Date   

Re: Help in finding Los Angeles towns by # #general

Hilary Henkin <hilary@...>
 

Dear Howie,
Los Angeles County is Huge, I mean Huge. Los Angeles City is entirely
within L.A. County, plus Hollywood, the entire San Fernando Valley, Santa
Monica, and more.

Having said that, the two-digit numbers you mentioned indicate the county
of death. I have a chart copied >from the microfilms of earlier Calif.
death indexes. "70" is Los Angeles County. "19" is not listed, but I
suspect it's Los Angeles also. According to the list, 17 is Lake County,
18 is Lassen County, then 70 as Los Angeles County, then 20 is Madera
County. Note they're alphabetical.

As a side note, when I sent to LA County for a Death Certificate and the
person had died elsewhere, they sent me a note that said so, and refunded
my money. They even told me which county was the correct one.

Good luck in your search!

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia USA
Researching:
Mogilev - BERLIN, HENKIN-GENKIN; MESCENOKOV
Ekaterinoslav - KATZ; LAPIDUS; LAVROTIN-LAVRUTIN; PESACHINSKY;
SHIMERNITSKY; STEINHART
Roumania: DONNENFIELD; RINCOVER-HARINCOVER; DOLLINGER
Harbin, China: SREBERK-SCHRIEBER, LITEBSK, SCHON--


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Help in finding Los Angeles towns by # #general

Hilary Henkin <hilary@...>
 

Dear Howie,
Los Angeles County is Huge, I mean Huge. Los Angeles City is entirely
within L.A. County, plus Hollywood, the entire San Fernando Valley, Santa
Monica, and more.

Having said that, the two-digit numbers you mentioned indicate the county
of death. I have a chart copied >from the microfilms of earlier Calif.
death indexes. "70" is Los Angeles County. "19" is not listed, but I
suspect it's Los Angeles also. According to the list, 17 is Lake County,
18 is Lassen County, then 70 as Los Angeles County, then 20 is Madera
County. Note they're alphabetical.

As a side note, when I sent to LA County for a Death Certificate and the
person had died elsewhere, they sent me a note that said so, and refunded
my money. They even told me which county was the correct one.

Good luck in your search!

Hilary Henkin
Atlanta, Georgia USA
Researching:
Mogilev - BERLIN, HENKIN-GENKIN; MESCENOKOV
Ekaterinoslav - KATZ; LAPIDUS; LAVROTIN-LAVRUTIN; PESACHINSKY;
SHIMERNITSKY; STEINHART
Roumania: DONNENFIELD; RINCOVER-HARINCOVER; DOLLINGER
Harbin, China: SREBERK-SCHRIEBER, LITEBSK, SCHON--


Re: Hebrew Cemetery, Norfolk, Virginia #general

NormK12065
 

Joan,

I just moved >from Norfolk to central New Jersey, but if you are talking
about the Hebrew Cemetery Section of Forest Lawn Cemetery than you may
call them at (757)441-1752. They are very nice and helpful and have a
card file of all the burials right there in the office and can look it
up for you immediately.

I have a map of the burials in the Mikro Kodesh cemetery but the is no
Westheimer buried there.

Good luck in your research.

Norm Katz
Monroe Township, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Hebrew Cemetery, Norfolk, Virginia #general

NormK12065
 

Joan,

I just moved >from Norfolk to central New Jersey, but if you are talking
about the Hebrew Cemetery Section of Forest Lawn Cemetery than you may
call them at (757)441-1752. They are very nice and helpful and have a
card file of all the burials right there in the office and can look it
up for you immediately.

I have a map of the burials in the Mikro Kodesh cemetery but the is no
Westheimer buried there.

Good luck in your research.

Norm Katz
Monroe Township, NJ


Winter Issue of AVOTAYNU #general

Gary Mokotoff <mokotoff@...>
 

The Winter issue of AVOTAYNU is in the mail. The over-sized 92-
page issue is our annual human interest issue which includes a
number of articles about personal experiences of genealogical
research. My favorite human interest article is by Carol Baird, the
daughter of Holocaust survivors, who returned to the German town
where her grandmother was born at the invitation of the citizens of
the town. The story includes a picture of her renewing her wedding
vows in the synagogue where her grandparents were married. Another
Holocaust-related article describes how a British Jewish
genealogist was able to determine that not all of his Belgian
relatives were murdered in the Holocaust; one 8-year-old cousin was
hidden and survived. How he was able to rapidly find his cousin,
now living in Canada, is a tribute to the networking that exists
today within the Jewish genealogical community.

