Date   

Re: Family Surname Mysteries #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

Linda Shefler < linsilv@nc.rr.com > wrote:

Some background: My SILVERMAN family came >from Zinkov, Podolia in the
Ukraine. They emigrated to Providence, RI about 1887. Of course, the
family name in Zinkov wasn't Silverman; what it was is still open to debate.
One suggestion is APPLEBAUM.
My gg grandfather Mordechai/Max *SILVERMAN* was married to Sima Rivka
PLOTKER/PLOTKE/PLOTKA bat Yeruhim Fischel PLOTKER/PLOTKE/PLOTKA.
Sima Rivka's death certificate reads "daughter of Philip PLOTKER" but her
matzeva says: "Sima Rivka bat Yeruhim Fishel ZILBERMAN". I was surprised
when I read that and couldn't understand how the mistake could have been
made. My gg grandfather was very much alive at the time and he would have
known the proper name of his wife's father. Also, if it was an error the
family would definitely have changed the matzeva.
This is not a mistake: the ZILBERMAN on the matzeva refers not to
her father's name but to her own (married) name. Similarly, my
great-grandmother's matzeva says (in Hebrew) "Raizel bat R' David
KOBILNITSKY", but KOBILNITSKY was her married name, not her maiden name.

Then I found the matzeva for Sima's brother (who came to America with Max
and Sima as their son. He was about 20 years younger then Sima and
according to family legend, he adopted the Silverman name along with the
rest of the family). His death certificate reads "son of Philip SILVERMAN"
and his matzeva reads "Israel bar FISHEL ZILBERMAN". To have a mistake like
that once is well, a mistake. Twice is significant!
It often happened that for one reason or another, people adopted the
name of another family that they married into.

Please tell me if this logic makes sense: Since Fishel and
PLOTKER/PLOTKE/PLOTKA mean "fish", does it seem logical that in order to
keep the secret of the origin of the family name (and it was definitely a
secret) Max and Sima gave Yeruhim Fishel a redundant last name (in other
words he became Yeruhim Fish Fish) so that they could then use the SILVERMAN
name?
I don't follow you.
1) How does PLOTKER mean "fish"?
2) What's so secret?
3) Why couldn't they use SILVERMAN otherwise?

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada


Samuel Freeedman to speak March 9 at Jewish Library in San Francisco #poland

Jrbaston
 

San Francisco Bay Area researchers will have a chance March 9 to hear
Samuel Freedman, author of "Who She Was: My Search for My Mother's
Life" and featured banquet speaker at the IAJGS Conference in New York,

Freedman will talk and read >from his book Thursday, March 9 at 7:30 p.m.
at the Jewish Community Library, 1835 Ellis Street, San Francisco. The
event is free and there is free parking in the building on Pierce Street
between Ellis and Eddy.

Freedman's mother died of cancer, in 1974, when he was 19. For the next
26 years he gave her little thought, becoming, "by default and by choice,"
his father's son. As he neared 50, the same age his mother was when she
died, Freedman began piecing together the fragments of his mother's life,
a task he understood as a filial duty and an act of atonement. Thus began
his investigative journey into researching his mother's life as she lived
it in the 30s, 40s, and 50s in the Bronx; her ambitions and yearnings, her
dreams and disappointments.

Freedman set out to learn who his mother was before she became his mother,
and about the forces that shaped her life. As his mother was coming of age
in the Bronx in the 1940s, her own mother was coming to terms with what
happened to her family who had remained in Bialystok during the Holocaust.

He researched in the "Bialystoker Stimme," the bilingual monthly magazine
of Bialystoker landslayt in America, >from letters between his grandmother
and her Polish relatives, as well as the scholarship of Rebecca Kobrin,
author of "Conflicting Diasporas, Shifting Centers: The Transnational
Bialystok Jewish Emigre Community in the United States, Argentina,
Australia and Palestine 1878-1949"

Although his grandmother had been born in Kolno (north of Lomza), her
family moved to Bialystok early in the 20th century. His grandmother's
maiden name was MARKIEWICZ, and other Bialystok family names mentioned
in the book are OSDER, KACZKOWICZ and GARTENBERG.

