Date   

MENDELEWICZ-Sephardic but living in Belarus? #belarus

Alan Tapper <sabaalan@...>
 

Genners,

When I started researching the MENDELEWICZ family, some one told me
that they were related to the CARDOZA's >from Spain. I thought that
they were kidding me. But what I have found out surprised me. The
family had come >from a small shtetl near Slonim, Belarus called Byten
where they had lived for many years.

No one knows for sure why or where they came >from before that, but
thanks to a family scribe, Shmuel Meyer MENDELEWICZ, who related the
story of the family to a nephew just before he left to come to the
United States in 1901, the story lives on. Shmuel Meyer was 93 at that
time. It seems that Shmuel Meyer's grandfather was Rabbi Shmuel Meyer
MENDOZA. In 1777, he took the position of rabbi in Byten which was in
the Russian Empire, and he changed the name to MENDELOVICH which in
Polish is spelled MENDELEWICZ. Rabbi Shmuel Meyer MENDOZA's family had
lived in Kobryn since 1650 when Israel MENDOZA, a merchant, settled
there.

Why or how they got there I do not know. I can surmise, but that leads
to trouble unless one is lucky. You see that in Tuscany ( Italy) around
1600 Jews were welcomed and encouraged to be merchants. >from 1600 t0
1800 under the rule of the Medici Jewish family life was very good.
Trading was known to take place with Russia around 1650. One could
draw the conclusion that the MENDOZA family were merchants and in
expanding their business, a son, Israel MENDOZA, moved to Kobryn .

Oh yes, I did also find out that a marriage took place in 1802 between
Esther MENDOZA and a member of the CARDOZA family but I don't know if
Esther is in our family tree.

Alan Tapper
Fairfax, VA.

Researching:

MENDELOVICH, MENDELEWICZ, MENDELOWITZ >from Slonim, Baraonvichi and Byten
MENDOZA >from Kobryn, GORMAN >from Baranovichi
HOCHBERG and KATZ >from Iasi
TAPPER >from Snitkov
BURDMAN and FAHRER >from Tulchin
NEMIROVSKY >from Lipovets


Belarus SIG #Belarus MENDELEWICZ-Sephardic but living in Belarus? #belarus

Alan Tapper <sabaalan@...>
 

Genners,

When I started researching the MENDELEWICZ family, some one told me
that they were related to the CARDOZA's >from Spain. I thought that
they were kidding me. But what I have found out surprised me. The
family had come >from a small shtetl near Slonim, Belarus called Byten
where they had lived for many years.

No one knows for sure why or where they came >from before that, but
thanks to a family scribe, Shmuel Meyer MENDELEWICZ, who related the
story of the family to a nephew just before he left to come to the
United States in 1901, the story lives on. Shmuel Meyer was 93 at that
time. It seems that Shmuel Meyer's grandfather was Rabbi Shmuel Meyer
MENDOZA. In 1777, he took the position of rabbi in Byten which was in
the Russian Empire, and he changed the name to MENDELOVICH which in
Polish is spelled MENDELEWICZ. Rabbi Shmuel Meyer MENDOZA's family had
lived in Kobryn since 1650 when Israel MENDOZA, a merchant, settled
there.

Why or how they got there I do not know. I can surmise, but that leads
to trouble unless one is lucky. You see that in Tuscany ( Italy) around
1600 Jews were welcomed and encouraged to be merchants. >from 1600 t0
1800 under the rule of the Medici Jewish family life was very good.
Trading was known to take place with Russia around 1650. One could
draw the conclusion that the MENDOZA family were merchants and in
expanding their business, a son, Israel MENDOZA, moved to Kobryn .

Oh yes, I did also find out that a marriage took place in 1802 between
Esther MENDOZA and a member of the CARDOZA family but I don't know if
Esther is in our family tree.

Alan Tapper
Fairfax, VA.

