Date   

Re: FIGUEROA etc. #general

DStern165@...
 

In a message dated 5/27/99 jrw@Brown.edu writes:

As is well known, many Sephardim fled >from Portugal around 1500 after the
Expulsion , and the name (also found in the forms Figueiro, Figueires and
Figueiredo) is definitely Portuguese -- though not specifically Jewish).
The index to the Encyclopaedia Judaica lists all three versions -- not one
of which turned out to be a Jew! However, I have the impression that
Jewish and gentile Portuguese share many surnames in common.
Judith, and other interested in the Jews of Portugal,

In 1936 or '37, Fritz Heymann, a German Jewish journalist fled >from the Nazis
to Amsterdam. >from there he researched and lectured on the Jews of Portugal.
He claims that most Portuguese, particularly those descended >from nobility,
have at least some Jewish or Marrano (Converso) ancestors. He mentions
seeing peasant children in the northern mountains of Portigal playing games
highly reminiscent of games played by Jewish children.

Although Heymann perished in the Holocaust, his notes for the lectures
survived; they were edited and published by Julius Schoeps at Athenaeum in
Frankfurt am Main, 1988, under the title "Tod oder Taufe; die Vertreibung
der Juden aus Spanien und Portugal im Zeitalter der Inquisition" [Death or
Baptism; the Expulsion of the Jews >from Spain and Portugal in the Era of the
Inquisition"] . The Leo Baeck Institute of NY authorised the publication; it
appears they have a "Vortragsmanuskript" [Lecture notes?], which is entitled
"Marranen-Chronik".

Unfortunately I'm not aware of an English translation. However, it's a
fascinating read.

David Stern - in Mill Valley, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: FIGUEROA etc. #general

DStern165@...
 

In a message dated 5/27/99 jrw@Brown.edu writes:

As is well known, many Sephardim fled >from Portugal around 1500 after the
Expulsion , and the name (also found in the forms Figueiro, Figueires and
Figueiredo) is definitely Portuguese -- though not specifically Jewish).
The index to the Encyclopaedia Judaica lists all three versions -- not one
of which turned out to be a Jew! However, I have the impression that
Jewish and gentile Portuguese share many surnames in common.
Judith, and other interested in the Jews of Portugal,

In 1936 or '37, Fritz Heymann, a German Jewish journalist fled >from the Nazis
to Amsterdam. >from there he researched and lectured on the Jews of Portugal.
He claims that most Portuguese, particularly those descended >from nobility,
have at least some Jewish or Marrano (Converso) ancestors. He mentions
seeing peasant children in the northern mountains of Portigal playing games
highly reminiscent of games played by Jewish children.

Although Heymann perished in the Holocaust, his notes for the lectures
survived; they were edited and published by Julius Schoeps at Athenaeum in
Frankfurt am Main, 1988, under the title "Tod oder Taufe; die Vertreibung
der Juden aus Spanien und Portugal im Zeitalter der Inquisition" [Death or
Baptism; the Expulsion of the Jews >from Spain and Portugal in the Era of the
Inquisition"] . The Leo Baeck Institute of NY authorised the publication; it
appears they have a "Vortragsmanuskript" [Lecture notes?], which is entitled
"Marranen-Chronik".

Unfortunately I'm not aware of an English translation. However, it's a
fascinating read.

David Stern - in Mill Valley, CA


Re: Yizkor book milestone #yizkorbooks

Martin Kessel <mkessel@...>
 

A sincere congratulations to everyone who helped the Yizkor Book Project
reach our milestone of 100 translations. I am amazed and proud that we
have come so far so quickly. I honestly thought, when we put our first
translation on-line in October 1997, that only a few people would send us
material -- but the response has been overwhelming.

A heartfelt thanks to those who donated translations; to those who did the
translations; to the publishers who gave us permission to put the material
on the web; to Lance Ackerfeld who found the publishers; to the
hard-working HTML volunteers who turned these translations into beautiful
web pages; and to the dedicated people at JewishGen who helped us through a
myriad of technical, legal, and logistical problems.

Most of all I want to congratulate Joyce Field, who has put more time and
energy into this project than any of us. Much of her work has been behind
the scenes -- helping people get started with projects, tracking their
progress, following up (and constantly reminding people) to complete the
necessary permission forms, coordinating the HTML volunteers, and checking
to make sure the pages were accurately completed. All of these details
have been essential to getting us to this point.

Because of your efforts, people all around the world who could not
understand Hebrew or Yiddish -- and who may not even have known what a
yizkor book was -- can now learn about the people, places, and stories that
these books describe.

