Date   

Researching the surnames Guttmacher, Gutmacher, Gutmaker and Gutmakher #ukraine

Caryn
 

Dear Genners,
I'm researching the surname Guttmacher (also Gutmacher, Gutmaker and Gutmakher), my mother's family, originally >from Teplik, Russia, now Ukraine.  FamilyFinder has enabled me to connect with my cousins in Philadelphia and very recently, cousins >from Warsaw, Poland.  While we're not certain, there is a possibility that we (especially those families >from the Pale) may all be descended >from one family that includes Rabbi Elijahu Guttmacher, who was born in Borek, Posen (Poznan) eastern Germany (now Poland) and known as the Tzadik of Grätz.
If you are a descendant of a Guttmacher, Gutmacher, Gutmaker or Gutmakher, I would love to hear >from you.  Please contact me off-list.
Caryn Levinson
USA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Researching the surnames Guttmacher, Gutmacher, Gutmaker and Gutmakher #ukraine

Caryn
 

Dear Genners,
I'm researching the surname Guttmacher (also Gutmacher, Gutmaker and Gutmakher), my mother's family, originally >from Teplik, Russia, now Ukraine.  FamilyFinder has enabled me to connect with my cousins in Philadelphia and very recently, cousins >from Warsaw, Poland.  While we're not certain, there is a possibility that we (especially those families >from the Pale) may all be descended >from one family that includes Rabbi Elijahu Guttmacher, who was born in Borek, Posen (Poznan) eastern Germany (now Poland) and known as the Tzadik of Grätz.
If you are a descendant of a Guttmacher, Gutmacher, Gutmaker or Gutmakher, I would love to hear >from you.  Please contact me off-list.
Caryn Levinson
USA


Searching for Shoah Survivor Estera ROTENBRG #unitedkingdom

Ann Linder
 

A year ago I posted this message and I am reposting in the hope that
someone might recognize and make a connection.

Last Rosh Hashana, I learned via the Polish Red Cross and ITS that a
first cousin of my mother survived the war.

We thought all ROTENBERG family members were slaughtered until my
research revealed that Estera ROTENBERG survived.
Estera ROTENBERG, born 1926 in Stopnice Poland was one of 8 brothers
and sisters. Her mother was Bajla Rivka (my mother's Aunt), her
father was Aron Lejba (aka Munysz). At some point Estera was living
in Gliwice, Poland on
Zabrowska Street. Thereafter, the Polish Red Cross has documentation
that she registered with the Central Committee in Warsaw in 1957. She
may have indeed stayed in Poland or made aliyah to Israel, or
emigrated to USA. I have good reason to think- if indeed she
emigrated- she may have gone to England b/c there were several aunts &
cousins already in England before WWII.

It is possible she is still living, altho she would be almost 90
years of age, and I would very much like to attempt to locate her. My
mother is close to 90 & it would be a Major event for her to locate a
1st cousin! Can anyone help w/this search? It is obviously more
difficult to find female relatives as names change with marriage. It
is possible that Estera was raised in an observant home and continued
to be observant/Orthodox. Search methods would also be most welcome.
Thanks a
million.

Ann Linder
USA


ADONI / ADONIS family #latvia

Sue Levy
 

I have just joined this list and would very much like to track down some of
my ancestors.

My father told me his father Joseph ADONIS (ne ADONI) was born in Marseilles
in the early 1880s, then travelled to Palestine where he met my and married
grandmother. They migrated to Australia about 1910 with two young sons and
settled in Perth.

I believe there is a Turkish connection - the name Adoni appears in Jewish
lists >from Constantinople which is thought to be their previous home.

If anyone can offer any suggestions about how I might search for birth,
marriage or death records for Marseilles I would be very appreciative.

My grandfather Joseph had a close friend and French speaker, Albert
Bidjarano (another Turkish Jewish name), who also settled in Australia
(South Australia). I have photos of Albert and his family that he sent to my
grandmother.

