Date   

Woman's name after a divorce #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

<< Does anyone know what the practice was in the Pale of Settlement
regarding a woman's name after a divorce. I recently discovered
that on a ship manifest, while immigrating to the US, my aunt was
travelling under her maiden name.
She had been married, but we are not sure whether she was divorced
or widowed. Would it have been the practice to revert to a maiden
name in either of these cases? And what about children, if they
stayed with the mother?>> (Posted on the Belarus SIG)

What an interesting question! I don't recall seeing this addressed before.
I have a passport of a relative >from Russia (Vilna Gubernia) who in 1893
came into the US. There are two names on the passport--hers and her
daughter.
The passport clearly states that she was a divorced woman traveling with
her daughter. She went by the name of Rosa UGER, and her daughter
travelled under the name of Chana Freda ROMBRO.

So, apparently, she reverted to her maiden name. Was this obligatory or
by choice? I don't know.

Carol Rombro Rider Baltimore, Maryland USA CRomRider@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Woman's name after a divorce #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

<< Does anyone know what the practice was in the Pale of Settlement
regarding a woman's name after a divorce. I recently discovered
that on a ship manifest, while immigrating to the US, my aunt was
travelling under her maiden name.
She had been married, but we are not sure whether she was divorced
or widowed. Would it have been the practice to revert to a maiden
name in either of these cases? And what about children, if they
stayed with the mother?>> (Posted on the Belarus SIG)

What an interesting question! I don't recall seeing this addressed before.
I have a passport of a relative >from Russia (Vilna Gubernia) who in 1893
came into the US. There are two names on the passport--hers and her
daughter.
The passport clearly states that she was a divorced woman traveling with
her daughter. She went by the name of Rosa UGER, and her daughter
travelled under the name of Chana Freda ROMBRO.

So, apparently, she reverted to her maiden name. Was this obligatory or
by choice? I don't know.

Carol Rombro Rider Baltimore, Maryland USA CRomRider@aol.com


Russian Laws of 1804 (#2) #belarus

Vcharny@...
 

For the first part look at the Belarus SIG digest Archives.

When you read laws and regulations regarding Jews in the Russian
Empire, consider the time and the place. There was no religious
and cultural tolerance on a modern scale between Christians and
Jews in society. There was almost no common ground between their
cultures, but only business relations that were a vital necessity.
Most Jewish teenagers, even in the mid nineteenth century, didn't
speak or understand well the Russian language.
It was almost impossible at that time (1804), in practice, to go
to a Russian school and remain a Jew. Only in 1854 did the first
schools open in the Russian Empire (Minsk and Vilno) that were
specially for Jewish children in that they taught some secular
subjects along with traditional Jewish education. Therefore,
although the part of the laws about education for Jews in Russian
institutions seemed beneficial, >from a Jewish point of view this
gave no real advantage but was another attempt at culturally and
educationally assimilating the Jews.

Now back to the document.

Regulations for Jews (translator's notes in parentheses):

I. About enlightenment.

1. All Jewish children may be accepted and taught, without any
differences >from other children, in all Russian public (elementary)
schools, gymnasiums (high school) and universities.

2. Jewish children, while attending school, cannot be diverted
from their religion under any circumstances, cannot be forced to
learn that which is adverse to their religion and even could
contradict their religion.

3. Jewish children attending parochial or uyezd (district) schools,
may wear Jewish dress, but those attending gymnasiums must wear
German or Polish [style] dress for the purpose of uniformity.

4. Jewish children will be accepted to St. Peterburg Academy of
Arts if they show talent and inclination. Then they must wear
German dress.

5. Those Jews who, by their ability, reach certain levels of
achievement in universities in Medicine, Surgery, Physics,
Mathematics and other fields, will be acknowledged and promoted
to university degrees on a level with all other Russian subjects.

6. In the case of Jews who, despite all these motivations, refuse
to send their children to common public schools, then there will be
established at their expense special schools for their children to
study, and necessary tax must be determined through government
consideration.(Taxes will be collected >from Jews to create public
Jewish schools under government control.) Among the subjects taught
must be one of these languages: Russian, Polish or German.

