Date   

Re: SALOSHIN #general

Gary Goldberg <XGaryG@...>
 

In article <20000318.085244.-195959.0.drothman1@juno.com>, David Rothman
<drothman1@juno.com> wrote:

Anybody ever seen people with name SALOSHIN?
Yes, but I don't think they're Jewish. I know the daughter, who's a
well-known broadcaster in the Boston area who goes by another name on the
air and is now married (I'm not sure if she uses his name at all). They're
from the Bethesda, Maryland, area.
I just checked the phone book and what is probably her father is listed
as "Saloschin" (SIC)

(Remove "X" >from address to reply)


Rumania Rumania #general

rokoco1@...
 

I am unfamiliar with the newsletter about RUMANIA RUMANIA, but If you wish to
'hear' the song, just log on to the Shtetlinks - Dolj County site

http:www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/dolj/Dolj.html

Scroll down to "Sights and Sounds of Romania" and follow instructions and
enjoy.

Bobbi Cohen
Dolj County Coordinator


Seeking Sam TUCHMAN #general

Kelly Modlin
 

I'm sending this message on behalf of ARMON Michael (Moni) a
friend, who is a member of our Kibbutz. He does't have access to
the Internet and has lost contact with his relations who are
listed below:

TUCHMAN Sam wife Betty
Lives/lived: Malibo California 90265

Sister:
SAFRAN Anne
Resada - California 91335

Brother:
TUCHMAN Al

Brother:
TUCHMAN Sack

Whoever has any information regarding the above mentioned persons
please contact me directly.

Kelly Modlin - Kibbutz Shluchot
kellym@shluhot.org.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: SALOSHIN #general

Gary Goldberg <XGaryG@...>
 

In article <20000318.085244.-195959.0.drothman1@juno.com>, David Rothman
<drothman1@juno.com> wrote:

Anybody ever seen people with name SALOSHIN?
Yes, but I don't think they're Jewish. I know the daughter, who's a
well-known broadcaster in the Boston area who goes by another name on the
air and is now married (I'm not sure if she uses his name at all). They're
from the Bethesda, Maryland, area.
I just checked the phone book and what is probably her father is listed
as "Saloschin" (SIC)

(Remove "X" >from address to reply)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Rumania Rumania #general

rokoco1@...
 

I am unfamiliar with the newsletter about RUMANIA RUMANIA, but If you wish to
'hear' the song, just log on to the Shtetlinks - Dolj County site

http:www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/dolj/Dolj.html

Scroll down to "Sights and Sounds of Romania" and follow instructions and
enjoy.

Bobbi Cohen
Dolj County Coordinator


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking Sam TUCHMAN #general

Kelly Modlin
 

I'm sending this message on behalf of ARMON Michael (Moni) a
friend, who is a member of our Kibbutz. He does't have access to
the Internet and has lost contact with his relations who are
listed below:

TUCHMAN Sam wife Betty
Lives/lived: Malibo California 90265

Sister:
SAFRAN Anne
Resada - California 91335

Brother:
TUCHMAN Al

Brother:
TUCHMAN Sack

Whoever has any information regarding the above mentioned persons
please contact me directly.

Kelly Modlin - Kibbutz Shluchot
kellym@shluhot.org.il


Re: Deported passenger in the Passenger Arrival Index? #general

Willie46@...
 

In a message dated 3/23/2000 12:54:35 AM Eastern Standard Time, Bruce Reisch
<bir1@nysaes.cornell.edu> writes:
I am looking through the soundex index of New York passenger arrivals
(1902-1943, National Archives Microfilm Series T621) for a person known
to have arrived in October 1921. He was detained due to an eye problem
and deported back to Warsaw soon thereafter, though his wife was
permitted to stay in New York. Will he still be found in the index to
passenger arrivals (and on the ship passenger manifest)?
Here are a few thoughts for you, based on the search for my grandfather's
entry into the US.

1) Family stories are not always factually correct.
2) By 1921, Shipping Companies were required to return, at their cost, any
immigrant not accepted by the US authorities. Therefore, the Shipping
Companies usually prescreened passengers prior to embarkation.
3) It was fairly easy to detect Trachoma, a contagious eye disease, in a
cursory physical exam.

