Date   

Re: Census Records #france

laurphil@...
 

The oldest censuses kept in France date of the end of the 18th Century.
Generally, nominative censuses have been done with regularity since 1836
every 5 years, excepted during the wars (for instance, the census of 1871
has been done in 1872).
They are kept in the "Archives Départementales" and often available on
microfilms.

Laurence Abensur-Hazan (Mrs)

Subject: Re: Census Records
From: "Jackye Sullins" <jsullins@san.rr.com>
What about the rest of France? And where and how can they be accessed?
Jackye Sullins
San Diego


French SIG #France Re: Census Records #france

laurphil@...
 

The oldest censuses kept in France date of the end of the 18th Century.
Generally, nominative censuses have been done with regularity since 1836
every 5 years, excepted during the wars (for instance, the census of 1871
has been done in 1872).
They are kept in the "Archives Départementales" and often available on
microfilms.

Laurence Abensur-Hazan (Mrs)

Subject: Re: Census Records
From: "Jackye Sullins" <jsullins@san.rr.com>
What about the rest of France? And where and how can they be accessed?
Jackye Sullins
San Diego


Re: latvia digest: #latvia

feigl@...
 

I haven?t been receiving information this last two days.
I would like to continue receiving it.
thanks
Fanny Kazarez


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: latvia digest: #latvia

feigl@...
 

I haven?t been receiving information this last two days.
I would like to continue receiving it.
thanks
Fanny Kazarez


New Website with Interesting Content for BialyGenners #poland

Bialystoker
 

I have become aware of a new website that may be of interest
to you. It is http://www.bagnowka.com/. Bagnowka is a
district of Bialystok, which contains the Wschodnia Street
Cemetery. See
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/bialygen/BialCem.htm and
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/bialygen/BialCemWall.htm
for information about this Cemetery.

Here are the webpages to visit.

Photo Gallery http://www.bagnowka.com/?m=atoz
Jewish Cemeteries http://www.bagnowka.com/?m=cm&g=2
WW2 Information http://www.bagnowka.com/?m=ww
Wooden Synagogues
http://www.bagnowka.com/?m=cm&g=show&idg=346

I am providing information about this website as a public
service. This posting does not imply any opinion or
endorsement about the tour services that are part of this
website. If you are looking for a tourguide in Bialystok and
its environs, the best recommendations will come >from your
fellow BialyGenners.

Mark Halpern
BialyGen Coordinator


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland New Website with Interesting Content for BialyGenners #poland

Bialystoker
 

I have become aware of a new website that may be of interest
to you. It is http://www.bagnowka.com/. Bagnowka is a
district of Bialystok, which contains the Wschodnia Street
Cemetery. See
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/bialygen/BialCem.htm and
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/bialygen/BialCemWall.htm
for information about this Cemetery.

Here are the webpages to visit.

Photo Gallery http://www.bagnowka.com/?m=atoz
Jewish Cemeteries http://www.bagnowka.com/?m=cm&g=2
WW2 Information http://www.bagnowka.com/?m=ww
Wooden Synagogues
http://www.bagnowka.com/?m=cm&g=show&idg=346

I am providing information about this website as a public
service. This posting does not imply any opinion or
endorsement about the tour services that are part of this
website. If you are looking for a tourguide in Bialystok and
its environs, the best recommendations will come >from your
fellow BialyGenners.

Mark Halpern
BialyGen Coordinator


Re: relationship puzzle - half brothers #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sat, 22 Jul 2006, harvey@hkaplan.freeserve.co.uk (Harvey L Kaplan) wrote:

A puzzle. My great-great-grandmother in Lithuania married twice and had
children by both husbands. My great-grandfather, therefore, had a
half-brother and a half-sister (same mother but different father). So were
there children half-cousins? And am I a half-third cousin of their
descendants?

Harvey L Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland
If you know what you mean by those terms, why yes, you are.

There is no reason to expect the language to have specific terms for such
relationships.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is not
valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL above -- no
Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: relationship puzzle - half brothers #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sat, 22 Jul 2006, harvey@hkaplan.freeserve.co.uk (Harvey L Kaplan) wrote:

A puzzle. My great-great-grandmother in Lithuania married twice and had
children by both husbands. My great-grandfather, therefore, had a
half-brother and a half-sister (same mother but different father). So were
there children half-cousins? And am I a half-third cousin of their
descendants?

