Date   

Re: Zlata #general

miriam shifreen <mirshif@...>
 

This is my first message to the Ukraine SIG, so I hope I am sending it
correctly.

My aunt Zlata Chalezky was born in 1902, in Nikapol on the Dneiper River.
This must have been an accepted Jewish name at the time of her birth, and
when she died and I gave details to the Chevra Kadisher for the funeral
arrangements, they accepted this as her Hebrew name, although I thought it
was her Yiddish name.

Miriam Shifreen
Researching CHALEZKY >from Nikapol, and SHIFREEN/SHIFRAN >from Chernigov


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Zlata #ukraine

miriam shifreen <mirshif@...>
 

This is my first message to the Ukraine SIG, so I hope I am sending it
correctly.

My aunt Zlata Chalezky was born in 1902, in Nikapol on the Dneiper River.
This must have been an accepted Jewish name at the time of her birth, and
when she died and I gave details to the Chevra Kadisher for the funeral
arrangements, they accepted this as her Hebrew name, although I thought it
was her Yiddish name.

Miriam Shifreen
Researching CHALEZKY >from Nikapol, and SHIFREEN/SHIFRAN >from Chernigov


Re: Surname change #belarus

sallybru@...
 

As we have mentioned many times, Ernie, Russian Jews were first assigned
permanent family names in 1826-but they didn't use them. Your ancestor was
still Abraham ben Isaac or whatever.

The government wanted to keep track of the family so it would know who was
draftable (often the first son was exempt) and who was allowed to marry
(legally that is, sometimes only the oldest son was allowed to marry) and
who was taxed. All of these are good reason for Abraham ben Isaac to
confuse things and not use the name he was signed up with. Over the years,
of course, we see that the surnames were used in different events registered
by the government-births, marriages, deaths-and often the names varied for a
long time before they became set. In your case, I would guess that the name
was used in a different form Bakstansky or Baksht.

Now, the challange for someone else, Baksht sounds to me like it might be
the acronym of some famous rabbi, but Dan Rottenberg doesn't have that
meaning for it. If this is true, it might have been turned into a 'Slavic'
form by adding the -ansky. Or else it might have been a town name. I am
certainly not an expert on famous rabbinical names. But I would think the
two names are just alternate forms of the same thing.

People didn't usually change their names because of the death of a spouse or
anything like that with one exception: sometimes if a man married a woman
who's father had no sons, he might take that man's surname-to become
undraftable(?) or just to perpetuate the name. Your two versions seem too
similar for that, but it is possible.

Sally Bruckheimer
Buffalo, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:Surname change #general

sallybru@...
 

As we have mentioned many times, Ernie, Russian Jews were first assigned
permanent family names in 1826-but they didn't use them. Your ancestor was
still Abraham ben Isaac or whatever.

The government wanted to keep track of the family so it would know who was
draftable (often the first son was exempt) and who was allowed to marry
(legally that is, sometimes only the oldest son was allowed to marry) and
who was taxed. All of these are good reason for Abraham ben Isaac to
confuse things and not use the name he was signed up with. Over the years,
of course, we see that the surnames were used in different events registered
by the government-births, marriages, deaths-and often the names varied for a
long time before they became set. In your case, I would guess that the name
was used in a different form Bakstansky or Baksht.

Now, the challange for someone else, Baksht sounds to me like it might be
the acronym of some famous rabbi, but Dan Rottenberg doesn't have that
meaning for it. If this is true, it might have been turned into a 'Slavic'
form by adding the -ansky. Or else it might have been a town name. I am
certainly not an expert on famous rabbinical names. But I would think the
two names are just alternate forms of the same thing.

People didn't usually change their names because of the death of a spouse or
anything like that with one exception: sometimes if a man married a woman
who's father had no sons, he might take that man's surname-to become
undraftable(?) or just to perpetuate the name. Your two versions seem too
similar for that, but it is possible.

Sally Bruckheimer
Buffalo, NY


February 2001 Yizkor Book update #general

Joyce Field <jfield@...>
 

Dear Genners: It is a pleasure to announce our new and updated yizkor books.

February 2001 update for Yizkor Book Project

How do our wonderful volunteers do it month after month? On the one
hand, we have our donors who contribute translations of yizkor books
and on the other hand, we have our html staff who turn those
translations into magnificent web pages. To all of them my heartiest
congratulations for their amazing work and their dedication to
unlocking the wonders of the yizkor books by translating them into
English so they will accessible to a wider audience.

