romania SIG #Romania Raducaneni Romania #romania

marcelg@...
 

Raducaneni Romania
Earlier in the year I took digital photos of all the Raducaneni Civil
Records - birth, marriage, and death, for the town of Raducaneni >from 1882
to 1912.
I have now compiled a comprehensive index of the Jewish records for each
year.
Shortly I will have all the earlier records.
If you are interested in Raducaneni please contact me
marcelg@netvision.net.i
Marcel Glaskie - Ra'anana Israel.


Taken from Newsletter, a reminder of November's events - PLUS two Plashet visits #unitedkingdom

Raymond Montanjees
 

Dear hardy CemTrekkers,

I will be at Plashet cemetery on Sundays the 4th and the 18th >from mid day
until approx 3 pm. If you would like to come along for research, please
RSVP. I will then send you my mobile number - (I may be at the far end of the
cemetery) - so as to let you in.

Upcoming November JGSGB Events and Program Contacts:

Tuesday 6th Chilterns

Regional Group Genealogical Workshop Northwood & Pinner Liberal
Synagogue.
For details: Contact: Stan Rose. stan@stanrosefamily.com
(RSVP)

Sunday 11th

3.00-6.00pm Anglo-Jewish
SIG Guest Speaker: Joel Levy The Kings of England, Wales and North America

Contact: Doreen Berger

DOREENJGN
(RSVP)

Sunday 11th

3.00-6.00pm S.W.
London Regional Group Breaking Down a few Brick Wallsâ??.
Usual venue in Teddington. (RSVP) Ena Black
dandeeblack@waitrose.com for details.


Wednesday14th
10.30- 3pm Library Session Open 10.30-3.00pm for general research. All
visitors welcome. Members of the society are on hand to help you use the
library.

Thursday 15th

7.30-9.30pm Education Evening Beginners This is a webinar lecture.
There is no physical meeting at 33 Seymour Place. Contact: Jeanette
Rosenberg for further details.
Jeanette.R.Rosenberg@googlemail.com

Wednesday21st

8.00 to 10pm Library Session Open 8.00-10.00pm for general research. All
visitors welcome. Members of the society are on hand to help you use the
library

Sunday 25th

2.00-4.30 pm South East
Essex Regional
Group Workshop:
Using online resources & comparing what works best.
Balmoral Community Centre, Salisbury Ave., Westcliffe on Sea, SS0 7AU
Contact: Anne Marcus for details.
RSVP to avoceta@hotmail.com

Sunday 25th

2.00-6.00 pm East European
SIG Speaker Geoff Munitz, Brody Records especially relating to the
Schottlander Family
(For details see page 23 of the JGSGB Newsletter.
(There will be the usual " 'round the
table " plus a library session after Geoff's talk)
RSVP to raymusik@aol.com

Sunday 25th

3.00- 6pm Library Session Open 3.00-6.00pm for general research. All
visitors welcome. Members of the society are on hand to help you use the
library

Regards,

Raymond Montanjees
Program Chair, JGSGB
London

Researching :
LEVY > < ISAACS > < JESSEL - maternal
MONTANHES, MONTAN(N)ES, MONTANEZ, MONTANJIES - MONTANJEES > < VAN PRAAG(H)

< KURTZ > < PIZER > < TOF(F)LER - TAF(F)LER - paternal.


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Taken from Newsletter, a reminder of November's events - PLUS two Plashet visits #unitedkingdom

Raymond Montanjees
 

Dear hardy CemTrekkers,

I will be at Plashet cemetery on Sundays the 4th and the 18th >from mid day
until approx 3 pm. If you would like to come along for research, please
RSVP. I will then send you my mobile number - (I may be at the far end of the
cemetery) - so as to let you in.

Upcoming November JGSGB Events and Program Contacts:

Tuesday 6th Chilterns

Regional Group Genealogical Workshop Northwood & Pinner Liberal
Synagogue.
For details: Contact: Stan Rose. stan@stanrosefamily.com
(RSVP)

Sunday 11th

3.00-6.00pm Anglo-Jewish
SIG Guest Speaker: Joel Levy The Kings of England, Wales and North America

Contact: Doreen Berger

DOREENJGN
(RSVP)

Sunday 11th

3.00-6.00pm S.W.
London Regional Group Breaking Down a few Brick Wallsâ??.
Usual venue in Teddington. (RSVP) Ena Black
dandeeblack@waitrose.com for details.


Wednesday14th
10.30- 3pm Library Session Open 10.30-3.00pm for general research. All
visitors welcome. Members of the society are on hand to help you use the
library.

Thursday 15th

7.30-9.30pm Education Evening Beginners This is a webinar lecture.
There is no physical meeting at 33 Seymour Place. Contact: Jeanette
Rosenberg for further details.
Jeanette.R.Rosenberg@googlemail.com

Wednesday21st

8.00 to 10pm Library Session Open 8.00-10.00pm for general research. All
visitors welcome. Members of the society are on hand to help you use the
library

Sunday 25th

2.00-4.30 pm South East
Essex Regional
Group Workshop:
Using online resources & comparing what works best.
Balmoral Community Centre, Salisbury Ave., Westcliffe on Sea, SS0 7AU
Contact: Anne Marcus for details.
RSVP to avoceta@hotmail.com

Sunday 25th

2.00-6.00 pm East European
SIG Speaker Geoff Munitz, Brody Records especially relating to the
Schottlander Family
(For details see page 23 of the JGSGB Newsletter.
(There will be the usual " 'round the
table " plus a library session after Geoff's talk)
RSVP to raymusik@aol.com

Sunday 25th

3.00- 6pm Library Session Open 3.00-6.00pm for general research. All
visitors welcome. Members of the society are on hand to help you use the
library

Regards,

Raymond Montanjees
Program Chair, JGSGB
London

Researching :
LEVY > < ISAACS > < JESSEL - maternal
MONTANHES, MONTAN(N)ES, MONTANEZ, MONTANJIES - MONTANJEES > < VAN PRAAG(H)

< KURTZ > < PIZER > < TOF(F)LER - TAF(F)LER - paternal.

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