Date   

Bratislava lookup #general

Moses Lenzky <mlenzky@...>
 

Q.
anyone traveling or is in Bratislava & able to look up
3 tombstones. I have group # row # & grave # .

m. lenzky
mlenzky@yahoo.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Bratislava lookup #general

Moses Lenzky <mlenzky@...>
 

Q.
anyone traveling or is in Bratislava & able to look up
3 tombstones. I have group # row # & grave # .

m. lenzky
mlenzky@yahoo.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately


The perils of research #general

JSelig3460@...
 

Genners:

I jumped the gun on my study of the Swislotcher Brotherhood Association and
again
found the stubs of the receipts given for the allocation of graves. It began
in the spring of 1919 and I noted the death of many children and young people
for this time way out of the ordinary for the size of the membership. If it
were coincidence, it was a fantastic occurence. It occured to me that this
was the period of the world-wide flu epidemic.

My psyche has learned to deal with pogroms and the SS death squads following
the German army into Belarus and slaughtering the Jewish population prior to
the systematic holocaust procedures which have been so well documented. Right
now I have to deal with a worldwide epidemic and how the New York
Swislotchers must have dealt with it. I trust that my psyche will make the
necessary adjustments.

Jerry Seligsohn
NYC
SELIGSOHN and ELKIN of Mogilev/Dnepr


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The perils of research #general

JSelig3460@...
 

Genners:

I jumped the gun on my study of the Swislotcher Brotherhood Association and
again
found the stubs of the receipts given for the allocation of graves. It began
in the spring of 1919 and I noted the death of many children and young people
for this time way out of the ordinary for the size of the membership. If it
were coincidence, it was a fantastic occurence. It occured to me that this
was the period of the world-wide flu epidemic.

My psyche has learned to deal with pogroms and the SS death squads following
the German army into Belarus and slaughtering the Jewish population prior to
the systematic holocaust procedures which have been so well documented. Right
now I have to deal with a worldwide epidemic and how the New York
Swislotchers must have dealt with it. I trust that my psyche will make the
necessary adjustments.

Jerry Seligsohn
NYC
SELIGSOHN and ELKIN of Mogilev/Dnepr


Re: information from synagogues #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

Unfortunately what you say is all too true. Many shuls were run by
volunteers who kept the records at home. My late father was the treasurer of
his shul for many years and kept the records at home, until someone else
took over and the records were transferred to him. It is not only in
synagogues that this occurs. I did my dissertation on Columbian Council of
Pittsburgh, the Pittsburgh section of the National Council of Jewish Women.
Trying to reconstruct the early years was very difficult. I was told that
the secretary kept the minutes at home and after she died no one really knew
where they were. I had to use newspaper accounts of meetings for my data.
While trying to track down the names of the charter members of Hadassah,
founded in 1912, the archivist of Hadassah sent me all the materials she had
available, and the only accounts were recollections of members fifty or more
years later.
Ida

-----Original Message-----
From: robert@robertcorwin.com [mailto:rcorwin@ucwphilly.rr.com]
Sent: Monday, July 01, 2002 11:58 PM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: information >from synagogues
Dear friends,

It seems to me that the records of our Synagogues, where we live the
landmarks of our lives, should contain a wealth of information. Since
notices are sent out for Yarzeit, I would think that the names of parents,
siblings, and others, many of whom died and have been lost to memory in the
old country, would be included.

A few years ago, I contacted the large Conservative Synagogue in Providence,
Rhode Island, of which my grandfather was a founder, hoping to find the date
of death of his father. I was told that no such records existed. Only a
note of a loan >from my grandfather, and a one line mention of my grandmother
as the founding President of the Sisterhood. And this >from a long lifetime
of involvement. I'm wondering if anyone else has experience or thoughts on
the subject.

On a related note, can anyone say what's happened to the records of the many
now defunct Synagogues of New York? My great grandparent's Shul, on
Rochester Avenue in Brooklyn, has become an African American church. Are
these records destroyed, absorbed by other congregations, kept by private
members of the congregation, have they found their way to Yivo or the New
York Public Library, or some combination of the above?

