Date   

Northern New Jersey Cemeteries #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Anyone out there know the Northern New Jersey Cemeteries?

A couisin tells me his father is buried in Richfield Park, New Jersey.
The father lived and worked in Hoboken, New Jersey. I don't know a
Richfield Park and I am wondering if it could be Rochelle Park. Any
other thoughts on which cemetery I might be looking for?

Thanks.

Allan Jordan
aejordan@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Northern New Jersey Cemeteries #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Anyone out there know the Northern New Jersey Cemeteries?

A couisin tells me his father is buried in Richfield Park, New Jersey.
The father lived and worked in Hoboken, New Jersey. I don't know a
Richfield Park and I am wondering if it could be Rochelle Park. Any
other thoughts on which cemetery I might be looking for?

Thanks.

Allan Jordan
aejordan@aol.com


Re: names Erma & Ola - Thank you! #general

LSHAPSKI <lshapski@...>
 

I am not able to respond personally to everyone who answered my queries
regarding the Russian given names Erma for a male and Ola for a female,
but I would like to thank everyone who took the time to share their
knowledge.

The general concensus re: the name Erma is that the "E" sound in Russian is
pronounced as "YE" would be in English. Therefore, Erma or Ermia is
actually Yermiah, or Jeremiah. One respondent even said that she had two
documents for one individual, one showing him as Ermia and the other as
Jeremiah.

The name Ola was not as clearly defined. Some responders were certain it
was Olya or Olga. Others referred to Oga, Alla, or Elka or Elke... One
person told me her mother's Yiddish name was Olia. I did not say in my
original query that the name Ola was not on an official Russian document
but on a printed Russian wedding invitation, i.e., on a somewhat formal
but not official record.
A few people pointed out that the name "Alta" was probably given to "fool
the Angel of Death", because it means "Old" in Yiddish. (I was aware of
that before, but had not stated that in my letter.)

Lynne Shapiro
Western Mass.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: names Erma & Ola - Thank you! #general

LSHAPSKI <lshapski@...>
 

I am not able to respond personally to everyone who answered my queries
regarding the Russian given names Erma for a male and Ola for a female,
but I would like to thank everyone who took the time to share their
knowledge.

The general concensus re: the name Erma is that the "E" sound in Russian is
pronounced as "YE" would be in English. Therefore, Erma or Ermia is
actually Yermiah, or Jeremiah. One respondent even said that she had two
documents for one individual, one showing him as Ermia and the other as
Jeremiah.

The name Ola was not as clearly defined. Some responders were certain it
was Olya or Olga. Others referred to Oga, Alla, or Elka or Elke... One
person told me her mother's Yiddish name was Olia. I did not say in my
original query that the name Ola was not on an official Russian document
but on a printed Russian wedding invitation, i.e., on a somewhat formal
but not official record.
A few people pointed out that the name "Alta" was probably given to "fool
the Angel of Death", because it means "Old" in Yiddish. (I was aware of
that before, but had not stated that in my letter.)

Lynne Shapiro
Western Mass.


Re: The Yiddish word "roys" #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/4/01 3:39:23 PM Eastern Standard Time,
kmgradel@dadlnet.dk writes:

<< >Your family name was probably a variant of ROSE. I do not know Slavic
>languages and so can't tell you a possible Slavic origin. My closest
>guess is Ross, German for horse. If you go by the pronunciation and a
>Yiddish word, "roys" would be a Galitzian prnounciation of the German
>'raus (properly heraus) which means (get) out!, scat, scram, outside,
>expelled and so on.
>
>Hope this helps
>
>Michael Bernet, New York

Michael

Sorry, for once you are mistaken

Royz - in Yiddish: resh vav jod zayin - means rose, which makes ROSE an
obvious name to take for a family with such a name emigrating to USA. In
Poland the name would probably be spelled ROJZ - and Beider finds it in
Biala, Radzyn, Pulawy, Janow and Warsaw. Artificial names starting with
ROJZ- abound in Poland and they all derive >from the name of that flower. >>

It would be helpful if we all took some minimal care before pouncing on
someone's "mistake."