I had always heard that my grandfather came to the US and was deported >from
Ellis Island because he had Trachoma. I confirmed this *story* with all of
my first cousins.

After two years of genealogical research, I was able to confirm that my
grandparents both attempted to immigrate to the US in 1926. Only my
grandmother boarded that ship in Danzig. My grandfather was rejected prior
to embarkation. He resided in a small town near Danzig until my grandmother
returned >from her "Vacation" in NY. My grandfather died of natural causes
in 1937 and my grandmother was able to finally immigrate to the US in 1938.

Sounds like your story may be similar. And, since the passenger manifests
were filled out prior to arrival in the US, your ancestor's name should be
in the index, even if he was subsequently deported.

Hope this helps,
Mark Halpern
West Conshohocken, PA

Searching: HALPERN, TENENBAUM, SASS, GRUNSEID, GORGEL -- Eastern Galician
towns of Tarnopol, Skalat, Plaucza Vielka, Kozlow, Urman, Petrikow


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Deported passenger in the Passenger Arrival Index? #general

Willie46@...
 

In a message dated 3/23/2000 12:54:35 AM Eastern Standard Time, Bruce Reisch
<bir1@nysaes.cornell.edu> writes:
I am looking through the soundex index of New York passenger arrivals
(1902-1943, National Archives Microfilm Series T621) for a person known
to have arrived in October 1921. He was detained due to an eye problem
and deported back to Warsaw soon thereafter, though his wife was
permitted to stay in New York. Will he still be found in the index to
passenger arrivals (and on the ship passenger manifest)?
Here are a few thoughts for you, based on the search for my grandfather's
entry into the US.

1) Family stories are not always factually correct.
2) By 1921, Shipping Companies were required to return, at their cost, any
immigrant not accepted by the US authorities. Therefore, the Shipping
Companies usually prescreened passengers prior to embarkation.
3) It was fairly easy to detect Trachoma, a contagious eye disease, in a
cursory physical exam.

I had always heard that my grandfather came to the US and was deported >from
Ellis Island because he had Trachoma. I confirmed this *story* with all of
my first cousins.

After two years of genealogical research, I was able to confirm that my
grandparents both attempted to immigrate to the US in 1926. Only my
grandmother boarded that ship in Danzig. My grandfather was rejected prior
to embarkation. He resided in a small town near Danzig until my grandmother
returned >from her "Vacation" in NY. My grandfather died of natural causes
in 1937 and my grandmother was able to finally immigrate to the US in 1938.

Sounds like your story may be similar. And, since the passenger manifests
were filled out prior to arrival in the US, your ancestor's name should be
in the index, even if he was subsequently deported.

Hope this helps,
Mark Halpern
West Conshohocken, PA

Searching: HALPERN, TENENBAUM, SASS, GRUNSEID, GORGEL -- Eastern Galician
towns of Tarnopol, Skalat, Plaucza Vielka, Kozlow, Urman, Petrikow


identity #belarus

JSelig3460@...
 

I accept Mr. Krauss' response as authoritative. It is unfair to use anecdotal
experience to make general claims.
Jerome Seligsohn
NYC


The final word on this subject, thank you.
Joanne Saltman, Moderator


Belarus SIG #Belarus identity #belarus

JSelig3460@...
 

I accept Mr. Krauss' response as authoritative. It is unfair to use anecdotal
experience to make general claims.
Jerome Seligsohn
NYC


The final word on this subject, thank you.
Joanne Saltman, Moderator


YIVO Landsmanshaften Bobruisk and Brest Litovsk [Brisker] #belarus

JSelig3460@...
 