7. After six years have expired since the publication of this
regulation, all bookkeeping and other merchant's documentation and
correspondence between Jews must be written in one of these languages:
Russian, Polish or German, or contain a translation on one side [of
the page].

8. All Jews who reside in the Russian Empire have the right to
use their language in all matters related to their faith and in
everyday life. They must, beginning January 1, 1807, use Russian,
Polish or German languages in all public documents, deeds, bills
of exchange, bonds, obligations, etc. Without this, no any
documents will be accepted.

9. >from the time of [publishing] this regulation, anyone who
would like to be elected as a Member of Town Council >from among
the Jews in the gubernias incorporated >from Poland, for general
order and uniformity must wear Russian or Polish dress if they
do not like to wear German dress. In the Russian gubernias, where
Jews are permitted to live, in case of election to Town Council,
Jews must wear German dress. Beginning in 1808, no Jew will be
elected as a Member of Town Council who cannot read and write in
one of these languages: Russian, German or Polish.

10. >from the beginning of the year 1812, nobody can be elected or
appointed to any position in Kahal or the Rabbinate without being
literate in one of these designated languages.

With appreciation to Laura Benjaminson for her help.

Vitaly Charny
Birmingham, AL


Belarus SIG #Belarus Russian Laws of 1804 (#2) #belarus

Vcharny@...
 

For the first part look at the Belarus SIG digest Archives.

When you read laws and regulations regarding Jews in the Russian
Empire, consider the time and the place. There was no religious
and cultural tolerance on a modern scale between Christians and
Jews in society. There was almost no common ground between their
cultures, but only business relations that were a vital necessity.
Most Jewish teenagers, even in the mid nineteenth century, didn't
speak or understand well the Russian language.
It was almost impossible at that time (1804), in practice, to go
to a Russian school and remain a Jew. Only in 1854 did the first
schools open in the Russian Empire (Minsk and Vilno) that were
specially for Jewish children in that they taught some secular
subjects along with traditional Jewish education. Therefore,
although the part of the laws about education for Jews in Russian
institutions seemed beneficial, >from a Jewish point of view this
gave no real advantage but was another attempt at culturally and
educationally assimilating the Jews.

Now back to the document.

Regulations for Jews (translator's notes in parentheses):

I. About enlightenment.

1. All Jewish children may be accepted and taught, without any
differences >from other children, in all Russian public (elementary)
schools, gymnasiums (high school) and universities.

2. Jewish children, while attending school, cannot be diverted
from their religion under any circumstances, cannot be forced to
learn that which is adverse to their religion and even could
contradict their religion.

3. Jewish children attending parochial or uyezd (district) schools,
may wear Jewish dress, but those attending gymnasiums must wear
German or Polish [style] dress for the purpose of uniformity.

4. Jewish children will be accepted to St. Peterburg Academy of
Arts if they show talent and inclination. Then they must wear
German dress.

5. Those Jews who, by their ability, reach certain levels of
achievement in universities in Medicine, Surgery, Physics,
Mathematics and other fields, will be acknowledged and promoted
to university degrees on a level with all other Russian subjects.

6. In the case of Jews who, despite all these motivations, refuse
to send their children to common public schools, then there will be
established at their expense special schools for their children to
study, and necessary tax must be determined through government
consideration.(Taxes will be collected >from Jews to create public
Jewish schools under government control.) Among the subjects taught
must be one of these languages: Russian, Polish or German.

7. After six years have expired since the publication of this
regulation, all bookkeeping and other merchant's documentation and
correspondence between Jews must be written in one of these languages:
Russian, Polish or German, or contain a translation on one side [of
the page].

8. All Jews who reside in the Russian Empire have the right to
use their language in all matters related to their faith and in
everyday life. They must, beginning January 1, 1807, use Russian,
Polish or German languages in all public documents, deeds, bills
of exchange, bonds, obligations, etc. Without this, no any
documents will be accepted.

