Date   

Gesher Galicia NYC Meeting - Oct. 21, 2007 - 11:30 a.m. #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

To all Galitizianers!

We are pleased to announce the fourth annual Gesher Galicia regional
meeting to be held in New York City this fall:

Sunday, October 21st >from 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
at the Center for Jewish History at 15 West 16th Street.

Our program will include a report on the Lviv archives cadastral map
and homeowner/landowner records project, JRI-Poland update, shtetl
trip/cemetery restoration report by Linda Cantor, Daniel Mendelsohn's
Bolechow Jewish Heritage Society (BJHS) report by Joan Adler, and a
screening of the short film "Past Lives: The Stanley Diamond Story."

from 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. informal Galician town and region research
groups and birds-of-a-feather networking will take place over lunch.

At 2:00 p.m., as part of the JGSNY main program, Susana Bloch will
discuss: "Recreating your Shtetl - Why and How," which will explain
how to create a group and website dedicated to your ancestral towns.

More program details will be forthcoming soon, but if you are
interested in coordinating or leading a town or region research group
BOF this day, during the lunch-hour time slot, please get in touch
with me.

Mark your calendars now! This meeting is free of charge and we hope
to see many Galician researchers there.

Our website: http://www.GesherGalicia.org

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia Research Coordinator
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Gesher Galicia NYC Meeting - Oct. 21, 2007 - 11:30 a.m. #galicia

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

To all Galitizianers!

We are pleased to announce the fourth annual Gesher Galicia regional
meeting to be held in New York City this fall:

Sunday, October 21st >from 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
at the Center for Jewish History at 15 West 16th Street.

Our program will include a report on the Lviv archives cadastral map
and homeowner/landowner records project, JRI-Poland update, shtetl
trip/cemetery restoration report by Linda Cantor, Daniel Mendelsohn's
Bolechow Jewish Heritage Society (BJHS) report by Joan Adler, and a
screening of the short film "Past Lives: The Stanley Diamond Story."

from 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. informal Galician town and region research
groups and birds-of-a-feather networking will take place over lunch.

At 2:00 p.m., as part of the JGSNY main program, Susana Bloch will
discuss: "Recreating your Shtetl - Why and How," which will explain
how to create a group and website dedicated to your ancestral towns.

More program details will be forthcoming soon, but if you are
interested in coordinating or leading a town or region research group
BOF this day, during the lunch-hour time slot, please get in touch
with me.

Mark your calendars now! This meeting is free of charge and we hope
to see many Galician researchers there.

Our website: http://www.GesherGalicia.org

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia Research Coordinator
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Re: The Hebrew name Sara and the Yiddish name Sura #ukraine

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Joseph Laden posted as follows on the Ukraine mailing list:

"I'm sorry that you feel that my premise is in error
but experience shows otherwise. With just a basic
familiarity of Jewish naming practices one only has to
spend five minutes looking through photocopies of
original ships' manifests to see what I'm saying. I
invite you to do that. BTW, the name Sara can be
pronounced, as my grandmother did, Soo-rah, with a
slight variance on the "r". The point I made was that
Sure is also a possible phonetic spelling, but not one
that we would ordinarily expect to see, yet that was
the way she was listed on the manifest. Spelling
variations need to be considered when searching for
relatives. That's why the Soundex search with the
Ellis Island data is so useful."

There is a basic difference between names like Sara and Sura (both
transliterated >from the names written originally in Hebrew letters). Sara
is a Hebrew name, originally coming >from the Jewish Bible and is considered
to be a holy name, since it was written in the holy Bible itself. On the
other hand, the name Sura is a Yiddish name (written in Hebrew characters,
just as was the Hebrew name Sara) which Jews consider to be a secular name
-- and therefor NOT a holy name.

The language Yiddish, while very beautiful and expressive (called Mama
Lashon (Mother Language) in Yiddish) has never been considered to be a holy
language, but just another secular language like German, Russian,
Lithuanian, and other European languages (but it was OUR secular
language!). By Jewish law and custom, the Hebrew name Sara may never be
written in Hebrew in any form except the one found in the Jewish Bible,
while Jewish law has no limitations on how Yiddish names may be spelled
when written down -- they may be spelled or miss-spelled as you will.