Sue Levy
Perth, Australia


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Searching for Shoah Survivor Estera ROTENBRG #unitedkingdom

Ann Linder
 

A year ago I posted this message and I am reposting in the hope that
someone might recognize and make a connection.

Last Rosh Hashana, I learned via the Polish Red Cross and ITS that a
first cousin of my mother survived the war.

We thought all ROTENBERG family members were slaughtered until my
research revealed that Estera ROTENBERG survived.
Estera ROTENBERG, born 1926 in Stopnice Poland was one of 8 brothers
and sisters. Her mother was Bajla Rivka (my mother's Aunt), her
father was Aron Lejba (aka Munysz). At some point Estera was living
in Gliwice, Poland on
Zabrowska Street. Thereafter, the Polish Red Cross has documentation
that she registered with the Central Committee in Warsaw in 1957. She
may have indeed stayed in Poland or made aliyah to Israel, or
emigrated to USA. I have good reason to think- if indeed she
emigrated- she may have gone to England b/c there were several aunts &
cousins already in England before WWII.

It is possible she is still living, altho she would be almost 90
years of age, and I would very much like to attempt to locate her. My
mother is close to 90 & it would be a Major event for her to locate a
1st cousin! Can anyone help w/this search? It is obviously more
difficult to find female relatives as names change with marriage. It
is possible that Estera was raised in an observant home and continued
to be observant/Orthodox. Search methods would also be most welcome.
Thanks a
million.

Ann Linder
USA


Latvia SIG #Latvia ADONI / ADONIS family #latvia

Sue Levy
 

I have just joined this list and would very much like to track down some of
my ancestors.

My father told me his father Joseph ADONIS (ne ADONI) was born in Marseilles
in the early 1880s, then travelled to Palestine where he met my and married
grandmother. They migrated to Australia about 1910 with two young sons and
settled in Perth.

I believe there is a Turkish connection - the name Adoni appears in Jewish
lists >from Constantinople which is thought to be their previous home.

If anyone can offer any suggestions about how I might search for birth,
marriage or death records for Marseilles I would be very appreciative.

My grandfather Joseph had a close friend and French speaker, Albert
Bidjarano (another Turkish Jewish name), who also settled in Australia
(South Australia). I have photos of Albert and his family that he sent to my
grandmother.

Sue Levy
Perth, Australia


KUPERWASSER family #general

Philip Cooper <philipcooper@...>
 

I am searching for information regarding the Hersz and Sura-Ester KUPERWASSER
family >from Zgierz, Poland. My husband's grandfather was one of the sons who
came to the USA in 1911.

Any information would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!!

Shirlene Cooper


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen KUPERWASSER family #general

Philip Cooper <philipcooper@...>
 

I am searching for information regarding the Hersz and Sura-Ester KUPERWASSER
family >from Zgierz, Poland. My husband's grandfather was one of the sons who
came to the USA in 1911.

Any information would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!!

Shirlene Cooper


Given name Sira or Sirach--thank you! #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear all,
I received many useful responses regarding the given name Sira or Sera
or Sirach or Serach. (The initial S is voiced; in a Polish
transliteration it would be a Z.)

The consensus was that the name was indeed used among Ashkenazim, but
was relatively rare. This is helpful to my research in that I am
searching for a Sirach COHN who lived in Deutsch Eylau, West Prussia
(now Ilawa) in the 1st half of the 19th century. I have only one vital
record of him--his death in 1863. A few years later he is mentioned as
the father of his daughter, who was getting married. There his name is
spelled "Sarrach," but I wouldn't have expected the registrar to spell
such an unusual name correctly, especially in the absence of the person
who bore it.

Once again, thanks to all who responded.

Roger Lustig, Princeton, New Jersey, research coordinator, GerSIG


German SIG #Germany Given name Sira or Sirach--thank you! #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear all,
I received many useful responses regarding the given name Sira or Sera
or Sirach or Serach. (The initial S is voiced; in a Polish
transliteration it would be a Z.)