Researching:

MENDELOVICH, MENDELEWICZ, MENDELOWITZ >from Slonim, Baraonvichi and Byten
MENDOZA >from Kobryn, GORMAN >from Baranovichi
HOCHBERG and KATZ >from Iasi
TAPPER >from Snitkov
BURDMAN and FAHRER >from Tulchin
NEMIROVSKY >from Lipovets


March Meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Bergen County #general

Edward Rosenbaum <erosenbaum@...>
 

Just a quick reminder... The Jewish Genealogical Society of Bergen County will be
having its next meeting on Sunday, March 13th. Alice Gould will be speaking about
the Jewish Cemeteries of Newark, NJ. The meeting starts at 2PM and is held at the
JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly. The JCC of the Palisades is located at 401 East
Clinton Avenue in Tenafly. Their phone number is 201-569-7900.

If you need directions, go to our homepage at
http://erosenbaum.netfirms.com/jgsbc/

About our speaker
Alice Perkins Gould was born in Newark, New Jersey and lived there for part of her
childhood. A graduate of Orange High school, she earned a BS degree at Douglass
College and an M Ed at Rutgers University. For 28 years, she taught secondary
school mathematics. The widow of Philip Perkins, her family includes a son,
daughter-in-law, and 3 grandchildren.

Early retirement gave her the leisure to pursue her avid interest in genealogy.
After becoming members of the Jewish Genealogical Society of North Jersey, Alice
and her second husband Bob Gould learned of a project of the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies to document every Jewish cemetery in
the world. Since they both were born in Newark, they volunteered to document the
old Newark cemeteries. This project included finding where the cemeteries were,
when and by whom the cemeteries were started, and recording the information
engraved on the gravestones. She has spent the last ten years leading groups of
volunteers in documenting the Newark cemeteries.

In researching the existing literature, Alice discovered that there was no written
account of the establishment of the Jewish cemeteries in Newark. Her years of
research subsequently led to the writing of a book about the cemeteries and about
the Jews buried there >from the middle of the nineteenth century to the end of the
twentieth century.

Her love of genealogy and travel have resulted in visits to relatives that she has
discovered in Israel, Slovakia, London, Canada, Kentucky, California and Ohio. She
presently keeps very active answering telephone, written, and e-mail inquiries
from all over the world about individuals buried in Newark.
Upcoming meetings
April 10th: Michael Brenner of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Southern Nevada
will speak about the upcoming IAJGS conference in Las Vegas in July.

Sincerely,
Edward L. Rosenbaum
JGS of Bergen County, NJ

About the JGS of Bergen county

We are an organization of Jewish genealogists who are enjoying the growing pastime
of tracing our families' roots back to the Old Country and collecting records of
our family, some of them hundreds of years old. The Jewish Genealogical Society
of Bergen County is one of over 70 member organizations of the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen March Meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Bergen County #general

Edward Rosenbaum <erosenbaum@...>
 

Just a quick reminder... The Jewish Genealogical Society of Bergen County will be
having its next meeting on Sunday, March 13th. Alice Gould will be speaking about
the Jewish Cemeteries of Newark, NJ. The meeting starts at 2PM and is held at the
JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly. The JCC of the Palisades is located at 401 East
Clinton Avenue in Tenafly. Their phone number is 201-569-7900.

If you need directions, go to our homepage at
http://erosenbaum.netfirms.com/jgsbc/

About our speaker
Alice Perkins Gould was born in Newark, New Jersey and lived there for part of her
childhood. A graduate of Orange High school, she earned a BS degree at Douglass
College and an M Ed at Rutgers University. For 28 years, she taught secondary
school mathematics. The widow of Philip Perkins, her family includes a son,
daughter-in-law, and 3 grandchildren.

Early retirement gave her the leisure to pursue her avid interest in genealogy.
After becoming members of the Jewish Genealogical Society of North Jersey, Alice
and her second husband Bob Gould learned of a project of the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies to document every Jewish cemetery in
the world. Since they both were born in Newark, they volunteered to document the
old Newark cemeteries. This project included finding where the cemeteries were,
when and by whom the cemeteries were started, and recording the information
engraved on the gravestones. She has spent the last ten years leading groups of
volunteers in documenting the Newark cemeteries.

In researching the existing literature, Alice discovered that there was no written
account of the establishment of the Jewish cemeteries in Newark. Her years of
research subsequently led to the writing of a book about the cemeteries and about
the Jews buried there >from the middle of the nineteenth century to the end of the
twentieth century.

