Date   

The December issue of the "Galitzianer" #austria-czech

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to release the December 2017 issue of the
"Galitzianer," a special issue on many Jewish ties to Krakow
throughout its history.

The featured topics in the current issue are:

-- >from the Editor's Desk by Andrew Zalewski
-- Research Corner by Tony Kahane
-- Jagiellonian Records: Jewish Medical Students by Andrew Zalewski
-- Conflicted Life of Ludwik Gumplowicz by Zdzislaw Mach
-- Man of Boundless Energy: Jozef Oettinger by Ryszard Gryglewski
-- Progressive Preachers by Alicja Maciejewska
-- Map Corner: The 1856 Map of Krakow by Jay Osborn
-- Simcha Dinter: Between Krakow and New York by Rivka Schiller
-- Jewish Resistance During WWII by Jakub Nowakowski
-- Candlestick Brought Home by Ann Harris

We hope you will enjoy the new issue of the journal.
The "Galitzianer" is a membership benefit of Gesher Galicia.


Andrew Zalewski
Editor, the Galitzianer
The Quarterly Research Journal of Gesher Galicia

--
---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to info@geshergalicia.org
---


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech The December issue of the "Galitzianer" #austria-czech

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to release the December 2017 issue of the
"Galitzianer," a special issue on many Jewish ties to Krakow
throughout its history.

The featured topics in the current issue are:

-- >from the Editor's Desk by Andrew Zalewski
-- Research Corner by Tony Kahane
-- Jagiellonian Records: Jewish Medical Students by Andrew Zalewski
-- Conflicted Life of Ludwik Gumplowicz by Zdzislaw Mach
-- Man of Boundless Energy: Jozef Oettinger by Ryszard Gryglewski
-- Progressive Preachers by Alicja Maciejewska
-- Map Corner: The 1856 Map of Krakow by Jay Osborn
-- Simcha Dinter: Between Krakow and New York by Rivka Schiller
-- Jewish Resistance During WWII by Jakub Nowakowski
-- Candlestick Brought Home by Ann Harris

We hope you will enjoy the new issue of the journal.
The "Galitzianer" is a membership benefit of Gesher Galicia.


Andrew Zalewski
Editor, the Galitzianer
The Quarterly Research Journal of Gesher Galicia

--
---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to info@geshergalicia.org
---


New York Rabinowitz actuary #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to reconnect with Aryey Mordecai Rabinowitz and family,
descendants of the Yehudi HaKodesh (paternal side) and the Landau
Dynasty of Ciechanow (on the maternal side). We were in touch in 1993.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic New York Rabinowitz actuary #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to reconnect with Aryey Mordecai Rabinowitz and family,
descendants of the Yehudi HaKodesh (paternal side) and the Landau
Dynasty of Ciechanow (on the maternal side). We were in touch in 1993.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


The Jewish Music of Maramaros #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Check out this YouTube film with Muzsikas, the marvelous Hungarian group whose CD revived interest in the music of the Maramaros Jews. Roma musicians like those in this film helped to preserve the music of their Jewish neighbors. Parts of this video were filmed in what was once Farkasrev, Maramaros, now Vadu Izei, Ukraine. Contact me off-list if Lyris mangled the URL.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8Eijcjyz_Y&feature=youtu.be

Vivian Kahn


PREZANTI family in Chernigov in the Ukraine in 1873 #ukraine

gamco@...
 

Dear all,

I am only slowly finding my way round this system, and now realise that I
should probably have better posted the message below on this Ukraine SIG,
although one respondent has already indicated some possible links with
Poland.

My interest is that my son-in-law's, great-grandfather, Alexander
Nikolaevich PREZANTI (1873-1936) (which means that his father's name was
presumably 'Nicholas' or 'Nicola'), who was reputedly born in June 1873 in
'Chernigov' (now called Chernihiv) (north of Kiev on the river Desna),
which is a town in present-day Ukraine, that in 1873 had quite a substantial
Jewish population.

The following variants in the surname PREZANTI are found in the Ukraine, but
not in Chernigov: PRIZANT, PRYZANT, PRISAND, PRESAMD and PRESANT on
<www.jewishgen.org>, of Jewish surnames. Alexander Nikolaevich PREZANTI was
meant to be of Italian ancestry, reputedly >from northern Italy.

