Date   

Re: The name EIDIL #ukraine

Richard Cooper <ricooper@...>
 

My grandmother's aunt Aidel (as she was known to the family) was
born in the Tarnow region of Galicia (now southern Poland)
around 1884, the daughter of Szaje MILLET and
Feige Sarah ENGELBERG. On her civil certificate of marriage to
Israel JOHSPE (at the synagogue in Portsmouth, UK)
on 2 May 1907 her forename is given as Adelaide!
Well, my mother always said she was very refined....!

Happy ancestor-spotting
Richard Cooper
(NB originally YAROSHEVSKY - not related to any COOPERS!)
Gosport, UK
LEWINSTEIN >from Berdichev
YAROSHEVSKY & SHAPOCHNIKOW >from Odessa
LEZTER, RINENBERG & SALENDER >from Rzeszow & Kolbuszowa
MILLET & ENGELBERG >from Dabrowa Tarnowska & Lezajsk
ADLER & FINKELSTEIN >from Tarnopol
BORENSTEIN, MATELEVITCH and GODZINSKIJ >from Warsaw


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: The name EIDIL #ukraine

Richard Cooper <ricooper@...>
 

My grandmother's aunt Aidel (as she was known to the family) was
born in the Tarnow region of Galicia (now southern Poland)
around 1884, the daughter of Szaje MILLET and
Feige Sarah ENGELBERG. On her civil certificate of marriage to
Israel JOHSPE (at the synagogue in Portsmouth, UK)
on 2 May 1907 her forename is given as Adelaide!
Well, my mother always said she was very refined....!

Happy ancestor-spotting
Richard Cooper
(NB originally YAROSHEVSKY - not related to any COOPERS!)
Gosport, UK
LEWINSTEIN >from Berdichev
YAROSHEVSKY & SHAPOCHNIKOW >from Odessa
LEZTER, RINENBERG & SALENDER >from Rzeszow & Kolbuszowa
MILLET & ENGELBERG >from Dabrowa Tarnowska & Lezajsk
ADLER & FINKELSTEIN >from Tarnopol
BORENSTEIN, MATELEVITCH and GODZINSKIJ >from Warsaw


koeln cemetries CAHN 1920s #germany

Ben Forman <ben.forman@...>
 

Hi Genners
I've hit another dead end searching for my Koeln ancestors prior to 1894, but I
had a brainwave this morning and I'm hoping you might be able to help me out.
I know that my ancestors lived in Koeln, probably Westhoven or Porz and
and that my GGM Gudua CAHN b. WOLF probably died between 1924 and 1926,
I do not know when my GGF HERMANN CAHN died.

With this information would it be possible to find their stones in a cemetery?
Are there cemeteries still existing in these areas where I might find them?
I this a real long shot? thanks for all your help in advance

Ben Forman Mnchester UK ben.forman@btconnect.com

searching: CAHN: Koeln; STILLMAN: SAWADY: Zavadi/Posen


German SIG #Germany koeln cemetries CAHN 1920s #germany

Ben Forman <ben.forman@...>
 

Hi Genners
I've hit another dead end searching for my Koeln ancestors prior to 1894, but I
had a brainwave this morning and I'm hoping you might be able to help me out.
I know that my ancestors lived in Koeln, probably Westhoven or Porz and
and that my GGM Gudua CAHN b. WOLF probably died between 1924 and 1926,
I do not know when my GGF HERMANN CAHN died.

With this information would it be possible to find their stones in a cemetery?
Are there cemeteries still existing in these areas where I might find them?
I this a real long shot? thanks for all your help in advance

Ben Forman Mnchester UK ben.forman@btconnect.com

searching: CAHN: Koeln; STILLMAN: SAWADY: Zavadi/Posen


GAILINGEN - a general query #germany

Adam Yamey <adamandlopa@...>
 

My great grand father Salomon Daniel BLOCH (1857-1894)
lived, and is buried in Gailingen-am-Rhein, just
across the river >from Diesenhofen in Switzerland. This
town had a large Jewish community for its size, but, I
have recently learnt, was until the mid 1860s, hardly
connected to the rest of Germany by land. What was the
'appeal' of Gailingen for its Jewish residents. Can
anyone point me in the direction of literature that
deals with Gailingen's Jewish history, please? {I have
access to very good libraries!]