And in fact, the Yiddish name Sura was a name which was used considerably
in Europe, and particularly in the Ukraine by Jews. In fact, this name was
a Yiddish name used with statistical significance in Ukraine, while the
similarly-pronounced Russian version of the name Sara was also widely used
(i.e., statistically significant) in Ukraine, as well as in Russia
itself. There are logical explanations for why we find certain name
spellings used extensively in archival records, and in the case of Sura, it
turns out that it *is* a name that we should expect to find in Ukrainian
archival data bases.

Thus, the *pronunciation* "Sura" could come >from several different
sources. This includes its having been written down by a Ukrainian or
Russian civil servant who *heard* the Yiddish name pronounced that way, but
wrote it down in Ukrainian or Russian letters, i.e., in
transliteration; this did not make it a Ukrainian or Russian name, but
rather a transliterated Yiddish name. Just as the Given Names Data Bases
provide Jewish given names in transliteration to English characters, civil
servants in European countries also used that procedure to make Yiddish
names more accessible to readers of the archival document which they were
preparing.

I suggest that persons interested in exploring the above thoughts
themselves, should visit the JewishGen Given Names Data Bases web site and
search for the name "Sara" (without the quotation marks), using Global Text
Search, at the following web site:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

The inclusion (or non-inclusion) of entries in the GNDBs was based on
statistical analysis of the frequencies of occurrence of the names in the
European countries.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: The Hebrew name Sara and the Yiddish name Sura #ukraine

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Joseph Laden posted as follows on the Ukraine mailing list:

"I'm sorry that you feel that my premise is in error
but experience shows otherwise. With just a basic
familiarity of Jewish naming practices one only has to
spend five minutes looking through photocopies of
original ships' manifests to see what I'm saying. I
invite you to do that. BTW, the name Sara can be
pronounced, as my grandmother did, Soo-rah, with a
slight variance on the "r". The point I made was that
Sure is also a possible phonetic spelling, but not one
that we would ordinarily expect to see, yet that was
the way she was listed on the manifest. Spelling
variations need to be considered when searching for
relatives. That's why the Soundex search with the
Ellis Island data is so useful."

There is a basic difference between names like Sara and Sura (both
transliterated >from the names written originally in Hebrew letters). Sara
is a Hebrew name, originally coming >from the Jewish Bible and is considered
to be a holy name, since it was written in the holy Bible itself. On the
other hand, the name Sura is a Yiddish name (written in Hebrew characters,
just as was the Hebrew name Sara) which Jews consider to be a secular name
-- and therefor NOT a holy name.

The language Yiddish, while very beautiful and expressive (called Mama
Lashon (Mother Language) in Yiddish) has never been considered to be a holy
language, but just another secular language like German, Russian,
Lithuanian, and other European languages (but it was OUR secular
language!). By Jewish law and custom, the Hebrew name Sara may never be
written in Hebrew in any form except the one found in the Jewish Bible,
while Jewish law has no limitations on how Yiddish names may be spelled
when written down -- they may be spelled or miss-spelled as you will.

And in fact, the Yiddish name Sura was a name which was used considerably
in Europe, and particularly in the Ukraine by Jews. In fact, this name was
a Yiddish name used with statistical significance in Ukraine, while the
similarly-pronounced Russian version of the name Sara was also widely used
(i.e., statistically significant) in Ukraine, as well as in Russia
itself. There are logical explanations for why we find certain name
spellings used extensively in archival records, and in the case of Sura, it
turns out that it *is* a name that we should expect to find in Ukrainian
archival data bases.

Thus, the *pronunciation* "Sura" could come >from several different
sources. This includes its having been written down by a Ukrainian or
Russian civil servant who *heard* the Yiddish name pronounced that way, but
wrote it down in Ukrainian or Russian letters, i.e., in
transliteration; this did not make it a Ukrainian or Russian name, but
rather a transliterated Yiddish name. Just as the Given Names Data Bases
provide Jewish given names in transliteration to English characters, civil
servants in European countries also used that procedure to make Yiddish
names more accessible to readers of the archival document which they were
preparing.