9. >from the time of [publishing] this regulation, anyone who
would like to be elected as a Member of Town Council >from among
the Jews in the gubernias incorporated >from Poland, for general
order and uniformity must wear Russian or Polish dress if they
do not like to wear German dress. In the Russian gubernias, where
Jews are permitted to live, in case of election to Town Council,
Jews must wear German dress. Beginning in 1808, no Jew will be
elected as a Member of Town Council who cannot read and write in
one of these languages: Russian, German or Polish.

10. >from the beginning of the year 1812, nobody can be elected or
appointed to any position in Kahal or the Rabbinate without being
literate in one of these designated languages.

With appreciation to Laura Benjaminson for her help.

Vitaly Charny
Birmingham, AL


Woman's name after a divorce #belarus

Carol Rombro Rider
 

<< Does anyone know what the practice was in the Pale of Settlement
regarding a woman's name after a divorce. I recently discovered
that on a ship manifest, while immigrating to the US, my aunt was
travelling under her maiden name.
She had been married, but we are not sure whether she was divorced
or widowed. Would it have been the practice to revert to a maiden
name in either of these cases? And what about children, if they
stayed with the mother?>>

What an interesting question! I don't recall seeing this addressed before.
I have a passport of a relative >from Russia (Vilna Gubernia) who in 1893 came
into the US. There are two names on the passport--hers and her daughter.
The passport clearly states that she was a divorced woman traveling with her
daughter. She went by the name of Rosa UGER, and her daughter travelled
under the name of Chana Freda ROMBRO.

So, apparently, she reverted to her maiden name. Was this obligatory or by
choice? I don't know.

Carol Rombro Rider Baltimore, Maryland USA CRomRider@aol.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus Woman's name after a divorce #belarus

Carol Rombro Rider
 

<< Does anyone know what the practice was in the Pale of Settlement
regarding a woman's name after a divorce. I recently discovered
that on a ship manifest, while immigrating to the US, my aunt was
travelling under her maiden name.
She had been married, but we are not sure whether she was divorced
or widowed. Would it have been the practice to revert to a maiden
name in either of these cases? And what about children, if they
stayed with the mother?>>

What an interesting question! I don't recall seeing this addressed before.
I have a passport of a relative >from Russia (Vilna Gubernia) who in 1893 came
into the US. There are two names on the passport--hers and her daughter.
The passport clearly states that she was a divorced woman traveling with her
daughter. She went by the name of Rosa UGER, and her daughter travelled
under the name of Chana Freda ROMBRO.

So, apparently, she reverted to her maiden name. Was this obligatory or by
choice? I don't know.

Carol Rombro Rider Baltimore, Maryland USA CRomRider@aol.com


Re: old telefon directories in France #general

Lifshitz-Krams Anne
 

According to France Telecom, the only place to see all the collection of
old telephone books is the Bibliotheque Francois Mitterand (National
Library).
In Paris Archives, there are only the "Bottin" or other professional lists.
I just had a telephone call with the specialized archivist in the
Bibliotheque Administrative de la ville de Paris, in Hotel de Ville
(Administrative Library of Paris), she told me that they have an incomplete
paper collection of the telephone books for Paris >from 1921 and for the
suburbs >from 1970. There are no books for 1940-1944. According to her it
has not been microfilmed by the Mormons (but maybe she is mistaking?)
She also told me that France Telecom will open at the end of the year 2000
a documentation center where it will be possible to consult the entire
collection >from the begining for all France. I don't know if it will be on
paper, microfilms or computerized.
Anne Lifshitz-Krams
Cercle de Genealogie Juive, Paris, France
http://www.genealoj.org

Jan Bousse <boussejan@pandora.be@telenet-ops.be> a écrit dans le message :
3A2CC015.31CA63FD@pandora.be...
If I understand Marie Lubman correctly, she is interested in telephone
directories in France >from the 1930s.
I found that the Bibliothèque Nationale de France at Tolbiac,
Paris, has, on microfilm, all the telephone books of France

I would be interested to know more about the collection at the Hotel de
Ville de Paris, as mentioned by Micheline Gutmann. Are they as complete,
in paper or also on microfilm? I hope Micheline could enlighten me and
the List. Thanks.