The Reuben Guskin Brobroisker 206 Workman's Circle 1958-77 consisted of a
large ledger of proceedings all in Yiddish of meetings >from 1958-77. The one
name I could make out was a David Koff, Chairman of 2047 Holland Ave, Bx NY.
United Brisker Relief l916-1978 is a treasure of 20th century Jewish History
in Yiddish and English. It features the tragedies of the Belarussian Jewish
experience fro WWI through the Russian Civil War to the Holocaust and Israel.
It is rich in names, celebrities, pictures correspondence and the heroic
efforts of ordinary Jewish people attempting to help their less fortunate
brethren through a relief organization. Four boxes of material would need the
greatest efforts to bring this to the widest audience.
Having a Yiddish translator to help I would like to quote >from a letter
written in Yiddish to the organization. This took place with using YIVO's
dictionaries and librarians fighting their way through localisms and idioms.
It was written >from Brest Litovsk at Channukah 1919:
I can't write you everything that happened there but even a little bit of our
plight will be enough to elicit your pity,our good-hearted brethren. The city
is burned and destroyed.The city dwellers find themselves ruined to the
ground. The survivors don't even have a piece of bread. They find themselves
wet, naked and shoeless. The lucky ones can live in their relatives' houses.
It is obvious that life under such impossible circumstances leads to scary
sicknesses that shouldn't happen to any one, God Forbid![chas cholulyeh]. Our
eyes see it but we can't do anything to help. Hopefully,if these American
Jewish organizations hear about this they will distribute charity.[hospitals,
medical personnel and supplies]
The pictures alone deserve our attention. If you can get to the YIVO archive
to see these four boxes of materials do so. Unfortunately, archivists should
get to it before amateurs like me will wear away many of the fragile
materials.
Jerome Seligsohn
NYC


Belarus SIG #Belarus YIVO Landsmanshaften Bobruisk and Brest Litovsk [Brisker] #belarus

JSelig3460@...
 

The Reuben Guskin Brobroisker 206 Workman's Circle 1958-77 consisted of a
large ledger of proceedings all in Yiddish of meetings >from 1958-77. The one
name I could make out was a David Koff, Chairman of 2047 Holland Ave, Bx NY.
United Brisker Relief l916-1978 is a treasure of 20th century Jewish History
in Yiddish and English. It features the tragedies of the Belarussian Jewish
experience fro WWI through the Russian Civil War to the Holocaust and Israel.
It is rich in names, celebrities, pictures correspondence and the heroic
efforts of ordinary Jewish people attempting to help their less fortunate
brethren through a relief organization. Four boxes of material would need the
greatest efforts to bring this to the widest audience.
Having a Yiddish translator to help I would like to quote >from a letter
written in Yiddish to the organization. This took place with using YIVO's
dictionaries and librarians fighting their way through localisms and idioms.
It was written >from Brest Litovsk at Channukah 1919:
I can't write you everything that happened there but even a little bit of our
plight will be enough to elicit your pity,our good-hearted brethren. The city
is burned and destroyed.The city dwellers find themselves ruined to the
ground. The survivors don't even have a piece of bread. They find themselves
wet, naked and shoeless. The lucky ones can live in their relatives' houses.
It is obvious that life under such impossible circumstances leads to scary
sicknesses that shouldn't happen to any one, God Forbid![chas cholulyeh]. Our
eyes see it but we can't do anything to help. Hopefully,if these American
Jewish organizations hear about this they will distribute charity.[hospitals,
medical personnel and supplies]
The pictures alone deserve our attention. If you can get to the YIVO archive
to see these four boxes of materials do so. Unfortunately, archivists should
get to it before amateurs like me will wear away many of the fragile
materials.
Jerome Seligsohn
NYC


Re: e-m addr #belarus

Hal S. Maggied, Ph.D. <drmaggoo@...>
 

Shalom Khaverim & Londzleit & Cuzzinen: Does anyone have the latest
e-m addr for Usvyatsky, Ilya?
I did write to him after the initial msg. The last inter-net address
I have is: <ilyau@ncc.co.il>. It now, bounces.