Her love of genealogy and travel have resulted in visits to relatives that she has
discovered in Israel, Slovakia, London, Canada, Kentucky, California and Ohio. She
presently keeps very active answering telephone, written, and e-mail inquiries
from all over the world about individuals buried in Newark.
Upcoming meetings
April 10th: Michael Brenner of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Southern Nevada
will speak about the upcoming IAJGS conference in Las Vegas in July.

Sincerely,
Edward L. Rosenbaum
JGS of Bergen County, NJ

About the JGS of Bergen county

We are an organization of Jewish genealogists who are enjoying the growing pastime
of tracing our families' roots back to the Old Country and collecting records of
our family, some of them hundreds of years old. The Jewish Genealogical Society
of Bergen County is one of over 70 member organizations of the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies.


BIALYGen Town Kruszyniany #poland

Bialystoker
 

Does anyone have any knowledge of the town of Kruszyniany? This town is
in the BIALYGen area at coordinates 5311, 2349, 28 miles east of
Bialystok and 6 miles SSE of Krynki, near the border with Belarus.

As many of you know, there are very few Jewish vital records for any
Polish town east of Bialystok. However, Miriam Weiner's Routes to Roots
Foundation Archive Database at http://www.rtrfoundation.org/ reports
that the local Urzad Stanu Cywilnego -- USC (civil records office) holds
Jewish births 1882-1939, deaths 1882-1914, 1922-39, and marriages
1882-1915, 1922-39.

If there is enough interest in this town, maybe something can be done.
It could be difficult. As many of you know, Polish privacy laws and laws
regulation USC offices protect these records >from public availability.

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland BIALYGen Town Kruszyniany #poland

Bialystoker
 

Does anyone have any knowledge of the town of Kruszyniany? This town is
in the BIALYGen area at coordinates 5311, 2349, 28 miles east of
Bialystok and 6 miles SSE of Krynki, near the border with Belarus.

As many of you know, there are very few Jewish vital records for any
Polish town east of Bialystok. However, Miriam Weiner's Routes to Roots
Foundation Archive Database at http://www.rtrfoundation.org/ reports
that the local Urzad Stanu Cywilnego -- USC (civil records office) holds
Jewish births 1882-1939, deaths 1882-1914, 1922-39, and marriages
1882-1915, 1922-39.

If there is enough interest in this town, maybe something can be done.
It could be difficult. As many of you know, Polish privacy laws and laws
regulation USC offices protect these records >from public availability.

Mark Halpern
BIALYGen Coordinator


Re: Translation from Hebrew please #warsaw #poland

Kris Murawski <kris.murawski@...>
 


The Gelbfisz Family:

He was very successful in his life , was very wealthy, the "Boursa"
(Hebrew word; my guess for translation is bursary) in Warsaw was managed
in his house.
"Bursa" in Polish has two meanings: one is a boarding school, the other
means money exchange, stock market. Obviously, in this case, the latter
applies.


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Re: Translation from Hebrew please #warsaw #poland

Kris Murawski <kris.murawski@...>
 


The Gelbfisz Family:

He was very successful in his life , was very wealthy, the "Boursa"
(Hebrew word; my guess for translation is bursary) in Warsaw was managed
in his house.
"Bursa" in Polish has two meanings: one is a boarding school, the other
means money exchange, stock market. Obviously, in this case, the latter
applies.


Re: Belarus SIG Coordinator Stepping Down Immediately #belarus

Tammy
 

I am sad to learn that David Fox is stepping down as Belarus SIG coordinator.
For almost seven years he has done a marvelous job coordinating the variety of
projects that members of this SIG have undertaken. He has moderated the listserv
and has educated so many of us along the way.

I am sorry to see Dave go and hope that someone else will try hard to keep the
tremendous momentum he established. All who read the Belarus SIG postings and
access the Belarus SIG website know that Dave's efforts reflected his passion for
documenting our Jewish heritage.

Dave, I thank you for all that you have done. I wish you and your family the best.

Tammy Weingarten
New York
searching: RABINOWITZ, WISHNEFSKY, Minsk


Belarus SIG #Belarus re: Belarus SIG Coordinator Stepping Down Immediately #belarus

Tammy
 

I am sad to learn that David Fox is stepping down as Belarus SIG coordinator.
For almost seven years he has done a marvelous job coordinating the variety of
projects that members of this SIG have undertaken. He has moderated the listserv
and has educated so many of us along the way.

