Date   

Re: Marriages in the Austro-Hungarian Empire #hungary

AttilaRona@...
 

Hi,

This law was in force in Moravia to control the Jewish population. This law
forced most of them to get married in another country. Many came to Hungary.

Attila Rona


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Marriages in the Austro-Hungarian Empire #hungary

AttilaRona@...
 

Hi,

This law was in force in Moravia to control the Jewish population. This law
forced most of them to get married in another country. Many came to Hungary.

Attila Rona


Urgent Appeal Re: Artifacts from Bor Slave Labor Units #hungary

Bob Friedman <inwood@...>
 

Dear Fellow H-SIG Members,

The Museum of Jewish Heritage in NYC is planning to open an exhibit on
the Hungarian Labor Service early next year. Bonnie Gurewitsch, the
archivist who is curating the exhibit, specifically needs additional
materials on the units who were sent to work in the copper mines at
Bor, Yugoslavia (many of whom were later slaughtered during the
infamous Cservenka massacre).

If you have, or have access to, any artifacts relating to Bor, such as
work register-books ("Zsold konyv"), uniforms, photos, etc., please
send email to bgurewitsch@mjhnyc.org AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. Thanks!

You may also reach Bonnie by phone at (212) 968-1800 ext. 149, or by
fax at (212) 968-1368.

--Bob Friedman
inwood@pipeline.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Urgent Appeal Re: Artifacts from Bor Slave Labor Units #hungary

Bob Friedman <inwood@...>
 

Dear Fellow H-SIG Members,

The Museum of Jewish Heritage in NYC is planning to open an exhibit on
the Hungarian Labor Service early next year. Bonnie Gurewitsch, the
archivist who is curating the exhibit, specifically needs additional
materials on the units who were sent to work in the copper mines at
Bor, Yugoslavia (many of whom were later slaughtered during the
infamous Cservenka massacre).

If you have, or have access to, any artifacts relating to Bor, such as
work register-books ("Zsold konyv"), uniforms, photos, etc., please
send email to bgurewitsch@mjhnyc.org AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. Thanks!

You may also reach Bonnie by phone at (212) 968-1800 ext. 149, or by
fax at (212) 968-1368.

--Bob Friedman
inwood@pipeline.com


Getting family response #general

NTILL10123@...
 

I've had excellent luck in getting family response.I made it very easy for
them. I worked out a detailed questionnaire, wrote a nice letter and most
important enclosed a self addressed stamped emvelope.Your investment of 33
cents will pay off as it obligates the receiver. I also have made it clear
that what I'm doing is not only for us, those living today, but for the
future generations and to keep the family history alive. I also urge
youngesters to ask questions while the older generations are still here.

Norman Tillman Albany, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Getting family response #general

NTILL10123@...
 

I've had excellent luck in getting family response.I made it very easy for
them. I worked out a detailed questionnaire, wrote a nice letter and most
important enclosed a self addressed stamped emvelope.Your investment of 33
cents will pay off as it obligates the receiver. I also have made it clear
that what I'm doing is not only for us, those living today, but for the
future generations and to keep the family history alive. I also urge
youngesters to ask questions while the older generations are still here.

Norman Tillman Albany, NY


United Spichenitzer Relief (organization?) #ukraine

Mkfpage@...
 

Some of my family apparently came >from BORSHCHAGOVKA, 8.1 miles west of
Kiev. However, one of my mother's uncles received an award >from the United
Spichenitzer Relief. My realtives are under the impression he came >from
near-by Spichenitzer, which just isn't making it for me.

Does anyone have any information on the term Spichenitzer or the United
Spichenitzer Relief. I have photos of the award, so there's no doubt about
it.

Thanks


Mitch Mermel
Orlando, Fl
mkfpage@aol.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine United Spichenitzer Relief (organization?) #ukraine

Mkfpage@...
 

Some of my family apparently came >from BORSHCHAGOVKA, 8.1 miles west of
Kiev. However, one of my mother's uncles received an award >from the United
Spichenitzer Relief. My realtives are under the impression he came >from
near-by Spichenitzer, which just isn't making it for me.

Does anyone have any information on the term Spichenitzer or the United
Spichenitzer Relief. I have photos of the award, so there's no doubt about
it.

Thanks


Mitch Mermel
Orlando, Fl
mkfpage@aol.com


Marriages Records #hungary

Michele Sankar <sankosy@...>
 

Hello!