Freedman's journey into trying to understand his mother's life is
fascinating for any family history researcher.

For more information, one may contact the Jewish Community Library at
<library@bjesf.org>

Judy Baston
San Francisco, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Family Surname Mysteries #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

Linda Shefler < linsilv@nc.rr.com > wrote:

Some background: My SILVERMAN family came >from Zinkov, Podolia in the
Ukraine. They emigrated to Providence, RI about 1887. Of course, the
family name in Zinkov wasn't Silverman; what it was is still open to debate.
One suggestion is APPLEBAUM.
My gg grandfather Mordechai/Max *SILVERMAN* was married to Sima Rivka
PLOTKER/PLOTKE/PLOTKA bat Yeruhim Fischel PLOTKER/PLOTKE/PLOTKA.
Sima Rivka's death certificate reads "daughter of Philip PLOTKER" but her
matzeva says: "Sima Rivka bat Yeruhim Fishel ZILBERMAN". I was surprised
when I read that and couldn't understand how the mistake could have been
made. My gg grandfather was very much alive at the time and he would have
known the proper name of his wife's father. Also, if it was an error the
family would definitely have changed the matzeva.
This is not a mistake: the ZILBERMAN on the matzeva refers not to
her father's name but to her own (married) name. Similarly, my
great-grandmother's matzeva says (in Hebrew) "Raizel bat R' David
KOBILNITSKY", but KOBILNITSKY was her married name, not her maiden name.

Then I found the matzeva for Sima's brother (who came to America with Max
and Sima as their son. He was about 20 years younger then Sima and
according to family legend, he adopted the Silverman name along with the
rest of the family). His death certificate reads "son of Philip SILVERMAN"
and his matzeva reads "Israel bar FISHEL ZILBERMAN". To have a mistake like
that once is well, a mistake. Twice is significant!
It often happened that for one reason or another, people adopted the
name of another family that they married into.

Please tell me if this logic makes sense: Since Fishel and
PLOTKER/PLOTKE/PLOTKA mean "fish", does it seem logical that in order to
keep the secret of the origin of the family name (and it was definitely a
secret) Max and Sima gave Yeruhim Fishel a redundant last name (in other
words he became Yeruhim Fish Fish) so that they could then use the SILVERMAN
name?
I don't follow you.
1) How does PLOTKER mean "fish"?
2) What's so secret?
3) Why couldn't they use SILVERMAN otherwise?

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada


JRI Poland #Poland Samuel Freeedman to speak March 9 at Jewish Library in San Francisco #poland

Jrbaston
 

San Francisco Bay Area researchers will have a chance March 9 to hear
Samuel Freedman, author of "Who She Was: My Search for My Mother's
Life" and featured banquet speaker at the IAJGS Conference in New York,

Freedman will talk and read >from his book Thursday, March 9 at 7:30 p.m.
at the Jewish Community Library, 1835 Ellis Street, San Francisco. The
event is free and there is free parking in the building on Pierce Street
between Ellis and Eddy.

Freedman's mother died of cancer, in 1974, when he was 19. For the next
26 years he gave her little thought, becoming, "by default and by choice,"
his father's son. As he neared 50, the same age his mother was when she
died, Freedman began piecing together the fragments of his mother's life,
a task he understood as a filial duty and an act of atonement. Thus began
his investigative journey into researching his mother's life as she lived
it in the 30s, 40s, and 50s in the Bronx; her ambitions and yearnings, her
dreams and disappointments.

Freedman set out to learn who his mother was before she became his mother,
and about the forces that shaped her life. As his mother was coming of age
in the Bronx in the 1940s, her own mother was coming to terms with what
happened to her family who had remained in Bialystok during the Holocaust.

He researched in the "Bialystoker Stimme," the bilingual monthly magazine
of Bialystoker landslayt in America, >from letters between his grandmother
and her Polish relatives, as well as the scholarship of Rebecca Kobrin,
author of "Conflicting Diasporas, Shifting Centers: The Transnational
Bialystok Jewish Emigre Community in the United States, Argentina,
Australia and Palestine 1878-1949"

Although his grandmother had been born in Kolno (north of Lomza), her
family moved to Bialystok early in the 20th century. His grandmother's
maiden name was MARKIEWICZ, and other Bialystok family names mentioned
in the book are OSDER, KACZKOWICZ and GARTENBERG.

