Date   

wee bit of Polish language #general

Norman Greenfeld <ng253@...>
 

Polish is a Slavic language and is related, thus, to Russian and
Czech. If you recall, Polish-speaking lands were divided between
Russia, Germany and Austria before 1918. Consequently, we find records
written before this date may be in Russian, German, Latin or Polish.

In what was Russian Poland, Polish was the official language >from
1808-1868. >from 1868 to 1917, official vital records were written in
Russian. Altho some records were kept in Polish, most records in
German Poland were kept in German or Latin. Latin, however, was the
official language for most records in Austran Poland, although some
records were kept in Polish. Latin and German words appear quite
often in Polish records. (So much for those of us who chose French or
Spanish in high school!)

Polish classifies persons, places and things as masculine, feminine
or neuter; e.g., "malzonek" is husband, "malzonka" is wife. Adjectives
must have the proper gender endings.

Also, in Polish, words may change with usage. This is important to know
as you read, or attempt to read, Polish records. Certain genitive endings
give the meaning "of" to a word. For example, noun endings are "a"
(masculine), "y" or " i" (feminine), and "ow", with accent over the
"o" (neuter), For adjectives, we have, respectively, "ego", "ej", and
"ich" or "ych".

Singular forms of words are usually changed in the plural: words
ending in "a" change to "y"; those ending in "o" change to "a". To
add to the confusion, spelling rules were not standardized in the
earlier centuries. So, when you do your research, be aware that i, y,
and j are used interchangeably, x used for ks, u for o
(with accent), ci for cz, si for sz, etc.

Numbers and dates are most often spelled out, with dates written in
ordinal form. Hold on, it's not that easy. In some records we find
two dates, 12 days apart; Julian (Russian Empire) and Gregorian
calendar (present-day). Abbreviations of dates are written as Roman
numerals for months. My grandfather's dates are: w roku osiemset
trydziestego piecdziestiat piec pazdziernika....October, 1855.

Given all of the above, those interested in genealogy in Poland, must
get a good English-Polish and Polish-English Dictionary and search out
the equivalents of the Russian, German, Polish and English alphabets.
(Note, if there is disagreement with my translation of the date,
October,1855, please be kind in your comments)


Norm Greenfeld
Albany NY
ng253@cnsibm.albany.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen wee bit of Polish language #general

Norman Greenfeld <ng253@...>
 

Polish is a Slavic language and is related, thus, to Russian and
Czech. If you recall, Polish-speaking lands were divided between
Russia, Germany and Austria before 1918. Consequently, we find records
written before this date may be in Russian, German, Latin or Polish.

In what was Russian Poland, Polish was the official language >from
1808-1868. >from 1868 to 1917, official vital records were written in
Russian. Altho some records were kept in Polish, most records in
German Poland were kept in German or Latin. Latin, however, was the
official language for most records in Austran Poland, although some
records were kept in Polish. Latin and German words appear quite
often in Polish records. (So much for those of us who chose French or
Spanish in high school!)

Polish classifies persons, places and things as masculine, feminine
or neuter; e.g., "malzonek" is husband, "malzonka" is wife. Adjectives
must have the proper gender endings.

Also, in Polish, words may change with usage. This is important to know
as you read, or attempt to read, Polish records. Certain genitive endings
give the meaning "of" to a word. For example, noun endings are "a"
(masculine), "y" or " i" (feminine), and "ow", with accent over the
"o" (neuter), For adjectives, we have, respectively, "ego", "ej", and
"ich" or "ych".

Singular forms of words are usually changed in the plural: words
ending in "a" change to "y"; those ending in "o" change to "a". To
add to the confusion, spelling rules were not standardized in the
earlier centuries. So, when you do your research, be aware that i, y,
and j are used interchangeably, x used for ks, u for o
(with accent), ci for cz, si for sz, etc.

