Date   

suggestions for finding twin #general

Suzecrazy@...
 

Hi again,
My GGGrandfather born 1877 in Austria/Hungary had a twin brother. I know
that my GGGdied in 1958 in N.Y.and I think his twin was still living at
that time. >from what I've been told, they weren't speaking, and at my ggg
funeral, his twin brother walked in and scared everyone to death.
Apparently, not everyone knew about Ellis Getzler's twin brother
Nathaniel. Any suggestions as how to begin the hunt for the illusive
twin's kins?
Susan Stock
Agoura Hills, Ca


brothers keeper problem #general

Robert Fraser <rgfraser@...>
 

Could an expert on BK help me out here, please? I need to combine three
GEDCOM files >from three separate subdirectories into one to submit the
total to the FTJP. I think I did it once before but can't figure out how.
I am using BK for Windows 5.2G
Offlist answers please

TIA, Shalom
Robert W Fraser
rgfraser@iinet.net.au


Re: "Sanok, Poland" #general

NFatouros@...
 

In response to Albert Brookenthal's 03-15-01 inquiry for information
about Sanok, Myrna Levin suggested that he visit the website at
http://www.bh.org.il where he could place an order for searches. That was
a good idea!

Before writing my own response, I did not check to see whether any part
of Sanok's yizkor book, "Sefer zikaron le-kehilat Sanok ve-ha-sevivah,"
published in 1970, has been translated and put online at Jewishgen, but if
he can read Yiddish and Hebrew, this book may be a source of information.
In her book, "Finding your Jewish Roots in Galicia," Jewishgenner Suzan
E. Wynne writes that she owns a copy of the book and has a translated
table of contents and a translated index of surnames.

According to my 1962 Columbia-Lippincott Gazetteer Sanok had a
population of 11,176. The town was near the San River, on a railroad
line, 34 miles south of Rzeszow. The inhabitants manufactured rolling
stock, bicycles,storage batteries, rubber footwear, and cement products.
They also did sawmilling and brick working. There were pipelines to Sanok
from nearby natural gas wells, and in the vicinity there were manganese
deposits.

In his "ShtetlFinder Gazetteer," Chester G. Cohen lists the names of
several subscribers to a certain book. The list includes a number of rabbis.

In her book, "Jewish Roots in Poland," Miriam Weiner lists the extant
records of Sanok and tells where they are located.

There is a probably brief article about Sanok in the "Encyclopedia
Judaica." And I guess that the Jewishgen affiliated cemetery project has a
description of the Sanok cemetery.

Maybe correspondence with other Sanok researchers would be helpful to
Mr. Brookenthal. He can find their e-mail addresses by looking through
Jewishen's Discussion Group Archives and he should also check with
Jewishgen's Family Finder.


Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ, SCHUTZ,
Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;SAS, Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol; BEHAM,
Salok, Kharkov.
03-16-01

MODERATOR NOTE: The Discussion Group Archives can be searched at
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~archpop
and the Jewishgen Family Finder is at http://www.jewishgen.org/


Ship Vaderland #general

Brian <brian@...>
 

To add to the postings regarding the ship Vaderland the following
little bit of history was gleaned >from 'Passenger Liners of the Western
Ocean' by Vernon Gibbs.

The first Vaderland built in 1873 sailed >from Antwerp to Philadelphia on
January 19th 1873. She and two companion ships Nederland and
Switzerland were the first ships to carry oil in bulk but was later
decided that carrying oil and passengers at the same time was not a good
idea. She was 2750 tons and was sold to French owners in 1889 and
renamed Nautique.

The second Vaderland was built in 1900 and became British registered
with White Star in 1915, renamed Southland and used as a troopship. She
was first torpedoed in the Aegean in 1915 but reached harbour. She was
torpedoed again and sunk off Northern Ireland on June 4th 1917.
--
Brian Wyndham

brian@guarlfrd.demon.co.uk


Where is "Kazan" ? #general

D J Olken <debolken@...>
 

I have just found a "business card" for one of my grandfather's older
brothers who never immigrated to the US. The family lived in Plock,
Poland. Time frame would probably be the 1890's.

The card reads "Jozef SZCZYPCZYK -- Student Medycyny". On the back of the
card is handwritten "a student at Kazan". I entered "Kazan" into the
Shtetlfinder but was presented with too many choices to know which is the
correct locale. Any suggestions as to what the locality is known as today?
Thanks for any help!