Freedman's journey into trying to understand his mother's life is
fascinating for any family history researcher.

For more information, one may contact the Jewish Community Library at
<library@bjesf.org>

Judy Baston
San Francisco, CA


Leib, Lieb, Levi and Nimes #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 3/2/2006 10:52:27 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
jewishgen@ecologicaltech.com writes:

< I think you are confusing two German/Yiddish words here.
< "Lieb", pronounced leehb, is >from the same root as the English "love", while
< "Leib" (note the spelling, also "loeb" etc.), pronounced lahyb, is >from the
< word for "lion". . . . . . .
< I think the similarities between "leib" and "levi" might have led people to
< connect the two, but I would not automatically assume that any given "Leib"
< was a levite.

==There is really no danger of such confusion for those who speak Yiddish.
Leyb, (>from German Loewe) meaning lion, is written in Yiddish with the Hebrew
letter bet, Levi is written with the Hebrew letter vav. The only possible
"confusion" might be in Russian (I do not know Russian and do not read the
cyrillic alphabet), where, I understand, the name Lev is derived >from the word
for lion.

==There may be some "confusion" in German-Jewish Surnames. It is highly
likely that some Jews de-Judaized the surname Lewi or Lewin by assuming the
surname Loewenstein, Loewenberg etc.

==Levi or Lewi is a rare first name today for Jews who are Levites by
descent. The best-known American Jew with a first name Levi, wasn't born that way.
He was named Loew in his home village in Upper Franconia, Germany. It was
only in America, where Levi was not uncommon among Christians, that Loewi
Strauss "Americanized" his name to Levi, and so marked his jeans.

==Jews and people aren't the only ones whose name get changed with
geographic moves. Jeans are named not after some woman (or Frenchman) named Jean,
but after Genoa, the Italian port. And denims take their name >from the French
city Nimes.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Leib, Lieb, Levi and Nimes #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 3/2/2006 10:52:27 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
jewishgen@ecologicaltech.com writes:

< I think you are confusing two German/Yiddish words here.
< "Lieb", pronounced leehb, is >from the same root as the English "love", while
< "Leib" (note the spelling, also "loeb" etc.), pronounced lahyb, is >from the
< word for "lion". . . . . . .
< I think the similarities between "leib" and "levi" might have led people to
< connect the two, but I would not automatically assume that any given "Leib"
< was a levite.

==There is really no danger of such confusion for those who speak Yiddish.
Leyb, (>from German Loewe) meaning lion, is written in Yiddish with the Hebrew
letter bet, Levi is written with the Hebrew letter vav. The only possible
"confusion" might be in Russian (I do not know Russian and do not read the
cyrillic alphabet), where, I understand, the name Lev is derived >from the word
for lion.

==There may be some "confusion" in German-Jewish Surnames. It is highly
likely that some Jews de-Judaized the surname Lewi or Lewin by assuming the
surname Loewenstein, Loewenberg etc.

==Levi or Lewi is a rare first name today for Jews who are Levites by
descent. The best-known American Jew with a first name Levi, wasn't born that way.
He was named Loew in his home village in Upper Franconia, Germany. It was
only in America, where Levi was not uncommon among Christians, that Loewi
Strauss "Americanized" his name to Levi, and so marked his jeans.

==Jews and people aren't the only ones whose name get changed with
geographic moves. Jeans are named not after some woman (or Frenchman) named Jean,
but after Genoa, the Italian port. And denims take their name >from the French
city Nimes.

Michael Bernet, New York


Yizkor Book Project Report for february 2006 #poland

Joyce Field
 

For the month of February 2006 nine updates, four new entries, and
one new book went online at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. All the new
material has flags in the index for easy identification.

New book:

-Rietavas, Lithuania

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Ilya, Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys,Lithuania
-Zloczew, Poland

-New entries:

-Branszczyk, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 4
-Brest, Belarus: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 5
-Kostopil, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot, vol. 5
-Zaliztsi, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 2

Many yizkor books are being translated by professional translators
paid by donations to the project fund. Donations to support these
worthy projects can be made at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
Please also consider a donation to the JewishGen General Fund to
support the infrastructure for all online projects.

