Date   

JRI Poland #Poland Two towns near Czestochowa (Praszka and Lelow) #poland

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

JRI-Poland's Czestochowa Archive Project is nearly complete. Only two of
eleven towns remain unfunded. These towns are included in this project:

Czestochowa
Janow
Klobuck
Krzepice
Lelow
Mstow
Plawno
Praszka
Przyrow
Szczekociny
Zarki

Now, after several recent contributions, only these two towns remain
unfunded:

Lelow ($112.84 needed; these years are included: 1884-95)
and
Praszka ($138.24 needed; these years: 1868, 1871-96)

Check here to see if your surnames are included in this project:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/1107.czesto.html

In all, the Czestochowa Archive Project will bring nearly
twenty-thousand index records to the JRI-Poland web site
(http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm)!

We invite contributions to this project. If you would like to contribute,
please....

Send a check or money order to:

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
c/o Sheila Salo Treasurer
5607 Greenleaf Rd.
Cheverly, MD 20785

For security reasons, JRI-Poland is not accepting online contributions. You
can charge your donation using Visa or MasterCard. Please print, fill out,
and mail the form shown here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/creditcardform.htm

Make sure to indicate that your donation is intended for:

"Lelow" or "Praszka"

Dan
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/1107.czesto.html
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psastat1.htm#Czestochowa
........................................................
Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
Archive Coordinator - JRI-Poland Czestochowa Archives Project
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/fam/engl/


JRI Poland #Poland New Files Added to Holocaust Database #poland

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


New Files Added to Holocaust Database #poland

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Two towns near Czestochowa (Praszka and Lelow) #poland

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

JRI-Poland's Czestochowa Archive Project is nearly complete. Only two of
eleven towns remain unfunded. These towns are included in this project:

Czestochowa
Janow
Klobuck
Krzepice
Lelow
Mstow
Plawno
Praszka
Przyrow
Szczekociny
Zarki

Now, after several recent contributions, only these two towns remain
unfunded:

Lelow ($112.84 needed; these years are included: 1884-95)
and
Praszka ($138.24 needed; these years: 1868, 1871-96)

Check here to see if your surnames are included in this project:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/1107.czesto.html

In all, the Czestochowa Archive Project will bring nearly
twenty-thousand index records to the JRI-Poland web site
(http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/jriplweb.htm)!

We invite contributions to this project. If you would like to contribute,
please....

Send a check or money order to:

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
c/o Sheila Salo Treasurer
5607 Greenleaf Rd.
Cheverly, MD 20785

For security reasons, JRI-Poland is not accepting online contributions. You
can charge your donation using Visa or MasterCard. Please print, fill out,
and mail the form shown here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/creditcardform.htm

Make sure to indicate that your donation is intended for:

"Lelow" or "Praszka"

Dan
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/1107.czesto.html
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psastat1.htm#Czestochowa
........................................................
Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
Archive Coordinator - JRI-Poland Czestochowa Archives Project
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/fam/engl/


Re: jri-pl digest: July 26, 2002 #poland

Fbussgang@...
 

In a message dated 7/27/02 1:11:01 AM, jri-pl@... writes:

<< Title: Jews-officers in the Polish armed forces, 1939-1945 /
Author(s): Meirtchak, Benjamin. >>

The book can be ordered >from The Association of Jewish War Veterans of Polish
Armies in Israel at 158 Dizengoff Street, Tel-Aviv 63461. There are also 4
volumes of Jewish casualties in Polish armies and partisan groups that can be
ordered there. Price is $50 for the Jewish officers book and $150 for the
whole set. Money benefits the organization, so it goes for a good cause.

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA


JRI Poland #Poland Re: jri-pl digest: July 26, 2002 #poland

Fbussgang@...
 

In a message dated 7/27/02 1:11:01 AM, jri-pl@... writes:

<< Title: Jews-officers in the Polish armed forces, 1939-1945 /
Author(s): Meirtchak, Benjamin. >>

The book can be ordered >from The Association of Jewish War Veterans of Polish
Armies in Israel at 158 Dizengoff Street, Tel-Aviv 63461. There are also 4
volumes of Jewish casualties in Polish armies and partisan groups that can be
ordered there. Price is $50 for the Jewish officers book and $150 for the
whole set. Money benefits the organization, so it goes for a good cause.