I am sorry to see Dave go and hope that someone else will try hard to keep the
tremendous momentum he established. All who read the Belarus SIG postings and
access the Belarus SIG website know that Dave's efforts reflected his passion for
documenting our Jewish heritage.

Dave, I thank you for all that you have done. I wish you and your family the best.

Tammy Weingarten
New York
searching: RABINOWITZ, WISHNEFSKY, Minsk


Wuerttemberg "Familienpredigten" = hespedim #germany

reuven <mor@...>
 

Hello GerSIG,

recently I came across a site that is probably not known to many. A German
genealogist has indexed a collection of "family speaches"
(Familienpredigten) - printed editions (gothic print) of speaches that were
held at private occasions, like baptizing, marriage or funeral. The
collection is kept at WLB in Stuttgart. It includes quite a few "hespedim"
funeral speaches for Jews who died in Wuerttemberg in the second half of the
19th century. Mr.Kunert seems to be working on his site, but it is already
searchable for last names, places, years, etc. I saw a few EINSTEIN in
Buchau, some Buttenhausen residents and my Lauheim ancestors: LAUPHEIMER,
HOFHEIMER, HIRSCHFELD. The copies for last I received - if anyone else
should be intersted.

http://home.t-online.de/home/Kunert.R/uebergl.htm

Copies have to be ordered >from the "Wuerttembergische Landesbibliothek
Stuttgart" (WLB).

http://www.wlb-stuttgart.de/archive/famprslg.html

Knowledge of German is essential for both sites. (Paste the links into the
browser.) If someone is not fluent in German but would like to check for a
certain name or town, I could help.

What I learned >from this: sofar I did not expect libraries to hold material
referring to individuals which, if you are lucky enough, include your ancestors.

Regards Reuven Mohr Israel


German SIG #Germany Wuerttemberg "Familienpredigten" = hespedim #germany

reuven <mor@...>
 

Hello GerSIG,

recently I came across a site that is probably not known to many. A German
genealogist has indexed a collection of "family speaches"
(Familienpredigten) - printed editions (gothic print) of speaches that were
held at private occasions, like baptizing, marriage or funeral. The
collection is kept at WLB in Stuttgart. It includes quite a few "hespedim"
funeral speaches for Jews who died in Wuerttemberg in the second half of the
19th century. Mr.Kunert seems to be working on his site, but it is already
searchable for last names, places, years, etc. I saw a few EINSTEIN in
Buchau, some Buttenhausen residents and my Lauheim ancestors: LAUPHEIMER,
HOFHEIMER, HIRSCHFELD. The copies for last I received - if anyone else
should be intersted.

http://home.t-online.de/home/Kunert.R/uebergl.htm

Copies have to be ordered >from the "Wuerttembergische Landesbibliothek
Stuttgart" (WLB).

http://www.wlb-stuttgart.de/archive/famprslg.html

Knowledge of German is essential for both sites. (Paste the links into the
browser.) If someone is not fluent in German but would like to check for a
certain name or town, I could help.

What I learned >from this: sofar I did not expect libraries to hold material
referring to individuals which, if you are lucky enough, include your ancestors.

Regards Reuven Mohr Israel


Re: Allan Hirsh & a Stuttgart Jewish Archives "Family Register" project #germany

EllnKahn@...
 

I would like to add my comments regarding the photocopied Family Registers at
the Stuttgart Jewish Archives and the project proposal
first brought up by Allan Hirsh.

I wholeheartedly agree that these records are extremely valuable.
After searching for many years, I found the only records (which
were photocopies) for all of my maternal ancestors at the Jewish Archives
in Stuttgart. My family had lived for centuries in small villages in the
Wuerttemberg province of Southern Germany just north of Stuttgart.

I found records going back to the early 1700s. As far as I can recall,
the Jewish Stuttgart records covered Jews of the Baden and Wuerttemberg
provinces but may have covered some of Bavaria also.