I seldom hear of Synagogues in the new world as a source of genealogical
information. I would think there'd be a bevy of information to mine here.

best,

Robert Corwin

Researching KREMENETSKY/KENNER and BECKERMAN >from Kremenets/Odessa,
LITTMAN and KRAVIATSKY >from Proshnits,
COHEN >from London/Vilna,
ARONSON and FRIEDMAN >from Warsaw.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: information from synagogues #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

Unfortunately what you say is all too true. Many shuls were run by
volunteers who kept the records at home. My late father was the treasurer of
his shul for many years and kept the records at home, until someone else
took over and the records were transferred to him. It is not only in
synagogues that this occurs. I did my dissertation on Columbian Council of
Pittsburgh, the Pittsburgh section of the National Council of Jewish Women.
Trying to reconstruct the early years was very difficult. I was told that
the secretary kept the minutes at home and after she died no one really knew
where they were. I had to use newspaper accounts of meetings for my data.
While trying to track down the names of the charter members of Hadassah,
founded in 1912, the archivist of Hadassah sent me all the materials she had
available, and the only accounts were recollections of members fifty or more
years later.
Ida

-----Original Message-----
From: robert@robertcorwin.com [mailto:rcorwin@ucwphilly.rr.com]
Sent: Monday, July 01, 2002 11:58 PM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: information >from synagogues
Dear friends,

It seems to me that the records of our Synagogues, where we live the
landmarks of our lives, should contain a wealth of information. Since
notices are sent out for Yarzeit, I would think that the names of parents,
siblings, and others, many of whom died and have been lost to memory in the
old country, would be included.

A few years ago, I contacted the large Conservative Synagogue in Providence,
Rhode Island, of which my grandfather was a founder, hoping to find the date
of death of his father. I was told that no such records existed. Only a
note of a loan >from my grandfather, and a one line mention of my grandmother
as the founding President of the Sisterhood. And this >from a long lifetime
of involvement. I'm wondering if anyone else has experience or thoughts on
the subject.

On a related note, can anyone say what's happened to the records of the many
now defunct Synagogues of New York? My great grandparent's Shul, on
Rochester Avenue in Brooklyn, has become an African American church. Are
these records destroyed, absorbed by other congregations, kept by private
members of the congregation, have they found their way to Yivo or the New
York Public Library, or some combination of the above?

I seldom hear of Synagogues in the new world as a source of genealogical
information. I would think there'd be a bevy of information to mine here.

best,

Robert Corwin

Researching KREMENETSKY/KENNER and BECKERMAN >from Kremenets/Odessa,
LITTMAN and KRAVIATSKY >from Proshnits,
COHEN >from London/Vilna,
ARONSON and FRIEDMAN >from Warsaw.


Finding a certain Book #general

Moshe Erez <erez3655@...>
 

Hello to you all.

It seems that the following Book titled:
" The Pechenik family : a genealogy of Dovid Hennoch Pechenik
and his descendants and remembrances of life in Eastern Europe"
by Selitzer, Ralph. is not traceable..
Could anyone help me somehow to get / purchase it?

Thanks
Moshe Erez

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Finding a certain Book #general

Moshe Erez <erez3655@...>
 

Hello to you all.

It seems that the following Book titled:
" The Pechenik family : a genealogy of Dovid Hennoch Pechenik
and his descendants and remembrances of life in Eastern Europe"
by Selitzer, Ralph. is not traceable..
Could anyone help me somehow to get / purchase it?

Thanks
Moshe Erez

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately


Sarnaki #general

Rafal Zubkowicz <zubkowiczr@...>
 

Hallo,

I found on the JewishGen site You are interested in Sarnaki Shtetl. So I,m
student researcher interested in Sarnaki too, my own little town it is.
Maybe I can help You in some way?

I'm looking for Jewish people connected with Sarnaki. Are You one of them?
Is your familly springed >from there? I try to prepare history of Sarnaki
Jews and every kind of contact will be very helpful for me.
I'm interested in vital records mentioned in e:mail I read.

Best regards - Rafal Zubkowicz

MODERATOR'S NOTE:Please respond privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Sarnaki #general

Rafal Zubkowicz <zubkowiczr@...>
 

Hallo,

I found on the JewishGen site You are interested in Sarnaki Shtetl. So I,m
student researcher interested in Sarnaki too, my own little town it is.
Maybe I can help You in some way?

