Date   

Search for FABER/LINDENBAUM #general

M. Faber <mfaber@...>
 

As a beginner in Genealogy, I apologize first for any errors I might make.

I am trying to find information on some of my husbands family. They have
very little history and what we do have is vague. The following are his
Paternal Grandparents (all deceased)

Saul (Kiev) Faber & Dorothy (Kiev) Goldman (m.1921)

and Great Grandparents:
Samuel Goldman (Kiev) m. Bessie Kortick
Dorothy/Sadie's siblings are: Anne, Irving, Sylvia & Jane Goldman

Fanny Lindenbaum (Bessarabie, Moldavia, Russia) m. Samuel Faber (Germany?)
Saul/Solomons's siblings are: Israel/Is, Selma, Jacob/Jack, David, Sarah
Roberta/Bobby, & Benjamin/Bunny.

Fanny Lindenbaums parents are Solomon & Libby.

If this is any part of your family branch, please let me know.

Thanks for your time.
Monica (Freed) Faber
Sherman, TX
mfaber@texoma.net

MODERATOR NOTE: Go to the following: http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff It's one
of our most visited sites. Look for the surnames you're
searching and enter yours for others to find.


ISRAEL family #general

Mrs M Sprott <msprott@...>
 

I am so excited, as a kind man >from England has found my Grandmother's
family. I am searching for any decendants of Morris and June/Jane/Jeanette
Israel, formerly Goodman. Morris Israel was born in Prussia. He married
June/Jane?Jeanette Goodman in March 1871. They had the following children,
Polly, Ansell, Amelia, Hannah (my grandmother) Abraham.

Please reply personally to Monica Sprott
at msprott@hotkey.net.au


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Search for FABER/LINDENBAUM #general

M. Faber <mfaber@...>
 

As a beginner in Genealogy, I apologize first for any errors I might make.

I am trying to find information on some of my husbands family. They have
very little history and what we do have is vague. The following are his
Paternal Grandparents (all deceased)

Saul (Kiev) Faber & Dorothy (Kiev) Goldman (m.1921)

and Great Grandparents:
Samuel Goldman (Kiev) m. Bessie Kortick
Dorothy/Sadie's siblings are: Anne, Irving, Sylvia & Jane Goldman

Fanny Lindenbaum (Bessarabie, Moldavia, Russia) m. Samuel Faber (Germany?)
Saul/Solomons's siblings are: Israel/Is, Selma, Jacob/Jack, David, Sarah
Roberta/Bobby, & Benjamin/Bunny.

Fanny Lindenbaums parents are Solomon & Libby.

If this is any part of your family branch, please let me know.

Thanks for your time.
Monica (Freed) Faber
Sherman, TX
mfaber@texoma.net

MODERATOR NOTE: Go to the following: http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff It's one
of our most visited sites. Look for the surnames you're
searching and enter yours for others to find.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ISRAEL family #general

Mrs M Sprott <msprott@...>
 

I am so excited, as a kind man >from England has found my Grandmother's
family. I am searching for any decendants of Morris and June/Jane/Jeanette
Israel, formerly Goodman. Morris Israel was born in Prussia. He married
June/Jane?Jeanette Goodman in March 1871. They had the following children,
Polly, Ansell, Amelia, Hannah (my grandmother) Abraham.

Please reply personally to Monica Sprott
at msprott@hotkey.net.au


Searching BLINDER family - Flatbush, Brooklyn, NY #general

Michael Trapunsky <mtrap@...>
 

Hi,

I'm searching for any descendants of the BLINDER family originally from
Vilna/Vilnius and the surrounding areas in Lithuania.

My great great great grandparents, David BLINDER and Gitel COHEN (born
between the 1830's to early 1840's), had either BLINDER descendants or
relatives who, in the 1930's or so, lived on (or around) Kings Highway in
the Flatbush area of Brooklyn, New York, USA. I don't know what happened to
them afterwards.

If anyone knows of this family I would love to hear back >from you regarding
this.

Thanks very much.

Michael Trapunsky
Queens, New York
mtrap@idt.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching BLINDER family - Flatbush, Brooklyn, NY #general

Michael Trapunsky <mtrap@...>
 

Hi,

I'm searching for any descendants of the BLINDER family originally from
Vilna/Vilnius and the surrounding areas in Lithuania.

My great great great grandparents, David BLINDER and Gitel COHEN (born
between the 1830's to early 1840's), had either BLINDER descendants or
relatives who, in the 1930's or so, lived on (or around) Kings Highway in
the Flatbush area of Brooklyn, New York, USA. I don't know what happened to
them afterwards.

If anyone knows of this family I would love to hear back >from you regarding
this.