Adam Yamey, London, UK <adamandlopa@yahoo.co.uk>


German SIG #Germany GAILINGEN - a general query #germany

Adam Yamey <adamandlopa@...>
 

My great grand father Salomon Daniel BLOCH (1857-1894)
lived, and is buried in Gailingen-am-Rhein, just
across the river >from Diesenhofen in Switzerland. This
town had a large Jewish community for its size, but, I
have recently learnt, was until the mid 1860s, hardly
connected to the rest of Germany by land. What was the
'appeal' of Gailingen for its Jewish residents. Can
anyone point me in the direction of literature that
deals with Gailingen's Jewish history, please? {I have
access to very good libraries!]

Adam Yamey, London, UK <adamandlopa@yahoo.co.uk>


Re: SS-5's #general

joshualevy <joshualevy@...>
 

The importance of the SS-5 is that it contains the applicant's parents
names, as written by the applicant. Almost no other official American
documents ask for parent's names. So if someone was born in another
country, the SS-5 is often the quickest and easist way for an American
to get a semi-official source for parent's names. (I'm not sure if they
will send SS-5s overseas or not.)

Cautionary and Humorus story: there was some uncertainty about the name of
a great-grandmother, so I got the SS-5s for three of her children. All
had moved >from Poland to US, all lived in San Francisco area, all were
great friends. And each of them spelt her maiden name differently on
their SS-5. Not just small transliteration differences, either! And
Yad Vashem had some pages of testimony with yet a different maiden name
for her. Next stop (for me): JRI-Poland! :-) Unless someone has another idea.

Joshua Levy


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: SS-5's #general

joshualevy <joshualevy@...>
 

The importance of the SS-5 is that it contains the applicant's parents
names, as written by the applicant. Almost no other official American
documents ask for parent's names. So if someone was born in another
country, the SS-5 is often the quickest and easist way for an American
to get a semi-official source for parent's names. (I'm not sure if they
will send SS-5s overseas or not.)

Cautionary and Humorus story: there was some uncertainty about the name of
a great-grandmother, so I got the SS-5s for three of her children. All
had moved >from Poland to US, all lived in San Francisco area, all were
great friends. And each of them spelt her maiden name differently on
their SS-5. Not just small transliteration differences, either! And
Yad Vashem had some pages of testimony with yet a different maiden name
for her. Next stop (for me): JRI-Poland! :-) Unless someone has another idea.

Joshua Levy


Re: Surname dictionary #general

avatom@...
 

I wish to thank everyone who overwhelmingly responded to my recent
request for the whereabouts of Beider's dictionary. As always, I am
impressed with the power and knowledge of this group.

Ava Cohn
AvaTom@comcast.net
Long Grove, IL

Searching:
SHANKMAN/SHENKMAN Volyntsy, Vitebsk gubernia>Riga>Mayzr>New York>Paterson, NJ;
COHN Botosani, Bucharesti>Montreal, Philadelphia>Los Angeles>Israel;
HANDELMAN/GANDELMAN Spivak/Spikow>New York; GOLDMAN Ukraine;
HAMMER Czernovitsi>Montreal>Bronx, NY; ABRAMS/ABROMOWITZ Odessa>Paterson, NJ


Re: Jewish GILBERTs in Manchester, UK, 1870s #general

Richard Gilbert <gilbert67@...>
 

Celia,

Thank you for your time and effort in helping me discover my heritage.

The more I learn about my family, the more I want and need to know.

At the moment I am awaiting word >from the NYC Municipal Archives, as to
whether or not they have located my grandfather's birth certificate (Joseph
GILBERT, born 1888 or 1889 in New York City). This would help to
substantiate my very strong belief that P.S. and Leah GILBERT were my great
grandparents.

I too suspect that the Solomon GILBERT found in Manchester is, in fact, the
same "P.S." Gilbert who married Leah, had children in Manchester and later
Westminster, then moved to America in 1888 and had my grandfather.

Richard


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:Surname dictionary #general

avatom@...
 

