Date   

Polish and Galician Jews in Cairo in the 20th Century #poland

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Siggers,

I published last week on Avotaynuonline.com an index
of surnames of 1,689 Jewish familiesthat lived in Cairo,
Egypt during the 20th century.I posted it on different
Facebook groups of Egyptian Jews and on the Sephardic
SIG and the general Jewishgen list.

I started getting feedback, corrections and additions
and have another 30 surnames which I was not aware of.
Several Ph.D. candidates drew my attention to surnames
of Polish and Galician Jews who lived in Cairo. Thus,I
decided to post the link here with the hope that you'll
look at the methodology and the names and come up with
more.

https://avotaynuonline.com/2019/12/index-of-jewish-surnames-of-20th-century
-cairo/

Regards and thanks >from rainy Jerusalem

Jacob Rosen


JRI Poland #Poland Polish and Galician Jews in Cairo in the 20th Century #poland

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Siggers,

I published last week on Avotaynuonline.com an index
of surnames of 1,689 Jewish familiesthat lived in Cairo,
Egypt during the 20th century.I posted it on different
Facebook groups of Egyptian Jews and on the Sephardic
SIG and the general Jewishgen list.

I started getting feedback, corrections and additions
and have another 30 surnames which I was not aware of.
Several Ph.D. candidates drew my attention to surnames
of Polish and Galician Jews who lived in Cairo. Thus,I
decided to post the link here with the hope that you'll
look at the methodology and the names and come up with
more.

https://avotaynuonline.com/2019/12/index-of-jewish-surnames-of-20th-century
-cairo/

Regards and thanks >from rainy Jerusalem

Jacob Rosen


Polish and Galician Jews in Cairo in the 20th Century #galicia

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Siggers,

I published last week on Avotaynuonline.com an index of surnames of 1,689
Jewish families that lived in Cairo, Egypt, during the 20th century. I posted
it on different Facebook groups of Egyptian Jews and on the Sephardic SIG
and the general Jewishgen list.

I started getting feedback, corrections and additions and have another 30
surnames which I was not aware of. Several Ph.D. candidates drew my
attention to surnames of Polish and Galician Jews who lived in Cairo. Thus,
I decided to post the link here with the hope that you'll look at the
methodology and the names and come up with more.

https://avotaynuonline.com/2019/12/index-of-jewish-surnames-of-20th-century-cairo/
[Or https://tinyurl.com/CairoNames -- MOD.]

Regards and thanks >from rainy Jerusalem,

Jacob Rosen


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Polish and Galician Jews in Cairo in the 20th Century #galicia

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

Dear Siggers,

I published last week on Avotaynuonline.com an index of surnames of 1,689
Jewish families that lived in Cairo, Egypt, during the 20th century. I posted
it on different Facebook groups of Egyptian Jews and on the Sephardic SIG
and the general Jewishgen list.

I started getting feedback, corrections and additions and have another 30
surnames which I was not aware of. Several Ph.D. candidates drew my
attention to surnames of Polish and Galician Jews who lived in Cairo. Thus,
I decided to post the link here with the hope that you'll look at the
methodology and the names and come up with more.

https://avotaynuonline.com/2019/12/index-of-jewish-surnames-of-20th-century-cairo/
[Or https://tinyurl.com/CairoNames -- MOD.]

Regards and thanks >from rainy Jerusalem,

Jacob Rosen


CHARLIE KATZ APPOINTED TREASURER OF GESHER GALICIA #galicia

Steven Turner
 

The Gesher Galicia Board of Directors welcomes Charlie Katz as our new
Treasurer. After 15 years of dedicated service, Ann Harris has stepped
down. We are grateful for her service as former treasurer and wish her
the very best in future endeavors.

Charlie is an information technology consultant with decades of
experience delivering data management solutions for a global financial
institution. Most recently, he was a Senior Vice President of
Enterprise Operations & Technology leading big data engineering and
advanced analytics initiatives. Charlie holds a BA degree in Liberal
Arts from The New School in New York City.