Numbers and dates are most often spelled out, with dates written in
ordinal form. Hold on, it's not that easy. In some records we find
two dates, 12 days apart; Julian (Russian Empire) and Gregorian
calendar (present-day). Abbreviations of dates are written as Roman
numerals for months. My grandfather's dates are: w roku osiemset
trydziestego piecdziestiat piec pazdziernika....October, 1855.

Given all of the above, those interested in genealogy in Poland, must
get a good English-Polish and Polish-English Dictionary and search out
the equivalents of the Russian, German, Polish and English alphabets.
(Note, if there is disagreement with my translation of the date,
October,1855, please be kind in your comments)


Norm Greenfeld
Albany NY
ng253@cnsibm.albany.edu


Brooklyn NY Obituaries #general

Stephanie Lewis <steflewis@...>
 

Dear JGenners:

I have many relatives on several sides of my family who lived and died
in and around Brooklyn and/or Bensenhurst and/or Manhattan. Is there
a place online where I could find obituaries >from local newspapers
(the names of which I don't know at this point)? I don't know that
everyone necessarily made it into the New York Times, nor do I know of
an online location to search those. Is there some other way to do
this >from the Philadelphia/South Jersey area?

Thanks for your help!

Stephanie Whitlon Lewis
Voorhees, New Jersey


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Brooklyn NY Obituaries #general

Stephanie Lewis <steflewis@...>
 

Dear JGenners:

I have many relatives on several sides of my family who lived and died
in and around Brooklyn and/or Bensenhurst and/or Manhattan. Is there
a place online where I could find obituaries >from local newspapers
(the names of which I don't know at this point)? I don't know that
everyone necessarily made it into the New York Times, nor do I know of
an online location to search those. Is there some other way to do
this >from the Philadelphia/South Jersey area?

Thanks for your help!

Stephanie Whitlon Lewis
Voorhees, New Jersey


Survivors List of Plock , Poland. #general

ada01@...
 

Shalom Plock (6),

I posted a list of Plock Holocaust survivors, names
and the circumstances of their survival, prepared
by the Plock Israeli Landsmanschaften, Mrs. Ilana Wojtkowski, following the
initiative of Alfred Jesion of blessed memory.

Please note that only Holocaust survivors are listed,
excluding those who emigrated >from Plock before the war.
Anyone who has information about other survivors not recorded for
lack of knowledge, are kindly requested to contact me to update the list.

The list contains 340 survivors, out of Jewish population of
more than 10,000 before the Holocaust... 3.4% only... and what is
hidden behind the dry figure...
3.4% to carry on the name of the Plocker Jew...
3.4% only to carry on the Jewish heritage of families and culture lost
and destroyed... 3.4% only miraculously lived to tell
the generations to come of this incomprehensible tragedy.
3.4% only, chosen by fate, to tell their life of agony and hope...
Many of them are unfortunately not with us anymore.

Behind each name there is a the whole world.
They suffered and endured the concentration camps and the ghettos,
participated in the revolts in Treblinka and Sobibor,
exiled in Siberia, joined the Partisans, hid in the Aryan side, fought and survived, fought and triumphed the victory of the
human spirit over evil.
Only one child was hidden by a Pole in his own hometown... Another
survivor, returned after the war to Plock, after surviving the Nazi
hell, to be murdered by Poles in his own old hometown!
One shtetl, a mirror to hundreds...

Evelyn Kohn Raycon, a descendant of a Plocker survivor responded:
"I read the list and it brought tears to my eyes. I cried because I am
grateful for those who survived, but I also cried for all of those who were
not on the list."

With this list I completed the first and surly the most important part
of the Plock memorial project on the web which I initiated: P.R.I. - Plock
Remembrance Initiative.

The page address:
http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/4017/SURVIVO.HTM

Ada Holtzman
Web site:http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/4017/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Survivors List of Plock , Poland. #general

ada01@...
 

Shalom Plock (6),

I posted a list of Plock Holocaust survivors, names
and the circumstances of their survival, prepared
by the Plock Israeli Landsmanschaften, Mrs. Ilana Wojtkowski, following the
initiative of Alfred Jesion of blessed memory.