Harvey L Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland
If you know what you mean by those terms, why yes, you are.

There is no reason to expect the language to have specific terms for such
relationships.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is not
valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL above -- no
Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


Kohanim question #general

Jane
 

Hello,
I am trying to find out our true family name. My grandfather came here
from Vilna around 1895. His name was Bograd, or something like it, nobody
is really sure. The story goes that he lost his papers on the ship, and he
wound up taking papers >from a little boy named Eduard Zeman who died during
the journey.

I found Eduard Zeman's name on a passenger manifest. I hoped that there
would be a name identical or similar to Bograd on that manifest, also.
There was nothing even close.

My father (hence, my grandfather) was a Kohen. Maybe I could approach
the problem >from this angle. Is there a compilation of names of Kohenim
somewhere? It might be very helpful.

I'm open to any other suggestions, too.

Thanks,

Jane Zeman Smith


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kohanim question #general

Jane
 

Hello,
I am trying to find out our true family name. My grandfather came here
from Vilna around 1895. His name was Bograd, or something like it, nobody
is really sure. The story goes that he lost his papers on the ship, and he
wound up taking papers >from a little boy named Eduard Zeman who died during
the journey.

I found Eduard Zeman's name on a passenger manifest. I hoped that there
would be a name identical or similar to Bograd on that manifest, also.
There was nothing even close.

My father (hence, my grandfather) was a Kohen. Maybe I could approach
the problem >from this angle. Is there a compilation of names of Kohenim
somewhere? It might be very helpful.

I'm open to any other suggestions, too.

Thanks,

Jane Zeman Smith


SCHWARZSCHILD and HOR(O)WITZ of Frankfurt am Main #germany

Simon Srebrny <srebrny@...>
 

Dear colleagues,
Does anybody out there have a copy of "Stammtafeln der von Liebmann
SCHWARZSCHILD in Frankfurt a. M. '(1555-1594)' abstammenden Familien"
by Dr Louis Neustadt (Frankfurt am Main: Dr. von Kumpf & Reis, 1886).
The copy at the municipal archives in Frankfurt disappeared 13 years
ago. The copy at the State Library in Berlin was destroyed in the war.
Neither the Library of Congress nor the British Library has a copy. I
would love to have a photocopy and would, of course, pay the costs. A
gedcom file covering the same territory (and more?!) would do too.

I am particularly interested in the descendants of Israel Aron
SCHWARZSCHILD (23 June 1803-1853) and his wife Bina HORWITZ (22 Jan
1803 Frankfurt - 31 Oct 1887 Frankfurt). She was the daughter of Zwi
Hirsch Horwitz, chief rabbi of Frankfurt am Main who died in 1817. Bina
was a child of his second wife, Taube LANDAU. Does anybody know who her
parents were? Isaac Aron and Bina SCHWARZSCHILD are reportedly the
ancestors of those SCHWARZSCHILDs who ran a bank in Frankfurt. The
HORWITZes are my family. In the records I found in the Frankfurt
archives the family name is indeed spelled with just one 'O'.

Thanks in advance for any help. Regards,

Simon Srebrny (>from London, living in Berlin) <srebrny@mac.com>


German SIG #Germany SCHWARZSCHILD and HOR(O)WITZ of Frankfurt am Main #germany

Simon Srebrny <srebrny@...>
 

Dear colleagues,
Does anybody out there have a copy of "Stammtafeln der von Liebmann
SCHWARZSCHILD in Frankfurt a. M. '(1555-1594)' abstammenden Familien"
by Dr Louis Neustadt (Frankfurt am Main: Dr. von Kumpf & Reis, 1886).
The copy at the municipal archives in Frankfurt disappeared 13 years
ago. The copy at the State Library in Berlin was destroyed in the war.
Neither the Library of Congress nor the British Library has a copy. I
would love to have a photocopy and would, of course, pay the costs. A
gedcom file covering the same territory (and more?!) would do too.

I am particularly interested in the descendants of Israel Aron
SCHWARZSCHILD (23 June 1803-1853) and his wife Bina HORWITZ (22 Jan
1803 Frankfurt - 31 Oct 1887 Frankfurt). She was the daughter of Zwi
Hirsch Horwitz, chief rabbi of Frankfurt am Main who died in 1817. Bina
was a child of his second wife, Taube LANDAU. Does anybody know who her
parents were? Isaac Aron and Bina SCHWARZSCHILD are reportedly the
ancestors of those SCHWARZSCHILDs who ran a bank in Frankfurt. The
HORWITZes are my family. In the records I found in the Frankfurt
archives the family name is indeed spelled with just one 'O'.