To start a translation project of a yizkor book of your ancestral
town, please contact me privately.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Yizkor Book Project Report for february 2006 #poland

Joyce Field
 

For the month of February 2006 nine updates, four new entries, and
one new book went online at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. All the new
material has flags in the index for easy identification.

New book:

-Rietavas, Lithuania

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Ilya, Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys,Lithuania
-Zloczew, Poland

-New entries:

-Branszczyk, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 4
-Brest, Belarus: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 5
-Kostopil, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot, vol. 5
-Zaliztsi, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 2

Many yizkor books are being translated by professional translators
paid by donations to the project fund. Donations to support these
worthy projects can be made at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
Please also consider a donation to the JewishGen General Fund to
support the infrastructure for all online projects.

To start a translation project of a yizkor book of your ancestral
town, please contact me privately.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Bialystoker Samuel Freedman to speak March 9 in San Francisco #poland

Jrbaston
 

San Francisco Bay Area researchers will have a chance March 9 to hear
Samuel Freedman, author of "Who She Was: My Search for My Mother's
Life" and featured banquet speaker at the IAJGS Conference in New York,

Freedman will talk and read >from his book Thursday, March 9 at 7:30 p.m.
at the Jewish Community Library, 1835 Ellis Street, San Francisco.
The event is free and there is free parking in the building on Pierce
Street between Ellis and Eddy.

Freedman's mother died of cancer, in 1974, when he was 19. For the next
26 years he gave her little thought, becoming, "by default and by choice,"
his father's son. As he neared 50, the same age his mother was when she
died, Freedman began piecing together the fragments of his mother's life,
a task he understood as a filial duty and an act of atonement. Thus began
his investigative journey into researching his mother's life as she lived
it in the 30s, 40s, and 50s in the Bronx; her ambitions and yearnings,
her dreams and disappointments.

Freedman set out to learn who his mother was before she became his mother,
and about the forces that shaped her life. As his mother was coming of age
in the Bronx in the 1940s, her own mother was coming to terms with what
happened to her family who had remained in Bialystok during the Holocaust.

He researched in the "Bialystoker Stimme," the bilingual monthly
magazine of Bialystoker landslayt in America, >from letters between his
grandmother and her polish relatives, as well as the scholarship of
Rebecca Kobrin, author of "Conflicting Diasporas, Shifting Centers: The
Transnational Bialystok Jewish Emigre Community in the United States,
Argentina, Australia and Palestine 1878-1949"

Although his grandmother had been born in Kolno (north of Lomza), her
family moved to Bialystok early in the 20th century. His grandmother's
maiden name was MARKIEWICZ, and other Bialystok family names mentioned
in the book are OSDER, KACZKOWICZ and GARTENBERG.

Freedman's journey into trying to understand his mother's life is
fascinating for any family history researcher.

For more information, one may contact the Jewish Community Library at
<library@bjesf.org>

Judy Baston
San Francisco, CA


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Bialystoker Samuel Freedman to speak March 9 in San Francisco #poland

Jrbaston
 

San Francisco Bay Area researchers will have a chance March 9 to hear
Samuel Freedman, author of "Who She Was: My Search for My Mother's
Life" and featured banquet speaker at the IAJGS Conference in New York,

Freedman will talk and read >from his book Thursday, March 9 at 7:30 p.m.
at the Jewish Community Library, 1835 Ellis Street, San Francisco.
The event is free and there is free parking in the building on Pierce
Street between Ellis and Eddy.

Freedman's mother died of cancer, in 1974, when he was 19. For the next
26 years he gave her little thought, becoming, "by default and by choice,"
his father's son. As he neared 50, the same age his mother was when she
died, Freedman began piecing together the fragments of his mother's life,
a task he understood as a filial duty and an act of atonement. Thus began
his investigative journey into researching his mother's life as she lived
it in the 30s, 40s, and 50s in the Bronx; her ambitions and yearnings,
her dreams and disappointments.