Thanks very much.

Michael Trapunsky
Queens, New York
mtrap@idt.net


Re: Recording Hebrew vs Yiddish names in database #general

Jessica Schein <jesshschein@...>
 

Some comments on all your responses:

In having received a bunch of responses, I find that the question seems
to have been answered backwards by many of you. I wanted to know
whether to change the "Hebrew" names to "Yiddish" or Birth Name since
the Hebrew name was not the Religious name. I had no problem with what
to do about the non Religious names. The point was that an obviously non
-Religious name (especially for the women) was being mis-labeled. What
our sources (current descendants) were calling a Hebrew name was
actually their secular birth name. I wanted to know if it was reasonable
to worry that people would be offended by our correcting this.

Another point that kept getting missed. I was talking about recording
the data in software. We are not talking about absolute interpretation.
Remember part of doing genealogy is to be able to communicate the
information to others. If no one understands what you are doing, you
have failed, no matter how "good" your data.

When your are creating family trees and other documents to share with
your family or a world-wide family tree you have to make certain
decisions so that you can accommodate the majority of your needs. I
don't think most of the respondents are taking this into account.

In the case of the multiple names, I was specifically looking at the
first generations out of Eastern Europe. Generally, it was these folks
who had a multiplicity of names. How do you avoid confusion and print
out a chart or narrative so that others get what you mean easily? How
were people known? Too many self-created terms will only confuse the
readers.

Remember that this is a *Genealogy* newsgroup not a Eastern European
Jewish History group.

Anyone else think there should be some genealogical standard for this?



tom klein wrote:


if the topic isn't played out yet, for what it's worth, let jump into
this one:

most decent programmes will allow quite lengthy entries, so why not
use as broad a term as possible for the field, such as "aka" ("also
known as")? this also covers non-jewish relatives, as well as those
from other countries who may have changed their names. then, whether
the contents are a nickname, or hebrew, yiddish, or ladino, can be
indicated with small notations such as (n), (h), or (y), etc., as
required.

for what it's worth,

....... tom klein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Recording Hebrew vs Yiddish names in database #general

Jessica Schein <jesshschein@...>
 

Some comments on all your responses:

In having received a bunch of responses, I find that the question seems
to have been answered backwards by many of you. I wanted to know
whether to change the "Hebrew" names to "Yiddish" or Birth Name since
the Hebrew name was not the Religious name. I had no problem with what
to do about the non Religious names. The point was that an obviously non
-Religious name (especially for the women) was being mis-labeled. What
our sources (current descendants) were calling a Hebrew name was
actually their secular birth name. I wanted to know if it was reasonable
to worry that people would be offended by our correcting this.

Another point that kept getting missed. I was talking about recording
the data in software. We are not talking about absolute interpretation.
Remember part of doing genealogy is to be able to communicate the
information to others. If no one understands what you are doing, you
have failed, no matter how "good" your data.

When your are creating family trees and other documents to share with
your family or a world-wide family tree you have to make certain
decisions so that you can accommodate the majority of your needs. I
don't think most of the respondents are taking this into account.

In the case of the multiple names, I was specifically looking at the
first generations out of Eastern Europe. Generally, it was these folks
who had a multiplicity of names. How do you avoid confusion and print
out a chart or narrative so that others get what you mean easily? How
were people known? Too many self-created terms will only confuse the
readers.

Remember that this is a *Genealogy* newsgroup not a Eastern European
Jewish History group.

Anyone else think there should be some genealogical standard for this?



tom klein wrote:


if the topic isn't played out yet, for what it's worth, let jump into
this one:

most decent programmes will allow quite lengthy entries, so why not
use as broad a term as possible for the field, such as "aka" ("also
known as")? this also covers non-jewish relatives, as well as those
from other countries who may have changed their names. then, whether
the contents are a nickname, or hebrew, yiddish, or ladino, can be
indicated with small notations such as (n), (h), or (y), etc., as
required.

for what it's worth,

....... tom klein


Re: Revere, Massachusetts newspaper #general

Susan&David
 

The Boston Public Library Microtext department has microfilm copies of the
Revere Journal as far back as 1881. The information you seek might be
there. The BPL website is http://www.bpl.org Other Boston newspapers--
the Globe, the Herald, the Transcript may have carried the story.

David Rosen
Boston, MA


Saul Goldstone wrote:

JewishGeners,

I am looking for a newspaper article or obituary for a young man
(A.S.Tarshis) who was killed in an automobile accident on June 17, 1918 in
Revere, Massachusetts.

What newspaper would that most likely be carried in?