Martin Kessel, Project Manager mkessel@jewishgen.org
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

For information about the Yizkor Book Project,
visit our Web page at: <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>
or send a blank e-mail message to: <yizkor2@jewishgen.org>


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Re: Yizkor book milestone #yizkorbooks

Martin Kessel <mkessel@...>
 

A sincere congratulations to everyone who helped the Yizkor Book Project
reach our milestone of 100 translations. I am amazed and proud that we
have come so far so quickly. I honestly thought, when we put our first
translation on-line in October 1997, that only a few people would send us
material -- but the response has been overwhelming.

A heartfelt thanks to those who donated translations; to those who did the
translations; to the publishers who gave us permission to put the material
on the web; to Lance Ackerfeld who found the publishers; to the
hard-working HTML volunteers who turned these translations into beautiful
web pages; and to the dedicated people at JewishGen who helped us through a
myriad of technical, legal, and logistical problems.

Most of all I want to congratulate Joyce Field, who has put more time and
energy into this project than any of us. Much of her work has been behind
the scenes -- helping people get started with projects, tracking their
progress, following up (and constantly reminding people) to complete the
necessary permission forms, coordinating the HTML volunteers, and checking
to make sure the pages were accurately completed. All of these details
have been essential to getting us to this point.

Because of your efforts, people all around the world who could not
understand Hebrew or Yiddish -- and who may not even have known what a
yizkor book was -- can now learn about the people, places, and stories that
these books describe.

Martin Kessel, Project Manager mkessel@jewishgen.org
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

For information about the Yizkor Book Project,
visit our Web page at: <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>
or send a blank e-mail message to: <yizkor2@jewishgen.org>


Blizzard of 1888 #general

Rosa3035@...
 

I have received so much great advice >from so many JG'rs that I hesitate to
post another question, but I simply do not know where to go for the answer to
an important question, so here goes;

When did the "Blizzard of 1888" in New York City take place?

The answer will settle the question of whether a family story handed down is
fact or just a Bubbe Meinseh.

Nathan Greenberg
San Diego, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Blizzard of 1888 #general

Rosa3035@...
 

I have received so much great advice >from so many JG'rs that I hesitate to
post another question, but I simply do not know where to go for the answer to
an important question, so here goes;

When did the "Blizzard of 1888" in New York City take place?

The answer will settle the question of whether a family story handed down is
fact or just a Bubbe Meinseh.

Nathan Greenberg
San Diego, CA


Berl #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Subject: Re: research on a name
From: (Stan Goodman)

Research is unnecessary. "Berl" is a Yiddish diminutive for Barukh, a
forename, which would have been found in any Yiddish-speaking area.
More accurately, Berl is a Yiddish diminutive of Ber, meaning "bear."
While it may sometimes be used as a Yiddish "sound-alike" for Baruch
(which it does not literally translate) it actually translates the common
Hebrew name "Dov", meaning "bear." In fact, the double-barrelled name Dov
Baer or Dov Ber is very common.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu

MODERATOR NOTE: The thread on Berl as a forname is closed. Please check
the archived messages for more information. If there is more on Berl as a surname,
again please check the archived messages for the original poster
of the question and reply privately. Thank you.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Berl #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Subject: Re: research on a name
From: (Stan Goodman)

Research is unnecessary. "Berl" is a Yiddish diminutive for Barukh, a
forename, which would have been found in any Yiddish-speaking area.
More accurately, Berl is a Yiddish diminutive of Ber, meaning "bear."
While it may sometimes be used as a Yiddish "sound-alike" for Baruch
(which it does not literally translate) it actually translates the common
Hebrew name "Dov", meaning "bear." In fact, the double-barrelled name Dov
Baer or Dov Ber is very common.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu

MODERATOR NOTE: The thread on Berl as a forname is closed. Please check
the archived messages for more information. If there is more on Berl as a surname,
again please check the archived messages for the original poster
of the question and reply privately. Thank you.


Natalya is a Russian name #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

I have heard that the name Natalie or Nathalie, is of Hebrew origin. I
have been told that, in its original form it appears as "Neta Li",
which means "My Seedling", or "I have a Seedling" in Hebrew. Could this
be true?
Macky Tutsingen
The midrashic imagination knows no bounds! Whoever thought up this
interpretation of Natalie (actually a Russian name, not Hebrew at all!)
was probably familiar with the midrashic folk-etymological technique of
splitting up a word into smaller words that quite often have nothing to do
with the original word. In Hebraic culture, this device was used in the
Bible, and later on we find it widespread in Talmud and Midrash. It is
especially prevalent in the interpretation of names, where the connection
to the alleged meaning may be genuine but is often spurious.

The example above calls to mind the attempt of the British Israel Society
back around 1900 to "prove" that the British are descended >from one of the
Lost Tribes of Israel -- by interpreting British as "Brit-Ish" (Hebrew
words meaning "the Covenant of a Man." One must guard against this kind
of thing, particularly when it involves spurious attempts to "translate"
from one language group to another, as in these examples.
Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu

MODERATOR NOTE: This thread is now closed.