Deb Olken
Cambridge MA

Searching:
OLKENITSKY of Voronovo, Belarus to USA; SZCZYPCZYK (became KAUFMAN) of
Plock, Poland to USA and UK; CHAJES of Medzhibooz, Bessarabia to USA;
FINKLESTEIN of "Russia" to Montreal; and SPECTOR of "Russia" to Montreal


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen suggestions for finding twin #general

Suzecrazy@...
 

Hi again,
My GGGrandfather born 1877 in Austria/Hungary had a twin brother. I know
that my GGGdied in 1958 in N.Y.and I think his twin was still living at
that time. >from what I've been told, they weren't speaking, and at my ggg
funeral, his twin brother walked in and scared everyone to death.
Apparently, not everyone knew about Ellis Getzler's twin brother
Nathaniel. Any suggestions as how to begin the hunt for the illusive
twin's kins?
Susan Stock
Agoura Hills, Ca


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen brothers keeper problem #general

Robert Fraser <rgfraser@...>
 

Could an expert on BK help me out here, please? I need to combine three
GEDCOM files >from three separate subdirectories into one to submit the
total to the FTJP. I think I did it once before but can't figure out how.
I am using BK for Windows 5.2G
Offlist answers please

TIA, Shalom
Robert W Fraser
rgfraser@iinet.net.au


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: "Sanok, Poland" #general

NFatouros@...
 

In response to Albert Brookenthal's 03-15-01 inquiry for information
about Sanok, Myrna Levin suggested that he visit the website at
http://www.bh.org.il where he could place an order for searches. That was
a good idea!

Before writing my own response, I did not check to see whether any part
of Sanok's yizkor book, "Sefer zikaron le-kehilat Sanok ve-ha-sevivah,"
published in 1970, has been translated and put online at Jewishgen, but if
he can read Yiddish and Hebrew, this book may be a source of information.
In her book, "Finding your Jewish Roots in Galicia," Jewishgenner Suzan
E. Wynne writes that she owns a copy of the book and has a translated
table of contents and a translated index of surnames.

According to my 1962 Columbia-Lippincott Gazetteer Sanok had a
population of 11,176. The town was near the San River, on a railroad
line, 34 miles south of Rzeszow. The inhabitants manufactured rolling
stock, bicycles,storage batteries, rubber footwear, and cement products.
They also did sawmilling and brick working. There were pipelines to Sanok
from nearby natural gas wells, and in the vicinity there were manganese
deposits.

In his "ShtetlFinder Gazetteer," Chester G. Cohen lists the names of
several subscribers to a certain book. The list includes a number of rabbis.

In her book, "Jewish Roots in Poland," Miriam Weiner lists the extant
records of Sanok and tells where they are located.

There is a probably brief article about Sanok in the "Encyclopedia
Judaica." And I guess that the Jewishgen affiliated cemetery project has a
description of the Sanok cemetery.

Maybe correspondence with other Sanok researchers would be helpful to
Mr. Brookenthal. He can find their e-mail addresses by looking through
Jewishen's Discussion Group Archives and he should also check with
Jewishgen's Family Finder.


Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ, SCHUTZ,
Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;SAS, Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol; BEHAM,
Salok, Kharkov.
03-16-01

MODERATOR NOTE: The Discussion Group Archives can be searched at
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~archpop
and the Jewishgen Family Finder is at http://www.jewishgen.org/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ship Vaderland #general

Brian <brian@...>
 

To add to the postings regarding the ship Vaderland the following
little bit of history was gleaned >from 'Passenger Liners of the Western
Ocean' by Vernon Gibbs.

The first Vaderland built in 1873 sailed >from Antwerp to Philadelphia on
January 19th 1873. She and two companion ships Nederland and
Switzerland were the first ships to carry oil in bulk but was later
decided that carrying oil and passengers at the same time was not a good
idea. She was 2750 tons and was sold to French owners in 1889 and
renamed Nautique.