Now that I see marriage questions coming up, it reminds me of a dilemma
I have yet to solve. Perhaps someone out there might have some insight,
and I hope that this is the right forum to ask, given the nature of the
circumstances.

My greatgrandparents Rezso Glockner/Gabor (1887-1964) and Elli Winter
(1893-1967) were both born and raised Jewish. Their children (including
my paternal grandmother, the eldest, b. Feb. 1914), were baptised,
raised Catholic, and sent to Catholic boarding schools. As my
grandmother still denies her Jewish heritage and claims not to have
known that her parents were Jewish, this is a touchy subject and she
won't tell me anything.

I want to track down the marriage records for Rezso & Elli. I would
guess that they were married in 1912 or 1913. My grandmother claims not
to know where her parents were married, except that it was not in
Budapest. Rezso was >from Somogy county and Elli was >from Salgotarjan.

Should I assume that R & E formally converted to Christianity before
getting married and therefore be hunting church records across the
country? If they married Jewish and then made the change, would there
be records? Or, given the time period, would everything (marriage,
conversion) have been recorded civilly? Is it possible to access
records this recent >from Budapest archives? Is it possible to do
without knowing place names? I was hoping that the records would show
me where the marriage took place and in which religion. What can I get,
and where?!

In a much earlier letter to this group, I learned that some Jews
converted in the early part of the century for "political or social
acceptance." Now I'm wondering if it was difficult for someone Jewish
to convert (for marriage or otherwise) or did the church
welcome/encourage converts with open arms. Did other Hungarians fully
accept "known converts" or was it really no big deal to them? I guess
I'm still trying to get inside the heads of my ancestors to get beyond
just names and dates.

Apologies if this is not the kind of topic I should bring up here, but
pointers would be appreciated.

Many thanks!

Michele Sankar

Searching WINTER, SEIDNER (Salgotarjan & Sena), GLOCKNER, (Somogy),
WEINBERGER, FREUND (Baja)

mod.- Please, no apologies are necessary. This is the type of intriguing
situation which makes our forum dynamic, entertaining and educational.LS


Hungary SIG #Hungary Marriages Records #hungary

Michele Sankar <sankosy@...>
 

Hello!

Now that I see marriage questions coming up, it reminds me of a dilemma
I have yet to solve. Perhaps someone out there might have some insight,
and I hope that this is the right forum to ask, given the nature of the
circumstances.

My greatgrandparents Rezso Glockner/Gabor (1887-1964) and Elli Winter
(1893-1967) were both born and raised Jewish. Their children (including
my paternal grandmother, the eldest, b. Feb. 1914), were baptised,
raised Catholic, and sent to Catholic boarding schools. As my
grandmother still denies her Jewish heritage and claims not to have
known that her parents were Jewish, this is a touchy subject and she
won't tell me anything.

I want to track down the marriage records for Rezso & Elli. I would
guess that they were married in 1912 or 1913. My grandmother claims not
to know where her parents were married, except that it was not in
Budapest. Rezso was >from Somogy county and Elli was >from Salgotarjan.

Should I assume that R & E formally converted to Christianity before
getting married and therefore be hunting church records across the
country? If they married Jewish and then made the change, would there
be records? Or, given the time period, would everything (marriage,
conversion) have been recorded civilly? Is it possible to access
records this recent >from Budapest archives? Is it possible to do
without knowing place names? I was hoping that the records would show
me where the marriage took place and in which religion. What can I get,
and where?!

In a much earlier letter to this group, I learned that some Jews
converted in the early part of the century for "political or social
acceptance." Now I'm wondering if it was difficult for someone Jewish
to convert (for marriage or otherwise) or did the church
welcome/encourage converts with open arms. Did other Hungarians fully
accept "known converts" or was it really no big deal to them? I guess
I'm still trying to get inside the heads of my ancestors to get beyond
just names and dates.

Apologies if this is not the kind of topic I should bring up here, but
pointers would be appreciated.

Many thanks!

Michele Sankar

Searching WINTER, SEIDNER (Salgotarjan & Sena), GLOCKNER, (Somogy),
WEINBERGER, FREUND (Baja)

mod.- Please, no apologies are necessary. This is the type of intriguing
situation which makes our forum dynamic, entertaining and educational.LS


Re: Marriages in the Austro-Hungarian Empire #hungary

Peter I. Hidas <thidas@...>
 

I have a problem with this message. There were no Austro-Hungarian
laws. Hungary for example had its own corpus juris. The situation was
quite different in Moravia. Could you identify the law you are
referring to?

