Date   

Re: Post-Dachau Deportations #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

jesseo@iccas.com wrote:
"I believe my grandfather may have been imprisoned in Dachau prior to
leaving Germany for New York in February, 1939 with a visa >from the
American consulate in Stuttgart."

My comment:

If your grandfather was "officially" imprisoned in Dachau his name
should be on the list of Dachau inmates. A significant part of these
records is already indexed by JewishGen.

Another way to get confirmation is through the Dachau museum staff who
promise to send copies of the records to next of kin. Their email address
is:

info@kz-gedenkstaette-dachau.de <mailto:info@kz-gedenkstaette-dachau.de>

I hope that helps

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany


German SIG #Germany Re: Post-Dachau Deportations #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

jesseo@iccas.com wrote:
"I believe my grandfather may have been imprisoned in Dachau prior to
leaving Germany for New York in February, 1939 with a visa >from the
American consulate in Stuttgart."

My comment:

If your grandfather was "officially" imprisoned in Dachau his name
should be on the list of Dachau inmates. A significant part of these
records is already indexed by JewishGen.

Another way to get confirmation is through the Dachau museum staff who
promise to send copies of the records to next of kin. Their email address
is:

info@kz-gedenkstaette-dachau.de <mailto:info@kz-gedenkstaette-dachau.de>

I hope that helps

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany


Help with 1829 Russian occupations #general

R Gerber <beccamd@...>
 

I am working on a project for JewishGen, and could use the expertise
of someone. I have a series of documents handwritten in Russian.
There are several columns

1 - female record number
2- male record number
3 - who performed the bris (usually 2 or 3 names)
4 - Christian date of birth (and date of bris)
5 - Jewish date of birth (and date of bris)
6 - where recorded (usually in Kishinev)
7 - Father and mother of child
8 - name of the child

I am particularly interested in column 7. This column at times
includes the father's occupation.

I have images of some of the lines which include occupations.

If you think you can help, please contact me privately, and I can
send the files to you.

Rebecca Gerber
Illinois, USA
beccamd@ix.netcom.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help with 1829 Russian occupations #general

R Gerber <beccamd@...>
 

I am working on a project for JewishGen, and could use the expertise
of someone. I have a series of documents handwritten in Russian.
There are several columns

1 - female record number
2- male record number
3 - who performed the bris (usually 2 or 3 names)
4 - Christian date of birth (and date of bris)
5 - Jewish date of birth (and date of bris)
6 - where recorded (usually in Kishinev)
7 - Father and mother of child
8 - name of the child

I am particularly interested in column 7. This column at times
includes the father's occupation.

I have images of some of the lines which include occupations.

If you think you can help, please contact me privately, and I can
send the files to you.

Rebecca Gerber
Illinois, USA
beccamd@ix.netcom.com


Mallasch, Poland #poland

Ilene Murray <ilenemurray@...>
 

Eve Richardson was inquiring about "Mallasch" in Poland. There is a
shtetl mentioned on page 53 of Chester Cohen's "Shtetl Finder Gazetteer"
that might be what she is looking for. It's called Maligoshtch or
Malogoszcz, and it is north of Krakow, southwest of Kielce.

Hope this helps.

Ilene Kanfer Murray
St. Louis, MO


JRI Poland #Poland Mallasch, Poland #poland

Ilene Murray <ilenemurray@...>
 

Eve Richardson was inquiring about "Mallasch" in Poland. There is a
shtetl mentioned on page 53 of Chester Cohen's "Shtetl Finder Gazetteer"
that might be what she is looking for. It's called Maligoshtch or
Malogoszcz, and it is north of Krakow, southwest of Kielce.

Hope this helps.

Ilene Kanfer Murray
St. Louis, MO


All Lithuania Database: Seta vs Seda #lithuania

Stanley Judd <stanleyjudd@...>
 

I have extracted two sets of data, some time apart. On review, I find they are basically for the same people and >from the same archive
(KRA/1-49/1/12938). The earlier extract was a Box Tax List for Seta Telsai
Kaunas. The later extract was for Seda Telsai Kaunas. Ada Greebblatt
informs me that Seta is in Ukmerge, not Telsai. She further advised that
this archive is for Seta in the Ukmerge District and that she is unaware of
any similar records for Seda.

Has anyone else encountered this problem? Before I revise my records it
would be helpful to know for sure whether the data are for Seta or Seda. It is also possible that there is an error in the ALD.

Stanley H. Judd Los Altos Hills, CA
Searching JUDELOWITZ/YUDELOWITZ, BRILLIANT, JANKOWSKY, ROTCHILD, BAER
Locations northern Lithuania and Latvia


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania All Lithuania Database: Seta vs Seda #lithuania

Stanley Judd <stanleyjudd@...>
 

I have extracted two sets of data, some time apart. On review, I find they are basically for the same people and >from the same archive
(KRA/1-49/1/12938). The earlier extract was a Box Tax List for Seta Telsai
Kaunas. The later extract was for Seda Telsai Kaunas. Ada Greebblatt
informs me that Seta is in Ukmerge, not Telsai. She further advised that
this archive is for Seta in the Ukmerge District and that she is unaware of
any similar records for Seda.

Has anyone else encountered this problem? Before I revise my records it
would be helpful to know for sure whether the data are for Seta or Seda. It is also possible that there is an error in the ALD.