Jan Bousse, Oostende, Belgium.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: old telefon directories in France #general

Lifshitz-Krams Anne
 

According to France Telecom, the only place to see all the collection of
old telephone books is the Bibliotheque Francois Mitterand (National
Library).
In Paris Archives, there are only the "Bottin" or other professional lists.
I just had a telephone call with the specialized archivist in the
Bibliotheque Administrative de la ville de Paris, in Hotel de Ville
(Administrative Library of Paris), she told me that they have an incomplete
paper collection of the telephone books for Paris >from 1921 and for the
suburbs >from 1970. There are no books for 1940-1944. According to her it
has not been microfilmed by the Mormons (but maybe she is mistaking?)
She also told me that France Telecom will open at the end of the year 2000
a documentation center where it will be possible to consult the entire
collection >from the begining for all France. I don't know if it will be on
paper, microfilms or computerized.
Anne Lifshitz-Krams
Cercle de Genealogie Juive, Paris, France
http://www.genealoj.org

Jan Bousse <boussejan@pandora.be@telenet-ops.be> a écrit dans le message :
3A2CC015.31CA63FD@pandora.be...
If I understand Marie Lubman correctly, she is interested in telephone
directories in France >from the 1930s.
I found that the Bibliothèque Nationale de France at Tolbiac,
Paris, has, on microfilm, all the telephone books of France

I would be interested to know more about the collection at the Hotel de
Ville de Paris, as mentioned by Micheline Gutmann. Are they as complete,
in paper or also on microfilm? I hope Micheline could enlighten me and
the List. Thanks.

Jan Bousse, Oostende, Belgium.


Foreign Characters in Windows #general

Gary Luke <feraltek@...>
 

Is there a site with instructions and/or hot keys for typing European
characters in Windows programmes - particularly Czech, Hungarian, Polish &
German.

Thanks for any help
Gary

Gary Luke
feraltek@zeta.org.au
Sydney, Australia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Foreign Characters in Windows #general

Gary Luke <feraltek@...>
 

Is there a site with instructions and/or hot keys for typing European
characters in Windows programmes - particularly Czech, Hungarian, Polish &
German.

Thanks for any help
Gary

Gary Luke
feraltek@zeta.org.au
Sydney, Australia


Re: Kultusbeamter #general

ROBERT WEISS
 

In a message dated 12/5/00 10:24:15 PM, jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:

<< Subject: Kultusbeamter
From: Fritz Neubauer <Fritz.Neubauer@Uni-Bielefeld.de>
Date: Tue, 05 Dec 2000 13:57:40 +0100
X-Message-Number: 7

Jack wrote:
My Cousin was called the "Kultusbeamter" of Speyer in the 1930's.
Does anyone know just what a "Kultusbeamter" and, therefore, a
"Kultusamt" was?
Stan wrote: (with my comments in between)
"Beamter" means "an official".
I agree, although in German it also implies a life-time job for the
state.

"Kultus" is "a cult". For German,
Judaism s a cult. I make it, then, that your cousin was an official
of his congregation, e.g. the gabai.
This may be wrong. There is a resemblance to the word "Kult", but in the
context of Kultusbeamter I see more a connection to the area of the
education ministry or local school district administration. Even today
in modern Germany, the state ministries for schools (education is under
the rule of individual states since 1945) are "Kultusministerien" and
the school minister today even in Bavaria is called the "Kultusminister"
who obviously has absolutely nothing to do with Jews. The person in
question may have worked in a local school district administration.
The only connection between "Kultus" and Jews is in the word
"Kultusgemeinde" which explicitly refers to the local Jewish community.

