Date   

SAKUTSKY #general

dov & varda epstein <yknow@...>
 

My mother tells me that her maternal grandparents came >from Vilna Guberniya,
she doesn't know the specific town, and that their name was Sakutsky. I
searched the ALD and all the names that were similar to this were not from
Vilna Guberniya. Does anybody have any idea how I can find this surname?
Searching for; Kopelman, Sakutsky, Yanovsky
Varda Epstein
yknow@...


Food minister #general

dov & varda epstein <yknow@...>
 

My mother has a vague recollection that her maternal grandfather had a
relative in Vilna Guberniya that was something like a food minister.
She was doubtful of the veracity of this claim. She didn't think a Jew
could hold an administrative government position of this sort. Does
anyone have any ideas on this?
Searching; Kopelman, Yanovsky, Sakutsky
Varda Epstein
yknow@...


Steffanesk/Stefanesti Thanks #general

Shel Bercovich <sbercovich@...>
 

Many, many thanks to all those who responded to my plea.

I have concluded that the "Steffanesk" written on my gm's documents
really was (as I believed >from the start) Stefanesti, Botosani County,
Romania, on the border with Moldava. As I said to a couple of
responders, I think the "Steffanesk" spelling came about as the result
of an English-speaker's liberal transliteration of a Yiddish speaker's
pronunciation of a Romanian name. :-) Hardly surprising, under the
circumstances.

It must be said that some of the responders were extremely thorough in
their responses, showing the tremendous amount of research being done
by a large number of genealogists.

Again, many thanks for your help.

Shel

Searching: BERCOVICI, GOLDENBERG, MOSCOVICI - Darabani, Dorohoi, Iasi
& Stefanesti, Romania
KLEBANOV (various spellings), LIPKIND - Minsk Gubernia; NYC
HECHTER (ECHTER), ZWANG - Tulchin, Botha, & Krivoye Ozero,
Ukraine; Israel


Re: Changing names--how was it done? #general

Harriet Brown <hnbrown@...>
 

I don't know how other families went about changing their names, but I can
tell you that my BRUCHANSKY family did it the legal way in 1920 in Camden,
New Jersey. I was lucky enough to get the legal papers to show this a few
years ago. Sure enough, just as family lore had said, my grandfather and
his brothers and sisters all changed their name to BROWN at the same time.

I am curious as to how unusual this was, as opposed to the "just waking up
and calling yourself something different" route.

--Harriet Brown
Madison, WI
hnbrown@...

Subject: Changing names - how was it done?
From: Aejordan@...

Has anyone looked into how someone changed their name at the turn of the
century in the United States? Did our ancestors wake up one morning and
say I want an American name and just start calling themselves by their new
name?
<snip>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SAKUTSKY #general

dov & varda epstein <yknow@...>
 

My mother tells me that her maternal grandparents came >from Vilna Guberniya,
she doesn't know the specific town, and that their name was Sakutsky. I
searched the ALD and all the names that were similar to this were not from
Vilna Guberniya. Does anybody have any idea how I can find this surname?
Searching for; Kopelman, Sakutsky, Yanovsky
Varda Epstein
yknow@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Food minister #general

dov & varda epstein <yknow@...>
 

My mother has a vague recollection that her maternal grandfather had a
relative in Vilna Guberniya that was something like a food minister.
She was doubtful of the veracity of this claim. She didn't think a Jew
could hold an administrative government position of this sort. Does
anyone have any ideas on this?
Searching; Kopelman, Yanovsky, Sakutsky
Varda Epstein
yknow@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Steffanesk/Stefanesti Thanks #general

Shel Bercovich <sbercovich@...>
 

Many, many thanks to all those who responded to my plea.

I have concluded that the "Steffanesk" written on my gm's documents
really was (as I believed >from the start) Stefanesti, Botosani County,
Romania, on the border with Moldava. As I said to a couple of
responders, I think the "Steffanesk" spelling came about as the result
of an English-speaker's liberal transliteration of a Yiddish speaker's
pronunciation of a Romanian name. :-) Hardly surprising, under the
circumstances.

It must be said that some of the responders were extremely thorough in
their responses, showing the tremendous amount of research being done
by a large number of genealogists.

Again, many thanks for your help.