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA


New Files Added to Holocaust Database #general

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust Database at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >. 55,000 records have
been added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an indexing
project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937 records. A total of
over 120,000 records will be in this database when it is completed. Rather
than wait until all the data are entered, we intend to put the data online
in large increments. We have an additional 20,000 records which have
already been indexed and are waiting for validation. As explained in the
introduction to this database, we have two levels of validation to ensure
the highest possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and
terms used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is >from
the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120 ledger
pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who had not
paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not pay their
bills because they had died or been deported!! This file contains
valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of people >from
Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941. It
consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen camp was
one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was used to hold
Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced labor camp and most
of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and all over Europe. This camp
prepared daily lists of arrivals and departures. Information on persons in
this collection includes name, prisoner number, and, where available,
dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German Passports
for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a much larger
Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. This
file is of historical and genealogical interest. Prior to the beginning of
mass deportations, and even after war began in 1939, the German Government
continued to issue passports to Jews resident in Germany ,
including "stateless" Jews, mostly of Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing agreement
with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen, Hungary. The
Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who were forced to
register according to a governmental order of 4 April 1944. The
registration lists included first and last name, name of mother, place and
date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of children, occupation, and
subscription of telephone and radio. The list facilitated the
concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and their subsequent deportation
to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a list
of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html >.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files and
should be used for research in these files as well as for a general
Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For each unique
title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with its English
translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous people --
Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust Database files;
the many volunteers who entered and validated the data; the volunteer
project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum -- primarily Zvi Bernhardt of Yad Vashem and Peter Lande
of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias and Warren Blatt of JewishGen,
without whose technical skills none of this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Files Added to Holocaust Database #general

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust Database at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust >. 55,000 records have
been added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an indexing
project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937 records. A total of
over 120,000 records will be in this database when it is completed. Rather
than wait until all the data are entered, we intend to put the data online
in large increments. We have an additional 20,000 records which have
already been indexed and are waiting for validation. As explained in the
introduction to this database, we have two levels of validation to ensure
the highest possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and
terms used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is >from
the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120 ledger
pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who had not
paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not pay their
bills because they had died or been deported!! This file contains
valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of people >from
Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941. It
consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen camp was
one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was used to hold
Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced labor camp and most
of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and all over Europe. This camp
prepared daily lists of arrivals and departures. Information on persons in
this collection includes name, prisoner number, and, where available,
dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German Passports
for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a much larger
Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. This
file is of historical and genealogical interest. Prior to the beginning of
mass deportations, and even after war began in 1939, the German Government
continued to issue passports to Jews resident in Germany ,
including "stateless" Jews, mostly of Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing agreement
with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen, Hungary. The
Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who were forced to
register according to a governmental order of 4 April 1944. The
registration lists included first and last name, name of mother, place and
date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of children, occupation, and
subscription of telephone and radio. The list facilitated the
concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and their subsequent deportation
to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a list
of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html >.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files and
should be used for research in these files as well as for a general
Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For each unique
title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with its English
translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous people --
Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust Database files;
the many volunteers who entered and validated the data; the volunteer
project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum -- primarily Zvi Bernhardt of Yad Vashem and Peter Lande
of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias and Warren Blatt of JewishGen,
without whose technical skills none of this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Hebrew name on a tombstone #ukraine

Larry Brikman
 

Dear Genners,

I found a cousin of mine in a Toronto cemetery. On his tombstone of course
is his hebrew name. Now, I do know a little hebrew, but I've never seen
this name before. For those of you who can read hebrew, here it is
right-to-left (the proper hebrew way):

Vav-vav-ayin-lamed-vav-youd-lamed.

His English name was Vladislav and his Russian name was Vladimir. Someone
told me that it might be Yiddish since both Hebrew and Yiddish have the
same alphabet with different sounds.

All help is appreciated. Please respond privately.

Warmest regards,

Larry Brikman
Toronto, Canada
lbb107@...

Researching:

BRENAYZIN (and all variants) - Khodorkov Ukr; Zhitomir Ukr; Kiyev Ukr;
Kharkov Ukr; Lithuania; BRIKMAN - Former Poland (Now Belarus, Lithuania,
Poland, Ukraine); Kiyev, Ukr; GRUSHKO/GRUSHKA - Kharkov, Ukr; GRINSHPUN -
Pulin Ukr; Zhitomir Ukr; Kharkov Ukr; FELDMAN - Khodorkov, Ukr; Zhitomir,
Ukr; NAUMOV - Lviv Ukr; BYTEMAN - Lviv Ukr; Zhitomir Ukr;
GOLOUBTCHIK/GOLUBTCHIK - Kiyev,Ukr; YAMNITSKI - Kharkov, Ukr;
FEYGIN/FEYGINA - Kharkov, Ukr;


Hebrew name on a tombstone #ukraine

Larry Brikman
 

Dear Genners,

I found a cousin of mine in a Toronto cemetery. On his tombstone of course
is his hebrew name. Now, I do know a little hebrew, but I've never seen
this name before. For those of you who can read hebrew, here it is
right-to-left (the proper hebrew way):

Vav-vav-ayin-lamed-vav-youd-lamed.