February is always a short month. Nevertheless, we added 7 new books
and updated 13 others, a great achievement. The first translated
chapter >from the Pinkas HaKehillot, Sadagura, went online on the
last day of February. We are still trying to determine the best way
to list all the translated chapters >from this massive encyclopedia,
so be sure to check under different categories until we post a
message notifying you how these translations will be categorized on
the index page at http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html.

New Books:

Gostynin, Poland
Meretch, Lithuania
Pinsk, Belarus
Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
Sadagura, Romania/Ukraine: chapter >from Pinkas HaKehillot
Turka, Ukraine
Volozhin, Belarus

Updated Books:


Bedzin, Poland
Bukowina, 2 entries : chapters on Vashkivtsi (Waschkoutz), Ukraine;
Sereth, Ukraine)
Chortkov, Ukraine
Dokshitsy, Belarus
Drohiczhn, Belarus
Kolomyya, Ukraine
Kurzeniac, Beklarus
Oswiecim, Poland
Radomsko, Poland
Rzeszow, Poland
Svencionys, Lithuania
Zaglembia, Poland (check under REGIONS)

As always I would like to call your attention to the yizkor book
fundraising projects which need your support. Many of our yizkor
books can be translated only by professional translators who are paid
for their remarkable work. If you have been helped by these
translations, please show your appreciation by providing financial
support so that more can be translated and put online. Some of the
projects are languishing because of a lack of funds. We know you
are reading these translations as there were almost 111,000 hits on
the yizkor book web site in February. And please add a contribution
to JewishGen, which makes all this possible by providing the
infrastructure and administrative support that allow us to run this
project.

Bolekhov, Ukraine
Brest, Belarus
Brzeziny, Poland
Buchach, Ukraine
Chelm, Poland
Czyzew, Poland
Dokshitsy, Belarus
Drogichin, Belarus
Gargzdai, Lithuania
Goniadz, Poland
Gorodenka, Ukraine
Gorodok, Ukraine
Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine
Kremenets, Ukraine
Krynki, Poland
Lancut, Poland
Maramures Region
Moravia
Przemysl, Poland
Pulawy, Poland
Rokiskis,Lithuania
Rozhnyatov, Ukraine
Rzeszow, Poland
Slutsk, Belarus
Sochaczew, Poland
Stawiski, Poland
Telekhany, Belarus
Wolbrom, Poland
Yedintsy, Moldova
Zgierz, Poland

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen February 2001 Yizkor Book update #general

Joyce Field <jfield@...>
 

Dear Genners: It is a pleasure to announce our new and updated yizkor books.

February 2001 update for Yizkor Book Project

How do our wonderful volunteers do it month after month? On the one
hand, we have our donors who contribute translations of yizkor books
and on the other hand, we have our html staff who turn those
translations into magnificent web pages. To all of them my heartiest
congratulations for their amazing work and their dedication to
unlocking the wonders of the yizkor books by translating them into
English so they will accessible to a wider audience.

February is always a short month. Nevertheless, we added 7 new books
and updated 13 others, a great achievement. The first translated
chapter >from the Pinkas HaKehillot, Sadagura, went online on the
last day of February. We are still trying to determine the best way
to list all the translated chapters >from this massive encyclopedia,
so be sure to check under different categories until we post a
message notifying you how these translations will be categorized on
the index page at http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html.

New Books:

Gostynin, Poland
Meretch, Lithuania
Pinsk, Belarus
Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
Sadagura, Romania/Ukraine: chapter >from Pinkas HaKehillot
Turka, Ukraine
Volozhin, Belarus

Updated Books:


Bedzin, Poland
Bukowina, 2 entries : chapters on Vashkivtsi (Waschkoutz), Ukraine;
Sereth, Ukraine)
Chortkov, Ukraine
Dokshitsy, Belarus
Drohiczhn, Belarus
Kolomyya, Ukraine
Kurzeniac, Beklarus
Oswiecim, Poland
Radomsko, Poland
Rzeszow, Poland
Svencionys, Lithuania
Zaglembia, Poland (check under REGIONS)

As always I would like to call your attention to the yizkor book
fundraising projects which need your support. Many of our yizkor
books can be translated only by professional translators who are paid
for their remarkable work. If you have been helped by these
translations, please show your appreciation by providing financial
support so that more can be translated and put online. Some of the
projects are languishing because of a lack of funds. We know you
are reading these translations as there were almost 111,000 hits on
the yizkor book web site in February. And please add a contribution
to JewishGen, which makes all this possible by providing the
infrastructure and administrative support that allow us to run this
project.