The consensus was that the name was indeed used among Ashkenazim, but
was relatively rare. This is helpful to my research in that I am
searching for a Sirach COHN who lived in Deutsch Eylau, West Prussia
(now Ilawa) in the 1st half of the 19th century. I have only one vital
record of him--his death in 1863. A few years later he is mentioned as
the father of his daughter, who was getting married. There his name is
spelled "Sarrach," but I wouldn't have expected the registrar to spell
such an unusual name correctly, especially in the absence of the person
who bore it.

Once again, thanks to all who responded.

Roger Lustig, Princeton, New Jersey, research coordinator, GerSIG


More about Nothandel / Nothaendler #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Several posters have described "Nothandel" as (small) trade in cattle.
To be sure, many "Nothaendler" bought and sold cattle, but that is not
the distinguishing feature of their occupation.

The original question regarding the occupation of "Nothaendler"
mentioned that the ancestor who was thus designated came >from Baden.
Here is a rough translation of a section of the 1809 Baden edict
regarding Jews:

XVIII: Requirements for communal and general citizenship

None of those who are not yet 21 full years of age may aspire to achieve
communal or general citizenship and thus be permitted to settle on his
own in the land [i.e., Baden] unless he has become skilled in an
occupation that has hitherto also been open to Christians. Among trading
occupations this includes mercantile trade with proper bookkeeping, or
factory operation, or open shopkeeping with inventory in metal, leather,
cut fabrics, groceries, money changing, etc. sufficient [for them] to
make a living, insofar as they operate lawfully in the same manner as
the Christians. (...) In contrast, _Nothandel_ of the kind that
especially the Jewish nation has for a long time resorted to for want of
opportunities for freer occupations, and which allowed them only a
meager existence, and which thus led them to be inclined toward
impermissible profiteering, is not included.

The same in German (spelling original except for mailing-list-friendly
alterations):
XVIII. Gemeinds- und Buerrgerrechts-Erfordernisse

Niemand von jenen, welche dermalen noch nicht voll einundzwanzig Jahre
alt sind, hat kuenftig Hoffnung zum Antritt eines Gemeinds- oder
Buergerechts, mithin zu einer eigenen Niederlassung im Lande gelassen zu
werden, er habe den zu einem auch fuer Christen bestehenden
Nahrungszweig sich befaehiget. Von der Handelschaft gehoeret dazu der
Kaufmannshandel, der mit ordentlicher Buchfuehrung, oder durch
Fabrikenbetreibung, oder in offenen Laeden mit einem zur Ernaehrung
hinlaenglichen Vorrate in Metall, Leder, Ellenwaren, Spezerei,
Wechselgeschaeften und dergleichen betrieben wird, soweit sie sich wie
die Christen ordnungsgemaess dazu befaehigen. (...) Hingegen wird dahin
derjenige Nothandel nicht gerechnet, womit sich seither vorzueglich die
juedische Nation aus Mangel der Gelegenheit zu einem freiern
Gewerbsfleisse haeufig abgegeben hat, und womit sie nur ein
unhinlaengliches Auskommen gewoehnlich sich erwerben konnte, das
nachmals sie zu unerlaubter Gewinnvermehrung geneigt machen musste.

Around the same time, in Heddernheim (now part of Frankfurt/Main), Jews
were forbidden to engage in:

der so genannte "Nothandel", das heisst der "Schuhmacher-, Leih-,
Maekler- und Troedelhandel".

Translated: so-called _Nothandel_, i.e., shoemaker, lending, brokering
and peddling business.

(Shoe making is a surprise on this list. Perhaps they were referring to
itinerant cobblers.)

>from Bavaria, the 1822 roll of Jewish heads of household in Lisberg
includes

Josef Leser (Nothandel mit Kleinvieh und Schnittwaren)

i.e., Josef Leser (_Nothandel_ in small livestock and cut goods)

Cut goods could be fabric or lumber; small livestock comprised sheep,
goats, rabbits and poultry, i.e., _not_ cattle.