I am looking for people, who speak either English, French or Portuguese, who
know more about the families in Chernigov region, and/or have focused more
on Italian Jewish families coming >from Italy to that part of the Ukraine in
the 19th century. Please send me private responses.

Yours sincerely

Vincent Tickner
Britain


Hungary SIG #Hungary The Jewish Music of Maramaros #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Check out this YouTube film with Muzsikas, the marvelous Hungarian group whose CD revived interest in the music of the Maramaros Jews. Roma musicians like those in this film helped to preserve the music of their Jewish neighbors. Parts of this video were filmed in what was once Farkasrev, Maramaros, now Vadu Izei, Ukraine. Contact me off-list if Lyris mangled the URL.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8Eijcjyz_Y&feature=youtu.be

Vivian Kahn


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine PREZANTI family in Chernigov in the Ukraine in 1873 #ukraine

gamco@...
 

Dear all,

I am only slowly finding my way round this system, and now realise that I
should probably have better posted the message below on this Ukraine SIG,
although one respondent has already indicated some possible links with
Poland.

My interest is that my son-in-law's, great-grandfather, Alexander
Nikolaevich PREZANTI (1873-1936) (which means that his father's name was
presumably 'Nicholas' or 'Nicola'), who was reputedly born in June 1873 in
'Chernigov' (now called Chernihiv) (north of Kiev on the river Desna),
which is a town in present-day Ukraine, that in 1873 had quite a substantial
Jewish population.

The following variants in the surname PREZANTI are found in the Ukraine, but
not in Chernigov: PRIZANT, PRYZANT, PRISAND, PRESAMD and PRESANT on
<www.jewishgen.org>, of Jewish surnames. Alexander Nikolaevich PREZANTI was
meant to be of Italian ancestry, reputedly >from northern Italy.

I am looking for people, who speak either English, French or Portuguese, who
know more about the families in Chernigov region, and/or have focused more
on Italian Jewish families coming >from Italy to that part of the Ukraine in
the 19th century. Please send me private responses.

Yours sincerely

Vincent Tickner
Britain


Re: : Inclusion of Stillbirths & Adopted Infants in NYC Birth Index? #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Deborah Dworski asked a multi-part question that's too complicated for me to
paraphrase, so I copied it below. I'm answering only the parts that I can, and
trying not to speculate.

If a baby was listed in the birth index, then it wasn't a stillborn. In New York
City, stillborns have been listed in the death index since the late 1930's (I'm
going >from memory, so I can't be more precise for the year), and only in a separate
section that follows the indices for the five boroughs. If the baby lived, and
even took only one breath, then both a birth certificate and a death certificate
were issued, with the death listed in the regular death index for that borough
until they went to a citywide listing.

If the baby was adopted, then things can get complicated. Nobody was removed >from
the birth indices, but names could be changed. The name recorded in the index
should be the same as on the birth certificate. So an adoption at birth or very
shortly afterward should get recorded with the name that the adoptive parents gave
the baby. The birth certificate could also be reissued if the name was changed,
say several weeks or months later, with the original version kept under seal
according to state law. In that case, the original name could disappear >from the
index, but the adoptive name would then appear. But an adoption that occurred
well after the birth, say the following year, after the index had been printed,
might result in a name appearing in the index but no birth certificate with that
name.

There are many babies that are named just "boy" or "girl," because the baby wasn't
named by the time the birth certificate was completed. In this case, it sounds
like Deborah is keeping an open mind that it could have been because the baby was
adopted so the biological parents didn't name it, or it died before being named.
For the latter, she should look at stillbirths at the end of the death index for
1957.

Regards,

Ira
Ira Leviton

Deborah Dworski wrote:
Online access to the 1957 NYC birth index has yielded the discovery of a surprise
baby who clearly belongs on my family tree due to the unusual surname. She is only
listed as "baby girl." Pondering possible explanations of this finding has led to
more general questions about the database...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: : Inclusion of Stillbirths & Adopted Infants in NYC Birth Index? #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Deborah Dworski asked a multi-part question that's too complicated for me to
paraphrase, so I copied it below. I'm answering only the parts that I can, and
trying not to speculate.