Yes, thank you, I happen to know the German word Rose (pron. Raw-ze) which
means Rose, and the Yiddish derivatives (more often Rosele or Raysele than
Rose or roys, both for the name and the flower). It's the obvious origin
of the NAME and I had mentioned this in my very first sentence. But the
original query was about a Yiddish word. The Yiddish word that's
pronounced "roys" is >from the German " ' raus."--a word that we Jews in
Germany heard all too often. It means "get out" etc and is not by any
means as sweet smelling as a rose.

Yes, many Jews bore the name Rosen, Rosenberg, Rosenbaum etc. often
because Rose, Rosa, Rayzele etc was a maternal name in the family, others
because it was emblematic, or simply because they liked it. But the
word roys would have been something else.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The Yiddish word "roys" #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/4/01 3:39:23 PM Eastern Standard Time,
kmgradel@dadlnet.dk writes:

<< >Your family name was probably a variant of ROSE. I do not know Slavic
>languages and so can't tell you a possible Slavic origin. My closest
>guess is Ross, German for horse. If you go by the pronunciation and a
>Yiddish word, "roys" would be a Galitzian prnounciation of the German
>'raus (properly heraus) which means (get) out!, scat, scram, outside,
>expelled and so on.
>
>Hope this helps
>
>Michael Bernet, New York

Michael

Sorry, for once you are mistaken

Royz - in Yiddish: resh vav jod zayin - means rose, which makes ROSE an
obvious name to take for a family with such a name emigrating to USA. In
Poland the name would probably be spelled ROJZ - and Beider finds it in
Biala, Radzyn, Pulawy, Janow and Warsaw. Artificial names starting with
ROJZ- abound in Poland and they all derive >from the name of that flower. >>

It would be helpful if we all took some minimal care before pouncing on
someone's "mistake."

Yes, thank you, I happen to know the German word Rose (pron. Raw-ze) which
means Rose, and the Yiddish derivatives (more often Rosele or Raysele than
Rose or roys, both for the name and the flower). It's the obvious origin
of the NAME and I had mentioned this in my very first sentence. But the
original query was about a Yiddish word. The Yiddish word that's
pronounced "roys" is >from the German " ' raus."--a word that we Jews in
Germany heard all too often. It means "get out" etc and is not by any
means as sweet smelling as a rose.

Yes, many Jews bore the name Rosen, Rosenberg, Rosenbaum etc. often
because Rose, Rosa, Rayzele etc was a maternal name in the family, others
because it was emblematic, or simply because they liked it. But the
word roys would have been something else.

Michael Bernet, New York


Anyone familiar with the name SCHICK #general

raquel dunning <raqueldunning@...>
 

I am trying to locate family members whose last name
is Schick. That was the name of my mother and her
father was >from Prague, Check Republic, who emigrated
to the UK in the late 1930s.


View Mate VM243 #general

Mpcamitta@...
 

Dear genners,
I've posted a photo that belonged to my maternal grandparents. The
people in this photo might or might not be members of my BASSEIN,
KAGAN/COHEN, GUREVICH/HOROWITZ, PALEY, RODMAN or TONIS families, however I
suspect that the seated man was named Jacob LIEBERMAN. I don't know if he
was related to me or not. The photo was taken in 1909 in New York City at
the Paley Photography Studio. It is inscribed to Rokhil: Remember
Kreslavka, Donya, Yacov and Silya. Are any of these faces or names
familiar to you? If so, please respond privately.
Sincerely,
Miriam Camitta
Wynnewood, PA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Anyone familiar with the name SCHICK #general

raquel dunning <raqueldunning@...>
 

I am trying to locate family members whose last name
is Schick. That was the name of my mother and her
father was >from Prague, Check Republic, who emigrated
to the UK in the late 1930s.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen View Mate VM243 #general

Mpcamitta@...
 