The office is near the Stuttgart Hauptarchives but was staffed (in 1992) by
one elderly man. I had written to him a few years earlier without a response.
When I went to his office, he apologized and showd me the pile of requests
he had no time to answer. It was a good thing that I was able to go there in
person. The photocopies had been put into many notebooks organized by this
gentleman, I believe. He directed me to the notebooks I needed and then all
owed me time to make copies of family records. Normally he makes all the
photocopies himself.

Allan Hirsh had stated that "In Stuttgart are 60,000 birth death marriage
and family register sheets. They include I believe all of Wuerttenberg and
some of Baden and some of Bavaria. I believe this was a Jewish census taken
when last names were required. The records go back several generations.

They are photo copies of the original sheets which I understand were lost.
Some are hard to read and of course they are in German."

Allan mentioned that he has a complete copy of the list of these charts and
sent a copy of this list to the Leo Baeck Institute asking them if they would
be interested in obtaining these records, but Allan got no answer.

I do not know if the Stuttgart office can find the necessary manpower or if
Allan's cost projection of $7,000 is correct, but I agree that those records
should be carefully copied and made available to the family members. If the
Stuttgart Jewish archives closes, who knows what would happen to this precious
resource?

GerSig already has received pledges for funds >from several people to have
these records copied. I realize that our manpower is overburdened.
Since Allan= has the list of the charts at Stuttgart, he would be the best
person to spearhead this project. I would offer him some help although I am
still working and have only limited time.

To answer Roger Lustig question as to availability of these records
elsewhere: I never found any of these Stuttgart records at LBI or
on any LDS films. I went to the website Roger specified:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~alcalz/share/
but did not find my family's data; there was nothing >from our area of Germany.

Several people have thus far shown their interest in these records. Some can
offer money; some can give time. Hopefully there are more such volunteers.

***** MODERATOR NOTE: As stated previously, the most important need is
for a qualified volunteer project coordinator who will form a
group to evaluate and lead such a project. Without this keystone
nothing can be done.

Reuven Mohr of Israel has 25 years of experience in reading German registers.
His expertise would be valuable since not everyone can decipher old German
script.

Dottie Miller of San Antonio, Texas, is enthusiastic about digitizing and
publishing these records, and suggested that there must be at least 59 others
interested.

We must have people who will know which method is best: making photocopies
or recording these digitally. And perhaps we can even find someone
knowledgeable, experienced and willing to travel to Stuttgart after all
arrangements have been made with these archives.

Allan Hirsh has been very successful in his genealogical work. My question
is whether Allan would be willing to have everyone contacthim and keep track
of all of the responses to his suggestion. Once that is done, he will know
if there are enough volunteers, funds, etc. ( allanhirsh@aol.com )

Ellen Kahn Homewood, IL EllnKahn@aol.com

P.S.: Mrs. Cheryl Johnson of Durban, South Africa wrote that LDS states "Family
registers are more common in southern Germany, especially in Wuerttemberg and
Baden after 1808. Children are usually listed in chronological order. Names,
birth dates, marriage dates, and death dates may be listed. In some registers,
when a child married, the register gives a "see" reference and a page number
where that particular child appears as the head of a household. Some family
registers indicate whether the family moved to another village or emigrated
to another country. I wondered if Gersiggers were aware of this vital source of
information."


German SIG #Germany Re: Allan Hirsh & a Stuttgart Jewish Archives "Family Register" project #germany

EllnKahn@...
 

I would like to add my comments regarding the photocopied Family Registers at
the Stuttgart Jewish Archives and the project proposal
first brought up by Allan Hirsh.

I wholeheartedly agree that these records are extremely valuable.
After searching for many years, I found the only records (which
were photocopies) for all of my maternal ancestors at the Jewish Archives
in Stuttgart. My family had lived for centuries in small villages in the
Wuerttemberg province of Southern Germany just north of Stuttgart.

I found records going back to the early 1700s. As far as I can recall,
the Jewish Stuttgart records covered Jews of the Baden and Wuerttemberg
provinces but may have covered some of Bavaria also.

The office is near the Stuttgart Hauptarchives but was staffed (in 1992) by
one elderly man. I had written to him a few years earlier without a response.
When I went to his office, he apologized and showd me the pile of requests
he had no time to answer. It was a good thing that I was able to go there in
person. The photocopies had been put into many notebooks organized by this
gentleman, I believe. He directed me to the notebooks I needed and then all
owed me time to make copies of family records. Normally he makes all the
photocopies himself.