His English name was Vladislav and his Russian name was Vladimir. Someone
told me that it might be Yiddish since both Hebrew and Yiddish have the
same alphabet with different sounds.

All help is appreciated. Please respond privately.

Warmest regards,

Larry Brikman
Toronto, Canada
lbb107@...

Researching:

BRENAYZIN (and all variants) - Khodorkov Ukr; Zhitomir Ukr; Kiyev Ukr;
Kharkov Ukr; Lithuania; BRIKMAN - Former Poland (Now Belarus, Lithuania,
Poland, Ukraine); Kiyev, Ukr; GRUSHKO/GRUSHKA - Kharkov, Ukr; GRINSHPUN -
Pulin Ukr; Zhitomir Ukr; Kharkov Ukr; FELDMAN - Khodorkov, Ukr; Zhitomir,
Ukr; NAUMOV - Lviv Ukr; BYTEMAN - Lviv Ukr; Zhitomir Ukr;
GOLOUBTCHIK/GOLUBTCHIK - Kiyev,Ukr; YAMNITSKI - Kharkov, Ukr;
FEYGIN/FEYGINA - Kharkov, Ukr;


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine New Files Added to Holocaust Database #ukraine

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


New Files Added to Holocaust Database #ukraine

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Re: Complaints #general

Joan Parker <housemom@...>
 

Bravo! to you Sandy. Everything you wrote is true. Every advanced
researcher started as a beginning neophyte. No one should be embarrassed
by writing any question of any kind. I see nothing wrong with asking a
question that may help one to get an answer sooner than later.

In our JGS we have created a mentor program of members who are available
to help anyone who needs their area of expertise. We even have several
who volunteered to do translations.

Joan Parker
Miami, FL
Searching: GOLDBERG and GOODSTEIN-Russia and Brooklyn, NY; PINKUS and
WINOGRAD-Odessa, Ukraine and Brooklyn, NY; GELFAND-Minsk and Bronx, NY; YEHUDIS;
KATZ, Bronx, NY

----- Original Message -----
From: "Harry Zimmerman" <JoelWire@...>
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" <jewishgen@...>
Sent: Friday, July 26, 2002 9:54 AM
Subject: Re: Complaints



To Everyone Who Reads Jewishgen:
It is very easy to complain about almost anything and I personally am
tired of seeing posts like this. The people at Jewish Gen are volunteers
who work their butts off for nothing but the love of Genealogy and in the
end it is something which benefits us all. Additionally there are a lot of
first time genealogist who post here too. So what if sometimes their
questions seem very elementary you who have been doing Genealogy for a
long time once asked these same questions of someone more knowledgeable
than you too.
>from now on it would be nice if people who posted here looked at
life and their comments as the cup being half full instead of half empty.

Will the person who wasn't a beginner when they first started
please stand up!


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Complaints #general

Joan Parker <housemom@...>
 

Bravo! to you Sandy. Everything you wrote is true. Every advanced
researcher started as a beginning neophyte. No one should be embarrassed
by writing any question of any kind. I see nothing wrong with asking a
question that may help one to get an answer sooner than later.

In our JGS we have created a mentor program of members who are available
to help anyone who needs their area of expertise. We even have several
who volunteered to do translations.

Joan Parker
Miami, FL
Searching: GOLDBERG and GOODSTEIN-Russia and Brooklyn, NY; PINKUS and
WINOGRAD-Odessa, Ukraine and Brooklyn, NY; GELFAND-Minsk and Bronx, NY; YEHUDIS;
KATZ, Bronx, NY

----- Original Message -----
From: "Harry Zimmerman" <JoelWire@...>
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" <jewishgen@...>
Sent: Friday, July 26, 2002 9:54 AM
Subject: Re: Complaints



To Everyone Who Reads Jewishgen:
It is very easy to complain about almost anything and I personally am
tired of seeing posts like this. The people at Jewish Gen are volunteers
who work their butts off for nothing but the love of Genealogy and in the
end it is something which benefits us all. Additionally there are a lot of
first time genealogist who post here too. So what if sometimes their
questions seem very elementary you who have been doing Genealogy for a
long time once asked these same questions of someone more knowledgeable
than you too.
>from now on it would be nice if people who posted here looked at
life and their comments as the cup being half full instead of half empty.

Will the person who wasn't a beginner when they first started
please stand up!


Family SACHS Connections from Latvia #general

Edward Walter Fabisak Jr. <kasibafe@...>
 

Searching for information concerning the following family members:
Jenny SACHS who passed through Ellis Island on Nov. 29, 1920 >from Riga,
Lettland, Latvia. Her father was Herman SACHS who lived at
Marisstrasse, 36, in Riga. She had traveled to America to visit or live
with her cousin, Julius SACHS, whose residence was at 161 Leonardt St.,
Brooklyn, NY. I am interested in these individuals because they may
have been related to my grandmother, Jeannette SACHS (1890-1973), who
arrived in the U.S. >from Riga in 1912-13 and her sister, Anna SACHS,
whose arrival at Ellis Island was in 1908. Anna and Jeanette lived a
few years with their uncle, a Mr. SMULYAN, who lived at 33 Union across
the street >from Union Square in Manhattan. Do you know of any
individuals who connect with any of the above persons?