Bolekhov, Ukraine
Brest, Belarus
Brzeziny, Poland
Buchach, Ukraine
Chelm, Poland
Czyzew, Poland
Dokshitsy, Belarus
Drogichin, Belarus
Gargzdai, Lithuania
Goniadz, Poland
Gorodenka, Ukraine
Gorodok, Ukraine
Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine
Kremenets, Ukraine
Krynki, Poland
Lancut, Poland
Maramures Region
Moravia
Przemysl, Poland
Pulawy, Poland
Rokiskis,Lithuania
Rozhnyatov, Ukraine
Rzeszow, Poland
Slutsk, Belarus
Sochaczew, Poland
Stawiski, Poland
Telekhany, Belarus
Wolbrom, Poland
Yedintsy, Moldova
Zgierz, Poland

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@...


Searching: The KIRSCHENSTEIN family #general

Leslie <lkerschtien@...>
 

Greetings >from Canada!

I am trying to research the family of my grandfather, Carl Kerschtien
(Kirschenstein). He was born in the Ukraine about 1881 and spoke of a sister
Emma.
Thank you,
Richard Kerschtien


Do you know this NYC school? #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

I am trying to find someone who was a member of the graduating class of
D.W.C.H.S., New York in 1929?

Would anyone be familiar with which school in New York this could be?

Thanks in advance,

Carol Rombro Rider Baltimore, Maryland USA CRomRider@...


Re: naturalization question #belarus

Sally Hohensee <hohensees@...>
 

Re: Sara Lynns' naturalization question, March 4:

To get naturalization records >from the INS, you need to make a Freedom of
Information Act/Privacy Act request. Use INS Form G-639, which you can get
on http://www.ins.usdoj.gov/graphics/formsfee/forms/g-639.htm . I did this
and received a copy of INS' naturalization certificate files for my
great-grandfather, Abe Lieb FEIGENBAUM, in about 3 months. There was no
charge!

You need to ask for "C-files" which are naturalization certificate files,
containing Declaration of Intention, Petition for Naturalization, and
Certificate of Naturalization. Send your request to INS headquarters in
Washington, D.C. More information is at
http://www.ins.usdoj.gov/graphics/aboutins/history/NatzRec/NATREC.htm .

Sally Hohensee
Prairie Village, Kansas

Researching: FEIGENBAUM, FEIGEN, GELBSMAN, RUGG - Lubartow, Poland, Russia,
Boston; KIPERBERG, COOPER, MARCUS - Ostrog?, Russia, Boston; HANDEL,
HANDELMAN, SCHLOMJUK, SCHARF, THAU - Mikulince?, Galicia, Austria, New York;
SINGER - Verenchanka?, Bukovina, Austria, New York


Yiddish Actors - Photos #general

David W. Harris <dharris1@...>
 

ViewMate is displaying two photographs taken about 1900 at the studio of
Philip Hurwitz, 374 1/2 Grand Street in New York. Since the studio was
near the Yiddish Theaters, it took many photographs of Yiddish stage
personalities, two of which appear under the category "Do you recognize?"
They are:

VM445 and VM446

I am trying to:
1. Identify the people in the photographs
2. Identify the plays and roles they were dressed for

Your help will be appreciated. Thank you.
David Harris
Silver Spring, MD


Searching: TODRESOWITZ-ROSENBERG #general

The Rosenbergs <rose4@...>
 

Hello all,

I am new to this mailing list and I am looking for leads/information on the
ancestors of the Todresowitz family >from Dvinsk who changed their name to
Rosenberg when they emigrated to Johannesburg, South Africa.
As far as I know, the father was Ben-Zion Todresowitz, he had sons: Shleima
(b.abt 1898), Leibe (b.1901) and Teddy (b.abt 1910). The last two emigrated
to South Africa and contact was lost with Shleima (Shlomo?) and his family
who stayed behind but apparently survived the holocaust.
Shleima's family may have ended up in Israel but no-one is sure what their
surname is now.
Leibe (Louis) Rosenberg married Leah Strugatz, and they had two sons Mair
and Hone.
Teddy Rosenberg married Luba Wainberg, and they had three children Victor,
Ian and Louelle.
Thanks for any help with the Todresowitz-Rosenberg connection and
information about Shleima's descendants.