These examples, all >from the same period, all >from southern/central
Germany, make it clear that "Nothandel" did *not* refer to cattle trade
in particular, or to any one type of goods being bought and sold; but
rather to small trade without a fixed place of business or focus on a
particular class of goods. "Opportunistic trade" might be a good term to
describe it >from the authorities' point of view.

(Thanks to wikipedia.de for source material.)

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

Moderator note: Our list email system has difficulty with
accent marks like "umlaut" - dots above A O U in German.

Please do not write or quote words containing accents
in your email to this Forum.

The term under discussion in older German text had
an accent above the A. To replace the accent ("umlaut")
in email to this list, please add and E after the accented vowel.
To insure complete results in list archive searches, it is best
to spell the subject word *** both *** without and with the
extra E in your mail to our list.
The word is Nothandel (A umlaut / Nothaendel


German SIG #Germany More about Nothandel / Nothaendler #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Several posters have described "Nothandel" as (small) trade in cattle.
To be sure, many "Nothaendler" bought and sold cattle, but that is not
the distinguishing feature of their occupation.

The original question regarding the occupation of "Nothaendler"
mentioned that the ancestor who was thus designated came >from Baden.
Here is a rough translation of a section of the 1809 Baden edict
regarding Jews:

XVIII: Requirements for communal and general citizenship

None of those who are not yet 21 full years of age may aspire to achieve
communal or general citizenship and thus be permitted to settle on his
own in the land [i.e., Baden] unless he has become skilled in an
occupation that has hitherto also been open to Christians. Among trading
occupations this includes mercantile trade with proper bookkeeping, or
factory operation, or open shopkeeping with inventory in metal, leather,
cut fabrics, groceries, money changing, etc. sufficient [for them] to
make a living, insofar as they operate lawfully in the same manner as
the Christians. (...) In contrast, _Nothandel_ of the kind that
especially the Jewish nation has for a long time resorted to for want of
opportunities for freer occupations, and which allowed them only a
meager existence, and which thus led them to be inclined toward
impermissible profiteering, is not included.

The same in German (spelling original except for mailing-list-friendly
alterations):
XVIII. Gemeinds- und Buerrgerrechts-Erfordernisse

Niemand von jenen, welche dermalen noch nicht voll einundzwanzig Jahre
alt sind, hat kuenftig Hoffnung zum Antritt eines Gemeinds- oder
Buergerechts, mithin zu einer eigenen Niederlassung im Lande gelassen zu
werden, er habe den zu einem auch fuer Christen bestehenden
Nahrungszweig sich befaehiget. Von der Handelschaft gehoeret dazu der
Kaufmannshandel, der mit ordentlicher Buchfuehrung, oder durch
Fabrikenbetreibung, oder in offenen Laeden mit einem zur Ernaehrung
hinlaenglichen Vorrate in Metall, Leder, Ellenwaren, Spezerei,
Wechselgeschaeften und dergleichen betrieben wird, soweit sie sich wie
die Christen ordnungsgemaess dazu befaehigen. (...) Hingegen wird dahin
derjenige Nothandel nicht gerechnet, womit sich seither vorzueglich die
juedische Nation aus Mangel der Gelegenheit zu einem freiern
Gewerbsfleisse haeufig abgegeben hat, und womit sie nur ein
unhinlaengliches Auskommen gewoehnlich sich erwerben konnte, das
nachmals sie zu unerlaubter Gewinnvermehrung geneigt machen musste.

Around the same time, in Heddernheim (now part of Frankfurt/Main), Jews
were forbidden to engage in:

der so genannte "Nothandel", das heisst der "Schuhmacher-, Leih-,
Maekler- und Troedelhandel".

Translated: so-called _Nothandel_, i.e., shoemaker, lending, brokering
and peddling business.

(Shoe making is a surprise on this list. Perhaps they were referring to
itinerant cobblers.)

>from Bavaria, the 1822 roll of Jewish heads of household in Lisberg
includes

Josef Leser (Nothandel mit Kleinvieh und Schnittwaren)

i.e., Josef Leser (_Nothandel_ in small livestock and cut goods)

Cut goods could be fabric or lumber; small livestock comprised sheep,
goats, rabbits and poultry, i.e., _not_ cattle.