Thanks,
Saul Goldstone
sgoldsto@ix.netcom.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Revere, Massachusetts newspaper #general

Susan&David
 

The Boston Public Library Microtext department has microfilm copies of the
Revere Journal as far back as 1881. The information you seek might be
there. The BPL website is http://www.bpl.org Other Boston newspapers--
the Globe, the Herald, the Transcript may have carried the story.

David Rosen
Boston, MA


Saul Goldstone wrote:

JewishGeners,

I am looking for a newspaper article or obituary for a young man
(A.S.Tarshis) who was killed in an automobile accident on June 17, 1918 in
Revere, Massachusetts.

What newspaper would that most likely be carried in?

Thanks,
Saul Goldstone
sgoldsto@ix.netcom.com


Re: Woman's name Manya #general

GRAMAW
 

My mother in law was Manya. Her cousin was Manya, and their grandmother in
Russia was Manya. As far as I know, there was no Hebrew equivalent. Myra
Shalet


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Woman's name Manya #general

GRAMAW
 

My mother in law was Manya. Her cousin was Manya, and their grandmother in
Russia was Manya. As far as I know, there was no Hebrew equivalent. Myra
Shalet


Profession: Sponger #general

Paula Spier <pspier@...>
 

Does anyone know of a possible translation-interpretation of the world
"sponger" given on an 1891 naturalization?

We think this might be our ancestor, although there are discrepancies.
Our guy came >from Hungary; this one says Austria--which could certainly be
Austria-Hungary. The birth dates and name match exactly. The year of
immigration is off by one year.

This document gives a residence on Columbia Street. Our maan lived on the
lower east side when he first arrived, and then moved to Hell's Kitchen
(11th Avenue between 39th and 40th) where he had a small shop which sold
supplies to butchers. (His brother-n-law was a butcher.) Is there any
way to tie the word "sponger" to such a trade?

I looked in the archives, but cannot find any note for a sponger.

Paula Spier
Yellow Springs, Ohio


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Profession: Sponger #general

Paula Spier <pspier@...>
 

Does anyone know of a possible translation-interpretation of the world
"sponger" given on an 1891 naturalization?

We think this might be our ancestor, although there are discrepancies.
Our guy came >from Hungary; this one says Austria--which could certainly be
Austria-Hungary. The birth dates and name match exactly. The year of
immigration is off by one year.

This document gives a residence on Columbia Street. Our maan lived on the
lower east side when he first arrived, and then moved to Hell's Kitchen
(11th Avenue between 39th and 40th) where he had a small shop which sold
supplies to butchers. (His brother-n-law was a butcher.) Is there any
way to tie the word "sponger" to such a trade?

I looked in the archives, but cannot find any note for a sponger.

Paula Spier
Yellow Springs, Ohio


witness at marriage #general

Seesiegel <seesiegel@...>
 

I have located my grandparent's original 1914 marriage certificate, but need to
know about the names signed as witnesses. Would they have been attending the
wedding (and thus possible relatives) or would they have signed it in a
clerk's office. I simply do not want to pursue names if they just happened to
be in the clerk's office at the time. One name looks like a relative and the
other is totally new to me. Mystery name: Benjamin DEUTSCH.

Any feedback on this issue would be helpful. Please email me privately.
Carolyn R. Siegel
New Mexico USA


NY Directory 1914 #general

Seesiegel <seesiegel@...>
 

Was there such a thing as a listing of people at certain addresses in Brooklyn,
NY 1914? If so, how do I find information >from it? ( I realize I can check
Fed. Census 1910 and 1920, but I suspect they moved more often) Please email
privately.

Carolyn Siegel
New Mexico, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen witness at marriage #general

Seesiegel <seesiegel@...>
 

I have located my grandparent's original 1914 marriage certificate, but need to
know about the names signed as witnesses. Would they have been attending the
wedding (and thus possible relatives) or would they have signed it in a
clerk's office. I simply do not want to pursue names if they just happened to
be in the clerk's office at the time. One name looks like a relative and the
other is totally new to me. Mystery name: Benjamin DEUTSCH.

Any feedback on this issue would be helpful. Please email me privately.
Carolyn R. Siegel
New Mexico USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NY Directory 1914 #general

Seesiegel <seesiegel@...>
 

Was there such a thing as a listing of people at certain addresses in Brooklyn,
NY 1914? If so, how do I find information >from it? ( I realize I can check
Fed. Census 1910 and 1920, but I suspect they moved more often) Please email
privately.

Carolyn Siegel
New Mexico, USA


19th Annual Conference on Jewish Genealogy, Aug 8-13, 1999-Passenger--Records #general

Jgsny@...
 

Attendess at the 19th Annual Conference on Jewish Genealogy, August 8-13,
1999 will have an opportunity to hear Steven Siegel lecture on Hamburg and
Holland America Line Passenger Departure Records.

