Date   

Re: Translation needed German to English #general

Marcelo Rosenbaum <marcelo@...>
 

Dear Madam/Sir

I may try to do the translation for you against a donation to Jewishgen
of US$ 0.10 per word. However I will confirm if I can translate your
document only after having seen it.

Please get in contact privately with me so that I can disclose my fax
number to you.

Best regards

M Rosenbaum
UK

D PITCHON <PITCHON@webtv.net> writes
I am looking for someone who can translate(free) two pages of
information that I just received >from the Vienna archives. The pages are
in German. I do not have a scanner so I would either have to fax it to
you or mail it.
Marcelo Rosenbaum
marcelo@roferma.demon.co.uk

searching for:
DURLACHER (Frankenthal), KAHN (Altenstadt, Osterberg), KRAMER (Walldorf),
MORGENSTERN (Buechenbach), NEUBURGER (Ichenhausen), RIESER (Laupheim),
ROSENBAUM (Nuernberg, Wonfurt), VANDEWART (Lendershausen, Neustadt a.d.
Saale, Nuernberg), WASSERMANN (Laupheim), WILHERMSDOERFER (Ansbach,
Gunzenhausen).

MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen appreciates the offer.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Translation needed German to English #general

Marcelo Rosenbaum <marcelo@...>
 

Dear Madam/Sir

I may try to do the translation for you against a donation to Jewishgen
of US$ 0.10 per word. However I will confirm if I can translate your
document only after having seen it.

Please get in contact privately with me so that I can disclose my fax
number to you.

Best regards

M Rosenbaum
UK

D PITCHON <PITCHON@webtv.net> writes
I am looking for someone who can translate(free) two pages of
information that I just received >from the Vienna archives. The pages are
in German. I do not have a scanner so I would either have to fax it to
you or mail it.
Marcelo Rosenbaum
marcelo@roferma.demon.co.uk

searching for:
DURLACHER (Frankenthal), KAHN (Altenstadt, Osterberg), KRAMER (Walldorf),
MORGENSTERN (Buechenbach), NEUBURGER (Ichenhausen), RIESER (Laupheim),
ROSENBAUM (Nuernberg, Wonfurt), VANDEWART (Lendershausen, Neustadt a.d.
Saale, Nuernberg), WASSERMANN (Laupheim), WILHERMSDOERFER (Ansbach,
Gunzenhausen).

MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen appreciates the offer.


Re: Help needed with a few words #yizkorbooks

Padraigh Dempsey <PDraighetc@...>
 

It appears you have stumbled across the Company unit of a staff command.
This company would have been of Siberian orientation. There also seems to be
reference to a movement along a wing, or it refers to the flank company this
unit represents?

Patrick

MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all posts with your full name and location.


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Re: Help needed with a few words #yizkorbooks

Padraigh Dempsey <PDraighetc@...>
 

It appears you have stumbled across the Company unit of a staff command.
This company would have been of Siberian orientation. There also seems to be
reference to a movement along a wing, or it refers to the flank company this
unit represents?

Patrick

MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all posts with your full name and location.


When, and where did the Holocaust start? #general

The Rosenbergs <rose4@...>
 

Kristallnacht took place on November 9th, 1938
See http://www.ushmm.org/kristallnacht/frame.htm

At 01:12 20/03/2001, you wrote:
I recently found the names of four of my relatives who were murdered in
an action at Berdichev, Ukraine on September 14-15 1941. According to John
Garrard, this was the first systematic massacre of the Shoah.
David Lewin wrote:
Sadly Golub-Dobrzyn has the same distinction
14 September 1939
Nicole Rosenberg
Israel


Re: Anatevka & Yehupets #general

Martin Green <btestware@...>
 

The question of the real name of Sholom Aleichem's fictional Anatevka has
come up as a topic of another discussion group, with several different
replies; I am posting my reply as it is of interest to the Ukraine SIG.
While looking through one of the Shtetl Finder books, I came across the
notations that Sholom Aleichem referred to existing places in the Ukraine
with pseudonyms. The fictional name of Yehupets was his name for Kiev;
the town of Anatevka was his name for Boyarka.