And yet another tombstone translation.... #general

Hilary Henkin <propper@...>
 

Hi, y'all!
I looked again at the photo I've had for years of my grandfather
and siblings standing at the grave of their mother. And there it
was - a Hebrew/Yiddish phrase! Right there all the time!

As I transliterate it, it reads: "Hinde Bat R (Lays or Laym)" (I
can't tell if the last letter is an Samech or a Mem)

Her given name was Hinde - that I know. >from my checking the
InfoFiles and Discussion group archives, it appears that the rest
means, "daughter of Reb Lays/Laim".

But we always understood her maiden name to be BERLIN.

Am I on the edge of a great new mystery searching out a new
maiden name, or am I mistranslating?

Oh, ye wise ones out there in www-land - enlighten me!


Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia USA
Researching RINCOVER, HENKIN/GHENKIN, PENSON/PENSAKHINSKY,
SREBERG/SCHRIEBER,
POLLACK/POLLOCK, BERLIN (Hilda, Willie), STEINHART and
variations, SHATZ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Natalya is a Russian name #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

I have heard that the name Natalie or Nathalie, is of Hebrew origin. I
have been told that, in its original form it appears as "Neta Li",
which means "My Seedling", or "I have a Seedling" in Hebrew. Could this
be true?
Macky Tutsingen
The midrashic imagination knows no bounds! Whoever thought up this
interpretation of Natalie (actually a Russian name, not Hebrew at all!)
was probably familiar with the midrashic folk-etymological technique of
splitting up a word into smaller words that quite often have nothing to do
with the original word. In Hebraic culture, this device was used in the
Bible, and later on we find it widespread in Talmud and Midrash. It is
especially prevalent in the interpretation of names, where the connection
to the alleged meaning may be genuine but is often spurious.

The example above calls to mind the attempt of the British Israel Society
back around 1900 to "prove" that the British are descended >from one of the
Lost Tribes of Israel -- by interpreting British as "Brit-Ish" (Hebrew
words meaning "the Covenant of a Man." One must guard against this kind
of thing, particularly when it involves spurious attempts to "translate"
from one language group to another, as in these examples.
Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu

MODERATOR NOTE: This thread is now closed.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen And yet another tombstone translation.... #general

Hilary Henkin <propper@...>
 

Hi, y'all!
I looked again at the photo I've had for years of my grandfather
and siblings standing at the grave of their mother. And there it
was - a Hebrew/Yiddish phrase! Right there all the time!

As I transliterate it, it reads: "Hinde Bat R (Lays or Laym)" (I
can't tell if the last letter is an Samech or a Mem)

Her given name was Hinde - that I know. >from my checking the
InfoFiles and Discussion group archives, it appears that the rest
means, "daughter of Reb Lays/Laim".

But we always understood her maiden name to be BERLIN.

Am I on the edge of a great new mystery searching out a new
maiden name, or am I mistranslating?

Oh, ye wise ones out there in www-land - enlighten me!


Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia USA
Researching RINCOVER, HENKIN/GHENKIN, PENSON/PENSAKHINSKY,
SREBERG/SCHRIEBER,
POLLACK/POLLOCK, BERLIN (Hilda, Willie), STEINHART and
variations, SHATZ


English to Hebrew Name help please #general

PJS Enterprises
 

Does anyone know of a book that you can look up the English name and it
will give you the Hebrew name?
I am looking for the Hebrew name of Ian Elliot and Kurt (if there is one)

You can email me privately.

Thank you,

Susan Jonesia
Jonesia@flash.net < mailto:Jonesia@flash.net >
Houston, Texas


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen English to Hebrew Name help please #general

PJS Enterprises
 

Does anyone know of a book that you can look up the English name and it
will give you the Hebrew name?
I am looking for the Hebrew name of Ian Elliot and Kurt (if there is one)

You can email me privately.

Thank you,

Susan Jonesia
Jonesia@flash.net < mailto:Jonesia@flash.net >
Houston, Texas


Re: Found ancestor in ancient document #general

Miriam Maimouni <MMAIMOUNI@...>
 

I am so excited! We've always thought that our family should be
"numerous like the stars in the sky" (BTW, does that ring a bell??) ---

Family lore has it that we, too, have an ancestor who, in fact, built
the biggest ship of his time, and he was into wine growing as well. I'm
not sure about the spelling of his name but my ggf said it sounded
something like "Noach" (Noakh in English), and when the family went to
live abroad later on, the guttural "ch" sound somehow got lost -- Would
it be rash to assume that we may be related? Do you know anything about
his wife, or the wives of his sons? BTW, my gf said there's a story
about a big scandal around one of them --

I've had the same problem with ships' records and found an interesting
piece of literature that has been on the market forever altho under
various names, moreover the author(s?) apparently wanted to remain
anonymous - try any bookshop for "Genesis", they should have it if they
are any good. It's written in semi-documentary style so it's hard to
tell what's "hard facts"... There's a possibility that back then, they
did not keep records, or at least not systematically. But I've heard
that a number of scholars and researchers have worked on it for quite a
while, there even used to be some sort of "school" somewhere over in the
Middle East, if I remember right it was either Palestine or Babylonia?