When AVOTAYNU editor Sallyann Amdur Sack attended a conference in
Israel last year, she was invited by the director of the
International Tracing Service in Arolsen, Germany, to visit its
facilities. ITS is the principal repository of Holocaust records
about individuals--both victims and survivors. When she was invited
to speak last October in Hamburg, Germany, at a conference that
recognized the city's major role as a European port of emigration,
she took the opportunity to visit the ITS facilities. She reports
in the latest issue of AVOTAYNU about both the Hamburg symposium
and the ITS visit.

Under the banner "Salt Lake City Success Syndrome" a number of
people who attended the annual conference last year held in Salt
Lake City describe how records at the Family History Library led to
breakthroughs in their research. There are also articles--as well
as a registration form--about the forthcoming 2001 conference to be
held in London.

Gary Mokotoff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Winter Issue of AVOTAYNU #general

Gary Mokotoff <mokotoff@...>
 

The Winter issue of AVOTAYNU is in the mail. The over-sized 92-
page issue is our annual human interest issue which includes a
number of articles about personal experiences of genealogical
research. My favorite human interest article is by Carol Baird, the
daughter of Holocaust survivors, who returned to the German town
where her grandmother was born at the invitation of the citizens of
the town. The story includes a picture of her renewing her wedding
vows in the synagogue where her grandparents were married. Another
Holocaust-related article describes how a British Jewish
genealogist was able to determine that not all of his Belgian
relatives were murdered in the Holocaust; one 8-year-old cousin was
hidden and survived. How he was able to rapidly find his cousin,
now living in Canada, is a tribute to the networking that exists
today within the Jewish genealogical community.

When AVOTAYNU editor Sallyann Amdur Sack attended a conference in
Israel last year, she was invited by the director of the
International Tracing Service in Arolsen, Germany, to visit its
facilities. ITS is the principal repository of Holocaust records
about individuals--both victims and survivors. When she was invited
to speak last October in Hamburg, Germany, at a conference that
recognized the city's major role as a European port of emigration,
she took the opportunity to visit the ITS facilities. She reports
in the latest issue of AVOTAYNU about both the Hamburg symposium
and the ITS visit.

Under the banner "Salt Lake City Success Syndrome" a number of
people who attended the annual conference last year held in Salt
Lake City describe how records at the Family History Library led to
breakthroughs in their research. There are also articles--as well
as a registration form--about the forthcoming 2001 conference to be
held in London.

Gary Mokotoff


Names: Lefkovits, Breter, Lavie #hungary

Diane Mason <stretchmason@...>
 

Dear H-Sig Members,

Since so many are reiterating their family names for the group, here goes my
entry.

My paternal grandfather, Aaron Herman LEFKOVITS (1873 – 1934) was born in
Kerekret, Hungary (now Okruhle, Slovakia). Immigrated to New York in 1893.
After 2 or 3 years, moved to Salem, OH, where he lived and worked with
cousin Emanuel Greenberger. Moved back in NYC in 1909. Owned and operated
a dry goods store. He married my grandmother, Anna Wolf, on April 9, 1916.
They had 2 children, my father Martin, and my aunt Ruth.

Aaron Herman, known as Herman, had an older brother Josef (1872 – 1890), and
four younger brothers, Nathan, Samuel, Henry, and Willi. Had a sister
Ester, and possible one other sister. All born in Hungary.

Nathan, Samuel and Henry all eventually settled in NYC. Willi served in the
Austro-Hungarian army in WWI. In 1938 he fled with his family to Palestine.
He died in Israel. The Israeli branch of the family hebraicized its name
to LAVIE, I have been told.

Ester Lefkovits Heiflinger had 8 children, five of whom, along with their
parents, perished in Europe during WWII. Three daughters survived and
settled in Israel: Roszi, Leuke, and Margit, who later settled in Sweden.

Herman’s parents were Isak/Isaac Lefkovits/Lefkovics, born in Hertnik,
Hungary (1845 – 1926) and Rebeca BRETER (1850 – 1901), born in Rymanow,
Austrian Galicia (now Poland). Isak and Rebeca were married in Kurima,
Hungary; April 30, 1871. Isak is recorded as a flour mill leaseholder and
farmer. Died 1926, probably in Bratislava. Isak had a sister, Julia, born
in 1848. We don’t know yet of any other siblings. Leah Lefkovits, possibly
a sister or cousin of Isak, married Solomon Greenberger and gave birth to
Emanuel Greenberger, who settled in Ohio in 1880, and with whom Herman
Lefkovits lived for some years after his arrival in the U.S. in 1893.