This last month, I spotted a similar surname of a cuzzin I've been
trying to locate for years. He is Abe SANDLER a surname the
intermingles with my mischpokhe several places and generations. b.
1921 in Shavel Lithuania as Avrom SVIATSKI; immigrated to NYC 1946 -
migrated to Columbus, OH. 1947 with his Pop Srol who changed his name
to SVESK. Srol married widow of her cuzzin Avrom Yaisif POLING ->
Fyah YENKIN/POLING, his [Srol's] 1st cuzzin. {they believed in
keeping the assets within the family} Srol, b. Usvyaty around 1889 d.
South Bend, IN. 1954. all the given names in Ilya's mischpokhe
-including his- are prominent in our ancestries & descendancies. Any
help with Ilya?
Khai Tov, Hal S. Maggied, Ph.D.; Lauderhill, FL

The last message I have recorded states:
"Here is what he told me of his family tree:
Abraham and Baila Rivlin Usvyatsky children: Khaim, b. 1915 Vitebsk Itzkhak;
Joseph;
Itzhak and Joseph each had two daughters.
Khaim had one son, Ilya's father Arcady.
Ilya's family emigrated to Israel in 1991,
Khaim deceased in 1993,
Itzhak and Joseph lived in St. Petersburg; Itzhak passed away in 1990
and Joseph in 1996.

Abraham had several sisters and at least one brother and they moved
to the US around 1910's. He does not know their names and no one is
left for him to ask. Apparently,Abraham's marriage to Baila caused
conflict in the family and they stayed behind when the rest of the
family came to the US. There was no contact within the family after
the 1920s.

According to Ilya, the names Usvyat, Usvyatsky and Usvyatov
originated late in the 19th century when the Jews were ordered to
leave the town (ethnic cleansing goes way back, doesn't it?), and
some people took the name of the town as their family name.
Apparently, there were several big families with those names. Most of
the families moved to Ukraine (my ggm lived in Odessa) or Byelorussia.

Ilya mentioned that according to his late grandfather, there were
more Jews with the name before WWII, and that the name is seen very
seldom nowadays. He was quite surprised and pleased to hear >from
someone with the name in their family. Another nice thing he
mentioned was that even
though he now lives in Israel, he has no plans to Hebraicize the
name-- "probably, it's the only remembrance of once big Jewish
community that was first spreaded [sic] by Russians and then almost
eliminated by Natzies (sic)".
"I can't tell if our families are related yet or not based on current
information, but his ggf, Abraham (Avram) Usvyatsky had several
brothers and sisters who came to the US early this century, so I
thought it may be of interest to Mr. Brill and Dr. Maggied to
correspond with him as well to see if there are any matches in their
research."


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: e-m addr #belarus

Hal S. Maggied, Ph.D. <drmaggoo@...>
 

Shalom Khaverim & Londzleit & Cuzzinen: Does anyone have the latest
e-m addr for Usvyatsky, Ilya?
I did write to him after the initial msg. The last inter-net address
I have is: <ilyau@ncc.co.il>. It now, bounces.

This last month, I spotted a similar surname of a cuzzin I've been
trying to locate for years. He is Abe SANDLER a surname the
intermingles with my mischpokhe several places and generations. b.
1921 in Shavel Lithuania as Avrom SVIATSKI; immigrated to NYC 1946 -
migrated to Columbus, OH. 1947 with his Pop Srol who changed his name
to SVESK. Srol married widow of her cuzzin Avrom Yaisif POLING ->
Fyah YENKIN/POLING, his [Srol's] 1st cuzzin. {they believed in
keeping the assets within the family} Srol, b. Usvyaty around 1889 d.
South Bend, IN. 1954. all the given names in Ilya's mischpokhe
-including his- are prominent in our ancestries & descendancies. Any
help with Ilya?
Khai Tov, Hal S. Maggied, Ph.D.; Lauderhill, FL

The last message I have recorded states:
"Here is what he told me of his family tree:
Abraham and Baila Rivlin Usvyatsky children: Khaim, b. 1915 Vitebsk Itzkhak;
Joseph;
Itzhak and Joseph each had two daughters.
Khaim had one son, Ilya's father Arcady.
Ilya's family emigrated to Israel in 1991,
Khaim deceased in 1993,
Itzhak and Joseph lived in St. Petersburg; Itzhak passed away in 1990
and Joseph in 1996.

Abraham had several sisters and at least one brother and they moved
to the US around 1910's. He does not know their names and no one is
left for him to ask. Apparently,Abraham's marriage to Baila caused
conflict in the family and they stayed behind when the rest of the
family came to the US. There was no contact within the family after
the 1920s.