Freedman set out to learn who his mother was before she became his mother,
and about the forces that shaped her life. As his mother was coming of age
in the Bronx in the 1940s, her own mother was coming to terms with what
happened to her family who had remained in Bialystok during the Holocaust.

He researched in the "Bialystoker Stimme," the bilingual monthly
magazine of Bialystoker landslayt in America, >from letters between his
grandmother and her polish relatives, as well as the scholarship of
Rebecca Kobrin, author of "Conflicting Diasporas, Shifting Centers: The
Transnational Bialystok Jewish Emigre Community in the United States,
Argentina, Australia and Palestine 1878-1949"

Although his grandmother had been born in Kolno (north of Lomza), her
family moved to Bialystok early in the 20th century. His grandmother's
maiden name was MARKIEWICZ, and other Bialystok family names mentioned
in the book are OSDER, KACZKOWICZ and GARTENBERG.

Freedman's journey into trying to understand his mother's life is
fascinating for any family history researcher.

For more information, one may contact the Jewish Community Library at
<library@bjesf.org>

Judy Baston
San Francisco, CA


Headstone Cleaning & Tracing Question #germany

B. Frederics <picturethisfilm@...>
 

Siggers,

Does anyone know how to remove graffiti >from old headstones? I'll be going
to the Illingen cemetery in a couple of months and I just read there's been
some vandalism and Nazi graffiti committed there recently. I'd like to try
to clean what I can.

Also, can you tell me how to trace a headstone whose writing is no longer
legible? What do I need? Thanks. Regards,

Bonnie Frederics Tucson, AZ picturethisfilm@email.com

Seeking: GOTTLIEB; LEVY; HEIMANN; HAHN; SILBER; ALEXANDER (Bosen, Consdorf,
Illingen, Mainstockheim, Schwanfeld, )


German SIG #Germany Headstone Cleaning & Tracing Question #germany

B. Frederics <picturethisfilm@...>
 

Siggers,

Does anyone know how to remove graffiti >from old headstones? I'll be going
to the Illingen cemetery in a couple of months and I just read there's been
some vandalism and Nazi graffiti committed there recently. I'd like to try
to clean what I can.

Also, can you tell me how to trace a headstone whose writing is no longer
legible? What do I need? Thanks. Regards,

Bonnie Frederics Tucson, AZ picturethisfilm@email.com

Seeking: GOTTLIEB; LEVY; HEIMANN; HAHN; SILBER; ALEXANDER (Bosen, Consdorf,
Illingen, Mainstockheim, Schwanfeld, )


SITE CITE - Jewish Population of the World in 2005 #germany

H.Peter Sinclair <peter@...>
 

Dear Gersigers

I have come across remarkable statistical information in respect of
the Jewish Population of the World, by Countries and Regions on

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Judaism/jewpop.html#region

Best wishes-Peter Sinclair (London) <peter@thesinclairs.co.uk>


German SIG #Germany SITE CITE - Jewish Population of the World in 2005 #germany

H.Peter Sinclair <peter@...>
 

Dear Gersigers

I have come across remarkable statistical information in respect of
the Jewish Population of the World, by Countries and Regions on

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Judaism/jewpop.html#region

Best wishes-Peter Sinclair (London) <peter@thesinclairs.co.uk>


Please help us add to our small town booklist #germany

GerSig@...
 

Lanie Bergman Long Island NY HeleneBergman@netscape.net wrote:
I received an e-mail about a book "Spuren im Stein" "traces in the
stone", "Ein Bochumer Friedhof als Spiegel juedischer Geschichte" "a Bochum
cemetery as a mirror of Jewish history". She asked if anyone could help her
find a copy of this publication. Please reply to HeleneBergman@netscape.net

At the GerSIG website we offer a long list of books, pamphlets, and
web resources specific to Jewish communities in small towns and cities
in Germany.
http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/communities.htm

Our list is focused on smaller towns and cities because Berlin and other major
cities are easier to research elsewhere.

We are always grateful to receive *** complete *** citations of new or newly
discovered publications for addition to this list.

If you find one please send us *** detaled *** information about it.

Write to: gersig@aol.com and tell us all of the following
information:

Title. (If you can translate a German title to English please do so and
include the translation ** after ** the German original).