Thanks in advance for any help. Regards,

Simon Srebrny (>from London, living in Berlin) <srebrny@mac.com>


FTDNA Surname Projects - Are you in one? #dna

Elise
 

All,

I am compiling a list of projects at FTDNA that focus on Jewish
ancestry. With FTDNA's help, I currently have a list of about 70
such surname projects. However, with over 3300 surname projects to
search through, I am sure we missed some.

If those of you who run or participate in an FTDNA surname project
could please send me a private email with the surname and the join
link and/or website, I would greatly appreciate it.

The compiled list will be made available on JewishGen's website in
a few weeks.

Thanks!

Elise Friedman
Baltimore, Maryland
elisejg@comcast.net


DNA Research #DNA FTDNA Surname Projects - Are you in one? #dna

Elise
 

All,

I am compiling a list of projects at FTDNA that focus on Jewish
ancestry. With FTDNA's help, I currently have a list of about 70
such surname projects. However, with over 3300 surname projects to
search through, I am sure we missed some.

If those of you who run or participate in an FTDNA surname project
could please send me a private email with the surname and the join
link and/or website, I would greatly appreciate it.

The compiled list will be made available on JewishGen's website in
a few weeks.

Thanks!

Elise Friedman
Baltimore, Maryland
elisejg@comcast.net


Re: Wiggery-pokery! #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Sally Bruckheimer wrote:
Hi Judith,

I saw your posting that said "western Jews
absorbed European culture much earlier than east European
Jews...they "lost" or rather chose to
"drop" the use of Yiddish in general earlier than in the east ".

Do you think, perhaps, that Jews in German-speaking countries spoke
German, as it developed around them, while Jews who moved East kept
speaking the 'German' that they had spoken for centruies, with an
admixture of the Russian/Polish/whatever they heard around them?
This seems reasonable to me,

Dear Sally,

Yes indeed! As for the admixture of Slavic languages to which you
allude, some current scholars of Yiddish have even detected the
Slavic influence on Yiddish grammar.

Perhaps more importantly, Yiddish scholars tell us that Yiddish is
very close to Middle High German in many ways. I personally know a
professor of German here at Brown University who was of gentile
German background but had actually made a point of learning the
Hebrew alphabet and Yiddish language precisely because of the help it
afforded him in tracing the historical development of German in the
Middle Ages! I was amused to discover that at one point this
professor's extra-curricular activities included teaching a Yiddish
class at the local Jewish Community Center!

Bottom line, you are absolutely right -- Jews everywhere seem to have
developed a "Jewish language" based on that of the dominant
surrounding culture. Yiddish is "Judeo-German" just as Ladino is
"Judeo-Spanish" -- and the Jews >from Arab countries developed
"Judeo-Arabic" (as well as being Arabic-speaking in their daily
lives).

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Wiggery-pokery! #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Sally Bruckheimer wrote:
Hi Judith,

I saw your posting that said "western Jews
absorbed European culture much earlier than east European
Jews...they "lost" or rather chose to
"drop" the use of Yiddish in general earlier than in the east ".

Do you think, perhaps, that Jews in German-speaking countries spoke
German, as it developed around them, while Jews who moved East kept
speaking the 'German' that they had spoken for centruies, with an
admixture of the Russian/Polish/whatever they heard around them?
This seems reasonable to me,

Dear Sally,

Yes indeed! As for the admixture of Slavic languages to which you
allude, some current scholars of Yiddish have even detected the
Slavic influence on Yiddish grammar.

Perhaps more importantly, Yiddish scholars tell us that Yiddish is
very close to Middle High German in many ways. I personally know a
professor of German here at Brown University who was of gentile
German background but had actually made a point of learning the
Hebrew alphabet and Yiddish language precisely because of the help it
afforded him in tracing the historical development of German in the
Middle Ages! I was amused to discover that at one point this
professor's extra-curricular activities included teaching a Yiddish
class at the local Jewish Community Center!

Bottom line, you are absolutely right -- Jews everywhere seem to have
developed a "Jewish language" based on that of the dominant
surrounding culture. Yiddish is "Judeo-German" just as Ladino is
"Judeo-Spanish" -- and the Jews >from Arab countries developed
"Judeo-Arabic" (as well as being Arabic-speaking in their daily
lives).