Charlie has been researching his family history for over 20 years, a
journey spanning roots in Galicia, immigration to New York’s Lower
East Side, and adaptation to life in America in the early 20th
century. His research reconnected family in the US and UK that had
lost contact 60 years earlier.

Please join us in welcoming Charlie to the Board and wishing him
success in his new role.

Dr. Steven Turner
President,
Gesher Galicia


need a researcher in Hungary #hungary

renato mannheimer
 

I need a researcher in hungary who can go to the cemetery of
Nagykanizsa.
Any suggestion?
Please answer to my private address renato@ispo.it
Thank ypu
Renato Mannheimer (Italy)

Moderator: Please respond off-list if you can help.


Hungary SIG #Hungary need a researcher in Hungary #hungary

renato mannheimer
 

I need a researcher in hungary who can go to the cemetery of
Nagykanizsa.
Any suggestion?
Please answer to my private address renato@ispo.it
Thank ypu
Renato Mannheimer (Italy)

Moderator: Please respond off-list if you can help.


Re: Kalonymus

Hank Mishkoff
 

The forename "Kalman" (Coleman) runs in my family (including my Dad), I'm told that's a common derivation of Kalonymus. My family is from northeastern Poland (Grajewo and Przerosl), near today's border with Lithuania.


Re: Vital Records - Nowy Sacz #galicia

Howard Fink
 

JRI-Poland has made a much more exhaustive extraction of the Jewish
vital records >from Nowy Sacz and nearby towns than we have online.

This includes both more years and more fields for the years that we
already have online. At this time we have these vital records:

Births 1854-1916
Marriages: 1882-1938
Deaths: 1877-1937

In addition, we have indexed the 1870 Census (which we do have online)
and are right now doing a final check of our very detailed extraction of
the 1890 Census.

At this time the Polish Archives has scanned the vital records up through
1913, and the 1890 Census. I am working on adding the links to these
records, but that work is not yet complete.

Please contact me with specific information about family that you are
researching so that I can let you know what records are available for
them.

Howard Fink
Nowy Sacz Town Leader
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland

Yaron Wolfsthal <yaron.wolfsthal@gmail.com> wrote:

<<I'd highly appreciate advice and insights about vital records and
genealogical resources for the town of Nowy Sacz. JRI contains some
indexes (without pointers to the actual records!). But this repository
seems to be very partial. Where can I search for vital records of people
whom I know lived in the city, beyond the JRI list?>>


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Vital Records - Nowy Sacz #galicia

Howard Fink
 

JRI-Poland has made a much more exhaustive extraction of the Jewish
vital records >from Nowy Sacz and nearby towns than we have online.

This includes both more years and more fields for the years that we
already have online. At this time we have these vital records:

Births 1854-1916
Marriages: 1882-1938
Deaths: 1877-1937

In addition, we have indexed the 1870 Census (which we do have online)
and are right now doing a final check of our very detailed extraction of
the 1890 Census.

At this time the Polish Archives has scanned the vital records up through
1913, and the 1890 Census. I am working on adding the links to these
records, but that work is not yet complete.

Please contact me with specific information about family that you are
researching so that I can let you know what records are available for
them.

Howard Fink
Nowy Sacz Town Leader
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland

Yaron Wolfsthal <yaron.wolfsthal@gmail.com> wrote:

<<I'd highly appreciate advice and insights about vital records and
genealogical resources for the town of Nowy Sacz. JRI contains some
indexes (without pointers to the actual records!). But this repository
seems to be very partial. Where can I search for vital records of people
whom I know lived in the city, beyond the JRI list?>>


Vital Records - Nowy Sacz #galicia

Yaron Wolfsthal
 

Dear Group,

I'd highly appreciate advice and insights about vital records and
genealogical resources for the town of Nowy Sacz.

JRI contains some indexes (without pointers to the actual records!).
But this repository seems to be very partial.

Where can I search for vital records of people whom I know lived in
the city, beyond the JRI list?