P.I.H.

Has anyone come across this situation in their research of Hungarian roots?

At 12:00 AM -0600 11/29/00, JewishGen Discussion Group digest wrote:
Subject: Re: Jewish Marriages
From: "Doug Cohen" <DMCohen@tiac.net>
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 21:33:52 -0500
X-Message-Number: 51

Under Austo-Hungarian law, only one marriage permit was issued per family,
and then only if a significant fee was paid. For instance, if a family had
five children, only one could legally be married.

The result is that a great many couples were married by a Rabbi "according
to the law of Moses and the traditions of Israel", but not according to the
law of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The marriage would therefore not be
recorded by the civil authorities.

Children of such couples would be listed in the Austro-Hungarian metrical
records as illegitimate.

Just another example of legal discrimination against Jews.

Doug Cohen
Lexington, MA
--
Dr. Peter I. Hidas
thidas@sympatico.ca
peterhidas@yahoo.com

At my home page you can find some of my writings:
www3.sympatico.ca/thidas


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Marriages in the Austro-Hungarian Empire #hungary

Peter I. Hidas <thidas@...>
 

I have a problem with this message. There were no Austro-Hungarian
laws. Hungary for example had its own corpus juris. The situation was
quite different in Moravia. Could you identify the law you are
referring to?

P.I.H.

Has anyone come across this situation in their research of Hungarian roots?

At 12:00 AM -0600 11/29/00, JewishGen Discussion Group digest wrote:
Subject: Re: Jewish Marriages
From: "Doug Cohen" <DMCohen@tiac.net>
Date: Tue, 28 Nov 2000 21:33:52 -0500
X-Message-Number: 51

Under Austo-Hungarian law, only one marriage permit was issued per family,
and then only if a significant fee was paid. For instance, if a family had
five children, only one could legally be married.

The result is that a great many couples were married by a Rabbi "according
to the law of Moses and the traditions of Israel", but not according to the
law of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The marriage would therefore not be
recorded by the civil authorities.

Children of such couples would be listed in the Austro-Hungarian metrical
records as illegitimate.

Just another example of legal discrimination against Jews.

Doug Cohen
Lexington, MA
--
Dr. Peter I. Hidas
thidas@sympatico.ca
peterhidas@yahoo.com

At my home page you can find some of my writings:
www3.sympatico.ca/thidas


Re: Need translation of ViewMate - File - VM118 Polish/Belorusyn #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Letter >from my grandfather Abraham Rafalowitz 1940,
circa. Arabic characters written in Polish/Belorusyn
combination ??? I need your help with translation.
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/
Because the body of the above message failed to state the VM number of the
photograph in question, I am betting that someone who would have liked to
help out may have dismissed the task as impossible. (It's pure accident
that in hitting "reply" to inform the poster of his crucial omission, I
saw the VM number only because the subject line automatically shows up at
the top of my reply screen.)

Some of us have complained before about people omitting essential facts
(usually the very surname or town they are researching!) because they think
it suffices to state it in the header alone. But it doesn't -- and here's
why: Although headers are usually shorter than messages, the maneuver of
ploughing through a header to discern the subject line often takes more
seconds than speedreading the message itself. Therefore, most readers
simply can't and won't waste valuable time on the header unless they have
first determined that the subject matter interests them. In this
particular case someone who might have been able to help the questioner
probably failed to do so because the VM number of the photograph did not
appear in the body of the message -- making lookup seem impossible!

Of about 100 jgen messages piled up at home during a recent trip, at
least five had failed to include the subject in the text of the message.
Extrapolating >from this random sample, it seems that 5% of jgen posters may
be wasting their own time as well as everyone else's, because their
messages get deleted immediately due to incomplete statement of subject
matter!

If we desire responses, we should have the courtesy to make our requests as
user-friendly as possible -- and that means stating the subject in the
message itself, not merely in the header.

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Need translation of ViewMate - File - VM118 Polish/Belorusyn #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Letter >from my grandfather Abraham Rafalowitz 1940,
circa. Arabic characters written in Polish/Belorusyn
combination ??? I need your help with translation.
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/
Because the body of the above message failed to state the VM number of the
photograph in question, I am betting that someone who would have liked to
help out may have dismissed the task as impossible. (It's pure accident
that in hitting "reply" to inform the poster of his crucial omission, I
saw the VM number only because the subject line automatically shows up at
the top of my reply screen.)