Dear genners,
I've posted a photo that belonged to my maternal grandparents. The
people in this photo might or might not be members of my BASSEIN,
KAGAN/COHEN, GUREVICH/HOROWITZ, PALEY, RODMAN or TONIS families, however I
suspect that the seated man was named Jacob LIEBERMAN. I don't know if he
was related to me or not. The photo was taken in 1909 in New York City at
the Paley Photography Studio. It is inscribed to Rokhil: Remember
Kreslavka, Donya, Yacov and Silya. Are any of these faces or names
familiar to you? If so, please respond privately.
Sincerely,
Miriam Camitta
Wynnewood, PA


Online phone books #belarus

JPlaxe@...
 

Another good link to Russian phone directories online is:

http://www.teldir.com/eng/euro/ru

Regards,

Jack Plaxe
Chicago, IL

Researching PLAXE/PLAX/PLAKS/FLAX/FLAKS


Belarus SIG #Belarus Online phone books #belarus

JPlaxe@...
 

Another good link to Russian phone directories online is:

http://www.teldir.com/eng/euro/ru

Regards,

Jack Plaxe
Chicago, IL

Researching PLAXE/PLAX/PLAKS/FLAX/FLAKS


Dollar Wire Transfers to Belarus #belarus

Herbert Maletz <herbmal@...>
 

In a message dated Tue, 2 Jan 2001 07:24:33 EST
Steve Gold wrote:

" In my experience, the bank will charge $15.00 - $30.00 to do this
(wire)transfer."

Steve, is this charge based on amount of dollars and do you know if
there are any other charges assessed for the service. Earlier this year
the Bank of New York quoted a fee of about $80.00 to send $100.00
to Belarus and explained that their foreign transfers are mainly commercial
transactions in high dollar amounts. Could you give us more details, i.e.,
Name of Bank, Countries serviced, Fee scale, etc. I'm sure there are
many SIGers who would appreciate it.

Herb Maletz, Staten Island
.
Researching: WINOGRAD, KAPLAN Shereshev, MALETZ, DRIBIN
Lyskovo, Malch, SLOSSITEL KamentzPodula


Belarus SIG #Belarus Dollar Wire Transfers to Belarus #belarus

Herbert Maletz <herbmal@...>
 

In a message dated Tue, 2 Jan 2001 07:24:33 EST
Steve Gold wrote:

" In my experience, the bank will charge $15.00 - $30.00 to do this
(wire)transfer."

Steve, is this charge based on amount of dollars and do you know if
there are any other charges assessed for the service. Earlier this year
the Bank of New York quoted a fee of about $80.00 to send $100.00
to Belarus and explained that their foreign transfers are mainly commercial
transactions in high dollar amounts. Could you give us more details, i.e.,
Name of Bank, Countries serviced, Fee scale, etc. I'm sure there are
many SIGers who would appreciate it.

Herb Maletz, Staten Island
.
Researching: WINOGRAD, KAPLAN Shereshev, MALETZ, DRIBIN
Lyskovo, Malch, SLOSSITEL KamentzPodula


Copy prices #belarus

Franklin J. Swartz <eejhp@...>
 

Dear All,

You should be aware that copies of documents purchased direct >from the Minsk
Archives cost all of $5.00. Translations done here for legal purposes are
seldom more than $10.00. In terms of prices for hand copying you should be
aware that the director of the archive only makes about $30 a month. It
seems ironic to me, in light of this, that comments are sometimes made about
the exploitative pricing of the National Archive.
. . .Hand-copy of records, in Russian: $50.00
Hand-copy of records, translated into English: $60.00 (i.e., $50 for
copying
+ an additional $10 for the translation)
Scanned image of records: $20.00

Franklin J. Swartz
Executive Director
East European Jewish Heritage Project Ltd (USA)
East European Jewish Heritage Project (UK)
Jewish Revival Charitable Mission (Republic of Belarus)
13b Dauman Street
Minsk 220002
Belarus
Tel/Fax: +375 17 234 3360
eejhp@yahoo.com
http://eejhp.tripod.ca
SAVE LIVES AND TRADITIONS, DONATE NOW: http://eejhp.tripod.ca/donation1.htm