I'm looking for Jewish people connected with Sarnaki. Are You one of them?
Is your familly springed >from there? I try to prepare history of Sarnaki
Jews and every kind of contact will be very helpful for me.
I'm interested in vital records mentioned in e:mail I read.

Best regards - Rafal Zubkowicz

MODERATOR'S NOTE:Please respond privately


Pinkas HaKehillot - Slovakia #general

meyersdenn <meyersdenn@...>
 

Hi everybody out there in Jewishgen land!!

Does anybody happen to have a copy of the Pinkas HaKehillot volume
for Slovakia in their possession? If so, could you please contact
me privately?

Thank you,

Meyer Denn
Los Angeles, CA
meyersdenn@webbox.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pinkas HaKehillot - Slovakia #general

meyersdenn <meyersdenn@...>
 

Hi everybody out there in Jewishgen land!!

Does anybody happen to have a copy of the Pinkas HaKehillot volume
for Slovakia in their possession? If so, could you please contact
me privately?

Thank you,

Meyer Denn
Los Angeles, CA
meyersdenn@webbox.com


Bar-Mitzva celebrations #general

יונתן בן ארי <yonatan@...>
 

To the best of my knowledge there is no religious significance to the
specific week that a boy may "celebrate" his Bar-Mitzva. Often we read
about an elderly citizen who "never had a bar-Mitzva"-this of course is
incorrect since the day that that person became 13 years old he was a
"Bar=Mitzva"=a jewish person who is legally=halachically responsible
for his or her own actions.

I know of many cases in which the "Bar-Mitzva" (celebration/party/reading
of the torah/haftora) was postponed for a later date which was for various
reasons more convenient for the family or the boy,
including a case in which the boy was mistakenly told
by his rabbi of his parsh/weekly portion and the family
decided to celebrate the bar-mitzva according to
the mistaken date since the boy had already invested
many weeks of preparing that reading.

Fortunately the mistake was for a date after his 13th birthday.

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem/Efrat

MODERATOR'S NOTE:
Further posts on this subject should be focused on Jewish genealogy.
Discussions of Jewish law should be continued privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Bar-Mitzva celebrations #general

יונתן בן ארי <yonatan@...>
 

To the best of my knowledge there is no religious significance to the
specific week that a boy may "celebrate" his Bar-Mitzva. Often we read
about an elderly citizen who "never had a bar-Mitzva"-this of course is
incorrect since the day that that person became 13 years old he was a
"Bar=Mitzva"=a jewish person who is legally=halachically responsible
for his or her own actions.

I know of many cases in which the "Bar-Mitzva" (celebration/party/reading
of the torah/haftora) was postponed for a later date which was for various
reasons more convenient for the family or the boy,
including a case in which the boy was mistakenly told
by his rabbi of his parsh/weekly portion and the family
decided to celebrate the bar-mitzva according to
the mistaken date since the boy had already invested
many weeks of preparing that reading.

Fortunately the mistake was for a date after his 13th birthday.

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem/Efrat

MODERATOR'S NOTE:
Further posts on this subject should be focused on Jewish genealogy.
Discussions of Jewish law should be continued privately.


Re: Death and wedding same day #general

Steve Eisenstein <steve@...>
 

There have been other comments on this subject. My original message was
rejected by the server but I thought that there are still some
misconceptions out there and I can comment >from the Orthodox viewpoint as
well as a personal experience with the Conservative viewpoint. As for the
comment made about a Bar Mitzvah on the day itself, I would have to check
with a Rav on this one, unfortunately ours is on vacation for another week.
Lest we forget, however, in years gone by many boys were married shortly
after their Bar Mitzvah and so the Rabbi's might have held that such a
landmark in life is nearly on a par with marriage itself.