Shel

Searching: BERCOVICI, GOLDENBERG, MOSCOVICI - Darabani, Dorohoi, Iasi
& Stefanesti, Romania
KLEBANOV (various spellings), LIPKIND - Minsk Gubernia; NYC
HECHTER (ECHTER), ZWANG - Tulchin, Botha, & Krivoye Ozero,
Ukraine; Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Changing names--how was it done? #general

Harriet Brown <hnbrown@...>
 

I don't know how other families went about changing their names, but I can
tell you that my BRUCHANSKY family did it the legal way in 1920 in Camden,
New Jersey. I was lucky enough to get the legal papers to show this a few
years ago. Sure enough, just as family lore had said, my grandfather and
his brothers and sisters all changed their name to BROWN at the same time.

I am curious as to how unusual this was, as opposed to the "just waking up
and calling yourself something different" route.

--Harriet Brown
Madison, WI
hnbrown@...

Subject: Changing names - how was it done?
From: Aejordan@...

Has anyone looked into how someone changed their name at the turn of the
century in the United States? Did our ancestors wake up one morning and
say I want an American name and just start calling themselves by their new
name?
<snip>


January Meeting Central Florida JGSGO #general

SSeckbach
 

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando is
Tuesday, January 9th, 7:00 PM in the Senior Lounge of the JCC. The speaker
is the President of IAJGS Howard Margold. His topic is research in
Lithuania. Following is information on his next trip. Dues are due January
1. If you have not remitted please do so by mail or at the meeting Tuesday.

For information contact
Sim Seckbach
Sseckbach@...



Sim Seckbach
Sseckbach@...


Israel Genealogy Society/Jerusalem/English section #general

irwin siegel <imsiegel@...>
 

Shalom to all English speakers.

A new venture is under way at the Jerusalem branch of the IGS.

The English speaking section of the IGS is off to a very good start. As of
this writing over 70 persons have expressed an interest in our group. The
first two programs will focus on genealogical resources available at Yad
Vashem, and have been scheduled as follows.:

Israel Genealogy Society/English Speaking Section



1. Tuesday, Jan.16, 2001

Place: Mevakshei Derech ShayAgnon 22, Jerusalem Bus #22

Time: 7:30 P.M. The library is open >from 6:00 P.M.
We will meet in the large conference room together with the general
membership for announcements. The English speaking Section will then
re-group in the downstairs library (at aprox. shortly before 8:00 P.M.)

Topic: "An overview of and introduction to the holdings and
facilities at Yad Vashem of interest to genealogists". Presenter:
Dr. Alex Avraham, director of the Hall of Names Project.


2. Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2001

Place: Yad Vashem

Time: 2:00- 5:00 P.M.

Topic: "Field trip/site visit" A tour of programs of interest to
genealogists followed by a presentation of the Names Computerization
Project by the Director of the Hall of Names, Dr. Alex Avraham.

We welcome your attendance and participation in this new project.


If you will be attending one or both of the above programs, please try to
RSVP to Barbara at <bsiegel@...> so we can plan accordingly.
If you will be unable to attend, but would like to remain on the list for
future announcements, please advise.

Any questions? Please E-mail Barbara at bsiegel@...

Barbara Siegel, Coordinator


Re: Changing names - how was it done? #general

LSHAPSKI <lshapski@...>
 

In taking Social Security claims over many years, I do not recall many,
if any, immigrants who just decided one day to take on a completely
different surname and did so. Most of the people I dealt with came in the
early 1900s, however, not as adults yet. And they were in NYC, their
likely portal of entry to the U.S. Perhaps people were more likely to
change their names informally when they moved to new areas, where no one
knew them. Many people did, of course, change their surnames, often to
make them sound less Jewish, and lessen the chance of discrimination
against them. But such changes, at least 20 - 30 years after the time of
which you speak, were done legally. After all, these folks had children
registered in school with the original name, owned property in that name,
etc. So even before Social Security, there would have been complications
in just changing a surname without doing it through the courts, especially
if it were a compete change. People often legally changed their names as
part of the naturalization process. Our ancestors would, however,
simplify spellings and such without such formal proceedings. Given names
were changed much more readily. Often teachers could not pronounce their
student's name and told the student they would call him or her something
else. Those names frequently carried forward throughout that person's
life. At least that's what many people told me.

Lynne Shapiro
Western Mass.

Has anyone looked into how someone changed their name at the turn of the
century in the United States? Did our ancestors wake up one morning and
say I want an American name and just start calling themselves by their
new name?


ISO Yosef Karo Family Tree #general

Steve Eller <steve-eller@...>
 

Does anyone know where I could find a list of the descendants of Yosef
Karo - author of the "Shulchan Aruch" - if such a tree even exists?