The second Vaderland was built in 1900 and became British registered
with White Star in 1915, renamed Southland and used as a troopship. She
was first torpedoed in the Aegean in 1915 but reached harbour. She was
torpedoed again and sunk off Northern Ireland on June 4th 1917.
--
Brian Wyndham

brian@guarlfrd.demon.co.uk


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Where is "Kazan" ? #general

D J Olken <debolken@...>
 

I have just found a "business card" for one of my grandfather's older
brothers who never immigrated to the US. The family lived in Plock,
Poland. Time frame would probably be the 1890's.

The card reads "Jozef SZCZYPCZYK -- Student Medycyny". On the back of the
card is handwritten "a student at Kazan". I entered "Kazan" into the
Shtetlfinder but was presented with too many choices to know which is the
correct locale. Any suggestions as to what the locality is known as today?
Thanks for any help!

Deb Olken
Cambridge MA

Searching:
OLKENITSKY of Voronovo, Belarus to USA; SZCZYPCZYK (became KAUFMAN) of
Plock, Poland to USA and UK; CHAJES of Medzhibooz, Bessarabia to USA;
FINKLESTEIN of "Russia" to Montreal; and SPECTOR of "Russia" to Montreal


Amchislavsky Origin #ukraine

KissenaBlvd@...
 

Dear Group,

Someone asked about the origin of the surname "Amchislavsky." According to
Where Once We Walked, an alternate name of the town Mstislavl, which is in
Belarus, was "Amchislav" or "Omchislav." That is the probable origin of the
name.

Ira Leibowitz
Bethesda, MD

Searching: BISKAR/BISKER, Ignatovka/Zofyuvka/Rovno, Ukr. to Washington, DC
TREST, Olyka and Odessa, Ukr. to Washington, DC and Israel


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Amchislavsky Origin #ukraine

KissenaBlvd@...
 

Dear Group,

Someone asked about the origin of the surname "Amchislavsky." According to
Where Once We Walked, an alternate name of the town Mstislavl, which is in
Belarus, was "Amchislav" or "Omchislav." That is the probable origin of the
name.

Ira Leibowitz
Bethesda, MD

Searching: BISKAR/BISKER, Ignatovka/Zofyuvka/Rovno, Ukr. to Washington, DC
TREST, Olyka and Odessa, Ukr. to Washington, DC and Israel


obtaining records from Bronx Surrogate Court #general

Howard Zakai
 

Genners,
Would anyone happen to know if it is possible to write to the Bronx
County Surrogate's Court in order to obtain a record >from long ago? I
have a picture of my great-grandfather and his siblings >from around 1920
and on the back is stamped Bronx Cty Surrogate Court. I was wondering if
any records >from this would still be archived/filed so I could possibly
learn the specifics. I am assuming it was 1920 - the year when both of
their parents died (I guess without a will), but perhaps there is some
info. I could use.
Thanks in advance
Howie Zakai
Staten Island


Re: LDS Online Catalogue #general

debjkay <debjkay@...>
 

Try to search by author, US Immigration and Naturalization Service, or
Immigration and Naturalization as key words

Debra Kay
debjkay@msn.com
Simi Valley, CA

Am I the only one who is having trouble figuring out
the LDS Family History Online Catalogue?

http://www.familysearch.org/Search/searchcatalog.asp

I am trying to find microfilms for:

Index to Passports
(USA, 1910-1930)

Can anyone help with this? I don't see how to search
by title, subject, etc.

Dan


Re: "El" as given name for a male? #general

ROBERT WEISS
 

Lynne Shapiro writes:


I have a copy of a record of birth and circumcision >from the archives in
Odessa. According to two different translators, it shows the name of the
child's father as, in English, "El Gdalovich UMANSKY". I assume
Gdalovich is a patronymic. (My great-grandfather, Nachum UMANSKY,
referred, in a translated letter I have, to "Uncle Gedalia".) What kind
of name is "El"? Is it an abbreviation for a longer name? Or does it
have some other meaning? >>
Consider the possibility that the transliteration is faulty, and that
that it should read "Elye" instead of "El". There are symbols in the
Cyrillic Russian alphabet that have the sound "ye" "yu" "ya" in English.
Some of these characters were eliminated >from the Russian alphabet in the
1918 spelling reforms, but would be found in records prior to that date.
I would take a copy of the original Russian-language record to a Russian
language expert and ask for a character-by-character transliteration of
the name.