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany >>

My Collins German Dictionary, 1988 says:

"Kultusbeamte(r): Synagogue Official"

Bob Weiss in Northridge, CA
RWeissJGS@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Kultusbeamter #general

ROBERT WEISS
 

In a message dated 12/5/00 10:24:15 PM, jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:

<< Subject: Kultusbeamter
From: Fritz Neubauer <Fritz.Neubauer@Uni-Bielefeld.de>
Date: Tue, 05 Dec 2000 13:57:40 +0100
X-Message-Number: 7

Jack wrote:
My Cousin was called the "Kultusbeamter" of Speyer in the 1930's.
Does anyone know just what a "Kultusbeamter" and, therefore, a
"Kultusamt" was?
Stan wrote: (with my comments in between)
"Beamter" means "an official".
I agree, although in German it also implies a life-time job for the
state.

"Kultus" is "a cult". For German,
Judaism s a cult. I make it, then, that your cousin was an official
of his congregation, e.g. the gabai.
This may be wrong. There is a resemblance to the word "Kult", but in the
context of Kultusbeamter I see more a connection to the area of the
education ministry or local school district administration. Even today
in modern Germany, the state ministries for schools (education is under
the rule of individual states since 1945) are "Kultusministerien" and
the school minister today even in Bavaria is called the "Kultusminister"
who obviously has absolutely nothing to do with Jews. The person in
question may have worked in a local school district administration.
The only connection between "Kultus" and Jews is in the word
"Kultusgemeinde" which explicitly refers to the local Jewish community.

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany >>

My Collins German Dictionary, 1988 says:

"Kultusbeamte(r): Synagogue Official"

Bob Weiss in Northridge, CA
RWeissJGS@aol.com


JGSLA December Meeting #general

Jan Meisels Allen <janmallen@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles will present a program on :

Jewish Roots In Los Angeles: The Impact of Jews on Los Angeles-- Pioneer
Life to Suburbia--The Movies to Politics. The speaker is Jerry Freedman
Habush: public affairs consultant specializing in community and media
relations. Mr. Habush teaches Jewish history and government affairs in
community colleges, high schools and adult education settings. He conducts
tours of "Jewish Los Angeles" for the Jewish Historical Society, the
University of Judaism and other organizations.

Beginning at 7:00 p.m. there will be a pre-meeting discussion: Breaking
Through Brick Walls: Things to Do When You Are Stuck in Your Genealogy
Research. The discussion Leader will be Hal Bookbinder- Vice President of
IAJGS and a former president of JGSLA.

The meeting will be on Monday, December 18, 2000 beginning at 7:00 p.m.for
the pre-meeting discussion and the regular meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m.
The meeting is being held at the Skirball Cultural Center, Haas Conference
Center 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90049

There is no fee and non-members are welcome.

For more information on the JGSLA please visit our website: http://
www.jgsla.org


Jan Meisels Allen
JGSLA Publicity Chairperson


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSLA December Meeting #general

Jan Meisels Allen <janmallen@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles will present a program on :

Jewish Roots In Los Angeles: The Impact of Jews on Los Angeles-- Pioneer
Life to Suburbia--The Movies to Politics. The speaker is Jerry Freedman
Habush: public affairs consultant specializing in community and media
relations. Mr. Habush teaches Jewish history and government affairs in
community colleges, high schools and adult education settings. He conducts
tours of "Jewish Los Angeles" for the Jewish Historical Society, the
University of Judaism and other organizations.

Beginning at 7:00 p.m. there will be a pre-meeting discussion: Breaking
Through Brick Walls: Things to Do When You Are Stuck in Your Genealogy
Research. The discussion Leader will be Hal Bookbinder- Vice President of
IAJGS and a former president of JGSLA.

The meeting will be on Monday, December 18, 2000 beginning at 7:00 p.m.for
the pre-meeting discussion and the regular meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m.
The meeting is being held at the Skirball Cultural Center, Haas Conference
Center 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90049

There is no fee and non-members are welcome.