Thank you

Yaron Wolfsthal
yaron.wolfsthal@gmail.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Vital Records - Nowy Sacz #galicia

Yaron Wolfsthal
 

Dear Group,

I'd highly appreciate advice and insights about vital records and
genealogical resources for the town of Nowy Sacz.

JRI contains some indexes (without pointers to the actual records!).
But this repository seems to be very partial.

Where can I search for vital records of people whom I know lived in
the city, beyond the JRI list?

Thank you

Yaron Wolfsthal
yaron.wolfsthal@gmail.com


Re: 1764 census content #galicia

Vered Dayan
 

Following Logan Kleinwaks's message >from yesterday, I took his advice and
searched the Judaica catalog of the Jagiellonian University:
http://www.judaiki.judaistyka.uj.edu.pl/. Relying on Google's translation,
my search for Sokal records yielded many intriguing results >from the late
18th century: >from census records to tidbits like "Files of the Szloma
Krakawski trial for the theft of silver synagogue plaques and cauldron from
the Sokal brewery". The question of the Surnames still stands, as I've
noticed that most Jewish surames are different >from those we know >from
the 19th century. Most earlier surnames bear the Russian suffix "icz" that I
think indicates "son of" (Mendelowicz - son of Mendel etc.), so I'm not sure
it's always possible to make connections to valid information. I will try to
find out how to order copies of some of the more interesting results (the
email I sent through their "contact" box just bounced back) and will share.

Vered Dayan
Israel


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia re: 1764 census content #galicia

Vered Dayan
 

Following Logan Kleinwaks's message >from yesterday, I took his advice and
searched the Judaica catalog of the Jagiellonian University:
http://www.judaiki.judaistyka.uj.edu.pl/. Relying on Google's translation,
my search for Sokal records yielded many intriguing results >from the late
18th century: >from census records to tidbits like "Files of the Szloma
Krakawski trial for the theft of silver synagogue plaques and cauldron from
the Sokal brewery". The question of the Surnames still stands, as I've
noticed that most Jewish surames are different >from those we know >from
the 19th century. Most earlier surnames bear the Russian suffix "icz" that I
think indicates "son of" (Mendelowicz - son of Mendel etc.), so I'm not sure
it's always possible to make connections to valid information. I will try to
find out how to order copies of some of the more interesting results (the
email I sent through their "contact" box just bounced back) and will share.

Vered Dayan
Israel


Re: The word 'Smouse' for a Jewish peddler #southafrica

Roy Ogus
 

Hi, Harold,

I don't remember that the word was derogatory, and you are correct that smouse
is the plural of smous. For more details, see:

https://dsae.co.za/entry/smous/e06649

Roy Ogus
Palo Alto, California
r_ogus at hotmail.com

--------
Subject: Re: The word 'Smouse' for a Jewish peddler
From: Harold Luntz <haroldluntz@outlook.com>
Date: Sun, 8 Dec 2019 20:47:38 +0000


Although I am unable to answer the thrust of the question whether the word
smouse is derogatory, my distant memory of Afrikaans tells me that smouse
is the plural of the singular word smous.

Harold Luntz


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Re: The word 'Smouse' for a Jewish peddler #southafrica

Roy Ogus
 

Hi, Harold,

I don't remember that the word was derogatory, and you are correct that smouse
is the plural of smous. For more details, see:

https://dsae.co.za/entry/smous/e06649

Roy Ogus
Palo Alto, California
r_ogus at hotmail.com

--------
Subject: Re: The word 'Smouse' for a Jewish peddler
From: Harold Luntz <haroldluntz@outlook.com>
Date: Sun, 8 Dec 2019 20:47:38 +0000


Although I am unable to answer the thrust of the question whether the word
smouse is derogatory, my distant memory of Afrikaans tells me that smouse
is the plural of the singular word smous.