I suggest that persons interested in exploring the above thoughts
themselves, should visit the JewishGen Given Names Data Bases web site and
search for the name "Sara" (without the quotation marks), using Global Text
Search, at the following web site:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

The inclusion (or non-inclusion) of entries in the GNDBs was based on
statistical analysis of the frequencies of occurrence of the names in the
European countries.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


looking for Leopold ISAACS Family #usa

WChurch520@...
 

I am looking for Leopold ISAACS family born in 1870 in New York City,
Father's name, Henry born 1833 Leeds England. Mothers Jeanie born 1837 born in
France. Had four sisters, Amelia, Rachel, Isbella and Rebecca.
Father died in New York City 1886.

Donn Church Berkeley Calif. WChurch520@aol.com


Early American SIG #USA looking for Leopold ISAACS Family #usa

WChurch520@...
 

I am looking for Leopold ISAACS family born in 1870 in New York City,
Father's name, Henry born 1833 Leeds England. Mothers Jeanie born 1837 born in
France. Had four sisters, Amelia, Rachel, Isbella and Rebecca.
Father died in New York City 1886.

Donn Church Berkeley Calif. WChurch520@aol.com


Arthur Obermayer honored for German Jewish History Award #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

Another GerSIG founder has received recognition for his work in German
Jewish genealogy and history. Arthur Obermayer will be honored at a
ceremony on Thursday, September 6, 2007, at 6 pm at the Temple Shalom,
175 Temple Street, Newton, Mass. 02465 (near Boston).

He will be awarded the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of
Germany in recognition of his sponsorship of the Obermayer German
Jewish History Awards.

Details are included in a news release >from the German Consulate in Boston.

E-Mail: consulgeneral@bost.diplo.de
Website: www.germany.info/boston

office of the Consul General
Three Copley Place, Suite 500, Boston, MA 02116, USA

To receive a summary of the press release in PDF format send email to:
GerSIGmod@gmail.com Subject: Send Obermayer News Release
No other text is required in your email request.

John Paul Lowens, Suburban NYC <gersigmod@gmail.com>


German SIG #Germany Arthur Obermayer honored for German Jewish History Award #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

Another GerSIG founder has received recognition for his work in German
Jewish genealogy and history. Arthur Obermayer will be honored at a
ceremony on Thursday, September 6, 2007, at 6 pm at the Temple Shalom,
175 Temple Street, Newton, Mass. 02465 (near Boston).

He will be awarded the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of
Germany in recognition of his sponsorship of the Obermayer German
Jewish History Awards.

Details are included in a news release >from the German Consulate in Boston.

E-Mail: consulgeneral@bost.diplo.de
Website: www.germany.info/boston

office of the Consul General
Three Copley Place, Suite 500, Boston, MA 02116, USA

To receive a summary of the press release in PDF format send email to:
GerSIGmod@gmail.com Subject: Send Obermayer News Release
No other text is required in your email request.

John Paul Lowens, Suburban NYC <gersigmod@gmail.com>


GerSIG's Karen Franklin on art restitution in Jerusalem Post #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

GerSIG Coordinator Karen S. Franklin is featured in a Jerusalem Post
article on how genealogy resources help accomplish looted art restitution.

Based in part on Ms. Franklin's lectures at the Salt Lake City 2007
Conference, the article says:

"Genealogy is not just about the names of dead people on a list, or
DNA or Holocaust victims, it is now also about art restitution. Online
resources used to solve cases include JewishGen, ProQuest, maps, Yad
Vashem, the Leo Baeck archives, the Center for Jewish History,
newspaper obituaries and other life cycle announcements (engagements,
marriages), Ancestry and even eBay. Art restitution today utilizes
three approaches: international and genealogical collaboration as well
as artifact exhibits. "

The full text is available (in English) as follows:

Jerusalem Post on line edition Aug 31, 2007 18:34
"State of the Art: Finding the heirs" By Schelly Talalay Dardashti

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid=1188392507317&pagename=JPost%2FJPArticle%2FShowFull

John Paul Lowens, Suburban NYC GerSIGmod@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany GerSIG's Karen Franklin on art restitution in Jerusalem Post #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

GerSIG Coordinator Karen S. Franklin is featured in a Jerusalem Post
article on how genealogy resources help accomplish looted art restitution.