For more information on the JGSLA please visit our website: http://
www.jgsla.org


Jan Meisels Allen
JGSLA Publicity Chairperson


Re: My Grandfather Israel Wulfow #ciechanow #poland

A Jendrzejewski <ajend@...>
 


What is the significance of the "owicz?"
Owicz is one of the several Polish suffixes meaning
"son of".


#Ciechanow #Poland Re: My Grandfather Israel Wulfow #ciechanow #poland

A Jendrzejewski <ajend@...>
 


What is the significance of the "owicz?"
Owicz is one of the several Polish suffixes meaning
"son of".


Re: rokonstein,etc..... #hungary

AttilaRona@...
 

Thanks! It was fantastic. All three were about my GGGF. Although, one of them I knew.

Thanks again. It is a great place for search.

Attila

mod.- I have no recall about this. But any message that has this much
praise shouldn't be dismissed.LS


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: rokonstein,etc..... #hungary

AttilaRona@...
 

Thanks! It was fantastic. All three were about my GGGF. Although, one of them I knew.

Thanks again. It is a great place for search.

Attila

mod.- I have no recall about this. But any message that has this much
praise shouldn't be dismissed.LS


A success story via serendipity #hungary

Dolph Klein <kledolph@...>
 

I want to share this story to illustrate how a bit of mazel played a key
role in discovering a family group that was completely unknown to me. At
the end of this story, I will also point out some differences between vital
records obtained >from Vienna and those >from the Family HIstory Library.

Three years ago, I saw the name of a Helene Klein on a 1903 passenger ship
manifest >from New York. I had not seen this name before, but there was some
clues that suggested Helene might be related to my family. Further research
failed to find further information about her activities in the States until
earlier this year when my Israeli son, Robert, saw her name mentioned in a
witness sheet submitted to Yad Vashem by my uncle in 1955. We still could
not discern >from the witness sheet the relationship of Helene to my uncle
or to the family. Helene and her husband were mentioned as the parents of
the Holocaust victim, Olga, who was born in Vienna in 1913. Apparently,
Helene returned to Europe, got married, and settled in Vienna with her
husband.

Robert contacted the archives in Vienna and received information of
Helene's death in 1933, her husband's death in 1938, Olga's birth, her
deportation to Minsk in 1942, and the birth in 1921 of her brother,
Leopold, who "disappeared" after 1938. Surely, we thought, this was the
end of the line for researching this family group. Nevertheless, the data
from Vienna added to the suggestion that Helene was linked to our family.
There were indications that Helene was originally >from western Slovakia,
the same region as that of my ancestors.

Expecting a negative response, I e-mailed Vienna and asked for probate
records on Helene and/or her husband. I was surprised when a copy of
Helene's probate record arrived by mail. >from this record I learned that
Helene had a married sister, Kathe, living in Vienna. Once again, I
contacted Vienna and asked for records on Kathe, her husband, and children
if any. The initial response >from Vienna was that they were not able to
find such information. This occurred last June. Five months later, I
received a letter >from Vienna giving me the vital information, not only on
Kathe and her husband, but also about their two sons, Max and Ernst.
All four were reported by Vienna to have emigrated to America in 1938-39!

Since both sons would now be in their late 80's, I promptly searched the
SSDI and found nothing. Were they still alive? Armed only with their names
and birth dates, I utilized the web site, anybirthday.com. This site is
based on public records and allows one to search for birthdates given a
name and location. Since I had no idea of location, I simply entered the
names and compared the results with the dates I had in hand. I found Max
living in Mississippi. Using the Internet phone directory, I called and
spoke to his wife who confirmed the information that I had about Max and
his family. Max was not at home at the time.

Not only is Max alive and well, so is his brother, Ernst, who is living
with his wife in North Carolina just 50 miles >from my home! In the course
of my conversation with Max's wife, she remarked how nice it was to learn
that Max and Ersnt have family here in the States other than a cousin with
whom they have been in constant touch. "Who is this cousin?", I asked. I
was shocked when she told me it was Leopold, Helene's son. He had emigrated
here in 1939 and was now living in New York with his wife.