Belarus SIG #Belarus Copy prices #belarus

Franklin J. Swartz <eejhp@...>
 

Dear All,

You should be aware that copies of documents purchased direct >from the Minsk
Archives cost all of $5.00. Translations done here for legal purposes are
seldom more than $10.00. In terms of prices for hand copying you should be
aware that the director of the archive only makes about $30 a month. It
seems ironic to me, in light of this, that comments are sometimes made about
the exploitative pricing of the National Archive.
. . .Hand-copy of records, in Russian: $50.00
Hand-copy of records, translated into English: $60.00 (i.e., $50 for
copying
+ an additional $10 for the translation)
Scanned image of records: $20.00

Franklin J. Swartz
Executive Director
East European Jewish Heritage Project Ltd (USA)
East European Jewish Heritage Project (UK)
Jewish Revival Charitable Mission (Republic of Belarus)
13b Dauman Street
Minsk 220002
Belarus
Tel/Fax: +375 17 234 3360
eejhp@yahoo.com
http://eejhp.tripod.ca
SAVE LIVES AND TRADITIONS, DONATE NOW: http://eejhp.tripod.ca/donation1.htm


Re: online phone book #belarus

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Wow!
I'm glad so many people have had great success with it.
I, however ironically, have not been able to get
anything >from it: Turning translit on and off,
resetting browser, inventing spellings of TALALAI/Y
which is a very phonetic name even in Russian! --
absolutely zilch, bupkas, kloom, heech, nada, etc.
Steve Gold suggested they might have unlisted numbers.
Don't think it works that way in former USSR, but who
knows? I KNOW there are several branches in each of
St.P and Moscow, so something should come up (I already
have information, am in contact with them, but am
looking for more) in one or both of them.
Oh well.
When Michael Gavrilovich who told me about it gets back
from St. Petersburg to his school in Illinois, he will
figure it out, unless someone else can try typing in
variants of TALALAI in English or Russian and
forwarding me the list if any information is
forthcoming.
Best wishes, and I am really glad that it works for
others.
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
dardasht@barak-online.net


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: online phone book #belarus

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Wow!
I'm glad so many people have had great success with it.
I, however ironically, have not been able to get
anything >from it: Turning translit on and off,
resetting browser, inventing spellings of TALALAI/Y
which is a very phonetic name even in Russian! --
absolutely zilch, bupkas, kloom, heech, nada, etc.
Steve Gold suggested they might have unlisted numbers.
Don't think it works that way in former USSR, but who
knows? I KNOW there are several branches in each of
St.P and Moscow, so something should come up (I already
have information, am in contact with them, but am
looking for more) in one or both of them.
Oh well.
When Michael Gavrilovich who told me about it gets back
from St. Petersburg to his school in Illinois, he will
figure it out, unless someone else can try typing in
variants of TALALAI in English or Russian and
forwarding me the list if any information is
forthcoming.
Best wishes, and I am really glad that it works for
others.
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
dardasht@barak-online.net


Righteous Gentile Candidates #belarus

Louis A Fine <loufine@...>
 

Dear Belarusans,

A short time ago one of my neighbors told me of her family's activities
during WWII.
The family consisted of Auke HARTSTRA, his wife Anna KOEN, their
daughters Anna Maria b.1920 and my neighbor Tine (now Olson) b.1930.