These examples, all >from the same period, all >from southern/central
Germany, make it clear that "Nothandel" did *not* refer to cattle trade
in particular, or to any one type of goods being bought and sold; but
rather to small trade without a fixed place of business or focus on a
particular class of goods. "Opportunistic trade" might be a good term to
describe it >from the authorities' point of view.

(Thanks to wikipedia.de for source material.)

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

Moderator note: Our list email system has difficulty with
accent marks like "umlaut" - dots above A O U in German.

Please do not write or quote words containing accents
in your email to this Forum.

The term under discussion in older German text had
an accent above the A. To replace the accent ("umlaut")
in email to this list, please add and E after the accented vowel.
To insure complete results in list archive searches, it is best
to spell the subject word *** both *** without and with the
extra E in your mail to our list.
The word is Nothandel (A umlaut / Nothaendel


Reminder: Webinar from the JGS Greater Orlando #general

Lin <lin2@...>
 

"Who Do You Think You Are, Bubala?
An Introduction to Jewish Genealogy Webinar

Orlando, FL, October 18, 2013 -- Join the Jewish Genealogical Society
of Greater Orlando (JGSGO) in celebration of International Jewish
Genealogy Month, for a free webinar that is certain to kick-start
your family tree research.

Have you heard,
"They never talked about it"
"What kind of a name is Tauntie Saucie (i.e. Aunt Sosia)?", or
"All the records were destroyed"?

With some know how and persistence, you can find your Jewish
ancestors! Join us for an "Introduction to Jewish Genealogy" webinar.
We will cover:
• 4 steps to getting started
• Records you might find & where to find them
• Available resources, tools, and help

We will show you key documents to help put that family tree together
and go further into the past: census; birth, death, and marriage
certificates; city directories, cemetery records and obituaries,
social security records, draft and military records, naturalization
papers, ships passenger lists, tax records, pages of testimony,
liberation records and more.

Nothing is more exciting than discovering a new cousin, an unknown
ancestor, or the real name of the shtetl where they once lived.
Learn how to begin that journey of discovery with Jewish Genealogical
Society of Greater Orlando experts.

Webinar presenter, Marlis Glaser Humphrey, is Vice President of
Programs and Publicity for the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Greater Orlando (JGSGO), Publications and Technology Outreach
Committee Chairs for the Florida State Genealogical Society (FSGS),
President of the International Association of Jewish Genealogical
Societies (IAJGS), Co-Chair for the IAJGS Boston 2013 Conference,
and a member of the IAJGS Membership Development Committee
responsible for the Southeastern U.S. Region. She has successfully
discovered all her ancestral shtetls. Marlis holds a B.A. in
Russian and an M.S. in Management of Technology. You can reach
Marlis atjgsgo.programs@....

DATE: Tuesday, October 22, 2013
TIME: 7:00pm - 8:30pm
COST: There is no cost to attend. You must pre-register. Space is
limited. Reserve your Webinar Seat Now:
https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/966295286

About the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando (JGSGO) is a not
for profit organization dedicated to sharing genealogical information,
techniques and research tools with anyone interested in Jewish
genealogy and family history. Anyone may join JGSGO. Annual dues are
$25 for an individual and $30 for a family. For more information visit
our blog at www.jgsgo.blogspot.com , "like" us at
www.facebook.com/jgsgreaterorlando or call us at 407-494-4230.

# # #
Contact Information:
Marlis Humphrey
JGSGO VP Programs & Publicity
jgsgo.programs@...

Respectfully submitted,
Lin Herz
Palm Bay, Florida
JGSGO Publicity Chairperson


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Reminder: Webinar from the JGS Greater Orlando #general

Lin <lin2@...>
 

"Who Do You Think You Are, Bubala?
An Introduction to Jewish Genealogy Webinar

Orlando, FL, October 18, 2013 -- Join the Jewish Genealogical Society
of Greater Orlando (JGSGO) in celebration of International Jewish
Genealogy Month, for a free webinar that is certain to kick-start
your family tree research.