I spoke to all three men and we delighted in sharing memories about the
family and our connections. The trail >from the 1903 ship manifest to Yad
Vashem, Vienna, and the Internet was a wonderous adventure thanks to
Helene's probate record. Without this document, I probably would never
have discovered the existence of yet another branch of our family tree. It
turns out that Helene, sister Kathe, and their siblings were the children
of my grandfather's oldest brother, Jakob.

Regarding the archives of Vienna, I have nothing but praise for their
program and eagerness to provide as much information as they can possibly
find. I received documents >from them that I know I would not have been able
to find through other means. However, I should caution the reader to look
elsewhere for vital records pertaining to Vienna in addition to obtaining
such records directly >from Vienna. The FHL has microfilms of births,
marriages, and deaths in Vienna >from about 1826-1938. For example, I
compared the birth records of Olga and Leopold >from FHL with those from
Vienna, and found that Vienna had omitted a number of interesting pieces of
information. These omissions had no effect on the outcome of my research,
but it was interesting to see that the original documents as seen on the
FHL microfilms had Nazi annotations dated in 1939. I presume these birth
records were being used by the Nazis to identify the Jews of Vienna and
their whereabouts.

The sad story about Olga is that she had the opportunity to leave with
Leopold when he emigrated to the U.S in mid-1939. She turned down the offer
because she had a boyfriend who soon afterwards jilted her. By the time she
sought permission to emigrate, it was too late.

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, NC


Re: My Grandfather Israel Wulfow #ciechanow #poland

Jonathan Goldmacher <JGoldmacher@...>
 

Majer is the son of Mosek.

Mosek is the son of Mortko.

"ggold" <ggold@tennesseelawyer.com> 12/05/00 09:53PM >>>
This list is supported by JewishGen. Please show
your appreciation and support by visiting
http://www.jewishgen.org/Jewishgen-erosity/=20
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The groom is Majer Bursztyn, son of Mosek (son of Mortko) and Chaja Sura
(daughter of Wolf). Majer was 19 when the marriage was reported in
Ciechanow during 1836. No information on the bride appears in the index =
but
will in the actual record.

Regards,

Jonathan Goldmacher

With regard to "Mosek Mortkowicz," is Majer the son of Mosek and Mosek the
son of Mortko, or is Mosek and Mortko the same?

Regards,

Gary Goldstein




"A Jendrzejewski" <ajend@vincennes.net> 12/05/00 10:10AM >>>
This list is supported by JewishGen. Please show
your appreciation and support by visiting
http://www.jewishgen.org/Jewishgen-erosity/=20
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ah! I checked the main Ciechanow page and the "Type
M" does stand for "marriage records".

So I am also confused by the headings at the top of
the table.
SURNAME: BURSZTYN
GIVEN NAMES: Majer
AKT: 2
FATHER: Mosek Mortkowicz
MOTHER: Chaja Sura Wolfow
AGE: 19
TOWN: Ciechanow
YEAR: 1836
TYPE: M
FILM: 702466

This does not make it clear who the bride and groom
are. Mosek and Chaja are listed as parents, but
chaja is only 19!

Andy


----- Original Message -----
From: "Marti Wulfow Garner" <wulfow@mindspring.com>
To: "Ciechanow Research Group"
<ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Monday, December 04, 2000 11:13 PM
Subject: My Grandfather Israel Wulfow


This list is supported by JewishGen. Please show
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I was very suprised to see the surname Wulfow
listed in some of the
Ciechanow lists. The only Wulfows I know are my
fathers brothers and their
wives and children. My grandfather left Russia to
avoid serving in the
Czar's army. This was prior to 1910. I know this
date because my
grandfather's brother and his twin sons came for a
visit and then went back.
This is the last we heard >from them. This
greatuncle supposedly went back
because his wife did not wish to leave her
belongings behind which she would
have had to done to emigrate.

Does anyone know why I might have found my surname
in the lists located at
www.firstport.com/ciechanow/m1836-40.htm and what
this means. I am
clueless.
Thanks for any help
Marti Wulfow Garner


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