I wish to thank everyone who overwhelmingly responded to my recent
request for the whereabouts of Beider's dictionary. As always, I am
impressed with the power and knowledge of this group.

Ava Cohn
AvaTom@comcast.net
Long Grove, IL

Searching:
SHANKMAN/SHENKMAN Volyntsy, Vitebsk gubernia>Riga>Mayzr>New York>Paterson, NJ;
COHN Botosani, Bucharesti>Montreal, Philadelphia>Los Angeles>Israel;
HANDELMAN/GANDELMAN Spivak/Spikow>New York; GOLDMAN Ukraine;
HAMMER Czernovitsi>Montreal>Bronx, NY; ABRAMS/ABROMOWITZ Odessa>Paterson, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Jewish GILBERTs in Manchester, UK, 1870s #general

Richard Gilbert <gilbert67@...>
 

Celia,

Thank you for your time and effort in helping me discover my heritage.

The more I learn about my family, the more I want and need to know.

At the moment I am awaiting word >from the NYC Municipal Archives, as to
whether or not they have located my grandfather's birth certificate (Joseph
GILBERT, born 1888 or 1889 in New York City). This would help to
substantiate my very strong belief that P.S. and Leah GILBERT were my great
grandparents.

I too suspect that the Solomon GILBERT found in Manchester is, in fact, the
same "P.S." Gilbert who married Leah, had children in Manchester and later
Westminster, then moved to America in 1888 and had my grandfather.

Richard


NEW BOOK ON a Lithuanian migration and life experiences in South Africa. #southafrica

H.E. <heastern@...>
 

Recently published book "Spilt milk" by Dr Len Lotzof


A recently released book "SPILT MILK" published [in Australia by WILD
& WOOLLEY PO Box W76 Watsons Bay NSW 2030 Australia ISBN 1
74018 351 7. ] tells the story of the author's (Dr Len Lotzof's )
ancestry from/in Lithuania, and of his fathers hurried migration [with a
price on his head] to South Africa.

The book is an autobiographical account of how living in a small rural
town (dorp) in South Africa as well as his parents attitude to life
shaped his (Len Lotzof's) worldly outlook and personality.

Len's father MIKE came >from Lutzin where he and his older brother worked
as horse traders.
One day on the way home they were attacked by Lithuanian gentiles, and
during the fight Max the brother accidentally killed one of the assailants.
Len's father, Mike, accepted the blame and fled to South Africa where he
led a span of donkeys up to Kimberly in the Free State.
He then went to a relative in the small Orange Free State town of Heilbron
hoping to get work.

The story continues with his empathy and relationship with the blacks and
his parents attitude to them and other people and relatives.
There is hilarity and drama in his time a as a young medical houseman
at various black and white hospitals.
Also his army experiences with the Youth Training Brigade during WWII

When Len's father was gored to death by a bull, Len had to (temporally)
give up his medical practice & profession, and move to the small town of
Heilbron and take over the running of the family farms.

The story goes on to describe Lens observations of the domestic politics
prevailing in South Africa during the fifties, and his family's decision
to migrate to Australia in 1960.

Please note that I have ABSOLUTELY no commercial or other interest of gain
in this book, but was recently given a copy.
Thought many other Litvak and South African Jewish Genealogy researchers
would also find this book of interest covering life in Lithuania / South
Africa during the first half of the past century.


Herbert Epstein
<heastern@netline.com.au>


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica NEW BOOK ON a Lithuanian migration and life experiences in South Africa. #southafrica

H.E. <heastern@...>
 

Recently published book "Spilt milk" by Dr Len Lotzof


A recently released book "SPILT MILK" published [in Australia by WILD
& WOOLLEY PO Box W76 Watsons Bay NSW 2030 Australia ISBN 1
74018 351 7. ] tells the story of the author's (Dr Len Lotzof's )
ancestry from/in Lithuania, and of his fathers hurried migration [with a
price on his head] to South Africa.

The book is an autobiographical account of how living in a small rural
town (dorp) in South Africa as well as his parents attitude to life
shaped his (Len Lotzof's) worldly outlook and personality.