Harold Luntz


Re: The word 'Smouse' for a Jewish peddler #southafrica

Hilde en Dennis Kahn <denmor@...>
 

According to 'Van Dale', the foremost dictionary in the Netherlands:

Smous is a Dutch word dating >from 1657. It is derived >from Yiddish for
Mousje (Moses).
The word has several meanings:
1. term of abuse for a jew.
2. ditto for a policeman.
3. cheat, dealer, haggler, trafficker.

Words derived >from smous include:
smousen -- to deal in a deceptive, disorderly, inferior manner.

Trust this is of use to you.
Best wishes,

Dennis Kahn
Amsterdam
Netherlands

-----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
Van: South Africa SIG [mailto:safrica@lyris.jewishgen.org]
Verzonden: zondag 8 december 2019 21:48
Aan: South Africa SIG
Onderwerp: Re:[safrica] The word 'Smouse' for a Jewish peddler

Although I am unable to answer the thrust of the question whether the word
smouse is derogatory, my distant memory of Afrikaans tells me that smouse
is the plural of the singular word smous.

Harold Luntz


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica RE: The word 'Smouse' for a Jewish peddler #southafrica

Hilde en Dennis Kahn <denmor@...>
 

According to 'Van Dale', the foremost dictionary in the Netherlands:

Smous is a Dutch word dating >from 1657. It is derived >from Yiddish for
Mousje (Moses).
The word has several meanings:
1. term of abuse for a jew.
2. ditto for a policeman.
3. cheat, dealer, haggler, trafficker.

Words derived >from smous include:
smousen -- to deal in a deceptive, disorderly, inferior manner.

Trust this is of use to you.
Best wishes,

Dennis Kahn
Amsterdam
Netherlands

-----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
Van: South Africa SIG [mailto:safrica@lyris.jewishgen.org]
Verzonden: zondag 8 december 2019 21:48
Aan: South Africa SIG
Onderwerp: Re:[safrica] The word 'Smouse' for a Jewish peddler

Although I am unable to answer the thrust of the question whether the word
smouse is derogatory, my distant memory of Afrikaans tells me that smouse
is the plural of the singular word smous.

Harold Luntz


Re: The word 'Smouse' for a Jewish peddler #southafrica

David Lewin
 

The difficulty I have here is that I do not know how to read the word
'Smouse' phonetically.

I think you are trying to convey what I would write as SHMOOZ. If
so, it is used in Yiddish but is German in origin and has a double
meaning of "cuddle" and of "soft talk".

David Lewin
London

At 20:47 08/12/2019, you wrote:
Although I am unable to answer the thrust of the question whether the word
smouse is derogatory, my distant memory of Afrikaans tells me that smouse
is the plural of the singular word smous.

Harold Luntz

At 19:20 28/11/2019, Geraldine Yvonne Auerbach
geraldine.auerbach@gmail.com wrote:
Smouse is a term that was often used to describe an itinerant Jewish
peddler in
South Africa. It seemed to me to be used almost as a badge of pride for some
early settlers who started their livelihood in South Africa
providing goods for
the farmers and shopkeepers in the country areas.

The Jewish digital archive for Graaff Reinet says:
The Mosenthals set up trading stores, promoted the mohair industry
and supported
the Jewish peddlers ("smouse"). A monument to these "smouse" was erected in
Graaff-Reinet in 1989.

South African Jewish Museum Cape Town, website says: 'Known as smouse (or
peddlers) they fanned out across the country into the small rural
communities.
They travelled in wagons with goods for sale and many settled in
these tiny towns
and villages that once had thriving Jewish communities (although this is no
longer the case).

I also have included a paragraph below >from THE JEWISH PEDDLERS OF
NAMAQUALAND
mentioning smouse and how they were welcomed by the Dutch farmers.

However, I was concerned to hear >from one of our Kimberley ex-pats,
that being
called a 'smouse' was not a complementary word - and that many
Jewish traders did
not appreciate this term. He said: People use the word smuk or smow
in Yiddish
but these are derogatory words. There was nothing complimentary by calling a
Jewish trader a smouse. He said, 'The Afrikaners used this term because they
also believed that the Jews exploited them by over charging for
their goods. My
parents who spoke only Yiddish at home told me never to use this
word as it was
insulting. The Afrikaners many of whom were anti-Semitic during the war years
enjoyed using this derogatory word to label many of the Jewish businesses.'