Please note that only Holocaust survivors are listed,
excluding those who emigrated >from Plock before the war.
Anyone who has information about other survivors not recorded for
lack of knowledge, are kindly requested to contact me to update the list.

The list contains 340 survivors, out of Jewish population of
more than 10,000 before the Holocaust... 3.4% only... and what is
hidden behind the dry figure...
3.4% to carry on the name of the Plocker Jew...
3.4% only to carry on the Jewish heritage of families and culture lost
and destroyed... 3.4% only miraculously lived to tell
the generations to come of this incomprehensible tragedy.
3.4% only, chosen by fate, to tell their life of agony and hope...
Many of them are unfortunately not with us anymore.

Behind each name there is a the whole world.
They suffered and endured the concentration camps and the ghettos,
participated in the revolts in Treblinka and Sobibor,
exiled in Siberia, joined the Partisans, hid in the Aryan side, fought and survived, fought and triumphed the victory of the
human spirit over evil.
Only one child was hidden by a Pole in his own hometown... Another
survivor, returned after the war to Plock, after surviving the Nazi
hell, to be murdered by Poles in his own old hometown!
One shtetl, a mirror to hundreds...

Evelyn Kohn Raycon, a descendant of a Plocker survivor responded:
"I read the list and it brought tears to my eyes. I cried because I am
grateful for those who survived, but I also cried for all of those who were
not on the list."

With this list I completed the first and surly the most important part
of the Plock memorial project on the web which I initiated: P.R.I. - Plock
Remembrance Initiative.

The page address:
http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/4017/SURVIVO.HTM

Ada Holtzman
Web site:http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/4017/


Re: Searching: BANNET Family- Krakow- Poland #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 99-03-03 22:32:02 EST, affinitydeal@hotmail.com writes:

<< I am searching for living relatives of BANNET Henryk and BANNET Izaak from
Krakow, Poland. Last heard >from W.W. II.

Check Encyc. Judaica, you'll finf many mentions under Banet, Baneth, Paneth,
Bannet, Bennet, Beneth etc. Also Paneth. There are three likely origins of
this family name mentioned in dictionaries of Jewish names.

1. Hebrew name Baruch (=Blessed) -> Benedik (Germanized form of Benedictus)

2. Hebrew name Dov (=Bear) -> Baer ((German) -> Bernhard -> Bernard -> Bannat
etc

3. Hebrew name YomTov (=Good Day or Holiday) -> Bonjiorn (==Good Day, Spain &
Provence ca 12th cent) --> Bonet --> Banet/Benet/Boné

My family name, Bernet (variant: Baerneth, Bernit, Bernert) probably derives
from #2 or #3 and I'm always interested in bearers of these names when the
family is known to be Levites. I do not know of any of my family in Krakow;
they settles in 1650 in villages around Bamberg (Germany). I'd like to know
more about your ancestries

Michael Bernet, New York


Lodz Archives #general

C.O.M.E. Racing <come@...>
 

There was an article in the Melbourne Edition of The Australian Jewish
News dated Feb. 26, about the Lodz archives that I thought might
interest some of you. Barbara Geller,a Jew whose father was a Holocaust
survivor, lives in Lodz and is Economic Advisor to the President of the
City of Lodz. She was here in Australia for a month. She has access to
the Lodz archives which are housed in 12 rooms of the basement of the
municipality building. She has a team of 20 people working on the
papers and documents stored there. They have found transportation lists
from Prague to the Lodz ghetto. Also transportation lists >from Vienna,
Luxembourg, Hamburg. Also a list of all Jews in the Lodz Ghetto. The
archives will eventually be housed in a permanent exhibition in a Jewish
Museum in Lodz. Ms. Geller also initiated the idea to make the Lodz
Jewish cemetery a UNESCO World Heritage site.