Nicole Rosenberg
rose4@...
Israel

Researching: MOSES/MOSS (Lodz - London); MISSULAWIN (Riga); LIKNAITZKY
(Jonishkis); KAPLAN (Plungian); EAST/MIZRAHI, SCHNITZER (Palestine); HACOHEN
KAPLAN, POLNE (Palestine)
and PERECHANSKY/PORZECANSKI(Simna); GREEN/GRIN (Jonishkis); STRUGATZ
(Dvinsk), TODRESOWITZ-ROSENBERG (Dvinsk).


DEUTSCH #general

Mpflerr
 

I am a "beginner" so excuse any and all dumb questions.

Was the family name Deutsch common among all European Jews or was it more
specific to a particular country like Hungary, Austria or Germany?

Thank you.

Marina E. Pflieger

MODERATOR NOTE: Welcome to JewishGen, Marina. Don't worry, there are no
"dumb questions". You might start by browsing the JewishGen Frequently
Asked Questions (FAQ) at <http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html>.
Check the JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) at <http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/>
for researchers interested in the name DEUTSCH. You may get a sense there
of where these families came from.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: TODRESOWITZ-ROSENBERG #general

The Rosenbergs <rose4@...>
 

Hello all,

I am new to this mailing list and I am looking for leads/information on the
ancestors of the Todresowitz family >from Dvinsk who changed their name to
Rosenberg when they emigrated to Johannesburg, South Africa.
As far as I know, the father was Ben-Zion Todresowitz, he had sons: Shleima
(b.abt 1898), Leibe (b.1901) and Teddy (b.abt 1910). The last two emigrated
to South Africa and contact was lost with Shleima (Shlomo?) and his family
who stayed behind but apparently survived the holocaust.
Shleima's family may have ended up in Israel but no-one is sure what their
surname is now.
Leibe (Louis) Rosenberg married Leah Strugatz, and they had two sons Mair
and Hone.
Teddy Rosenberg married Luba Wainberg, and they had three children Victor,
Ian and Louelle.
Thanks for any help with the Todresowitz-Rosenberg connection and
information about Shleima's descendants.

Nicole Rosenberg
rose4@...
Israel

Researching: MOSES/MOSS (Lodz - London); MISSULAWIN (Riga); LIKNAITZKY
(Jonishkis); KAPLAN (Plungian); EAST/MIZRAHI, SCHNITZER (Palestine); HACOHEN
KAPLAN, POLNE (Palestine)
and PERECHANSKY/PORZECANSKI(Simna); GREEN/GRIN (Jonishkis); STRUGATZ
(Dvinsk), TODRESOWITZ-ROSENBERG (Dvinsk).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: The KIRSCHENSTEIN family #general

Leslie <lkerschtien@...>
 

Greetings >from Canada!

I am trying to research the family of my grandfather, Carl Kerschtien
(Kirschenstein). He was born in the Ukraine about 1881 and spoke of a sister
Emma.
Thank you,
Richard Kerschtien


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Do you know this NYC school? #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

I am trying to find someone who was a member of the graduating class of
D.W.C.H.S., New York in 1929?

Would anyone be familiar with which school in New York this could be?

Thanks in advance,

Carol Rombro Rider Baltimore, Maryland USA CRomRider@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: naturalization question #general

Sally Hohensee <hohensees@...>
 

Re: Sara Lynns' naturalization question, March 4:

To get naturalization records >from the INS, you need to make a Freedom of
Information Act/Privacy Act request. Use INS Form G-639, which you can get
on http://www.ins.usdoj.gov/graphics/formsfee/forms/g-639.htm . I did this
and received a copy of INS' naturalization certificate files for my
great-grandfather, Abe Lieb FEIGENBAUM, in about 3 months. There was no
charge!

You need to ask for "C-files" which are naturalization certificate files,
containing Declaration of Intention, Petition for Naturalization, and
Certificate of Naturalization. Send your request to INS headquarters in
Washington, D.C. More information is at
http://www.ins.usdoj.gov/graphics/aboutins/history/NatzRec/NATREC.htm .