I just wonder if anyone has any views on the term 'Smouse' and how
it was used,
and whether it was mainly a derogatory or neutral term.

I look forward to hearing >from you.
Best wishes
Geraldine


Geraldine Auerbach MBE
T: 020 8907 1905 M: 07971 818 262
geraldine.auerbach@gmail.com

.........................................
THE JEWISH PEDDLERS OF NAMAQUALAND
Peddlers appeared in South Africa in the late nineteenth century, and
the name smous or bondeldraers (men carrying bundles) were given to
them by the Dutch. These itinerant travellers arrived on foot >from the
Cape carrying items for trading on their backs. They made their way
from farm to farm selling jewellery, sewing necessities such as
needles, buttons, thread, thimbles, pins and an assortment of
material, as well as herbs, medicines and beauty products. They were
welcomed on the farms, given food and accommodation and sometimes had
their washing done for them. Travelling over the rough terrain of
Namaqualand was dangerous, especially while descending the steep Kammiesberg.
This community of Jewish traders in Namaqualand came >from the shtetls
of Eastern Europe and at its peak in the 1930s there were about 200
peddlers, and the numbers subsequently declined until the peddlers
became a part of the formal economy of the region. Fleeing repression,
the peddlers started off supplying necessities -- and later luxuries --
to isolated farmers. Many years later they became proprietors of
country hotels, spotting the need to provide hospitality to travellers
in these inhospitable parts. Having been attracted to the region by
the development of copper mining in the 1850s and the discovery of
diamonds in the 1920s, these Jews became the area's middlemen --
traders, shopkeepers and hoteliers -- rather than being involved in
the mining
itself.
.......................................................

In the city of Graaf-Reinet, there was a plaque on the main street
honoring the "smouse," the itinerant merchant who peddled wares >from
town to town.
The smouse would travel with a cart filled with supplies that often
served as a lifeline for these tiny outposts in the wilderness. Yet
every city I stop in now, a whole litany of places like Grahamstown,
Ladybrand, Kroonstad, Colesburg, Ficksburg and Bethlehem (yes, same
name), there are communities that have dried up, and synagogues that
are now closed. Some synagogues have been bought out by private
business like the one in Colesburg that is now an ABSA bank office.
............................................
Some crossed the countryside as smouse (itinerant peddlers), where
devout Boer farmers who regarded them as the "people of the book"
received them warmly. These entrepreneurs were significant agents of
the commercial revolution that transformed the South African
countryside in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. They acted
as intermediates between the dorps and the producers, both black and
white. Jewish storekeepers and smouse bought wool, maize and skins
from Boer landowners and black sharecroppers and then sent them to
urban markets and wholesalers. In turn the Jewish country stores met
the growing needs of these emergent rural consumers.


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Re: The word 'Smouse' for a Jewish peddler #southafrica

David Lewin
 

The difficulty I have here is that I do not know how to read the word
'Smouse' phonetically.

I think you are trying to convey what I would write as SHMOOZ. If
so, it is used in Yiddish but is German in origin and has a double
meaning of "cuddle" and of "soft talk".

David Lewin
London

At 20:47 08/12/2019, you wrote:
Although I am unable to answer the thrust of the question whether the word
smouse is derogatory, my distant memory of Afrikaans tells me that smouse
is the plural of the singular word smous.

Harold Luntz

At 19:20 28/11/2019, Geraldine Yvonne Auerbach
geraldine.auerbach@gmail.com wrote:
Smouse is a term that was often used to describe an itinerant Jewish
peddler in
South Africa. It seemed to me to be used almost as a badge of pride for some
early settlers who started their livelihood in South Africa
providing goods for
the farmers and shopkeepers in the country areas.