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


Ulla Uller Benevolent Association #general

JSelig3460@...
 

Genners:
In order to avoid duplication of effort if you have investigated this
landsmanshaft please contact me privately. If you have any reason to
believe that it is not located 114 miles northeast of Minsk please advise
me. My study of Tomcovici is complete and will be placed on the belarus
website subsequent to the Toronto Conference.

Jerome Seligsohn
NYC
SELIGSOHN and ELKIN of Mogilev/Dnepr


Paris, 1920s #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

My great uncle Moshe FRESCO (FRESKO) married Juliette JORDAN (JOURDAN) in
Paris, in the 1920s. Their daughter, Colette FRESCO (born 1920s, Paris)
became a dentist in Paris in the late 1940s.

Several years searching for my FRESCO cousins have proved fruitless.
(Colette likely married and acquired a new surname.) Now I am focusing on
the JORDAN half of this picture....

Juliette JORDAN (JOURDAN) was the daughter of Jules Desire Pierre JORDAN or
JOURDAN. I see two possible listings for this man in the 1927 Paris City
directory:

25.82 Jourdan (Jules), ingen-opticien; r. Lafayette, 107 (arr 10)

and

24.32 Jordan (J.), docteur dentiste, r. Cambon, 26 (arr 1)

Now what? What can you imagine I can do with these two possible addresses.
I am not sure how to continue my search.

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
Springfield, Ohio USA
Czestochowa-Przyrow-Mstow-Janow-Zarki-Plawno-Radomsko-Lodz-Zgierz
Turkey: KAZEZ-KAZES, ALHADEF-ELHADEF, FRESKO-FRESCO, HABIB, DEVIDAS-
DE VIDAS
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/dk/elh-kaz-fre.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ulla Uller Benevolent Association #general

JSelig3460@...
 

Genners:
In order to avoid duplication of effort if you have investigated this
landsmanshaft please contact me privately. If you have any reason to
believe that it is not located 114 miles northeast of Minsk please advise
me. My study of Tomcovici is complete and will be placed on the belarus
website subsequent to the Toronto Conference.

Jerome Seligsohn
NYC
SELIGSOHN and ELKIN of Mogilev/Dnepr


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Family SACHS Connections from Latvia #general

Edward Walter Fabisak Jr. <kasibafe@...>
 

Searching for information concerning the following family members:
Jenny SACHS who passed through Ellis Island on Nov. 29, 1920 >from Riga,
Lettland, Latvia. Her father was Herman SACHS who lived at
Marisstrasse, 36, in Riga. She had traveled to America to visit or live
with her cousin, Julius SACHS, whose residence was at 161 Leonardt St.,
Brooklyn, NY. I am interested in these individuals because they may
have been related to my grandmother, Jeannette SACHS (1890-1973), who
arrived in the U.S. >from Riga in 1912-13 and her sister, Anna SACHS,
whose arrival at Ellis Island was in 1908. Anna and Jeanette lived a
few years with their uncle, a Mr. SMULYAN, who lived at 33 Union across
the street >from Union Square in Manhattan. Do you know of any
individuals who connect with any of the above persons?

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Paris, 1920s #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

My great uncle Moshe FRESCO (FRESKO) married Juliette JORDAN (JOURDAN) in
Paris, in the 1920s. Their daughter, Colette FRESCO (born 1920s, Paris)
became a dentist in Paris in the late 1940s.

Several years searching for my FRESCO cousins have proved fruitless.
(Colette likely married and acquired a new surname.) Now I am focusing on
the JORDAN half of this picture....

Juliette JORDAN (JOURDAN) was the daughter of Jules Desire Pierre JORDAN or
JOURDAN. I see two possible listings for this man in the 1927 Paris City
directory:

25.82 Jourdan (Jules), ingen-opticien; r. Lafayette, 107 (arr 10)

and

24.32 Jordan (J.), docteur dentiste, r. Cambon, 26 (arr 1)

Now what? What can you imagine I can do with these two possible addresses.
I am not sure how to continue my search.

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
Springfield, Ohio USA
Czestochowa-Przyrow-Mstow-Janow-Zarki-Plawno-Radomsko-Lodz-Zgierz
Turkey: KAZEZ-KAZES, ALHADEF-ELHADEF, FRESKO-FRESCO, HABIB, DEVIDAS-
DE VIDAS
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/dk/elh-kaz-fre.html