Len's father MIKE came >from Lutzin where he and his older brother worked
as horse traders.
One day on the way home they were attacked by Lithuanian gentiles, and
during the fight Max the brother accidentally killed one of the assailants.
Len's father, Mike, accepted the blame and fled to South Africa where he
led a span of donkeys up to Kimberly in the Free State.
He then went to a relative in the small Orange Free State town of Heilbron
hoping to get work.

The story continues with his empathy and relationship with the blacks and
his parents attitude to them and other people and relatives.
There is hilarity and drama in his time a as a young medical houseman
at various black and white hospitals.
Also his army experiences with the Youth Training Brigade during WWII

When Len's father was gored to death by a bull, Len had to (temporally)
give up his medical practice & profession, and move to the small town of
Heilbron and take over the running of the family farms.

The story goes on to describe Lens observations of the domestic politics
prevailing in South Africa during the fifties, and his family's decision
to migrate to Australia in 1960.

Please note that I have ABSOLUTELY no commercial or other interest of gain
in this book, but was recently given a copy.
Thought many other Litvak and South African Jewish Genealogy researchers
would also find this book of interest covering life in Lithuania / South
Africa during the first half of the past century.


Herbert Epstein
<heastern@netline.com.au>


LEVY in Johannesburg from 1899 #southafrica

Justin Levy <levyduffy@...>
 

Hello Folks,

A Happy New Year to you all!

Although new to this SIG, I have been a member of the German-SIG for a couple of
years.

Less than a week ago I obtained a copy of the registation card of:

Matthias Walther LEVY, b. 23 Nov 1879 in Hamburg, Germany, son of Leopold LEVY and
Anna born LEVY.

The card records that Walther (as he was known) had lived in Johannesburg for
about a year prior to his first registration in Hamburg on 23 Oct 1899. Less than
ten days later, he was back on a ship heading for London.

He was not recorded in the 1901 UK census and I suspect that he returned to South
Africa. His uncle, Henry Levy (my great-grandfather), had lived in Jo’burg until
at least 1896, and became a naturalized British subject in 1901 while resident in
Cape Town.

Any help in tracking him down would be much appreciated.

Rgds,

Justin Levy, Dublin, Ireland (levyduffy@eircom.net)


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica LEVY in Johannesburg from 1899 #southafrica

Justin Levy <levyduffy@...>
 

Hello Folks,

A Happy New Year to you all!

Although new to this SIG, I have been a member of the German-SIG for a couple of
years.

Less than a week ago I obtained a copy of the registation card of:

Matthias Walther LEVY, b. 23 Nov 1879 in Hamburg, Germany, son of Leopold LEVY and
Anna born LEVY.

The card records that Walther (as he was known) had lived in Johannesburg for
about a year prior to his first registration in Hamburg on 23 Oct 1899. Less than
ten days later, he was back on a ship heading for London.

He was not recorded in the 1901 UK census and I suspect that he returned to South
Africa. His uncle, Henry Levy (my great-grandfather), had lived in Jo’burg until
at least 1896, and became a naturalized British subject in 1901 while resident in
Cape Town.

Any help in tracking him down would be much appreciated.

Rgds,

Justin Levy, Dublin, Ireland (levyduffy@eircom.net)


Re: Jewish community archives #romania

Sorin Goldenberg <SorinG@...>
 

OK,

I should have known in advance that I need to peek my words more
carefully when addressing WWII.

The happenings around Botosani were much harder then in Botosani. In
Dorohoi city (north to Botosani) - there was pogrom. The ppl. in the
district of Dorohoi were sent to Transnistria.

In Iasi, there was also pogrom. The jews in the small cities/villages
around Botosani were expelled to Botosani.

In Botosani itself, the life was not pleasant and regular. Jews had to
wear the yellow star, men were taken to forced labour etc... (see Pinkas
ha Kehilot Romania, Botosani at jewishgen).

However - most of jews of the city have survived WWII at Botosani. The
comunity was not deported anywhere.

Hope that this clarifies the issue

Sorin


Romania SIG #Romania RE: Jewish community archives #romania

Sorin Goldenberg <SorinG@...>
 

OK,

I should have known in advance that I need to peek my words more
carefully when addressing WWII.

The happenings around Botosani were much harder then in Botosani. In
Dorohoi city (north to Botosani) - there was pogrom. The ppl. in the
district of Dorohoi were sent to Transnistria.