Have you heard,
"They never talked about it"
"What kind of a name is Tauntie Saucie (i.e. Aunt Sosia)?", or
"All the records were destroyed"?

With some know how and persistence, you can find your Jewish
ancestors! Join us for an "Introduction to Jewish Genealogy" webinar.
We will cover:
• 4 steps to getting started
• Records you might find & where to find them
• Available resources, tools, and help

We will show you key documents to help put that family tree together
and go further into the past: census; birth, death, and marriage
certificates; city directories, cemetery records and obituaries,
social security records, draft and military records, naturalization
papers, ships passenger lists, tax records, pages of testimony,
liberation records and more.

Nothing is more exciting than discovering a new cousin, an unknown
ancestor, or the real name of the shtetl where they once lived.
Learn how to begin that journey of discovery with Jewish Genealogical
Society of Greater Orlando experts.

Webinar presenter, Marlis Glaser Humphrey, is Vice President of
Programs and Publicity for the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Greater Orlando (JGSGO), Publications and Technology Outreach
Committee Chairs for the Florida State Genealogical Society (FSGS),
President of the International Association of Jewish Genealogical
Societies (IAJGS), Co-Chair for the IAJGS Boston 2013 Conference,
and a member of the IAJGS Membership Development Committee
responsible for the Southeastern U.S. Region. She has successfully
discovered all her ancestral shtetls. Marlis holds a B.A. in
Russian and an M.S. in Management of Technology. You can reach
Marlis atjgsgo.programs@....

DATE: Tuesday, October 22, 2013
TIME: 7:00pm - 8:30pm
COST: There is no cost to attend. You must pre-register. Space is
limited. Reserve your Webinar Seat Now:
https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/966295286

About the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando (JGSGO) is a not
for profit organization dedicated to sharing genealogical information,
techniques and research tools with anyone interested in Jewish
genealogy and family history. Anyone may join JGSGO. Annual dues are
$25 for an individual and $30 for a family. For more information visit
our blog at www.jgsgo.blogspot.com , "like" us at
www.facebook.com/jgsgreaterorlando or call us at 407-494-4230.

# # #
Contact Information:
Marlis Humphrey
JGSGO VP Programs & Publicity
jgsgo.programs@...

Respectfully submitted,
Lin Herz
Palm Bay, Florida
JGSGO Publicity Chairperson


Issue 115 of Genealo-J #general

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Issue 115, Fall 2013 of Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish
Genealogical Society of France, has just been published.
Please find heafter the abstracts