Allan Hirsh had stated that "In Stuttgart are 60,000 birth death marriage
and family register sheets. They include I believe all of Wuerttenberg and
some of Baden and some of Bavaria. I believe this was a Jewish census taken
when last names were required. The records go back several generations.

They are photo copies of the original sheets which I understand were lost.
Some are hard to read and of course they are in German."

Allan mentioned that he has a complete copy of the list of these charts and
sent a copy of this list to the Leo Baeck Institute asking them if they would
be interested in obtaining these records, but Allan got no answer.

I do not know if the Stuttgart office can find the necessary manpower or if
Allan's cost projection of $7,000 is correct, but I agree that those records
should be carefully copied and made available to the family members. If the
Stuttgart Jewish archives closes, who knows what would happen to this precious
resource?

GerSig already has received pledges for funds >from several people to have
these records copied. I realize that our manpower is overburdened.
Since Allan= has the list of the charts at Stuttgart, he would be the best
person to spearhead this project. I would offer him some help although I am
still working and have only limited time.

To answer Roger Lustig question as to availability of these records
elsewhere: I never found any of these Stuttgart records at LBI or
on any LDS films. I went to the website Roger specified:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~alcalz/share/
but did not find my family's data; there was nothing >from our area of Germany.

Several people have thus far shown their interest in these records. Some can
offer money; some can give time. Hopefully there are more such volunteers.

***** MODERATOR NOTE: As stated previously, the most important need is
for a qualified volunteer project coordinator who will form a
group to evaluate and lead such a project. Without this keystone
nothing can be done.

Reuven Mohr of Israel has 25 years of experience in reading German registers.
His expertise would be valuable since not everyone can decipher old German
script.

Dottie Miller of San Antonio, Texas, is enthusiastic about digitizing and
publishing these records, and suggested that there must be at least 59 others
interested.

We must have people who will know which method is best: making photocopies
or recording these digitally. And perhaps we can even find someone
knowledgeable, experienced and willing to travel to Stuttgart after all
arrangements have been made with these archives.

Allan Hirsh has been very successful in his genealogical work. My question
is whether Allan would be willing to have everyone contacthim and keep track
of all of the responses to his suggestion. Once that is done, he will know
if there are enough volunteers, funds, etc. ( allanhirsh@aol.com )

Ellen Kahn Homewood, IL EllnKahn@aol.com

P.S.: Mrs. Cheryl Johnson of Durban, South Africa wrote that LDS states "Family
registers are more common in southern Germany, especially in Wuerttemberg and
Baden after 1808. Children are usually listed in chronological order. Names,
birth dates, marriage dates, and death dates may be listed. In some registers,
when a child married, the register gives a "see" reference and a page number
where that particular child appears as the head of a household. Some family
registers indicate whether the family moved to another village or emigrated
to another country. I wondered if Gersiggers were aware of this vital source of
information."


Name-adoption lists, Censuses, Family Registers, etc #germany

Jan Bousse <janbousse@...>
 

As always Roger Lustig made an important contribution to the subject of
adoption lists, censuses, etc. When this discussion started I was wondering
when someone would refer to the very extensive lists dated 24 March 1812 for
Berlin and the surrounding region, the Kurmark. When I spent a week in
Berlin in various archives, almost three years ago, I saw the booklet with
these lists, >from a friend researcher I got a photocopy of two pages with
the places I was interested in, Spandau and Liebenwalde, but I have seen
that there is a long list for Berlin. It seems to me that this printed
booklet should be available in the main library, for instance the
Staatsbibliothek Berlin. I know that the lady who made these copies for me
possessed the booklet, so it should not be difficult to find. Since I can't
put attachments in this mail, I could propose to Roger that I send him
privately a scan of the two pages I have, so that he can identify it and see
if we are talking of the same thing. I for one would now, at this stage of
my research, dearly wish I could check names in the larger Berlin list.