But the name "El" is also found in Russian areas. The name Il'ya is a
common diminutive of the Hebrew name Eliyahu. It has many variants common
in Russian areas such as Eliash, El, El'yu, Elya, Elia, Il'ya, Ilya, etc.
For more information consult "Russian-Jewish Given Names- Their Origins
and Variants" by Boris Feldblyum, Avotaynu, 1998

Robert Weiss in Northridge, CA
RWeissJGS@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen obtaining records from Bronx Surrogate Court #general

Howard Zakai
 

Genners,
Would anyone happen to know if it is possible to write to the Bronx
County Surrogate's Court in order to obtain a record >from long ago? I
have a picture of my great-grandfather and his siblings >from around 1920
and on the back is stamped Bronx Cty Surrogate Court. I was wondering if
any records >from this would still be archived/filed so I could possibly
learn the specifics. I am assuming it was 1920 - the year when both of
their parents died (I guess without a will), but perhaps there is some
info. I could use.
Thanks in advance
Howie Zakai
Staten Island


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: LDS Online Catalogue #general

debjkay <debjkay@...>
 

Try to search by author, US Immigration and Naturalization Service, or
Immigration and Naturalization as key words

Debra Kay
debjkay@msn.com
Simi Valley, CA

Am I the only one who is having trouble figuring out
the LDS Family History Online Catalogue?

http://www.familysearch.org/Search/searchcatalog.asp

I am trying to find microfilms for:

Index to Passports
(USA, 1910-1930)

Can anyone help with this? I don't see how to search
by title, subject, etc.

Dan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:"El" as given name for a male? #general

ROBERT WEISS
 

Lynne Shapiro writes:


I have a copy of a record of birth and circumcision >from the archives in
Odessa. According to two different translators, it shows the name of the
child's father as, in English, "El Gdalovich UMANSKY". I assume
Gdalovich is a patronymic. (My great-grandfather, Nachum UMANSKY,
referred, in a translated letter I have, to "Uncle Gedalia".) What kind
of name is "El"? Is it an abbreviation for a longer name? Or does it
have some other meaning? >>
Consider the possibility that the transliteration is faulty, and that
that it should read "Elye" instead of "El". There are symbols in the
Cyrillic Russian alphabet that have the sound "ye" "yu" "ya" in English.
Some of these characters were eliminated >from the Russian alphabet in the
1918 spelling reforms, but would be found in records prior to that date.
I would take a copy of the original Russian-language record to a Russian
language expert and ask for a character-by-character transliteration of
the name.

But the name "El" is also found in Russian areas. The name Il'ya is a
common diminutive of the Hebrew name Eliyahu. It has many variants common
in Russian areas such as Eliash, El, El'yu, Elya, Elia, Il'ya, Ilya, etc.
For more information consult "Russian-Jewish Given Names- Their Origins
and Variants" by Boris Feldblyum, Avotaynu, 1998

Robert Weiss in Northridge, CA
RWeissJGS@aol.com


Reminder - JGS (NY) meeting - Sunday, March 18, 2001 #general

Jgsny@...
 

Genomic Views of Jewish History - Sunday, March 18, 2001

Have you ever wondered how well 5000 years of recorded history could
be preserved in the genetic record? Dr. Harry Ostrer, Director, Human
Genetics Program, New York University School of Medicine, will describe
his recent work to understand the historical migrations of Jewish
peoples. For information about this study and how you can participate,
come join us at the Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, NYC,
at 2:00 pm.

For more information about this study, see
www.med.nyu.edu/genetics/jewishorigins.html

Remember to bring your membership cards.
See you Sunday!

Best Regards,
Estelle Guzik
JGS (NY)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Reminder - JGS (NY) meeting - Sunday, March 18, 2001 #general

Jgsny@...
 

Genomic Views of Jewish History - Sunday, March 18, 2001

Have you ever wondered how well 5000 years of recorded history could
be preserved in the genetic record? Dr. Harry Ostrer, Director, Human
Genetics Program, New York University School of Medicine, will describe
his recent work to understand the historical migrations of Jewish
peoples. For information about this study and how you can participate,
come join us at the Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, NYC,
at 2:00 pm.

For more information about this study, see
www.med.nyu.edu/genetics/jewishorigins.html

Remember to bring your membership cards.
See you Sunday!

Best Regards,
Estelle Guzik
JGS (NY)