Steven Siegel advises us that Hamburg is the only European port for which
complete passenger lists exist for the years 1850-1934. The lists document
more than 5.5 million persons and include sailings to other European ports
and to overseas locations in North America, the Caribbean, South America and
Africa. Each passenger's hometown (place of origin, not necessarily
birthplace) is included. The lists are alphabetically arranged, 1850-1854,
and indexed, 1855-1934. The Family History Library has microfilms of these
materials. The Family History Center in Manhattan has the complete set of
indexes and lists. Steve will also describe Holland-American Line departure
records which document passengers bound for New York during the years
1900-1940. They include people who left >from Rotterdam as well as those who
boarded at Boulogne and Southampton. The lists are completely indexed. The
New York Public Library has the microfiched indexes [call number *XMG-1755]
but not the lists. U.S. arrival records (National Archives microfilms) may be
used in conjunction with the indexes.

Steven Siegel is library director and archivist of New York's 92nd Street
Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Association. He is a founding member and
past president of Jewish Genealogical Society, Inc. (NY) and was on the AJGS
Board of Directors, 1995-97. Since 1990 he has organized the Family History
Fair of the Archivists Round Table of Metro NY. He is president of the Jewish
Historical Society of NY, a Jewish Book Council board member, and chair of
the Documentary Heritage Program Advisory Council of the Metro NY Library
Council. An expert in NYC records and history, Steven is editing the revised
edition of Genealogical Resources in the New York Metropolitan Area. He
contributed entries to The Encyclopedia of New York City and to Jewish Women
in America. Steve compiled the Archival Resources volume of Jewish
Immigrants of the Nazi Period in the USA, and was co-founder and co-editor of
Toledot: The Journal of Jewish Genealogy.

A copy of the Conference registration application can be printed directly from
the web site (http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf). Check out the lecture
schedule now available. The Conference will be held at the Marriott Marquis
Hotel, located in the heart of revitalized Times Square. Note: Early
registration must be postmarked by May 15, 1999.

See you at the Conference!
Estelle Guzik, Pres.
JGS (NY)
PS Contact us at nyc99conf@aol.com if you have any questions about the
Conference.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 19th Annual Conference on Jewish Genealogy, Aug 8-13, 1999-Passenger--Records #general

Jgsny@...
 

Attendess at the 19th Annual Conference on Jewish Genealogy, August 8-13,
1999 will have an opportunity to hear Steven Siegel lecture on Hamburg and
Holland America Line Passenger Departure Records.

Steven Siegel advises us that Hamburg is the only European port for which
complete passenger lists exist for the years 1850-1934. The lists document
more than 5.5 million persons and include sailings to other European ports
and to overseas locations in North America, the Caribbean, South America and
Africa. Each passenger's hometown (place of origin, not necessarily
birthplace) is included. The lists are alphabetically arranged, 1850-1854,
and indexed, 1855-1934. The Family History Library has microfilms of these
materials. The Family History Center in Manhattan has the complete set of
indexes and lists. Steve will also describe Holland-American Line departure
records which document passengers bound for New York during the years
1900-1940. They include people who left >from Rotterdam as well as those who
boarded at Boulogne and Southampton. The lists are completely indexed. The
New York Public Library has the microfiched indexes [call number *XMG-1755]
but not the lists. U.S. arrival records (National Archives microfilms) may be
used in conjunction with the indexes.

Steven Siegel is library director and archivist of New York's 92nd Street
Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Association. He is a founding member and
past president of Jewish Genealogical Society, Inc. (NY) and was on the AJGS
Board of Directors, 1995-97. Since 1990 he has organized the Family History
Fair of the Archivists Round Table of Metro NY. He is president of the Jewish
Historical Society of NY, a Jewish Book Council board member, and chair of
the Documentary Heritage Program Advisory Council of the Metro NY Library
Council. An expert in NYC records and history, Steven is editing the revised
edition of Genealogical Resources in the New York Metropolitan Area. He
contributed entries to The Encyclopedia of New York City and to Jewish Women
in America. Steve compiled the Archival Resources volume of Jewish
Immigrants of the Nazi Period in the USA, and was co-founder and co-editor of
Toledot: The Journal of Jewish Genealogy.

A copy of the Conference registration application can be printed directly from
the web site (http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf). Check out the lecture
schedule now available. The Conference will be held at the Marriott Marquis
Hotel, located in the heart of revitalized Times Square. Note: Early
registration must be postmarked by May 15, 1999.

See you at the Conference!
Estelle Guzik, Pres.
JGS (NY)
PS Contact us at nyc99conf@aol.com if you have any questions about the
Conference.