Based in part on Ms. Franklin's lectures at the Salt Lake City 2007
Conference, the article says:

"Genealogy is not just about the names of dead people on a list, or
DNA or Holocaust victims, it is now also about art restitution. Online
resources used to solve cases include JewishGen, ProQuest, maps, Yad
Vashem, the Leo Baeck archives, the Center for Jewish History,
newspaper obituaries and other life cycle announcements (engagements,
marriages), Ancestry and even eBay. Art restitution today utilizes
three approaches: international and genealogical collaboration as well
as artifact exhibits. "

The full text is available (in English) as follows:

Jerusalem Post on line edition Aug 31, 2007 18:34
"State of the Art: Finding the heirs" By Schelly Talalay Dardashti

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid=1188392507317&pagename=JPost%2FJPArticle%2FShowFull

John Paul Lowens, Suburban NYC GerSIGmod@gmail.com


Distantcousin website #general

Shelly Crane
 

Hello,
I happened to come across a web site called "Distantcousin", which is
an archive of "genealogical data and document images". It appears to
have an incredible amount of online information. Just the city directory
search page alone is pretty amazing. It's a hit and miss whether your
town and year of interest will be included, but worth taking a look.
So far, I have not identified any links on this site to genealogy data
outside of the USA.

This is the description >from their home page: "Distantcousin is an online
archive of genealogy records and scanned images of historical documents
from a wide variety of sources, such as newspaper obituaries, city
directories, census records, ship lists, school yearbooks, military
records, vital records and more. In all, there are more than 6 million
genealogy records >from over 1,500 sources online. There are no fees
or memberships required to use the records at DistantCousin.

This needs to be clarified in that the site itself is free and did in fact
lead to city directories and other resources without charge including pictures
of gravestone, cemetery information, old yearbooks etc. However, in some
instances it linked to that well known fee-for-service web site which includes
online census and other pages that would require payment.

I have no commercial interest in this site and have no further information
as I just happened to find it by chance. Did a search on JewishGen archives
and it appears not to have been mentioned previously.
You can access this site at www.distantcousin.com
Shelly Levin
USA
crzprncess@aol.com, USA

Names I am researching:
Anywhere in Lomza-Suwalki, Poland: DANOWSKI, FAJNTUCH, FEINSTEJN, FROMSEN,
GABELMAN, LANGUS, LEJZEROWICZ, LIPOWICZ, MILEWICZ, MILEWSKI, WYTRIOL.
Warsaw, Poland: AJZENSZTEIN, GONSIJEWSKI.
Gabin, Poland: BAL;
Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland: FLASZTERSZTEIN.
Gorodkovka, Myastkovka, Tomoshpol Ukraine: and hisinau (Moldova): AJZENSHTEJN.
Ukraine, Kiev area: BERKA, BERMAN, BLAS/BLAZ, KVACHINSKIJ, LEFELMAN,
LIPOVETSKY/LIPOVETSKIJ, SHIFFMAN.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Distantcousin website #general

Shelly Crane
 

Hello,
I happened to come across a web site called "Distantcousin", which is
an archive of "genealogical data and document images". It appears to
have an incredible amount of online information. Just the city directory
search page alone is pretty amazing. It's a hit and miss whether your
town and year of interest will be included, but worth taking a look.
So far, I have not identified any links on this site to genealogy data
outside of the USA.

This is the description >from their home page: "Distantcousin is an online
archive of genealogy records and scanned images of historical documents
from a wide variety of sources, such as newspaper obituaries, city
directories, census records, ship lists, school yearbooks, military
records, vital records and more. In all, there are more than 6 million
genealogy records >from over 1,500 sources online. There are no fees
or memberships required to use the records at DistantCousin.