If the title does not name the town described in the book please give the town
name after the title. If significant information about ** other ** towns
is included please list names of those towns.

Author of the book.

Date of publication Publisher and city.

ISBN number - This is usually found on the title page. It is used to locate the
book using the Interlibrary Loan System.

Is the book held at the Leo Baeck Institute (LBI) ? Yivo ? CJH ? LDS FHL ?

Number of pages in the book.

Notes about the illustrations, charts, tables etc. contained.

Description of the index. Is the book indexed ? (Are most family names mentioned
in the book included in the index ? Your description will help others know how
hard or easy it will be to locate possible relatives in the text - especially in
German language publications.)

Please send your Community History Resource citations to us at gersig@aol.com.

If your citation is not complete (as described above)
it will probably be ignored.

Please check the list of books in our list
to be sure your book is not already included.

http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/communities.htm

If you can add information to an existing listing
please do so and let us know that is what you
are doing. Many thanks.

John Paul Lowens Suburban NYC GerSIG Coordinator


German SIG #Germany Please help us add to our small town booklist #germany

GerSig@...
 

Lanie Bergman Long Island NY HeleneBergman@netscape.net wrote:
I received an e-mail about a book "Spuren im Stein" "traces in the
stone", "Ein Bochumer Friedhof als Spiegel juedischer Geschichte" "a Bochum
cemetery as a mirror of Jewish history". She asked if anyone could help her
find a copy of this publication. Please reply to HeleneBergman@netscape.net

At the GerSIG website we offer a long list of books, pamphlets, and
web resources specific to Jewish communities in small towns and cities
in Germany.
http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/communities.htm

Our list is focused on smaller towns and cities because Berlin and other major
cities are easier to research elsewhere.

We are always grateful to receive *** complete *** citations of new or newly
discovered publications for addition to this list.

If you find one please send us *** detaled *** information about it.

Write to: gersig@aol.com and tell us all of the following
information:

Title. (If you can translate a German title to English please do so and
include the translation ** after ** the German original).

If the title does not name the town described in the book please give the town
name after the title. If significant information about ** other ** towns
is included please list names of those towns.

Author of the book.

Date of publication Publisher and city.

ISBN number - This is usually found on the title page. It is used to locate the
book using the Interlibrary Loan System.

Is the book held at the Leo Baeck Institute (LBI) ? Yivo ? CJH ? LDS FHL ?

Number of pages in the book.

Notes about the illustrations, charts, tables etc. contained.

Description of the index. Is the book indexed ? (Are most family names mentioned
in the book included in the index ? Your description will help others know how
hard or easy it will be to locate possible relatives in the text - especially in
German language publications.)

Please send your Community History Resource citations to us at gersig@aol.com.

If your citation is not complete (as described above)
it will probably be ignored.

Please check the list of books in our list
to be sure your book is not already included.

http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/communities.htm

If you can add information to an existing listing
please do so and let us know that is what you
are doing. Many thanks.

John Paul Lowens Suburban NYC GerSIG Coordinator


INTRO: researching LEVI-SEGAL-FEIBELMAN and more #germany

Orit Lavi <orit@...>
 

Hello GerSigers,
I have been doing genealogy research for three years or so, but recently joined
this group to advance my research in the Polish-German areas.

[MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen hosts other SIG groups that are focused on these
areas. GerSIG is really not likely to be helpful to you. We will not post
replies to this message that are not specific to present or historic Germany.]

In Poznan and Pomerania, the family names I am researching are:
LEVI - SEGAL - FEIBELMAN / FEIWELMAN / FEIFELMAN - Samter-Szamotuly to Kalisz
(1796) and then to Fordon (1828), and Lutomiersk (Lodz area, Poland)
LIDZBARSKI - Mlawa at least >from early 19th century, but also Germany
HORONCZYK - Kalisz area and possibly Poznan, as well as Dobra near Turek
SZATAN - Mlawa in the 19th century, but possibly Poznan area as well.
POZNANSKI - Kowal, Lodz

Presently, and with respect to this group, my primary goal is to find out
more about the family and ancestors of Yehoshua FEIBELMAN HALEVI and his son
Simon LEWI-SEGAL, the Rabbi of Fordon and Rogozno. I have obtained info
from Heppner and Hercberg's book on this family, as well as from
Louis Lewin's book on Lissa-Leszno Jewry.