Apart >from these lists in German regions, I would like to point out that
such lists, or at least the original records of the declarations of name
adoption, exist for the period of 1808 in Belgium and in parts of the
Netherlands which were then also under French rule. I have copies of such
declarations in Gulpen, Limburg, and there the origin of the person is
marked, very often they came >from Germany. In this case a man called Lebe
Elias chose the name Hector LACLOCHE and he came >from Gemmingen,
Wuerttemberg. I have seen the same records in Brussels, about a hundred
persons, there the origin of the person was not recorded, only the old name
and the new adopted name. The case I am interested in, e.g., was EBIE who
became DEBY. I know >from other documents that he was born in Strelitz,
Mecklenburg.

I hope this helps those who are looking for more sources and details. I
repeat that the Berlin list I saw contains many localities outside Berlin,
they are listed in alphabetical order. For instance on the page where I have
Spandau there follows Storckow, Strasburg, Strausberg. On the other page I
have there is Joachimsthal, Kyritz, Alt Landsberg, Amt Lebus, Lenzen,
Liebenwalde, Lindow, Luckenwalde, Lychen, Mittenwalde, Muenchenberg.

Jan Bousse, Oostende, Belgium janbousse@skynet.be


German SIG #Germany Name-adoption lists, Censuses, Family Registers, etc #germany

Jan Bousse <janbousse@...>
 

As always Roger Lustig made an important contribution to the subject of
adoption lists, censuses, etc. When this discussion started I was wondering
when someone would refer to the very extensive lists dated 24 March 1812 for
Berlin and the surrounding region, the Kurmark. When I spent a week in
Berlin in various archives, almost three years ago, I saw the booklet with
these lists, >from a friend researcher I got a photocopy of two pages with
the places I was interested in, Spandau and Liebenwalde, but I have seen
that there is a long list for Berlin. It seems to me that this printed
booklet should be available in the main library, for instance the
Staatsbibliothek Berlin. I know that the lady who made these copies for me
possessed the booklet, so it should not be difficult to find. Since I can't
put attachments in this mail, I could propose to Roger that I send him
privately a scan of the two pages I have, so that he can identify it and see
if we are talking of the same thing. I for one would now, at this stage of
my research, dearly wish I could check names in the larger Berlin list.

Apart >from these lists in German regions, I would like to point out that
such lists, or at least the original records of the declarations of name
adoption, exist for the period of 1808 in Belgium and in parts of the
Netherlands which were then also under French rule. I have copies of such
declarations in Gulpen, Limburg, and there the origin of the person is
marked, very often they came >from Germany. In this case a man called Lebe
Elias chose the name Hector LACLOCHE and he came >from Gemmingen,
Wuerttemberg. I have seen the same records in Brussels, about a hundred
persons, there the origin of the person was not recorded, only the old name
and the new adopted name. The case I am interested in, e.g., was EBIE who
became DEBY. I know >from other documents that he was born in Strelitz,
Mecklenburg.

I hope this helps those who are looking for more sources and details. I
repeat that the Berlin list I saw contains many localities outside Berlin,
they are listed in alphabetical order. For instance on the page where I have
Spandau there follows Storckow, Strasburg, Strausberg. On the other page I
have there is Joachimsthal, Kyritz, Alt Landsberg, Amt Lebus, Lenzen,
Liebenwalde, Lindow, Luckenwalde, Lychen, Mittenwalde, Muenchenberg.

Jan Bousse, Oostende, Belgium janbousse@skynet.be


Re: Proposed name adoption list project for GerSIG website #germany

A & B Algaze <Algaze@...>
 

[Any comments, questions or other discussion of this message should be sent to:
obermayer@alum.mit.edu with a cc (copy) to gersig@lyris.jewishgen.org
and cc to Algaze@comcast.net ] ======================>

I have been following the discussion thread regarding
the proposed name adloption list project for GerSIG
originally mentioned on this Forum.

I believe that Avotaynu Press, Inc. will be publishing a book
shortly, written by our own Lars Menk, (GerSig member since 1998)
that contains information >from many of these name adoption lists.
(correct me if I am wrong, Lars.) [*** What is the publication date ? ***]

If this is so, we do not need to "reinvent the wheel."