Jewish law on this is very interesting to say the least. My Mother just
died and my youngest daughter is getting married in August. Before her
death Mom wanted me to promise to be at my daughter's wedding AND dance.
We are members of an orthodox congregation and so I asked my Rabbi (many
consider him a Torah Scholar). He told me I could not make such a
promise to my Mother but that I should tell her that I HAD to be at the
wedding AND dance with my new son-in-law and the rest of the men. It is
my brother who would be affected if he were observant - I assure you he is
not. Another congregant was in the same situation a couple of years ago
and her brother was at the ceremony but had to eat his meal in a room
separate >from the main group. If he had a real "job" to do, such as pour
wine for many of the tables, he could be in with the main group during that
time, but could not eat with them or dance.

I also know that IF the parent of either the Chosan or Challa dies less
than 12 months before the wedding, there is no dancing and no music. In
the case of a death the morning of the wedding the band is cancelled but
the wedding must go on. Generally a couple will not schedule a wedding
within the twelve months if the parent had already died but there are
extenuating circumstances. My wife's father died in December of the year
before we met. We met in March and were married in September. At that
time we were not members of an Orthodox congregation, and we referred the
question to the Rabbi of her Grandmother's congregation - a Conservative
Congregation. We were told that due to the extenuating circumstances -
we were to be entering graduate school and separate living accomodations
would have been difficult to find at that late point and very
expensive. Both the Rabbi and my wife's Grandmother said it was OK with
them that we have the wedding but without dancing or music. I have never
asked my Orthodox Rabbi what he would have said. We are married almost 37
years so there is little he can do about it now!!! anyway!!

Steve Eisenstein
Houston


Subject Death and wedding same day
from "Haviva Langenauer" <havival@bellsouth.net>
Date Sat, 29 Jun 2002 073329 -0400
X-Message-Number 5

Josephine Rosenblum writes of a wedding that took place even though the
mother of the bride had died earlier that same day.
It is possible that Jewish law said that the marriage should take place.
In our family we had a wedding at which the father of the groom died just
after the ceremony. Rabbis had to be consulted about how the groom would
observed the seven days of mourning (sit shiva).
He was told that first he had to observe the seven days after a wedding
when he and his bride were blessed during the Sheva Brachos, special
blessings recited after meals during the week after a wedding. His days
of sitting Shiva, and mourning his father would have to be postponed for
one week, so he sat Shiva alone, beginning seven days after his father
died. It would seem that Jewish law recognizes that death is a reality,
and while we honor and remember our dead, we also give high priorities to
the mitzvah of standing under a bridal canopy and starting a new Jewish
family.
Haviva Dolgin Langenauer
So. Florida

MODERATOR'S NOTE:
Further posts on this subject should be focused on Jewish genealogy.
Discussions of Jewish law should be continued privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Death and wedding same day #general

Steve Eisenstein <steve@...>
 

There have been other comments on this subject. My original message was
rejected by the server but I thought that there are still some
misconceptions out there and I can comment >from the Orthodox viewpoint as
well as a personal experience with the Conservative viewpoint. As for the
comment made about a Bar Mitzvah on the day itself, I would have to check
with a Rav on this one, unfortunately ours is on vacation for another week.
Lest we forget, however, in years gone by many boys were married shortly
after their Bar Mitzvah and so the Rabbi's might have held that such a
landmark in life is nearly on a par with marriage itself.

Jewish law on this is very interesting to say the least. My Mother just
died and my youngest daughter is getting married in August. Before her
death Mom wanted me to promise to be at my daughter's wedding AND dance.
We are members of an orthodox congregation and so I asked my Rabbi (many
consider him a Torah Scholar). He told me I could not make such a
promise to my Mother but that I should tell her that I HAD to be at the
wedding AND dance with my new son-in-law and the rest of the men. It is
my brother who would be affected if he were observant - I assure you he is
not. Another congregant was in the same situation a couple of years ago
and her brother was at the ceremony but had to eat his meal in a room
separate >from the main group. If he had a real "job" to do, such as pour
wine for many of the tables, he could be in with the main group during that
time, but could not eat with them or dance.