I was intrigued, as my maternal ancestors come >from Boyarka..
We are also >from Boyarka. My family was Greenspoon, and some
of the other family names >from the village are Belapolsky, Antonovsky,
and Shubinsky.

Martin Green
Winnipeg, Canada


Suicide, customs and reality #general

Matt Friedman <rabbi@...>
 

The subject of suicide is a hard one. Unfortunately I have had
occaision to officiate at the funeral of suicide victims. Jewish law
is clear. One who takes their own life is guilty of self murder.
The individual has a destroyed a creation of God. The individual has
demonstrated lack of self respect. Thus Jewish law dictates that such
a person be buried by the cemetery wall and not be given the honor of
a eulogy. This hard ruling is usually tempered by the following
understandings.
1. The person who has taken their own life can be assumed to have
changed their mind in the instant before death, but unchangeable forces
were already in motion. Thus at the moment of death, it was no longer
desired.
2. The person was mentally ill and unable to make a rational
decision and thus can't be held to the same standard as a healthy
person. Stated another way, mental illness as a life ending disease is
no different than heart disease. Two examples come to mind. A young
man on anti-depressant drugs ended his life after he became destabilized
when his physician changed his medications. In his case the suicide was
akin to a drug side effect. Another, more classical case, is one of a
woman who hanged herslf. She had previous attempts at suicide and was
at times under the care of a counselor. Clearly, she too, suffered from
long term mental illness.
3. Suicide brings on entirely different sets of issues beyond
ordinary grief. The surviving friends and family are plagued by the
"what if's.." and "if only's.."
Therefore in consideration of all these factors, Rabbis will often
give a suicide all the benefits of burial and mourning.
So what is the connection to genealogy? A death by suicide or
possible suicide is one that could have multigenerational impact upon
a family. This is important because genealogy is more than names and
dates. It is about understanding ourslelves and those related to us.
Furthermore, suicide can be an indicator of mental illness that is often
familial. While we celebrate connections to relatives who have great
accomplishments, we also need to understand our shared medical history.
I'm sure that readers of Jewishgen have also encountered medical studies
of people of Jewish decent who have family or personal histories of
schizophrenia, psoriasis, breast cancer, Tay-Sachs and Gaucher's
Disease. At times we can find ourselves becoming "forensic
genealogists" when we start to trace certain trends within our
families. Sorry about the length and seriousness of this post, but
the topic is one that has a greater impact than what might be readily
apparent at first.

Matt Friedman


Looking for Israel DREZNER's family #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

I'm looking for the family of Israel DREZNER, born in Warsaw on
20 June 1906, deported >from France on 15 May 1944 with convoy #73. Any
information would be welcome. Please reply privately.

Eve Line Blum
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (French JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


HABERMAN name change in Slonim #general

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Friends,

My ancestor Yushe Leib MEREMINSKY (b.1821) changed his surname in Slonim
to HABERMAN, the only one of his brothers to use this particular
"borrowed" name. I think he was the eldest son, so, as we are often told,
he probably changed it to evade a draft, and, as we are also told, often
took the surname of a family with no sons. My question is: are there any
HABERMAN'S out there with roots in Slonim whose surname Yushe Leib might
have borrowed?

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, Aarizona

Please respond privately


DNA/Genealogy article in New Yorker #general

steven weiss <szome@...>
 

An entertaining article on one man's pursuit to locate his ancestors
through conventional genealogy and DNA testing can be read in the New
Yorker Magazine of March 26, 2001. The article is not online but an
interview with John Seabrook, the author of the article titled "The Tree
of Me: DNA testing and the mania for genealogy" is online at:

http://www.newyorker.com/ON-LINE_ONLY/ARCHIVES/?010326on_onlineonly01

The article discusses Jewish interest in DNA testing and gives a lot of
information on what types of DNA tests are currently available through the
Internet.