Steve Eller
Baltimore MD

Researching: KAMENETZKY of Voronovo, Brooklyn, Staten Island, and New Jersey.
Researching: LEVIN of Voronovo
Researching: ZARENDA/ZARENDE/ZARENDYTE
Researching: SENDZUL/SENZEL/SHENDZEL
Researching: SHMIT/SMITH/SCHMIDT of Klykoliai and Norway


Re: Changing names #general

Chuck Weinstein <cweinstein@...>
 

Anyone in this country (USA) can use any name they choose, as long as it
is not done with the intent to defraud. >from our ancestors' point of
view, the same opportunity was not possible. As has been discussed on
JewishGen's list many times, name changes were not done on the ship or
at Ellis Island or any port of debarkation. Our ancestors made a
conscious decision to change their names for a variety of reasons.
Mostly it was to fit in in the "Goldeneh Medina". Sometimes, they were
fearful of the czar's secret police or the conscription process.
Sometimes they were trying to hide their European identities. Sometimes
they just wanted to forget. There is an old Yiddish joke (with, I am
certain, at least grain of truth) about how Moshe the pisher became
Maurice LeFontaine. (It helps to understand both Yiddish and French)
Yakov Katzowicz found it easier to sound American (and easier to spell)
as Jack Katz, etc. Jews were, by far, not the only people to change
their names. Many immigrants found an "American" name was useful.
Probably the best example is that of Prince Philip, the Duke of
Edinburgh, whose father found it politic in 1915 to change the family
name >from the German Battenberg to the more English-sounding
Mountbatten. That was at the height of World War I, when anything that
sounded German was viewed suspiciously in both England and the US.


There are many records around the country for legal name changes. Not
everyone went to a court, but just began using their name of choice. In
addition to the above examples, any Jewish names became more American
sounding names which themselves became identified with Jews. Isidore
(Israel), Moe, Morris, and Max (Moshe), etc. are common examples.

Chuck Weinstein in San Mateo, CA
cweinstein@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen January Meeting Central Florida JGSGO #general

SSeckbach
 

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Orlando is
Tuesday, January 9th, 7:00 PM in the Senior Lounge of the JCC. The speaker
is the President of IAJGS Howard Margold. His topic is research in
Lithuania. Following is information on his next trip. Dues are due January
1. If you have not remitted please do so by mail or at the meeting Tuesday.

For information contact
Sim Seckbach
Sseckbach@...



Sim Seckbach
Sseckbach@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Israel Genealogy Society/Jerusalem/English section #general

irwin siegel <imsiegel@...>
 

Shalom to all English speakers.

A new venture is under way at the Jerusalem branch of the IGS.

The English speaking section of the IGS is off to a very good start. As of
this writing over 70 persons have expressed an interest in our group. The
first two programs will focus on genealogical resources available at Yad
Vashem, and have been scheduled as follows.:

Israel Genealogy Society/English Speaking Section



1. Tuesday, Jan.16, 2001

Place: Mevakshei Derech ShayAgnon 22, Jerusalem Bus #22

Time: 7:30 P.M. The library is open >from 6:00 P.M.
We will meet in the large conference room together with the general
membership for announcements. The English speaking Section will then
re-group in the downstairs library (at aprox. shortly before 8:00 P.M.)

Topic: "An overview of and introduction to the holdings and
facilities at Yad Vashem of interest to genealogists". Presenter:
Dr. Alex Avraham, director of the Hall of Names Project.


2. Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2001

Place: Yad Vashem

Time: 2:00- 5:00 P.M.

Topic: "Field trip/site visit" A tour of programs of interest to
genealogists followed by a presentation of the Names Computerization
Project by the Director of the Hall of Names, Dr. Alex Avraham.

We welcome your attendance and participation in this new project.


If you will be attending one or both of the above programs, please try to
RSVP to Barbara at <bsiegel@...> so we can plan accordingly.
If you will be unable to attend, but would like to remain on the list for
future announcements, please advise.

Any questions? Please E-mail Barbara at bsiegel@...