According to Ilya, the names Usvyat, Usvyatsky and Usvyatov
originated late in the 19th century when the Jews were ordered to
leave the town (ethnic cleansing goes way back, doesn't it?), and
some people took the name of the town as their family name.
Apparently, there were several big families with those names. Most of
the families moved to Ukraine (my ggm lived in Odessa) or Byelorussia.

Ilya mentioned that according to his late grandfather, there were
more Jews with the name before WWII, and that the name is seen very
seldom nowadays. He was quite surprised and pleased to hear >from
someone with the name in their family. Another nice thing he
mentioned was that even
though he now lives in Israel, he has no plans to Hebraicize the
name-- "probably, it's the only remembrance of once big Jewish
community that was first spreaded [sic] by Russians and then almost
eliminated by Natzies (sic)".
"I can't tell if our families are related yet or not based on current
information, but his ggf, Abraham (Avram) Usvyatsky had several
brothers and sisters who came to the US early this century, so I
thought it may be of interest to Mr. Brill and Dr. Maggied to
correspond with him as well to see if there are any matches in their
research."


Re: Mary Antin #belarus

theentins <theentins@...>
 

Greetings,

While it is true that many names were Anglicized when immigrants arrived
from Europe, especially Eastern Europe and especially those of Jewish
descent, the name Antin is a real Russian surname. Remember that until the
late 1700's early 1800's, the Russian empire Jews did not have surnames as
we know them today, hence David ben (son of) Samuel etc.

My great grandfather Gitel Entin >from Minsk had a brother named Max Antin.
Which brother had the correct spelling is arguable. Both Entin and Antin are
Russian surnames, not Anglicized. Polotsk where Mary Antin was born is a
town not far >from Minsk in Belarus. Obviously, Antin was not her Hebrew
name. Nor was Mary. But it was her Russian surname.

I have been led to believe that Mary Antin is a part of my extened
Entin/Antin family, although my research has not yet proven the connection .

Regards,

Jeff Entin

Reseaching:
ENTIN, Minsk, Belarus; BERLYAVSKY, Pereyaslav and Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine;
PERCICOVICH (HORVITZ), Butrimonys, Lithuania; BUBELSKY, Prienai, Lithuania;
LEVIN, Vilnius, Lithuania; SCHILANSKY, Mariampole and Siauliai, Lithuania;
LIPSCHITZ, Kaunas and Vilnius, Lithuania; UCHEVITZ, Vilnius, Lithuania,
KABATCHNICK , Lithuania; FALK, Lithuania


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Mary Antin #belarus

theentins <theentins@...>
 

Greetings,

While it is true that many names were Anglicized when immigrants arrived
from Europe, especially Eastern Europe and especially those of Jewish
descent, the name Antin is a real Russian surname. Remember that until the
late 1700's early 1800's, the Russian empire Jews did not have surnames as
we know them today, hence David ben (son of) Samuel etc.

My great grandfather Gitel Entin >from Minsk had a brother named Max Antin.
Which brother had the correct spelling is arguable. Both Entin and Antin are
Russian surnames, not Anglicized. Polotsk where Mary Antin was born is a
town not far >from Minsk in Belarus. Obviously, Antin was not her Hebrew
name. Nor was Mary. But it was her Russian surname.

I have been led to believe that Mary Antin is a part of my extened
Entin/Antin family, although my research has not yet proven the connection .

Regards,

Jeff Entin

Reseaching:
ENTIN, Minsk, Belarus; BERLYAVSKY, Pereyaslav and Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine;
PERCICOVICH (HORVITZ), Butrimonys, Lithuania; BUBELSKY, Prienai, Lithuania;
LEVIN, Vilnius, Lithuania; SCHILANSKY, Mariampole and Siauliai, Lithuania;
LIPSCHITZ, Kaunas and Vilnius, Lithuania; UCHEVITZ, Vilnius, Lithuania,
KABATCHNICK , Lithuania; FALK, Lithuania


Geneology from Borisov and Gomel #belarus

Florence Minkow <luau_2000@...>
 

I am in my 7th year researching my families: the MINKOV (now MINKOW and MINKOFF), the CASHDEN, the HODES and the WEINSTEIN family >from Borisov. Also the SHCOLNIK (WAS SHCOLNIKOW) >from Gomel. Information >from the passenger lists state Rose Minkow and five children left Borisov in 1911. Jacob Minkov her husband come two years prior. Morris Shcolnikow born in 1889 came in 190 per his passenger list. Any information on these families will be greatly appreciated. I will be glad to share what I have gathered. Thank you.