Steven Weiss
Chicago
VOLK and SHVARTSBERG >from Lithuania


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen When, and where did the Holocaust start? #general

The Rosenbergs <rose4@...>
 

Kristallnacht took place on November 9th, 1938
See http://www.ushmm.org/kristallnacht/frame.htm

At 01:12 20/03/2001, you wrote:
I recently found the names of four of my relatives who were murdered in
an action at Berdichev, Ukraine on September 14-15 1941. According to John
Garrard, this was the first systematic massacre of the Shoah.
David Lewin wrote:
Sadly Golub-Dobrzyn has the same distinction
14 September 1939
Nicole Rosenberg
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Anatevka & Yehupets #general

Martin Green <btestware@...>
 

The question of the real name of Sholom Aleichem's fictional Anatevka has
come up as a topic of another discussion group, with several different
replies; I am posting my reply as it is of interest to the Ukraine SIG.
While looking through one of the Shtetl Finder books, I came across the
notations that Sholom Aleichem referred to existing places in the Ukraine
with pseudonyms. The fictional name of Yehupets was his name for Kiev;
the town of Anatevka was his name for Boyarka.

I was intrigued, as my maternal ancestors come >from Boyarka..
We are also >from Boyarka. My family was Greenspoon, and some
of the other family names >from the village are Belapolsky, Antonovsky,
and Shubinsky.

Martin Green
Winnipeg, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Suicide, customs and reality #general

Matt Friedman <rabbi@...>
 

The subject of suicide is a hard one. Unfortunately I have had
occaision to officiate at the funeral of suicide victims. Jewish law
is clear. One who takes their own life is guilty of self murder.
The individual has a destroyed a creation of God. The individual has
demonstrated lack of self respect. Thus Jewish law dictates that such
a person be buried by the cemetery wall and not be given the honor of
a eulogy. This hard ruling is usually tempered by the following
understandings.
1. The person who has taken their own life can be assumed to have
changed their mind in the instant before death, but unchangeable forces
were already in motion. Thus at the moment of death, it was no longer
desired.
2. The person was mentally ill and unable to make a rational
decision and thus can't be held to the same standard as a healthy
person. Stated another way, mental illness as a life ending disease is
no different than heart disease. Two examples come to mind. A young
man on anti-depressant drugs ended his life after he became destabilized
when his physician changed his medications. In his case the suicide was
akin to a drug side effect. Another, more classical case, is one of a
woman who hanged herslf. She had previous attempts at suicide and was
at times under the care of a counselor. Clearly, she too, suffered from
long term mental illness.
3. Suicide brings on entirely different sets of issues beyond
ordinary grief. The surviving friends and family are plagued by the
"what if's.." and "if only's.."
Therefore in consideration of all these factors, Rabbis will often
give a suicide all the benefits of burial and mourning.
So what is the connection to genealogy? A death by suicide or
possible suicide is one that could have multigenerational impact upon
a family. This is important because genealogy is more than names and
dates. It is about understanding ourslelves and those related to us.
Furthermore, suicide can be an indicator of mental illness that is often
familial. While we celebrate connections to relatives who have great
accomplishments, we also need to understand our shared medical history.
I'm sure that readers of Jewishgen have also encountered medical studies
of people of Jewish decent who have family or personal histories of
schizophrenia, psoriasis, breast cancer, Tay-Sachs and Gaucher's
Disease. At times we can find ourselves becoming "forensic
genealogists" when we start to trace certain trends within our
families. Sorry about the length and seriousness of this post, but
the topic is one that has a greater impact than what might be readily
apparent at first.

Matt Friedman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for Israel DREZNER's family #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

I'm looking for the family of Israel DREZNER, born in Warsaw on
20 June 1906, deported >from France on 15 May 1944 with convoy #73. Any
information would be welcome. Please reply privately.