Sally Hohensee
Prairie Village, Kansas

Researching: FEIGENBAUM, FEIGEN, GELBSMAN, RUGG - Lubartow, Poland, Russia,
Boston; KIPERBERG, COOPER, MARCUS - Ostrog?, Russia, Boston; HANDEL,
HANDELMAN, SCHLOMJUK, SCHARF, THAU - Mikulince?, Galicia, Austria, New York;
SINGER - Verenchanka?, Bukovina, Austria, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yiddish Actors - Photos #general

David W. Harris <dharris1@...>
 

ViewMate is displaying two photographs taken about 1900 at the studio of
Philip Hurwitz, 374 1/2 Grand Street in New York. Since the studio was
near the Yiddish Theaters, it took many photographs of Yiddish stage
personalities, two of which appear under the category "Do you recognize?"
They are:

VM445 and VM446

I am trying to:
1. Identify the people in the photographs
2. Identify the plays and roles they were dressed for

Your help will be appreciated. Thank you.
David Harris
Silver Spring, MD


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen DEUTSCH #general

Mpflerr
 

I am a "beginner" so excuse any and all dumb questions.

Was the family name Deutsch common among all European Jews or was it more
specific to a particular country like Hungary, Austria or Germany?

Thank you.

Marina E. Pflieger

MODERATOR NOTE: Welcome to JewishGen, Marina. Don't worry, there are no
"dumb questions". You might start by browsing the JewishGen Frequently
Asked Questions (FAQ) at <http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html>.
Check the JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) at <http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/>
for researchers interested in the name DEUTSCH. You may get a sense there
of where these families came from.


Re: Understanding a Romanian Name #general

PJL427@...
 

Janculovici is not a Slavic Patronimic. The ici at the end is the Romanian
suffix that means son of. Other Romanian forms would be Rabinovici,
Berkovici, Abramovici and sometimes they used "cu" such as Lazarescu,
Anotonescu, etc.

Hersu is the Romanian form of Hirsh or the diminuative Hershelah.

Romanians, before they had last names were known as Marcu Hersu or Marcu sin
(son of) Hersu.

If there was a last name, then that was appended to the end. Marcu Hersu
Horn.

In the case of an unmarried woman, she would be known as Zisla (followed by
fathers first name) perhaps Simca for example Aranovici.

When she married, she would be known as Zisla Marcu Horn.

On some of the documents that I have, the woman might be listed by only her
first name.

This is the way that she would be listed on a Romanian document. Remember
that in a traditional Ketubah the woman's name is often not listed at all.
She would be referred to as: "the virgin," "the divorced woman", or the
"widow." This was important because, the virgin was worth 200 zuzim and the
non virgin was only valued at 100 zuzim.

The dowries were often registered in the town hall.

I have no clue why there are two last names here, unless, Horn was a
corruption of Aaron, which seemed to happen on many of the certificates. I
think it would be worthwhile to look at the entire document in its entirity
to understand it in context since I have never seen a document where there
were more than two family names. One possibility is that he was the son of
a former husband of the mother, that the mother remarried while she was
pregnant with the child and both names were used or that the child had a
different father for some other reason.

In one of my grandfather's aunts children's birth certificates that I got,
we alway thought that Emil was the son of Shabetai. The birth certificate
listed his mother only by her first name, but did not list the name of the
father. This was not the mother that we thought was his mother. He was
listed as being born in the home of her brother, Shabettai. When Emil came
to America, he became a physician. The lady who we thought was his mother
was Shabettai's wife.

The important thing that relates to the documents is that his mother was not
listed with a last name at all.

I hope that this is helpful.

Philip J. Leonard MD
Researching WIND, SOMMER, ROSENTHAL, SPRINGER, GOLDENBERG, SOLOMON, WEINBERG,
RABINOVICI, FRANK, HERSHKOWITZ, JANKOWITZ, KAUFMAN, LEVENTER in Braila,
ROMANIA.


Re: Gitlin Library #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

You are looking for the Gitlin Library in Cape Town. If you go to either
the South Africa SIG, http://www.jewishgen.org/SAfrica, or the South Africa
section of the Databases on Jewishgen, you will find references to the
Gitlin family. There is a Jacob Gitlin, born 1878, listed.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@...