This needs to be clarified in that the site itself is free and did in fact
lead to city directories and other resources without charge including pictures
of gravestone, cemetery information, old yearbooks etc. However, in some
instances it linked to that well known fee-for-service web site which includes
online census and other pages that would require payment.

I have no commercial interest in this site and have no further information
as I just happened to find it by chance. Did a search on JewishGen archives
and it appears not to have been mentioned previously.
You can access this site at www.distantcousin.com
Shelly Levin
USA
crzprncess@aol.com, USA

Names I am researching:
Anywhere in Lomza-Suwalki, Poland: DANOWSKI, FAJNTUCH, FEINSTEJN, FROMSEN,
GABELMAN, LANGUS, LEJZEROWICZ, LIPOWICZ, MILEWICZ, MILEWSKI, WYTRIOL.
Warsaw, Poland: AJZENSZTEIN, GONSIJEWSKI.
Gabin, Poland: BAL;
Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland: FLASZTERSZTEIN.
Gorodkovka, Myastkovka, Tomoshpol Ukraine: and hisinau (Moldova): AJZENSHTEJN.
Ukraine, Kiev area: BERKA, BERMAN, BLAS/BLAZ, KVACHINSKIJ, LEFELMAN,
LIPOVETSKY/LIPOVETSKIJ, SHIFFMAN.


Yassa, Romania #romania

Cindy Jeitler <cljeitler@...>
 

In looking over some notes I took while speaking to my grandmother
thirty-four years ago, I discovered that she had said her family came
from a place called Yassa in Romania. Does the name sound familiar to
anyone?

MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all messages with your name and place
of residence (city, state or country). Thank you, Moderator on Duty


Romania SIG #Romania Yassa, Romania #romania

Cindy Jeitler <cljeitler@...>
 

In looking over some notes I took while speaking to my grandmother
thirty-four years ago, I discovered that she had said her family came
from a place called Yassa in Romania. Does the name sound familiar to
anyone?

MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all messages with your name and place
of residence (city, state or country). Thank you, Moderator on Duty


Yaniva? #ukraine

Cindy Jeitler <cljeitler@...>
 

In looking over some notes I took while speaking to my grandfather
thirty-four years ago, I discovered that he had said he had come >from a
place called Yaniva. Does the name sound familiar to anyone?

(Cindy Jeitler)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Yaniva? #ukraine

Cindy Jeitler <cljeitler@...>
 

In looking over some notes I took while speaking to my grandfather
thirty-four years ago, I discovered that he had said he had come >from a
place called Yaniva. Does the name sound familiar to anyone?

(Cindy Jeitler)


Hershal-esta-polia #ukraine

Cindy Jeitler <cljeitler@...>
 

My father recalls hearing years ago his father's family came >from a
place called Hershal-esta-polia in Russia. Does the name sound familiar
to anyone?

Cindy Jeitler (Please sign your messages with your whole name & country
of residence)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Hershal-esta-polia #ukraine

Cindy Jeitler <cljeitler@...>
 

My father recalls hearing years ago his father's family came >from a
place called Hershal-esta-polia in Russia. Does the name sound familiar
to anyone?

Cindy Jeitler (Please sign your messages with your whole name & country
of residence)


Sanje #ukraine

NOYMA APPELBAUM <noyma1@...>
 

The discussion about the name Sanje makes me think of my maternal
grandfather who died in Zvenigorodka in 1927. My mother told me his name was
Sanna (pronounced SAHneh). The name Sanje is the first time I have run
across a name anything like it. Perhaps they are the same name.

Noyma Appelbaum
Philadelphia, PA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Sanje #ukraine

NOYMA APPELBAUM <noyma1@...>
 

The discussion about the name Sanje makes me think of my maternal
grandfather who died in Zvenigorodka in 1927. My mother told me his name was
Sanna (pronounced SAHneh). The name Sanje is the first time I have run
across a name anything like it. Perhaps they are the same name.

Noyma Appelbaum
Philadelphia, PA