Eve Line Blum
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (French JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen HABERMAN name change in Slonim #general

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Friends,

My ancestor Yushe Leib MEREMINSKY (b.1821) changed his surname in Slonim
to HABERMAN, the only one of his brothers to use this particular
"borrowed" name. I think he was the eldest son, so, as we are often told,
he probably changed it to evade a draft, and, as we are also told, often
took the surname of a family with no sons. My question is: are there any
HABERMAN'S out there with roots in Slonim whose surname Yushe Leib might
have borrowed?

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, Aarizona

Please respond privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen DNA/Genealogy article in New Yorker #general

steven weiss <szome@...>
 

An entertaining article on one man's pursuit to locate his ancestors
through conventional genealogy and DNA testing can be read in the New
Yorker Magazine of March 26, 2001. The article is not online but an
interview with John Seabrook, the author of the article titled "The Tree
of Me: DNA testing and the mania for genealogy" is online at:

http://www.newyorker.com/ON-LINE_ONLY/ARCHIVES/?010326on_onlineonly01

The article discusses Jewish interest in DNA testing and gives a lot of
information on what types of DNA tests are currently available through the
Internet.

Steven Weiss
Chicago
VOLK and SHVARTSBERG >from Lithuania


Looking for FLEISHMAN Family #general

mouallem <vze2drbc@...>
 

Dear Genners:

I am looking for Fleishman's >from Proskurow or Moscow, Russia who would
be related to Leon Fleishman. Leon was alive in 1939 and had a son
Adolph who emigrated to this country, both were musicians. I believe
that this family may have some information regarding my Lukashevsky
relatives who apparently lived in Moscow in 1939. Thank you in advance.

Sincerely,
Carole Mouallem
Bayside, NY


New Outlook and Data of my Website #general

Jan Brugge <jbrugge@...>
 

Hello

I have not only give my web page a new look but also new data is available
on this site. The Pedigree of this site is in several (8) languages.
English, Deutsch, Nederland's, Dansk, Swedish, Norwish, Frans and Greek

The applet I used, you can download it >from the website

http://www.linktop.demon.co.uk/dftcom2

I hope, if you like this website or there is a broken link, you will
E-mail me

Have a nice day

Jan Brugge
Groningen, Nederland
http://members.home.nl/jbrugge/
jbrugge@home.nl


name change Beth Zion Hosp #general

Suee20@...
 

Thank you all for your replies. I just found out that Beth Zion Hosp.
is now Maimonidies Hospital. It was just a name change.

Also. they told me that hospital records are just kept for 7 to 10
years. I was wondering if that is correct. I can find the cause of
death,>from the death certificate, but I suppose I can't find the Drs.
name who attended him, and his previous hospitalizations or illnesses.

Regards,
Sue Smithe
Queens, NY


"Back to Poland" -- part 2 #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

In response to the query below, I received 34 responses (some of
them were posted to JewishGen also). In case others are curious
about the results: The consensus was that immigrants to the
USA did in fact return to Europe fairly often. The information
helps me to understand the activities of my ENGLANDER-STRAUSBERG
branch after they settled in Newark, New Jersey in 1893.

I have learned, >from what seems like a reliable source, that
someone on my family tree went "back to Europe" in about 1905.
(He was >from Czestochowa, Poland.)

This strikes me as very unlikely. Or is it??

Does anyone have confirmed cases of family members going back
to Poland??
Daniel Kazez <dkazez@mail.wittenberg.edu>
ALHADEFF, Jacob & Rafael: Cuba, 1920.
KAZEZ, Nisim: Leipzig-1952. LEBOY, "John Doe": Florida, 1996.
FRESCO, Moris, Juliette, Colette: Paris, 1948.
DEVIDAS, Sarah, Pauline, & Albert: Argentina, 1932.
ENGLANDER, Solomon, Mary, Joseph, & Samuel.
http://jewishcuba.org/famties/