Barbara Siegel, Coordinator


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Changing names - how was it done? #general

LSHAPSKI <lshapski@...>
 

In taking Social Security claims over many years, I do not recall many,
if any, immigrants who just decided one day to take on a completely
different surname and did so. Most of the people I dealt with came in the
early 1900s, however, not as adults yet. And they were in NYC, their
likely portal of entry to the U.S. Perhaps people were more likely to
change their names informally when they moved to new areas, where no one
knew them. Many people did, of course, change their surnames, often to
make them sound less Jewish, and lessen the chance of discrimination
against them. But such changes, at least 20 - 30 years after the time of
which you speak, were done legally. After all, these folks had children
registered in school with the original name, owned property in that name,
etc. So even before Social Security, there would have been complications
in just changing a surname without doing it through the courts, especially
if it were a compete change. People often legally changed their names as
part of the naturalization process. Our ancestors would, however,
simplify spellings and such without such formal proceedings. Given names
were changed much more readily. Often teachers could not pronounce their
student's name and told the student they would call him or her something
else. Those names frequently carried forward throughout that person's
life. At least that's what many people told me.

Lynne Shapiro
Western Mass.

Has anyone looked into how someone changed their name at the turn of the
century in the United States? Did our ancestors wake up one morning and
say I want an American name and just start calling themselves by their
new name?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ISO Yosef Karo Family Tree #general

Steve Eller <steve-eller@...>
 

Does anyone know where I could find a list of the descendants of Yosef
Karo - author of the "Shulchan Aruch" - if such a tree even exists?

Steve Eller
Baltimore MD

Researching: KAMENETZKY of Voronovo, Brooklyn, Staten Island, and New Jersey.
Researching: LEVIN of Voronovo
Researching: ZARENDA/ZARENDE/ZARENDYTE
Researching: SENDZUL/SENZEL/SHENDZEL
Researching: SHMIT/SMITH/SCHMIDT of Klykoliai and Norway


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Changing names #general

Chuck Weinstein <cweinstein@...>
 

Anyone in this country (USA) can use any name they choose, as long as it
is not done with the intent to defraud. >from our ancestors' point of
view, the same opportunity was not possible. As has been discussed on
JewishGen's list many times, name changes were not done on the ship or
at Ellis Island or any port of debarkation. Our ancestors made a
conscious decision to change their names for a variety of reasons.
Mostly it was to fit in in the "Goldeneh Medina". Sometimes, they were
fearful of the czar's secret police or the conscription process.
Sometimes they were trying to hide their European identities. Sometimes
they just wanted to forget. There is an old Yiddish joke (with, I am
certain, at least grain of truth) about how Moshe the pisher became
Maurice LeFontaine. (It helps to understand both Yiddish and French)
Yakov Katzowicz found it easier to sound American (and easier to spell)
as Jack Katz, etc. Jews were, by far, not the only people to change
their names. Many immigrants found an "American" name was useful.
Probably the best example is that of Prince Philip, the Duke of
Edinburgh, whose father found it politic in 1915 to change the family
name >from the German Battenberg to the more English-sounding
Mountbatten. That was at the height of World War I, when anything that
sounded German was viewed suspiciously in both England and the US.


There are many records around the country for legal name changes. Not
everyone went to a court, but just began using their name of choice. In
addition to the above examples, any Jewish names became more American
sounding names which themselves became identified with Jews. Isidore
(Israel), Moe, Morris, and Max (Moshe), etc. are common examples.

Chuck Weinstein in San Mateo, CA
cweinstein@...


áòðééï: Nagykanizsa #hungary

Tsvi Sinai <t_sinai1@...>
 

Dear Marriane,

My grandfather and hi siblings were born in NagyKanizsa and I have
some traces of information about his father and his aunts, but it's
all >from the 19th century. Most of the family left N. to Vienna and
Budapest.

Regards,.
Tsvi Sinat, Givatayim, Israel
-----äåãòä î÷åøéú-----
îàú: Hunter <pmhunter@...>
àì: Hungarian SIG <h-sig@...>
úàøéê: éåí øàùåï 07 éðåàø 2001 01:08
ðåùà: Nagykanizsa

Dear H-SIGers,

Is there anyone doing any work on the Jewish population of Nagykanizsa?
The town owed its prosperity to its <snip>


Magyarositas #hungary

Judith A. Bacskai <jbacskai@...>
 

Having two changed (Hungarianized) names, I have to add my comments to this
subject. My grandmother and her sisters and brothers were born in
Muraszombat (now Murska Sobota, Slovenia) in the 1870-s. Their family name
was Neuman. The four brothers changed their name to Timar in 1917. Not only
can all their birth records be foundl at the FHL, but their name changes
were duly annotated in 1917 on those original records. I have seen similar
notations in the birth records of other towns in southern Hungary.
I hope this helps someone.

Judy Bacskai ( my husband was formerly Boschan)
aka J. Dan formerly Diamant. These changes were made shortly after WWII.