The Jewish digital archive for Graaff Reinet says:
The Mosenthals set up trading stores, promoted the mohair industry
and supported
the Jewish peddlers ("smouse"). A monument to these "smouse" was erected in
Graaff-Reinet in 1989.

South African Jewish Museum Cape Town, website says: 'Known as smouse (or
peddlers) they fanned out across the country into the small rural
communities.
They travelled in wagons with goods for sale and many settled in
these tiny towns
and villages that once had thriving Jewish communities (although this is no
longer the case).

I also have included a paragraph below >from THE JEWISH PEDDLERS OF
NAMAQUALAND
mentioning smouse and how they were welcomed by the Dutch farmers.

However, I was concerned to hear >from one of our Kimberley ex-pats,
that being
called a 'smouse' was not a complementary word - and that many
Jewish traders did
not appreciate this term. He said: People use the word smuk or smow
in Yiddish
but these are derogatory words. There was nothing complimentary by calling a
Jewish trader a smouse. He said, 'The Afrikaners used this term because they
also believed that the Jews exploited them by over charging for
their goods. My
parents who spoke only Yiddish at home told me never to use this
word as it was
insulting. The Afrikaners many of whom were anti-Semitic during the war years
enjoyed using this derogatory word to label many of the Jewish businesses.'

I just wonder if anyone has any views on the term 'Smouse' and how
it was used,
and whether it was mainly a derogatory or neutral term.

I look forward to hearing >from you.
Best wishes
Geraldine


Geraldine Auerbach MBE
T: 020 8907 1905 M: 07971 818 262
geraldine.auerbach@gmail.com

.........................................
THE JEWISH PEDDLERS OF NAMAQUALAND
Peddlers appeared in South Africa in the late nineteenth century, and
the name smous or bondeldraers (men carrying bundles) were given to
them by the Dutch. These itinerant travellers arrived on foot >from the
Cape carrying items for trading on their backs. They made their way
from farm to farm selling jewellery, sewing necessities such as
needles, buttons, thread, thimbles, pins and an assortment of
material, as well as herbs, medicines and beauty products. They were
welcomed on the farms, given food and accommodation and sometimes had
their washing done for them. Travelling over the rough terrain of
Namaqualand was dangerous, especially while descending the steep Kammiesberg.
This community of Jewish traders in Namaqualand came >from the shtetls
of Eastern Europe and at its peak in the 1930s there were about 200
peddlers, and the numbers subsequently declined until the peddlers
became a part of the formal economy of the region. Fleeing repression,
the peddlers started off supplying necessities -- and later luxuries --
to isolated farmers. Many years later they became proprietors of
country hotels, spotting the need to provide hospitality to travellers
in these inhospitable parts. Having been attracted to the region by
the development of copper mining in the 1850s and the discovery of
diamonds in the 1920s, these Jews became the area's middlemen --
traders, shopkeepers and hoteliers -- rather than being involved in
the mining
itself.
.......................................................

In the city of Graaf-Reinet, there was a plaque on the main street
honoring the "smouse," the itinerant merchant who peddled wares >from
town to town.
The smouse would travel with a cart filled with supplies that often
served as a lifeline for these tiny outposts in the wilderness. Yet
every city I stop in now, a whole litany of places like Grahamstown,
Ladybrand, Kroonstad, Colesburg, Ficksburg and Bethlehem (yes, same
name), there are communities that have dried up, and synagogues that
are now closed. Some synagogues have been bought out by private
business like the one in Colesburg that is now an ABSA bank office.
............................................
Some crossed the countryside as smouse (itinerant peddlers), where
devout Boer farmers who regarded them as the "people of the book"
received them warmly. These entrepreneurs were significant agents of
the commercial revolution that transformed the South African
countryside in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. They acted
as intermediates between the dorps and the producers, both black and
white. Jewish storekeepers and smouse bought wool, maize and skins
from Boer landowners and black sharecroppers and then sent them to
urban markets and wholesalers. In turn the Jewish country stores met
the growing needs of these emergent rural consumers.

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