If you have any questions about the article please contact the
Australian Jewish News, not myself, on email ajnewmel@netspace.net.au
Dan Goldberg was the reporter. The paper's address is 193 Balaclava
Road, North Caulfield, Victoria, Australia 3161
I could mail a copy of the article to someone in the U.S. who could then
fax copies to others there, if you are interested.

Mary Blumenstein
Melbourne, Australia
Researching: BAUM/ Satoraljaujhely, Hungary. BERNER/KATZ/ Beregovo,
Ukraine. BLUMENSTEIN/Ivano Frankovsk, Ukraine.GOLDFARB/MONCIASZ
Parczew,Poland. HELLINGER/Michalovce, Kosice,
Slovakia.NEUMAN/NEUMANN/Kvakovce,Michalovce, Slovakia.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Searching: BANNET Family- Krakow- Poland #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 99-03-03 22:32:02 EST, affinitydeal@hotmail.com writes:

<< I am searching for living relatives of BANNET Henryk and BANNET Izaak from
Krakow, Poland. Last heard >from W.W. II.

Check Encyc. Judaica, you'll finf many mentions under Banet, Baneth, Paneth,
Bannet, Bennet, Beneth etc. Also Paneth. There are three likely origins of
this family name mentioned in dictionaries of Jewish names.

1. Hebrew name Baruch (=Blessed) -> Benedik (Germanized form of Benedictus)

2. Hebrew name Dov (=Bear) -> Baer ((German) -> Bernhard -> Bernard -> Bannat
etc

3. Hebrew name YomTov (=Good Day or Holiday) -> Bonjiorn (==Good Day, Spain &
Provence ca 12th cent) --> Bonet --> Banet/Benet/Boné

My family name, Bernet (variant: Baerneth, Bernit, Bernert) probably derives
from #2 or #3 and I'm always interested in bearers of these names when the
family is known to be Levites. I do not know of any of my family in Krakow;
they settles in 1650 in villages around Bamberg (Germany). I'd like to know
more about your ancestries

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lodz Archives #general

C.O.M.E. Racing <come@...>
 

There was an article in the Melbourne Edition of The Australian Jewish
News dated Feb. 26, about the Lodz archives that I thought might
interest some of you. Barbara Geller,a Jew whose father was a Holocaust
survivor, lives in Lodz and is Economic Advisor to the President of the
City of Lodz. She was here in Australia for a month. She has access to
the Lodz archives which are housed in 12 rooms of the basement of the
municipality building. She has a team of 20 people working on the
papers and documents stored there. They have found transportation lists
from Prague to the Lodz ghetto. Also transportation lists >from Vienna,
Luxembourg, Hamburg. Also a list of all Jews in the Lodz Ghetto. The
archives will eventually be housed in a permanent exhibition in a Jewish
Museum in Lodz. Ms. Geller also initiated the idea to make the Lodz
Jewish cemetery a UNESCO World Heritage site.

If you have any questions about the article please contact the
Australian Jewish News, not myself, on email ajnewmel@netspace.net.au
Dan Goldberg was the reporter. The paper's address is 193 Balaclava
Road, North Caulfield, Victoria, Australia 3161
I could mail a copy of the article to someone in the U.S. who could then
fax copies to others there, if you are interested.

Mary Blumenstein
Melbourne, Australia
Researching: BAUM/ Satoraljaujhely, Hungary. BERNER/KATZ/ Beregovo,
Ukraine. BLUMENSTEIN/Ivano Frankovsk, Ukraine.GOLDFARB/MONCIASZ
Parczew,Poland. HELLINGER/Michalovce, Kosice,
Slovakia.NEUMAN/NEUMANN/Kvakovce,Michalovce, Slovakia.


SUGAR Family Owners: New Arlington Hotel, Fleishmanns, NY #general

Gary Platt <grplatt@...>
 

Does anyone have any recollection of the New Arlington Hotel, a
Hungarian-Jewish hotel in Fleischmanns, NY? It was owned by a family
named SUGAR during the 50s and 60s.