I also know that IF the parent of either the Chosan or Challa dies less
than 12 months before the wedding, there is no dancing and no music. In
the case of a death the morning of the wedding the band is cancelled but
the wedding must go on. Generally a couple will not schedule a wedding
within the twelve months if the parent had already died but there are
extenuating circumstances. My wife's father died in December of the year
before we met. We met in March and were married in September. At that
time we were not members of an Orthodox congregation, and we referred the
question to the Rabbi of her Grandmother's congregation - a Conservative
Congregation. We were told that due to the extenuating circumstances -
we were to be entering graduate school and separate living accomodations
would have been difficult to find at that late point and very
expensive. Both the Rabbi and my wife's Grandmother said it was OK with
them that we have the wedding but without dancing or music. I have never
asked my Orthodox Rabbi what he would have said. We are married almost 37
years so there is little he can do about it now!!! anyway!!

Steve Eisenstein
Houston


Subject Death and wedding same day
from "Haviva Langenauer" <havival@bellsouth.net>
Date Sat, 29 Jun 2002 073329 -0400
X-Message-Number 5

Josephine Rosenblum writes of a wedding that took place even though the
mother of the bride had died earlier that same day.
It is possible that Jewish law said that the marriage should take place.
In our family we had a wedding at which the father of the groom died just
after the ceremony. Rabbis had to be consulted about how the groom would
observed the seven days of mourning (sit shiva).
He was told that first he had to observe the seven days after a wedding
when he and his bride were blessed during the Sheva Brachos, special
blessings recited after meals during the week after a wedding. His days
of sitting Shiva, and mourning his father would have to be postponed for
one week, so he sat Shiva alone, beginning seven days after his father
died. It would seem that Jewish law recognizes that death is a reality,
and while we honor and remember our dead, we also give high priorities to
the mitzvah of standing under a bridal canopy and starting a new Jewish
family.
Haviva Dolgin Langenauer
So. Florida

MODERATOR'S NOTE:
Further posts on this subject should be focused on Jewish genealogy.
Discussions of Jewish law should be continued privately.


Thank You #lithuania

ADAM1GS@...
 

Would just like to thank all the LitvakSig members that took the time to
write to me regarding information pertaining to Concentration Camp Survivor.

I would also like to ad that HIAS was also very helpful in providing the
information they had. If anyone is searching for a relative that may have
passed through the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS), they may be contacted at: 333 Seventh Ave., N.Y., NY 10001-5004 -
write to Mr. Valery Bazarov. Please note, that they do charge a fee for their records.

Fred Klein
N. Falmouth, MA


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Thank You #lithuania

ADAM1GS@...
 

Would just like to thank all the LitvakSig members that took the time to
write to me regarding information pertaining to Concentration Camp Survivor.

I would also like to ad that HIAS was also very helpful in providing the
information they had. If anyone is searching for a relative that may have
passed through the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS), they may be contacted at: 333 Seventh Ave., N.Y., NY 10001-5004 -
write to Mr. Valery Bazarov. Please note, that they do charge a fee for their records.

Fred Klein
N. Falmouth, MA


"SHALTENOSSES" or "SALTENOSSES" #lithuania

E Goldstein <eligold@...>
 

It appears that this dish is the dairy equivalent of KREPLACH (made similar
to Italian Ravioli but bigger and the pastry is made into a square, filled
with minced beef lung and then folded over as a triangle and then boiled in
salted water and finally served with soup)

Could someone enlighten on the dairy equivalent which is using cottage
cheese with some kind of added flavouring and served baked? in cream?

Is the pronounciation Sh- or S- dependent on the part of Lithuania that it
came from?

Eli Goldstein
Johannesburg
South Africa

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please keep your replies on topic -- dealing with this one Litvak dish, and the pronunciation thereof, despite the temptation to share and discuss other recipes and culinary customs.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania "SHALTENOSSES" or "SALTENOSSES" #lithuania

E Goldstein <eligold@...>
 

It appears that this dish is the dairy equivalent of KREPLACH (made similar
to Italian Ravioli but bigger and the pastry is made into a square, filled
with minced beef lung and then folded over as a triangle and then boiled in
salted water and finally served with soup)

Could someone enlighten on the dairy equivalent which is using cottage
cheese with some kind of added flavouring and served baked? in cream?

Is the pronounciation Sh- or S- dependent on the part of Lithuania that it
came from?

Eli Goldstein
Johannesburg
South Africa

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please keep your replies on topic -- dealing with this one Litvak dish, and the pronunciation thereof, despite the temptation to share and discuss other recipes and culinary customs.