In addition I would also like to find out whether my LIDZBARSKI family came
from Lidzbark, and when was that.
My native language is Hebrew and I am also fluent in English. Greetings,

Reply to: orit@olavi.co.il Orit Lavi Tsukey-Yam, Israel


German SIG #Germany INTRO: researching LEVI-SEGAL-FEIBELMAN and more #germany

Orit Lavi <orit@...>
 

Hello GerSigers,
I have been doing genealogy research for three years or so, but recently joined
this group to advance my research in the Polish-German areas.

[MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen hosts other SIG groups that are focused on these
areas. GerSIG is really not likely to be helpful to you. We will not post
replies to this message that are not specific to present or historic Germany.]

In Poznan and Pomerania, the family names I am researching are:
LEVI - SEGAL - FEIBELMAN / FEIWELMAN / FEIFELMAN - Samter-Szamotuly to Kalisz
(1796) and then to Fordon (1828), and Lutomiersk (Lodz area, Poland)
LIDZBARSKI - Mlawa at least >from early 19th century, but also Germany
HORONCZYK - Kalisz area and possibly Poznan, as well as Dobra near Turek
SZATAN - Mlawa in the 19th century, but possibly Poznan area as well.
POZNANSKI - Kowal, Lodz

Presently, and with respect to this group, my primary goal is to find out
more about the family and ancestors of Yehoshua FEIBELMAN HALEVI and his son
Simon LEWI-SEGAL, the Rabbi of Fordon and Rogozno. I have obtained info
from Heppner and Hercberg's book on this family, as well as from
Louis Lewin's book on Lissa-Leszno Jewry.

In addition I would also like to find out whether my LIDZBARSKI family came
from Lidzbark, and when was that.
My native language is Hebrew and I am also fluent in English. Greetings,

Reply to: orit@olavi.co.il Orit Lavi Tsukey-Yam, Israel


WALTER and SICHEL from Kleinsteinach #germany

Charles Hexter <CHexter@...>
 

I am seeking information on families WALTER and SICHEL who lived in Kleinsteinach
in the early years of the last century (1900 - 1920).

My grandfather Herman SCHORNSTEIN who was born in Bamberg was orphaned as a young
teenager and then lived with either or both of the above families in Kleinsteinach
sometime during the years 1906 - 1915.

Charles Hexter Rehovot, Israel chexter@europe.sial.com

MODERATOR REMINDER: For a better chance at success everyone should include more
information about small towns than simply the name of the town.
Use geo@genealogy.net * or the JewishGen ShtetlSeeker ** to get the name of the
Land (state) Kreis (county) and map coordinates of towns and included that
information in your message to GerSIG. If you are not willing
to take the trouble to do this why should others want to help you?

* Send email to geo@genealogy.net with the name of the town as the only text in
your email. If you spelled the town correctly the reply will be immediate.
** http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetlSeeker/loctown.htm MOD1


German SIG #Germany WALTER and SICHEL from Kleinsteinach #germany

Charles Hexter <CHexter@...>
 

I am seeking information on families WALTER and SICHEL who lived in Kleinsteinach
in the early years of the last century (1900 - 1920).

My grandfather Herman SCHORNSTEIN who was born in Bamberg was orphaned as a young
teenager and then lived with either or both of the above families in Kleinsteinach
sometime during the years 1906 - 1915.

Charles Hexter Rehovot, Israel chexter@europe.sial.com

MODERATOR REMINDER: For a better chance at success everyone should include more
information about small towns than simply the name of the town.
Use geo@genealogy.net * or the JewishGen ShtetlSeeker ** to get the name of the
Land (state) Kreis (county) and map coordinates of towns and included that
information in your message to GerSIG. If you are not willing
to take the trouble to do this why should others want to help you?

* Send email to geo@genealogy.net with the name of the town as the only text in
your email. If you spelled the town correctly the reply will be immediate.
** http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetlSeeker/loctown.htm MOD1