The star paper of this issue is an article by Jean-Camille Bloch who
tells about the treasure found in the former synagogue of
Dambach-la-Ville (Alsace). Working in the trusses of this building in
October 2012, workers found a mess of objects that they were prepared to
throw away as waste. Fortunately a clever passer-by was intrigued and
understood that these objects belonged to a genizah. A scientific team
working in acrobatic conditions extracted 900 objects >from the roof and
analyzed them for more than six months. Among the findings : 250 mappot,
the oldest one dated 1614, 10 Torah coatings, many fragments of old
Torahs, 300 books or fragments of books, the oldest one dated 1592 and
many other religious objects. It is probably the best preserved genizah
of the whole Europe.
Two other papers of this issue deal with Tunisian Jews. It is well
known that for many centuries two distinct Jewish communities coexisted
in the city of Tunis : the Twansa, who were genuine Tunisians and the
Grana, who were Italians, closely related to the communities of Leghorn
and also Venice. In the first paper, Gilles Boulu studies the Lumbroso
family. The first referenced Lumbroso is found in Burgos (Spain) in
1199. Several others are quoted in Spain in the 14th and 15th centuries.
They were expelled to Portugal which they left soon for Italy, probably
first to Venice and later to Leghorn. But as soon as the beginning of
the 17th century, they had commercial links with the city of Tunis where
some of them settled. The author tries to reconstruct the family links
between the numerous Lumbroso quoted in the archives of Tunis and of
Leghorn. They were among the wealthiest and more powerful families of
the city.
In another paper, Claire Rubinstein-Cohen deals with another Lumbroso
family, living in Mahdia, a small harbour on the Tunisian coast, about
200 km south of Tunis. In the years 1920-1930, this city of 60,000
inhabitants included 20 Grana families and 400 or 500 Twansa. The
Lumbroso of Mahdia were businessmen who founded several oil and soap
factories and were immensely rich. The family links with the Tunis
family were not found.
Salonika Jewish community existed for centuries. Since the beginning of
the common era and even earlier, waves of Jews settled there, coming
from all parts of the Mediterranean sea, ashkenazis as well as
sephardis. Anne-Marie Faraggi Rychner depicts the history of this
community. Until 1911, it was an active and wealthy community,
representing 55% of the total population of the city, under Turkish
rule. The numerous Jewish newspapers, in French or in Judeo-spanish,
give a glimpse on the life of the time. In 1912, Salonika was annexed by
Greece and its hellenization was rather quick. Then came WW I and above
all the big fire of August 18, 1917 which destroyed a large part of the
Jewish neighborhood and ruined the Jews. Many of them left the city and
emigrated to France. The last and fatal period is WW II. The Germans
occupied Salonika in April 1941 and in 1943, 52,000 out of 55,000 Jews
were slaughtered in Auschwitz. The genealogical work, rendered difficult
by all the destructions, is a way to reconstruct the history of a
vanished community.
Eliane Roos Schuhl, our specialist on Hebraic paleography, analyzes
several short inscriptions in Hebrew found in village of Scherwiller in
Alsace.

Georges Graner (Paris-France)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Issue 115 of Genealo-J #general

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Issue 115, Fall 2013 of Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish
Genealogical Society of France, has just been published.
Please find heafter the abstracts

The star paper of this issue is an article by Jean-Camille Bloch who
tells about the treasure found in the former synagogue of
Dambach-la-Ville (Alsace). Working in the trusses of this building in
October 2012, workers found a mess of objects that they were prepared to
throw away as waste. Fortunately a clever passer-by was intrigued and
understood that these objects belonged to a genizah. A scientific team
working in acrobatic conditions extracted 900 objects >from the roof and
analyzed them for more than six months. Among the findings : 250 mappot,
the oldest one dated 1614, 10 Torah coatings, many fragments of old
Torahs, 300 books or fragments of books, the oldest one dated 1592 and
many other religious objects. It is probably the best preserved genizah
of the whole Europe.
Two other papers of this issue deal with Tunisian Jews. It is well
known that for many centuries two distinct Jewish communities coexisted
in the city of Tunis : the Twansa, who were genuine Tunisians and the
Grana, who were Italians, closely related to the communities of Leghorn
and also Venice. In the first paper, Gilles Boulu studies the Lumbroso
family. The first referenced Lumbroso is found in Burgos (Spain) in
1199. Several others are quoted in Spain in the 14th and 15th centuries.
They were expelled to Portugal which they left soon for Italy, probably
first to Venice and later to Leghorn. But as soon as the beginning of
the 17th century, they had commercial links with the city of Tunis where
some of them settled. The author tries to reconstruct the family links
between the numerous Lumbroso quoted in the archives of Tunis and of
Leghorn. They were among the wealthiest and more powerful families of
the city.
In another paper, Claire Rubinstein-Cohen deals with another Lumbroso
family, living in Mahdia, a small harbour on the Tunisian coast, about
200 km south of Tunis. In the years 1920-1930, this city of 60,000
inhabitants included 20 Grana families and 400 or 500 Twansa. The
Lumbroso of Mahdia were businessmen who founded several oil and soap
factories and were immensely rich. The family links with the Tunis
family were not found.
Salonika Jewish community existed for centuries. Since the beginning of
the common era and even earlier, waves of Jews settled there, coming
from all parts of the Mediterranean sea, ashkenazis as well as
sephardis. Anne-Marie Faraggi Rychner depicts the history of this
community. Until 1911, it was an active and wealthy community,
representing 55% of the total population of the city, under Turkish
rule. The numerous Jewish newspapers, in French or in Judeo-spanish,
give a glimpse on the life of the time. In 1912, Salonika was annexed by
Greece and its hellenization was rather quick. Then came WW I and above
all the big fire of August 18, 1917 which destroyed a large part of the
Jewish neighborhood and ruined the Jews. Many of them left the city and
emigrated to France. The last and fatal period is WW II. The Germans
occupied Salonika in April 1941 and in 1943, 52,000 out of 55,000 Jews
were slaughtered in Auschwitz. The genealogical work, rendered difficult
by all the destructions, is a way to reconstruct the history of a
vanished community.
Eliane Roos Schuhl, our specialist on Hebraic paleography, analyzes
several short inscriptions in Hebrew found in village of Scherwiller in
Alsace.