Judith Romney Wegner


Re: relationship puzzle - half brothers #general

Roger Lustig <julierog@...>
 

Harvey L Kaplan wrote:
A puzzle. My great-great-grandmother in Lithuania married twice and had
children by both husbands. My great-grandfather, therefore, had a half-
brother and a half-sister (same mother but different father). So were there
children half-cousins? And am I a half-third cousin of their descendants?
Yes, and yes.

However, it is not the case that, when long-lost half-cousins suddenly
appear, they will schnorr for only half as much money...8)

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: relationship puzzle - half brothers #general

Roger Lustig <julierog@...>
 

Harvey L Kaplan wrote:
A puzzle. My great-great-grandmother in Lithuania married twice and had
children by both husbands. My great-grandfather, therefore, had a half-
brother and a half-sister (same mother but different father). So were there
children half-cousins? And am I a half-third cousin of their descendants?
Yes, and yes.

However, it is not the case that, when long-lost half-cousins suddenly
appear, they will schnorr for only half as much money...8)

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ


R' Yosef of Breznitz, Galicia - 18th Cent. #rabbinic

yoni ben-ari <yrcdi@...>
 

Does anyone know of a town in Galicia known as Breznitz?

According to my relatives one of my elderly uncles said, as it appears
in our family tree, that one of our ancestors was a certain Rabbi
Yosef of Breznitz.

This Rabbi Yosef was the son-in-law of a Rabbi Shmuel ben Harav Arieh
Leib both of whom served at the end of the 17th-beg. 18th cent. in
Kremenetz. The names of these rabbis appear in the Kremenetz Memorial
book (I think it's called "Pinkas Kremenetz") as well as being listed
in Rosenstein's "The Unbroken Chain" and Wunder's "Elef Margaliot".
But all these sources stop with Smuel of Kremenetz without listing any
daughters (Rosenstein lists a son if it's the same family).

The only town with such a name that I found in the encyclopedia
Judaica is in Czechoslovakia but since our long past ancestor the
Maharal of Prague we know of no ancestor who lived in Czech.

Alternatively, does anyone know of a Rabbi Yosef, who married a
descendant of the Mahara"l, and the Maharsha"l for that matter, who
served as a rabbi in the Czech town of Breznitz during the 18th cent.?

As mentioned in the past, the PAPIRNE family of Jerusalem have the
same family tree as we do till some 150 years ago so maybe some one
from that family is on this list?
Thank you,
Yoni Ben-Ari, Efrat, Israel

[Moderator's Comment: Please respond to RavSIG only if your response
deals with Rabbinic Genealogy. Otherwise, please respond privately.]


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic R' Yosef of Breznitz, Galicia - 18th Cent. #rabbinic

yoni ben-ari <yrcdi@...>
 

Does anyone know of a town in Galicia known as Breznitz?

According to my relatives one of my elderly uncles said, as it appears
in our family tree, that one of our ancestors was a certain Rabbi
Yosef of Breznitz.

This Rabbi Yosef was the son-in-law of a Rabbi Shmuel ben Harav Arieh
Leib both of whom served at the end of the 17th-beg. 18th cent. in
Kremenetz. The names of these rabbis appear in the Kremenetz Memorial
book (I think it's called "Pinkas Kremenetz") as well as being listed
in Rosenstein's "The Unbroken Chain" and Wunder's "Elef Margaliot".
But all these sources stop with Smuel of Kremenetz without listing any
daughters (Rosenstein lists a son if it's the same family).

The only town with such a name that I found in the encyclopedia
Judaica is in Czechoslovakia but since our long past ancestor the
Maharal of Prague we know of no ancestor who lived in Czech.

Alternatively, does anyone know of a Rabbi Yosef, who married a
descendant of the Mahara"l, and the Maharsha"l for that matter, who
served as a rabbi in the Czech town of Breznitz during the 18th cent.?

As mentioned in the past, the PAPIRNE family of Jerusalem have the
same family tree as we do till some 150 years ago so maybe some one
from that family is on this list?
Thank you,
Yoni Ben-Ari, Efrat, Israel

[Moderator's Comment: Please respond to RavSIG only if your response
deals with Rabbinic Genealogy. Otherwise, please respond privately.]