Barbara Algaze Los Angeles, California Algaze@comcast.net

MOD NOTES:
1. Lars Menk's book will cover northern Germany only, I believe.
2. Months ago I asked Mr. Menk whether he could make his name adoption
list sources available for use in a GerSIG or JewishGen data base.
He replied that the contract with Avotaynu Press would not allow this.
3. GerSIG is an Internet based group. Any project that we take on as an
official SIG project must have the creation of an Internet database
at the JewishGen website as its ultimate goal.

Name adoptions lists >from cities and towns in Germany are available >from many
sources. Some sources are widely known. Others are very obscure.

Arthur Obermayer suggested combining the information >from such lists into a
single database that could be searched and read >from anywhere via the Internet.

For an example of what Mr. Obermayer has proposed, visit the excellent
database created by Wolfgang Fritzsche. This link is always available
via the "Resources" page at the GerSIG website under "Name Adoption Lists":

http://www.a-h-b.de/AHB/links_e.htm

(Dr. Fritzsche's efforts have been focused on only one part of Germany.
The Obermayer proposal was for an all Germany database.)

This would not, in my opinion, be described as a wasteful use of time and
effort to "reinvent the wheel".

Any comments, questions or other discussion of this message should be sent to:
obermayer@alum.mit.edu with a ccs (copies) to gersig@lyris.jewishgen.org
and cc to Algaze@comcast.net


German SIG #Germany Re: Proposed name adoption list project for GerSIG website #germany

A & B Algaze <Algaze@...>
 

[Any comments, questions or other discussion of this message should be sent to:
obermayer@alum.mit.edu with a cc (copy) to gersig@lyris.jewishgen.org
and cc to Algaze@comcast.net ] ======================>

I have been following the discussion thread regarding
the proposed name adloption list project for GerSIG
originally mentioned on this Forum.

I believe that Avotaynu Press, Inc. will be publishing a book
shortly, written by our own Lars Menk, (GerSig member since 1998)
that contains information >from many of these name adoption lists.
(correct me if I am wrong, Lars.) [*** What is the publication date ? ***]

If this is so, we do not need to "reinvent the wheel."

Barbara Algaze Los Angeles, California Algaze@comcast.net

MOD NOTES:
1. Lars Menk's book will cover northern Germany only, I believe.
2. Months ago I asked Mr. Menk whether he could make his name adoption
list sources available for use in a GerSIG or JewishGen data base.
He replied that the contract with Avotaynu Press would not allow this.
3. GerSIG is an Internet based group. Any project that we take on as an
official SIG project must have the creation of an Internet database
at the JewishGen website as its ultimate goal.

Name adoptions lists >from cities and towns in Germany are available >from many
sources. Some sources are widely known. Others are very obscure.

Arthur Obermayer suggested combining the information >from such lists into a
single database that could be searched and read >from anywhere via the Internet.

For an example of what Mr. Obermayer has proposed, visit the excellent
database created by Wolfgang Fritzsche. This link is always available
via the "Resources" page at the GerSIG website under "Name Adoption Lists":

http://www.a-h-b.de/AHB/links_e.htm

(Dr. Fritzsche's efforts have been focused on only one part of Germany.
The Obermayer proposal was for an all Germany database.)

This would not, in my opinion, be described as a wasteful use of time and
effort to "reinvent the wheel".

Any comments, questions or other discussion of this message should be sent to:
obermayer@alum.mit.edu with a ccs (copies) to gersig@lyris.jewishgen.org
and cc to Algaze@comcast.net


Marktsteft, Bavaria Name Adoption List #germany

William Suhler <wsuhler@...>
 

My family came >from Marksteft Bavaria and there are in the Bavarian archives the
naming documents for the Jewish families of the area (at least Marktsteft)
as I have a photocopy of the page containing my ancestor, Samuel SUHLER.

William C. Suhler, Rockville, Maryland USA <wsuhler@erols.com>


German SIG #Germany Marktsteft, Bavaria Name Adoption List #germany

William Suhler <wsuhler@...>
 

My family came >from Marksteft Bavaria and there are in the Bavarian archives the
naming documents for the Jewish families of the area (at least Marktsteft)
as I have a photocopy of the page containing my ancestor, Samuel SUHLER.

William C. Suhler, Rockville, Maryland USA <wsuhler@erols.com>