Gary R. Platt
Morristown, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SUGAR Family Owners: New Arlington Hotel, Fleishmanns, NY #general

Gary Platt <grplatt@...>
 

Does anyone have any recollection of the New Arlington Hotel, a
Hungarian-Jewish hotel in Fleischmanns, NY? It was owned by a family
named SUGAR during the 50s and 60s.

Gary R. Platt
Morristown, NJ


FEINGLOSS, WEINTRAUB-Baltimore; Detroit; Florida #general

Marian Rubin
 

Looking for descendants of Abe (ROGOSNITZKY) FEINGLOSS, born in
Kobryn about 1895. Settled in Baltimore. Abe and his wife Dora FEINGLOSS
(or FEINGLASS) had a son. Their grandson may be Nachman
FEINGLOSS. Abe & Dora's daughter may have been Zelma who
may have married a Herman WEINTRAUB in the auto business
in Detroit.
Abe Feingloss is said to have moved >from Baltimore to Florida in 1965.

Related to the ALON family in Israel.

I would appreciate any leads. Please reply privately. Thank you.

Marian Rubin
San Francisco

Reply to merubin@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen FEINGLOSS, WEINTRAUB-Baltimore; Detroit; Florida #general

Marian Rubin
 

Looking for descendants of Abe (ROGOSNITZKY) FEINGLOSS, born in
Kobryn about 1895. Settled in Baltimore. Abe and his wife Dora FEINGLOSS
(or FEINGLASS) had a son. Their grandson may be Nachman
FEINGLOSS. Abe & Dora's daughter may have been Zelma who
may have married a Herman WEINTRAUB in the auto business
in Detroit.
Abe Feingloss is said to have moved >from Baltimore to Florida in 1965.

Related to the ALON family in Israel.

I would appreciate any leads. Please reply privately. Thank you.

Marian Rubin
San Francisco

Reply to merubin@aol.com


Bullay, Rhineland-Pfalz #general

Larry E. Oppenheimer <loppen@...>
 

Can anyone tell me the location of the archive containing the vital
records (births, deaths, marriages) for Bullay, Rhineland-Pfalz?

Thank you for the help.
Larry Oppenheimer
loppen@tiac.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Bullay, Rhineland-Pfalz #general

Larry E. Oppenheimer <loppen@...>
 

Can anyone tell me the location of the archive containing the vital
records (births, deaths, marriages) for Bullay, Rhineland-Pfalz?

Thank you for the help.
Larry Oppenheimer
loppen@tiac.net


United States Immigration Records #general

MIchael Zigun <zigun@...>
 

I was wondering -- where can I search for someone who Immigrated from
russia to the states in the begining of the century. how can I get
Immigration records offline or online ?


Michael Zigun
zigun@inter.net.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen United States Immigration Records #general

MIchael Zigun <zigun@...>
 

I was wondering -- where can I search for someone who Immigrated from
russia to the states in the begining of the century. how can I get
Immigration records offline or online ?


Michael Zigun
zigun@inter.net.il


Travel to Pantalowice, Poland #general

sabramscpa@...
 

My cousin is interested in traveling to Pantalowice, Poland this
summer. This small area is near the southeast corner of Poland and it
is not far >from the Ukraine border.

Nearby larger areas/towns are Jaroslaw, Przemysl and Rzeszow.

If anyone has traveled to this area please e mail Ed Adler at
emadler@hotmail.com. He would like to benefit >from others who have
traveled to this region and to Poland.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Steve Abrams
Van Nuys, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Travel to Pantalowice, Poland #general

sabramscpa@...
 

My cousin is interested in traveling to Pantalowice, Poland this
summer. This small area is near the southeast corner of Poland and it
is not far >from the Ukraine border.

Nearby larger areas/towns are Jaroslaw, Przemysl and Rzeszow.

If anyone has traveled to this area please e mail Ed Adler at
emadler@hotmail.com. He would like to benefit >from others who have
traveled to this region and to Poland.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Steve Abrams
Van Nuys, CA