Some of us have complained before about people omitting essential facts
(usually the very surname or town they are researching!) because they think
it suffices to state it in the header alone. But it doesn't -- and here's
why: Although headers are usually shorter than messages, the maneuver of
ploughing through a header to discern the subject line often takes more
seconds than speedreading the message itself. Therefore, most readers
simply can't and won't waste valuable time on the header unless they have
first determined that the subject matter interests them. In this
particular case someone who might have been able to help the questioner
probably failed to do so because the VM number of the photograph did not
appear in the body of the message -- making lookup seem impossible!

Of about 100 jgen messages piled up at home during a recent trip, at
least five had failed to include the subject in the text of the message.
Extrapolating >from this random sample, it seems that 5% of jgen posters may
be wasting their own time as well as everyone else's, because their
messages get deleted immediately due to incomplete statement of subject
matter!

If we desire responses, we should have the courtesy to make our requests as
user-friendly as possible -- and that means stating the subject in the
message itself, not merely in the header.

Judith Romney Wegner


Skvirs and New Square #ukraine

Brandler Institute of Chasidic Thought <bict@...>
 

Dear Steve:

In my message I did state that "is indeed named after the city of Skver, it
is not an actual transplanted city."

When Grand Rabbi Yaakov Yosef Twersky Skver-Kolorash decided to establish a
"Shtetil" in America, we went to great lengths to ensure that it would
indeed be a faithful replica of an old Chasidic "Shtetil", therefore he
went to great lengths to obtain legal separation >from Spring Valley and even
named after the original hometown of his dynasty. To this very day it serves
as a an model for an original "Shtetil" as nearly all of its inhabitants are
indeed Skvira Chasidim and all are Torah Observant Jews.
While the community is famous for its hospitality to the Religious and
non-Religious alike, and many of its inhabitants commute to Manhattan where
they have wonderful relationships with people outside their group, at "home"
they can raise their children in the identical atmosphere of their
ancestors.

Abraham J. Heschel


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Skvirs and New Square #ukraine

Brandler Institute of Chasidic Thought <bict@...>
 

Dear Steve:

In my message I did state that "is indeed named after the city of Skver, it
is not an actual transplanted city."

When Grand Rabbi Yaakov Yosef Twersky Skver-Kolorash decided to establish a
"Shtetil" in America, we went to great lengths to ensure that it would
indeed be a faithful replica of an old Chasidic "Shtetil", therefore he
went to great lengths to obtain legal separation >from Spring Valley and even
named after the original hometown of his dynasty. To this very day it serves
as a an model for an original "Shtetil" as nearly all of its inhabitants are
indeed Skvira Chasidim and all are Torah Observant Jews.
While the community is famous for its hospitality to the Religious and
non-Religious alike, and many of its inhabitants commute to Manhattan where
they have wonderful relationships with people outside their group, at "home"
they can raise their children in the identical atmosphere of their
ancestors.

Abraham J. Heschel


Re: town/ship? #general

Drew Hershkowitz <dhershko@...>
 

I have located the 1920 census info for these 2 ancestors and they mention
they were born in Ogotza, Hungary. They were born in the 1860-1870 time.
Could this possibly be the same as Ochodza, Poland? I imagine they would
have left Europe >from Budapest?

Thanks

Drew Hershkowitz
dhershko@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: town/ship? #general

Drew Hershkowitz <dhershko@...>
 

I have located the 1920 census info for these 2 ancestors and they mention
they were born in Ogotza, Hungary. They were born in the 1860-1870 time.
Could this possibly be the same as Ochodza, Poland? I imagine they would
have left Europe >from Budapest?

Thanks

Drew Hershkowitz
dhershko@aol.com


Re: Jewish Athletes murdered in Holocaust #general

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Hello,

Just want to make people aware of a webpage I just created for
Jewish Athletes murdered in the Bialystok Ghetto. 15 Athletes
are listed. Here is the web address,

www.zabludow.com/Bialystokathletes.htm
Bialystok Athletes

Tilford Bartman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:Jewish Athletes murdered in Holocaust #general

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Hello,

Just want to make people aware of a webpage I just created for
Jewish Athletes murdered in the Bialystok Ghetto. 15 Athletes
are listed. Here is the web address,

www.zabludow.com/Bialystokathletes.htm
Bialystok Athletes

Tilford Bartman