Two houses away >from the Hartstra family, at either #50 or 42
Voortsweg, Enschede Netherlands, lived a Jewish family, named Ausen
(Aussen). The family consisted of the senior Aussen, their son and his
wife and their toddler/preschooler, red-haired son.
One day members of the Resistance told the Hartstras the Nazis were
coming that night to round up Jews and for them to warn the Ausens. The
Ausens refused to believe them, but Tine requested that the little Ausen
boy be allowed to stay in their home ONE night. Permission was granted.
Circa 3 or 4 am the Nazis came in trucks and took the Ausen family, never
to return. Some of the Hartstra neighbors were Nazi collaborators and
they feared for the boy's life. Consequently he was taken by the
Resistance to live with a farm family outside of Enschede. Tine believes
he was probably adopted.
Another part of the Hartstra's history relates another set of
neighbors. Late 1942 or early 1943 the Hartstra's moved to Delden. Next
door lived a family named COHEN: Mr/Mrs. COHEN and the husband's brother.
The Cohen's ran a butcher shop in town. Again the Resistance told the
Hartstra's the Nazis were about to round up Jews. The Cohens listened to
the Hartstra's and went to live with the mother of Tine's
brother-in-law: Mr/Mrs Henry LAST ala Anne FRANK. Last in Dolphia & ran
a barber shop in Glanerbrug.
The Hartstras took as much of the Cohen's equipment and furnishing as
they could, stored them their attic and post war, the Cohen's recovered
their goods. As a result, the Cohen's were able to re-open their butcher
shop in Delden. their daughter married and the couple ran a butcher shop
in Hengelo.
In my opinion, the Hartstra family, Tine being the sole survivor,
deserves to be awarded the status of Righteous Gentile. However the above
requires substantiation and validation >from someone other than Tine. IS
THERE ANYONE OUT THERE WHO KNOWS ANYTHING ABOUT THESE FAMILIES?

If so, please contact me privately ASAP.

Louis A. Fine
University Place WA-U.S.A
E-mail <loufine@juno.com>


Belarus SIG #Belarus Righteous Gentile Candidates #belarus

Louis A Fine <loufine@...>
 

Dear Belarusans,

A short time ago one of my neighbors told me of her family's activities
during WWII.
The family consisted of Auke HARTSTRA, his wife Anna KOEN, their
daughters Anna Maria b.1920 and my neighbor Tine (now Olson) b.1930.

Two houses away >from the Hartstra family, at either #50 or 42
Voortsweg, Enschede Netherlands, lived a Jewish family, named Ausen
(Aussen). The family consisted of the senior Aussen, their son and his
wife and their toddler/preschooler, red-haired son.
One day members of the Resistance told the Hartstras the Nazis were
coming that night to round up Jews and for them to warn the Ausens. The
Ausens refused to believe them, but Tine requested that the little Ausen
boy be allowed to stay in their home ONE night. Permission was granted.
Circa 3 or 4 am the Nazis came in trucks and took the Ausen family, never
to return. Some of the Hartstra neighbors were Nazi collaborators and
they feared for the boy's life. Consequently he was taken by the
Resistance to live with a farm family outside of Enschede. Tine believes
he was probably adopted.
Another part of the Hartstra's history relates another set of
neighbors. Late 1942 or early 1943 the Hartstra's moved to Delden. Next
door lived a family named COHEN: Mr/Mrs. COHEN and the husband's brother.
The Cohen's ran a butcher shop in town. Again the Resistance told the
Hartstra's the Nazis were about to round up Jews. The Cohens listened to
the Hartstra's and went to live with the mother of Tine's
brother-in-law: Mr/Mrs Henry LAST ala Anne FRANK. Last in Dolphia & ran
a barber shop in Glanerbrug.
The Hartstras took as much of the Cohen's equipment and furnishing as
they could, stored them their attic and post war, the Cohen's recovered
their goods. As a result, the Cohen's were able to re-open their butcher
shop in Delden. their daughter married and the couple ran a butcher shop
in Hengelo.
In my opinion, the Hartstra family, Tine being the sole survivor,
deserves to be awarded the status of Righteous Gentile. However the above
requires substantiation and validation >from someone other than Tine. IS
THERE ANYONE OUT THERE WHO KNOWS ANYTHING ABOUT THESE FAMILIES?

If so, please contact me privately ASAP.

Louis A. Fine
University Place WA-U.S.A
E-mail <loufine@juno.com>