In Iasi, there was also pogrom. The jews in the small cities/villages
around Botosani were expelled to Botosani.

In Botosani itself, the life was not pleasant and regular. Jews had to
wear the yellow star, men were taken to forced labour etc... (see Pinkas
ha Kehilot Romania, Botosani at jewishgen).

However - most of jews of the city have survived WWII at Botosani. The
comunity was not deported anywhere.

Hope that this clarifies the issue

Sorin


Jewish GILBERTs in Manchester, UK, 1870s #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Richard Gilbert >from Seattle writes that he is
researching his family's genealogy, and believes he
has "found a not-too-distant uncle's birth in
Manchester, in 1876. Benjamin GILBERT would have been
born to P. GILBERT and his wife Leah (my most likely
great grandparents) in November 1876. P. and Leah had
apparently been born in Poland in about 1852 and July
1854, respectively.... by 1881, they had moved to the
City of Westminster then to New York by 1888/89, then
to Philadelphia."

Richard has no idea how long they had been in
Manchester, or what or why they might have changed
their name *from*!

I did check the 1881 census and found the GILBERT
family there, unfortunately father GILBERT is not
given a first name only the initials P and what I read
to be a letter *S*. This is how he is indexed, with
his birth in 1851.

I searched fruitlessly in the 1871 census for a
possible matching Leah and Lea. There is however a
clue. In 1871, a Solomon GILBERT aged 21 born in
Poland ca 1850 is lodging with Simon GAMBETZKI
[capmaker] born in Poland in 1829. Simon and his wife
had arrived in Manchester between 1856-1858, when
their first English-born child is listed [1858]. The
young lodger Solomon GILBERT then disappears from
future UK censuses. Could he have gone to the USA
before 1881? Could he be a relative [brother perhaps]
of P.S. GILBERT who then came to Manchester on his
recommendation sometime before 1876?

Or another exciting possibility is that P.S. GILBERT
is identical to Solomon GILBERT. Solomon and Leah may
have married in Manchester. All P.S. GILBERT's
children were born in England -Benjamin born in 1876
was the oldest.

The GAMBETZKI family may also have been relatives and
GILBERT could possibly be derived >from this name. A
birth certificate of of Benjamin may reveal more. It
should certainly be ordered.

Celia Male [U.K.]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish GILBERTs in Manchester, UK, 1870s #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Richard Gilbert >from Seattle writes that he is
researching his family's genealogy, and believes he
has "found a not-too-distant uncle's birth in
Manchester, in 1876. Benjamin GILBERT would have been
born to P. GILBERT and his wife Leah (my most likely
great grandparents) in November 1876. P. and Leah had
apparently been born in Poland in about 1852 and July
1854, respectively.... by 1881, they had moved to the
City of Westminster then to New York by 1888/89, then
to Philadelphia."

Richard has no idea how long they had been in
Manchester, or what or why they might have changed
their name *from*!

I did check the 1881 census and found the GILBERT
family there, unfortunately father GILBERT is not
given a first name only the initials P and what I read
to be a letter *S*. This is how he is indexed, with
his birth in 1851.

I searched fruitlessly in the 1871 census for a
possible matching Leah and Lea. There is however a
clue. In 1871, a Solomon GILBERT aged 21 born in
Poland ca 1850 is lodging with Simon GAMBETZKI
[capmaker] born in Poland in 1829. Simon and his wife
had arrived in Manchester between 1856-1858, when
their first English-born child is listed [1858]. The
young lodger Solomon GILBERT then disappears from
future UK censuses. Could he have gone to the USA
before 1881? Could he be a relative [brother perhaps]
of P.S. GILBERT who then came to Manchester on his
recommendation sometime before 1876?

Or another exciting possibility is that P.S. GILBERT
is identical to Solomon GILBERT. Solomon and Leah may
have married in Manchester. All P.S. GILBERT's
children were born in England -Benjamin born in 1876
was the oldest.

The GAMBETZKI family may also have been relatives and
GILBERT could possibly be derived >from this name. A
birth certificate of of Benjamin may reveal more. It
should certainly be ordered.

Celia Male [U.K.]