Florence Minkov

As requested many times, please tell us where you are from-just the state and country or the town also if possible.
Thank you,
Joanne Saltman, Moderator


Belarus SIG #Belarus Geneology from Borisov and Gomel #belarus

Florence Minkow <luau_2000@...>
 

I am in my 7th year researching my families: the MINKOV (now MINKOW and MINKOFF), the CASHDEN, the HODES and the WEINSTEIN family >from Borisov. Also the SHCOLNIK (WAS SHCOLNIKOW) >from Gomel. Information >from the passenger lists state Rose Minkow and five children left Borisov in 1911. Jacob Minkov her husband come two years prior. Morris Shcolnikow born in 1889 came in 190 per his passenger list. Any information on these families will be greatly appreciated. I will be glad to share what I have gathered. Thank you.

Florence Minkov

As requested many times, please tell us where you are from-just the state and country or the town also if possible.
Thank you,
Joanne Saltman, Moderator


Alexander as a jewish name #general

Leslie Reich <countrywide@...>
 

Date: 23 March 200
From: Leslie Reich

Judith Wegner wrote
" In the mid-19th century many Russian Jews named their sons Alexander in
appreciation of the relatively tolerant policies of Czar Alexander II
who succeeded to the throne in 1855 (that is, relative to the harsh
policies of his father and predecessor, Czar Nicholas I). That's why so
many Russian Jews and their descendants have the name Alexander.

People often assume that it has something to do with Alexander the
Great (it doesn't) or at least with the fact that some members of the
Hasmonean Dynasty who ruled Judaea in the 2nd century BCE had added the
Greek name Alexander to their Hebrew names (e.g. Alexander Jannai). While
the name Alexander seems to have been popular with the Jews of Judaea back
then, that fact has zip to do with the naming practices of 19th-century
Russian Jews (most of whom had certainly never heard of Alexander Jannai)."

I find most remarkable the prescience of 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th and early
19th Century parents (see over forty Rabbis >from these periods listed in
OtzarHarabbonim) in naming their children after a Russian Tsar, albeit less
cruel than his predecessors or successors, of the late 19th Century.

Leslie Reich,
Manchester

MODERATOR NOTE: This discussion has strayed away >from genealogy. Please
continue comments privately.


Re: KATZENELENBOGEN #general

yoni ben-ari <mrtfuzot@...>
 

There are dozens if not hundreds of individuals of the above family who are
mentioned in Dr. Rosenstein's "The Unbroken Chain". He actually starts out
with this family.

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem

----- Original Message -----
From: <JLSpector@aol.com>
To: JewishGen Discussion Group <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2000 4:13 AM
Subject: KATZENELENBOGEN


Over the past several months, there have been several, if not many,
questions posed to Jewishgen based on the KATZENELENBOGEN surname.
In my research in the Russian language Evreiskaya Encyclopedia (St.
Petersburg, 1907-13), I have just come across several references to
that name. They are located in Volume IX, columns 391 to 395. The
articles vary in length, but may include some valuable biographical
information for those interested in those names.

KATZENELENBOGEN: Ari Leib ben-Iosif, Avraam Abush, Avraam ben-David,
Avraam ben-Simha, Benyamin ben-Saul, Chaim ben Mosei, Chaim Leib,
David-Tevel, Ezekiel ben-Avraam, Girsh, Isaac ben-Mosei, Meir ben-Isaac,
Meir ben-Saul, Mosei ben-Saul, Naftali Girsh, Pinechas ben Mosei,
Pinechas ben-Mosei, Saul ben Iosef, Yakov, Yakov ben Pinchas, Yakov
Sholom.

Joel Spector,
Cherry Hill, NJ
(Jewish Genealogical Society of Philadelphia).

mailto:JLSpector@AOL.COM