Isak’s parents were Herschko Lefkovics (1805 – 1868), a shopkeeper, and
Sari/Sarah (1805 – 1870, maiden name unknown), who lived at least for a
while in Hertnik, Saros County, Hungary (now Slovakia).

Rebeca (Breter) Lefkovits’ father was Josef Breter (ca. 1820 – 1868). Her
mother’s name is yet unknown to us. Josef and his wife married around 1848.
We have yet to find out whether they had other children besides Rebeca.


Sincerely,

Diane Mason
Nashville, TN





_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com


Re: More names #hungary

korman3 <korman3@...>
 

I am researching:

WIDDER/WIEDER/VIDOR - originally >from Surany, Ersekujvar, Galgocz and
that area of Nitra megye (moved to Budapest and Vienna)
WELLESZ - originally >from Urmin, Nitra megye (moved to Budapest and
Vienna)
BERGIDA - >from Slovakia, western Ukraine (formerly Czechoslovakia)
Hungary etc. - all Bergidas are related
BACK - originally >from Prostejov in Moravia, then in Budapest
KRAUSZ - originally >from Turo Luka, Nitra megye then Budapest
WEINBERGER - >from Uzhgorod
LIFFERMAN - >from Slovakia
FLAUL - >from Nitra megye
LEFKOWITZ - >from Uzhgorod

Thanks. All leads appreciated.

Debbi Korman


Hungary SIG #Hungary Names: Lefkovits, Breter, Lavie #hungary

Diane Mason <stretchmason@...>
 

Dear H-Sig Members,

Since so many are reiterating their family names for the group, here goes my
entry.

My paternal grandfather, Aaron Herman LEFKOVITS (1873 – 1934) was born in
Kerekret, Hungary (now Okruhle, Slovakia). Immigrated to New York in 1893.
After 2 or 3 years, moved to Salem, OH, where he lived and worked with
cousin Emanuel Greenberger. Moved back in NYC in 1909. Owned and operated
a dry goods store. He married my grandmother, Anna Wolf, on April 9, 1916.
They had 2 children, my father Martin, and my aunt Ruth.

Aaron Herman, known as Herman, had an older brother Josef (1872 – 1890), and
four younger brothers, Nathan, Samuel, Henry, and Willi. Had a sister
Ester, and possible one other sister. All born in Hungary.

Nathan, Samuel and Henry all eventually settled in NYC. Willi served in the
Austro-Hungarian army in WWI. In 1938 he fled with his family to Palestine.
He died in Israel. The Israeli branch of the family hebraicized its name
to LAVIE, I have been told.

Ester Lefkovits Heiflinger had 8 children, five of whom, along with their
parents, perished in Europe during WWII. Three daughters survived and
settled in Israel: Roszi, Leuke, and Margit, who later settled in Sweden.

Herman’s parents were Isak/Isaac Lefkovits/Lefkovics, born in Hertnik,
Hungary (1845 – 1926) and Rebeca BRETER (1850 – 1901), born in Rymanow,
Austrian Galicia (now Poland). Isak and Rebeca were married in Kurima,
Hungary; April 30, 1871. Isak is recorded as a flour mill leaseholder and
farmer. Died 1926, probably in Bratislava. Isak had a sister, Julia, born
in 1848. We don’t know yet of any other siblings. Leah Lefkovits, possibly
a sister or cousin of Isak, married Solomon Greenberger and gave birth to
Emanuel Greenberger, who settled in Ohio in 1880, and with whom Herman
Lefkovits lived for some years after his arrival in the U.S. in 1893.

Isak’s parents were Herschko Lefkovics (1805 – 1868), a shopkeeper, and
Sari/Sarah (1805 – 1870, maiden name unknown), who lived at least for a
while in Hertnik, Saros County, Hungary (now Slovakia).

Rebeca (Breter) Lefkovits’ father was Josef Breter (ca. 1820 – 1868). Her
mother’s name is yet unknown to us. Josef and his wife married around 1848.
We have yet to find out whether they had other children besides Rebeca.