Georges Graner (Paris-France)


Jewish surnames ending in OW or OWA #poland

RuthNW <ruthnw@...>
 

While indexing 19th century vital records I've "encountered" quite a
few surnames (secular last names) that end in "OW," and in one or two
instances, "OWA." Here are several examples taken >from several years
of marriage records: JAKOBOW, JEKOW, FRANKLOW, CYNAMANOW - all maiden
names of brides' mothers. I also found the names MASLO/MUSLO (the name
of a groom) and KOSMOWA (of a female). I'm aware that in Eastern
European languages such as Polish or Russian the "A" suffix is the
female ending.

Does anyone know the significance of these two suffixes - "OW" and "OWA"?
Could they just be the root of a name such as JAKOBOWICZ?

Naidia Woolf
San Francisco, California
ruthnw@...


JRI Poland #Poland Jewish surnames ending in OW or OWA #poland

RuthNW <ruthnw@...>
 

While indexing 19th century vital records I've "encountered" quite a
few surnames (secular last names) that end in "OW," and in one or two
instances, "OWA." Here are several examples taken >from several years
of marriage records: JAKOBOW, JEKOW, FRANKLOW, CYNAMANOW - all maiden
names of brides' mothers. I also found the names MASLO/MUSLO (the name
of a groom) and KOSMOWA (of a female). I'm aware that in Eastern
European languages such as Polish or Russian the "A" suffix is the
female ending.

Does anyone know the significance of these two suffixes - "OW" and "OWA"?
Could they just be the root of a name such as JAKOBOWICZ?

Naidia Woolf
San Francisco, California
ruthnw@...


Josef Selzer attestation from Sao Paulo, Brazil #poland

Milton Koch
 

I am searching for a contact to Regina Gross who attested to the death
of Josef Selzer, >from Trembowla. He was the son of Samuel and Roshai
Selzer.

Samuel, his father, was the son of Naftali and Raisl Selzer, who I
believe are my paternal great-grandparents.

However, I am still missing several family links.

Unfortunately, the attestation was posted in 1954, but if anyone is
aware of the Gross family >from Sao Paulo, Brazil, I would appreciate
making contact with one of them.
Thank you for your help.

MIlton Koch
Bethesda, MD USA
SELZER-TREMBOWLA


JRI Poland #Poland Josef Selzer attestation from Sao Paulo, Brazil #poland

Milton Koch
 

I am searching for a contact to Regina Gross who attested to the death
of Josef Selzer, >from Trembowla. He was the son of Samuel and Roshai
Selzer.

Samuel, his father, was the son of Naftali and Raisl Selzer, who I
believe are my paternal great-grandparents.

However, I am still missing several family links.

Unfortunately, the attestation was posted in 1954, but if anyone is
aware of the Gross family >from Sao Paulo, Brazil, I would appreciate
making contact with one of them.
Thank you for your help.

MIlton Koch
Bethesda, MD USA
SELZER-TREMBOWLA

138021 - 138040 of 670650