Other names I've found out are Aram, Ophir, Kusch and Kittim but I
haven't been able to establish exactly the lines of relation. Do you
have any of these names in your tree??

Shalom,
Miriam Maimouni, Berlin

MODERATOR NOTE: Thank you all who entered into the spirit of fun.
I'd like to thank the following who also sent in replies:
David Stern, Roman Turovsky, Eliezer Kroll, and Simon Barak. The
thread is now ended.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Found ancestor in ancient document #general

Miriam Maimouni <MMAIMOUNI@...>
 

I am so excited! We've always thought that our family should be
"numerous like the stars in the sky" (BTW, does that ring a bell??) ---

Family lore has it that we, too, have an ancestor who, in fact, built
the biggest ship of his time, and he was into wine growing as well. I'm
not sure about the spelling of his name but my ggf said it sounded
something like "Noach" (Noakh in English), and when the family went to
live abroad later on, the guttural "ch" sound somehow got lost -- Would
it be rash to assume that we may be related? Do you know anything about
his wife, or the wives of his sons? BTW, my gf said there's a story
about a big scandal around one of them --

I've had the same problem with ships' records and found an interesting
piece of literature that has been on the market forever altho under
various names, moreover the author(s?) apparently wanted to remain
anonymous - try any bookshop for "Genesis", they should have it if they
are any good. It's written in semi-documentary style so it's hard to
tell what's "hard facts"... There's a possibility that back then, they
did not keep records, or at least not systematically. But I've heard
that a number of scholars and researchers have worked on it for quite a
while, there even used to be some sort of "school" somewhere over in the
Middle East, if I remember right it was either Palestine or Babylonia?

Other names I've found out are Aram, Ophir, Kusch and Kittim but I
haven't been able to establish exactly the lines of relation. Do you
have any of these names in your tree??

Shalom,
Miriam Maimouni, Berlin

MODERATOR NOTE: Thank you all who entered into the spirit of fun.
I'd like to thank the following who also sent in replies:
David Stern, Roman Turovsky, Eliezer Kroll, and Simon Barak. The
thread is now ended.


Notaries #general

Steven Chall <steven.chall@...>
 

Irene Newhouse wrote:

Although some of the early postings on this thread mentioned the point,
the more recnet ones seem to be losing track of it: In European
countires whose legal system derives >from Roman law, which includes
Germany & France & in the US, Louisiana, to be a notary, you have to be a
lawyer, attorney first. I don't knw what additional study or examination
is required.>>

Perhaps this is different >from a American "Notary Public" which
apparently has no educational requirements. While working part-time for
a bank while he was in high school, my son simply paid a fee and became a
notary. It was required of many of the bank employees as a service for
customers. My experience at work was that most of the notaries were
secretaries.


Steven Chall in Minneapolis, MN


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Notaries #general

Steven Chall <steven.chall@...>
 

Irene Newhouse wrote:

Although some of the early postings on this thread mentioned the point,
the more recnet ones seem to be losing track of it: In European
countires whose legal system derives >from Roman law, which includes
Germany & France & in the US, Louisiana, to be a notary, you have to be a
lawyer, attorney first. I don't knw what additional study or examination
is required.>>

Perhaps this is different >from a American "Notary Public" which
apparently has no educational requirements. While working part-time for
a bank while he was in high school, my son simply paid a fee and became a
notary. It was required of many of the bank employees as a service for
customers. My experience at work was that most of the notaries were
secretaries.


Steven Chall in Minneapolis, MN


Montefiore Home and Hospital #general

IRSWED <irswed@...>
 

I have a death certificate for Rachel Plitnick Swerdlowsky. It says she died in
the Montefiore Home and Hospital in 1919. She entered it in 1916. Growing up in
the Bronx, I am familiar with Montefiore Hospital. Can anyone give me
information on the Home? How can I obtain info for the year 1919? Thank-you,
Irene Swedroe,Ca; IRSWED@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Montefiore Home and Hospital #general

IRSWED <irswed@...>
 

I have a death certificate for Rachel Plitnick Swerdlowsky. It says she died in
the Montefiore Home and Hospital in 1919. She entered it in 1916. Growing up in
the Bronx, I am familiar with Montefiore Hospital. Can anyone give me
information on the Home? How can I obtain info for the year 1919? Thank-you,
Irene Swedroe,Ca; IRSWED@aol.com