Sincerely,

Diane Mason
Nashville, TN





_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: More names #hungary

korman3 <korman3@...>
 

I am researching:

WIDDER/WIEDER/VIDOR - originally >from Surany, Ersekujvar, Galgocz and
that area of Nitra megye (moved to Budapest and Vienna)
WELLESZ - originally >from Urmin, Nitra megye (moved to Budapest and
Vienna)
BERGIDA - >from Slovakia, western Ukraine (formerly Czechoslovakia)
Hungary etc. - all Bergidas are related
BACK - originally >from Prostejov in Moravia, then in Budapest
KRAUSZ - originally >from Turo Luka, Nitra megye then Budapest
WEINBERGER - >from Uzhgorod
LIFFERMAN - >from Slovakia
FLAUL - >from Nitra megye
LEFKOWITZ - >from Uzhgorod

Thanks. All leads appreciated.

Debbi Korman


Names I am researching #hungary

Sarah Jane Schwarzenberg <schwa005@...>
 

I am researching the following names:

BLAUFELD >from Tolzek (now Tulchin) and Sebes-Kellemes (now Sarisske-Luky),
immigrated to Ohio and Knoxville, Tennessee.
Guttman/Goodman >from what is now NE Slovakia, immigrated to Ohio and Memphis
and Chattanooga, Tennessee.
LUSTIG
REISS Presov
LUSTIL
FISCHER

Thank you

Sarah Jane Schwarzenberg
schwa005@tc.umn.edu


Re: Researching these names #galicia

Dolph Klein <kledolph@...>
 

From: Mary Blumenstein, Melbourne, Australia
come@comeracing.com
I have a few towns listed in my tree that I'm a bit puzzled about.
One ancestor is born in a town called FASTRAB. I haven't found any
information on this town or whether it actually existed. Anyone heard
of it?
I can't find this town either. Check the spelling and/or if in another
language.

I have one relative listed as born in JANOSHI and another in
MAKKOSJANOSI. Are these both the same town?
Yes, Janosi, Ukraine is the same as the former name, Makkosjanosi, which
was in the district of Tiszahati, in the county of Bereg of old Hungary.

Lastly, the town PALAD. I have the same person as being born in
PALAGY. Are these the same town?
Maybe yes, maybe no. Palagy is in the Ukraine and did undergo a name change
when Palagy which was in the district of Nagykaposi, county of Ung became
part of the Ukraine. Palagy is very close to the eastern border of Slovakia.

The settlements of Botpalad, Kispalad, and Nagypalad once bore the name of
Palad. They were in the county of Szatmar, district of Szatmarmemeti. Even
though these three settlements are only 2-5 km >from each other, Botpalad
and Kispalad are now in Hungary, whereas Nagypalad, now called Veliky
Palagy, is in the Ukraine.

Was your person born in Palagy or Veliky Palagy? These two towns are about
80 km apart. If the person was born in Palagy the answer to your question
is no. If the birth place was Veliky Palagy, the answer is yes.

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, NC


Hungary SIG #Hungary Names I am researching #hungary

Sarah Jane Schwarzenberg <schwa005@...>
 

I am researching the following names:

BLAUFELD >from Tolzek (now Tulchin) and Sebes-Kellemes (now Sarisske-Luky),
immigrated to Ohio and Knoxville, Tennessee.
Guttman/Goodman >from what is now NE Slovakia, immigrated to Ohio and Memphis
and Chattanooga, Tennessee.
LUSTIG
REISS Presov
LUSTIL
FISCHER

Thank you

Sarah Jane Schwarzenberg
schwa005@tc.umn.edu


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Researching these names #hungary

Dolph Klein <kledolph@...>
 

From: Mary Blumenstein, Melbourne, Australia
come@comeracing.com
I have a few towns listed in my tree that I'm a bit puzzled about.
One ancestor is born in a town called FASTRAB. I haven't found any
information on this town or whether it actually existed. Anyone heard
of it?
I can't find this town either. Check the spelling and/or if in another
language.

I have one relative listed as born in JANOSHI and another in
MAKKOSJANOSI. Are these both the same town?
Yes, Janosi, Ukraine is the same as the former name, Makkosjanosi, which
was in the district of Tiszahati, in the county of Bereg of old Hungary.

Lastly, the town PALAD. I have the same person as being born in
PALAGY. Are these the same town?
Maybe yes, maybe no. Palagy is in the Ukraine and did undergo a name change
when Palagy which was in the district of Nagykaposi, county of Ung became
part of the Ukraine. Palagy is very close to the eastern border of Slovakia.