If a baby was listed in the birth index, then it wasn't a stillborn. In New York
City, stillborns have been listed in the death index since the late 1930's (I'm
going >from memory, so I can't be more precise for the year), and only in a separate
section that follows the indices for the five boroughs. If the baby lived, and
even took only one breath, then both a birth certificate and a death certificate
were issued, with the death listed in the regular death index for that borough
until they went to a citywide listing.

If the baby was adopted, then things can get complicated. Nobody was removed >from
the birth indices, but names could be changed. The name recorded in the index
should be the same as on the birth certificate. So an adoption at birth or very
shortly afterward should get recorded with the name that the adoptive parents gave
the baby. The birth certificate could also be reissued if the name was changed,
say several weeks or months later, with the original version kept under seal
according to state law. In that case, the original name could disappear >from the
index, but the adoptive name would then appear. But an adoption that occurred
well after the birth, say the following year, after the index had been printed,
might result in a name appearing in the index but no birth certificate with that
name.

There are many babies that are named just "boy" or "girl," because the baby wasn't
named by the time the birth certificate was completed. In this case, it sounds
like Deborah is keeping an open mind that it could have been because the baby was
adopted so the biological parents didn't name it, or it died before being named.
For the latter, she should look at stillbirths at the end of the death index for
1957.

Regards,

Ira
Ira Leviton

Deborah Dworski wrote:
Online access to the 1957 NYC birth index has yielded the discovery of a surprise
baby who clearly belongs on my family tree due to the unusual surname. She is only
listed as "baby girl." Pondering possible explanations of this finding has led to
more general questions about the database...


Jewish Families From Aden in Port Said #unitedkingdom

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Genners,

I am writing an article about the Jewish community in Port Said which
shortlived there between 1859-1956.

75% of its members were Jews >from Aden. All of them held British
nationality and most of them moved through the years to the UK and further
(USA, Australia).

If you know of such families I would like to have their surnames.

Please respond privately.

Jacob Rosen-Koenigsbuch
Jerusalem


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Jewish Families From Aden in Port Said #unitedkingdom

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Genners,

I am writing an article about the Jewish community in Port Said which
shortlived there between 1859-1956.

75% of its members were Jews >from Aden. All of them held British
nationality and most of them moved through the years to the UK and further
(USA, Australia).

If you know of such families I would like to have their surnames.

Please respond privately.

Jacob Rosen-Koenigsbuch
Jerusalem


Bessarabia SIG at the conference in Warsaw #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

It is now time to find out who are going to be in Warsaw at the conference
from our Bessarabia SIG.
I hope to have a good number of our members interested in joining us in
Warsaw.

Our Bessarabia SIG is planning to participate in
- Share Fair
- Bessarabia SIG meeting
- a number of lectures, sessions on the Bessarabia topics
- We also are planning to invite a guest >from Moldova - a local historian,
who helped us a lot at many projects. He will talk about his prospective on
cemetery research and more
- We also may have a SIG lunch or dinner with informal discussions. need to
know if people will participate

I would like to know who is planning to be at these events.

Please reply to me even if you are not yet sure.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Bessarabia SIG at the conference in Warsaw #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

It is now time to find out who are going to be in Warsaw at the conference
from our Bessarabia SIG.
I hope to have a good number of our members interested in joining us in
Warsaw.

Our Bessarabia SIG is planning to participate in
- Share Fair
- Bessarabia SIG meeting
- a number of lectures, sessions on the Bessarabia topics
- We also are planning to invite a guest >from Moldova - a local historian,
who helped us a lot at many projects. He will talk about his prospective on
cemetery research and more
- We also may have a SIG lunch or dinner with informal discussions. need to
know if people will participate

I would like to know who is planning to be at these events.

Please reply to me even if you are not yet sure.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator


Re: William POSNER- Philadelphia 1930s #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

What a small world we are. According to the replies we received William POSNER who
was like " a big brother" to my mother in Philly in the mid 30s turns out to be the
uncle of very good friends of ours >from the 70s and on. WOW!

Thanks for all the replies.

Happy Chanuka and a happy new Chodesh Tevet
Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: William POSNER- Philadelphia 1930s #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

What a small world we are. According to the replies we received William POSNER who
was like " a big brother" to my mother in Philly in the mid 30s turns out to be the
uncle of very good friends of ours >from the 70s and on. WOW!