The settlements of Botpalad, Kispalad, and Nagypalad once bore the name of
Palad. They were in the county of Szatmar, district of Szatmarmemeti. Even
though these three settlements are only 2-5 km >from each other, Botpalad
and Kispalad are now in Hungary, whereas Nagypalad, now called Veliky
Palagy, is in the Ukraine.

Was your person born in Palagy or Veliky Palagy? These two towns are about
80 km apart. If the person was born in Palagy the answer to your question
is no. If the birth place was Veliky Palagy, the answer is yes.

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, NC


Re: Town Roz K.V. = Rozhanovce #hungary

Marian Brown
 

Thank you to all who tried to help with the name of the town, Roz K.V. Since this was
found in an 1869 birth record I think the following >from Attila Rona is probably the
answer. Also the old name for the town would be Rosgony, current name Rozhanovce.

AttilaRona@aol.com wrote:

I think you are the right track. K.V. probably means Kosice Vidiek (Kassa
vidéki járás.

Attila Róna
Thank you again,

Marian Brown


Subject lines - again #hungary

IsraelP <zach4v6@...>
 

Look at the list below. That was >from this morning's digest. Many of
us skim and look only at the subject lines of interest. Excuse me for
being blunt, but this is a pretty useless set of subject lines, isn't it?

Israel Pickholtz

H-SIG Digest for Monday, January 29, 2001.

1. researching
2. Researching these names
3. Re: My name list
4. *re: Balashwazas Saros, Austria-Hungary
5. RE: new messages
6. * Families and places I'm researching
7. Searching: HERZ, SCHOEN, EHRLICH, DAVIDSON, GROSS, TAX
8. Searching these names & towns
9. The Names I Am Searching
10. RE: name origin
11. Researching these names
12. Researching these names
13. Plain text format only
14. research


Researching my Family #hungary

rrcooper <rrcooper@...>
 

Hello,

I am researching my family line in Budapest and the surrounding area. They
are:

All in the 1800's and earlier;

Neufeld - Budapest - probably in Pest and Obuda.
Glückstein/Glustein - unknown, maybe Budapest
Scheibel - Budapest and Mikla (Maklár, Heves) Hungary
Schillinger - Budapest area
Schlesinger - Budapest area
Stern - Maybe Budapest
Weil - unknown, maybe Budapest

Thank you all, and good hunting

Ruffin Cooper
rrcooper@erols.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Town Roz K.V. = Rozhanovce #hungary

Marian Brown
 

Thank you to all who tried to help with the name of the town, Roz K.V. Since this was
found in an 1869 birth record I think the following >from Attila Rona is probably the
answer. Also the old name for the town would be Rosgony, current name Rozhanovce.

AttilaRona@aol.com wrote:

I think you are the right track. K.V. probably means Kosice Vidiek (Kassa
vidéki járás.

Attila Róna
Thank you again,

Marian Brown


Hungary SIG #Hungary Subject lines - again #hungary

IsraelP <zach4v6@...>
 

Look at the list below. That was >from this morning's digest. Many of
us skim and look only at the subject lines of interest. Excuse me for
being blunt, but this is a pretty useless set of subject lines, isn't it?

Israel Pickholtz

H-SIG Digest for Monday, January 29, 2001.

1. researching
2. Researching these names
3. Re: My name list
4. *re: Balashwazas Saros, Austria-Hungary
5. RE: new messages
6. * Families and places I'm researching
7. Searching: HERZ, SCHOEN, EHRLICH, DAVIDSON, GROSS, TAX
8. Searching these names & towns
9. The Names I Am Searching
10. RE: name origin
11. Researching these names
12. Researching these names
13. Plain text format only
14. research


Hungary SIG #Hungary Researching my Family #hungary

rrcooper <rrcooper@...>
 

Hello,

I am researching my family line in Budapest and the surrounding area. They
are:

All in the 1800's and earlier;

Neufeld - Budapest - probably in Pest and Obuda.
Glückstein/Glustein - unknown, maybe Budapest
Scheibel - Budapest and Mikla (Maklár, Heves) Hungary
Schillinger - Budapest area
Schlesinger - Budapest area
Stern - Maybe Budapest
Weil - unknown, maybe Budapest

Thank you all, and good hunting

Ruffin Cooper
rrcooper@erols.com