Thanks for all the replies.

Happy Chanuka and a happy new Chodesh Tevet
Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


Re: Inclusion of Stillbirths & Adopted Infants in NYC Birth Index? #general

banai@...
 

Adoptions are listed in the NYC Birth Index under the birth name. The
records were sealed and new birth certificates issued under the same
certificate number.

I also pondered if they were listed under the mother or the father. I
have an example listed under the father's surname. But I can imagine
the mother not revealing the father's identity and finding the child
listed under the mother's surname as well.

As for stillbirths, I believe they are included in the birth indexes.
At least for a certain range of years, they are listed separately
from the other births, but they are included on the microfilms at the
FHL. But that is just the indexes; none of the stillbirth
certificates were microfilmed. And 1957 would be much too recent for
those films anyway. You'd have to try in NYC.

Banai

From: Deborah Dworski <ddworski@gmail.com>
Online access to the 1957 NYC birth index has yielded the discovery of a surprise
baby who clearly belongs on my family tree due to the unusual surname. She is
only listed as "baby girl." Pondering possible explanations of this finding has
led to more general questions about the database. First, did the NYC birth
index include stillbirths or were stillbirths assigned to the City death index?
Banai Lynn Feldstein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Inclusion of Stillbirths & Adopted Infants in NYC Birth Index? #general

banai@...
 

Adoptions are listed in the NYC Birth Index under the birth name. The
records were sealed and new birth certificates issued under the same
certificate number.

I also pondered if they were listed under the mother or the father. I
have an example listed under the father's surname. But I can imagine
the mother not revealing the father's identity and finding the child
listed under the mother's surname as well.

As for stillbirths, I believe they are included in the birth indexes.
At least for a certain range of years, they are listed separately
from the other births, but they are included on the microfilms at the
FHL. But that is just the indexes; none of the stillbirth
certificates were microfilmed. And 1957 would be much too recent for
those films anyway. You'd have to try in NYC.

Banai

From: Deborah Dworski <ddworski@gmail.com>
Online access to the 1957 NYC birth index has yielded the discovery of a surprise
baby who clearly belongs on my family tree due to the unusual surname. She is
only listed as "baby girl." Pondering possible explanations of this finding has
led to more general questions about the database. First, did the NYC birth
index include stillbirths or were stillbirths assigned to the City death index?
Banai Lynn Feldstein


Petsetmetszo #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Thanks to everyone who responded to my request for assistance with =
translation of an occupation listed in the 1848 Szepes census. Appears =
that I was on the right track. Several Hungarian researchers confirmed =
that petsetmetszo, which would now be spelled pecsetmetszo, is actually =
an archaic profession, a person who makes seals by cutting them out >from =
a piece of metal. Metszo means cutter but in this case has different =
meaning than the same word "Metszo" or ritual =
slaughterer/shochet.

I have added this term to a growing list of Hungarian occupations that I =
believe Tom Venetianer created. We will eventually upload the list to =
the Hungarian SIG website but, in the meantime, please contact me =
off-list and I will send it.

And BTW, I am still looking for folks who would like to help transcribe =
the 1848 Szepes census records. We are making good progress but could =
use additional volunteers.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, California
JewishGen Hungarian SIG Coordinator=


Hungary SIG #Hungary Petsetmetszo #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Thanks to everyone who responded to my request for assistance with =
translation of an occupation listed in the 1848 Szepes census. Appears =
that I was on the right track. Several Hungarian researchers confirmed =
that petsetmetszo, which would now be spelled pecsetmetszo, is actually =
an archaic profession, a person who makes seals by cutting them out >from =
a piece of metal. Metszo means cutter but in this case has different =
meaning than the same word "Metszo" or ritual =
slaughterer/shochet.

I have added this term to a growing list of Hungarian occupations that I =
believe Tom Venetianer created. We will eventually upload the list to =
the Hungarian SIG website but, in the meantime, please contact me =
off-list and I will send it.

And BTW, I am still looking for folks who would like to help transcribe =
the 1848 Szepes census records. We are making good progress but could =
use additional volunteers.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, California
JewishGen Hungarian SIG Coordinator=

49801 - 49820 of 662171