Stanley H. Judd Los Altos Hills, CA
Searching JUDELOWITZ/YUDELOWITZ, BRILLIANT, JANKOWSKY, ROTCHILD, BAER
Locations northern Lithuania and Latvia


Deportation lists from France... #france

Rosanne D. Leeson <leeson1@...>
 

The following message is reprinted with permission >from "Nu? What's
New?",
the Internet e-zine published by Avotaynu. Free subscriptions are
available at: http://www.avotaynu.com>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Deportations >from France during the Holocaust
=============================================
Many of us occasionally key our surname into a major search engine like
Google in the hope of getting interesting hits. Last week, using Google,
I stumbled onto a site that lists more than 19,400 persons, mostly Jews,
who were deported to their deaths >from France during World War II.

The list was compiled by Daniel Carouge >from official French government
lists that have been published on the Internet at

http://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/html/accueil.htm.

At that site, click "Le Journal officiel" Then use the search
engine (Recherche par des mots). Enter the key words
"mort en deportation" and click "Valider". It will identify 91
documents; each contain names of deported people including their date
and place of birth as well as probable date and place of death.

Carouge has combined these lists into a single database and organized
the list in two sequences: according to place of birth and
alphabetically.
The links to the two lists are at
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/petit-chemin/Histoire/Accueil.htm.

The list by place of birth (Liste des morts en deportation dans le
J.O. de 1991 a 2001 par pays ou departement) is incomplete.
The alphabetical list (Liste des morts en deportation dans le
J.O. de 1991 a 2001 par ordre alphabetique) is complete.

The usual source of the names of Jews deported >from France is the book
"Memorial to the Jews Deported >from France (1942-1944)," by Serge
Klarsfeld. It identifies more than 80,000 Jews transported on
70 train convoys, mostly to their deaths at Auschwitz. The book
is organized by date of deportation; therefore, to find an individual,
it is necessary to go through the 70 lists. Avotaynu publishes on
microfiche an alphabetical index to the surnames in the book identifying
which convoys have which surnames.

Information about the microfiche can be found at:
http://www.avotaynu.com/microf.htm under the Holocaust category. A more
detailed description of the Klarsfeld book can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/FR-klars.txt.

The lists above contain names not found in Klarsfeld.
--
Rosanne Leeson
Los Altos, CA USA
Leeson1@attglobal.net


French SIG #France Deportation lists from France... #france

Rosanne D. Leeson <leeson1@...>
 

The following message is reprinted with permission >from "Nu? What's
New?",
the Internet e-zine published by Avotaynu. Free subscriptions are
available at: http://www.avotaynu.com>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Deportations >from France during the Holocaust
=============================================
Many of us occasionally key our surname into a major search engine like
Google in the hope of getting interesting hits. Last week, using Google,
I stumbled onto a site that lists more than 19,400 persons, mostly Jews,
who were deported to their deaths >from France during World War II.

The list was compiled by Daniel Carouge >from official French government
lists that have been published on the Internet at

http://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/html/accueil.htm.

At that site, click "Le Journal officiel" Then use the search
engine (Recherche par des mots). Enter the key words
"mort en deportation" and click "Valider". It will identify 91
documents; each contain names of deported people including their date
and place of birth as well as probable date and place of death.

Carouge has combined these lists into a single database and organized
the list in two sequences: according to place of birth and
alphabetically.
The links to the two lists are at
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/petit-chemin/Histoire/Accueil.htm.

The list by place of birth (Liste des morts en deportation dans le
J.O. de 1991 a 2001 par pays ou departement) is incomplete.
The alphabetical list (Liste des morts en deportation dans le
J.O. de 1991 a 2001 par ordre alphabetique) is complete.

The usual source of the names of Jews deported >from France is the book
"Memorial to the Jews Deported >from France (1942-1944)," by Serge
Klarsfeld. It identifies more than 80,000 Jews transported on
70 train convoys, mostly to their deaths at Auschwitz. The book
is organized by date of deportation; therefore, to find an individual,
it is necessary to go through the 70 lists. Avotaynu publishes on
microfiche an alphabetical index to the surnames in the book identifying
which convoys have which surnames.

Information about the microfiche can be found at:
http://www.avotaynu.com/microf.htm under the Holocaust category. A more
detailed description of the Klarsfeld book can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/FR-klars.txt.

The lists above contain names not found in Klarsfeld.
--
Rosanne Leeson
Los Altos, CA USA
Leeson1@attglobal.net


Fw: Russian translation needed #general

Sandy Perloff <sproots@...>
 

Wedding record >from 1869 in Nezhin..is posted on view mate. Both
Hebrew and Russian are there.

They can be found at http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/toview.html
Viewmate number 1744. Thanks in advance. Please reply to me directly.
Sandy

MODERATOR NOTE: The direct link is
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/source/vm1744.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Fw: Russian translation needed #general

Sandy Perloff <sproots@...>
 

Wedding record >from 1869 in Nezhin..is posted on view mate. Both
Hebrew and Russian are there.

They can be found at http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/toview.html
Viewmate number 1744. Thanks in advance. Please reply to me directly.
Sandy

MODERATOR NOTE: The direct link is
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/source/vm1744.html


Success story - just in time for the New Year! #galicia

Marilyn Sheridan <marilyns@...>
 

Dear members of JewishGen Discussion Group, and BohMor SIG, France SIG,
Galicia SIG, and Hungary SIG,

Thanks to JewishGen (and to some other wonderful Jewish organizations) I
have recently found lost family in Budapest!

Not long before my father died, he mentioned that when he was a young child,
his mother would take him by train >from Vienna to visit his C******* cousins
in Budapest. He had three girl cousins, all older than himself. He
remembered only the first name of one cousin, and that another cousin had
married a man with the surname R*****.

My father could not tell me how he was related to these cousins, but I
suspected that his own mother and the mother of the cousins were sisters.
This proved to be correct, as I found when I looked recently in a book
called "Counted Remnant: Register of the Jewish Survivors in Budapest" that
was published in Budapest in 1946.

When I searched the list under "R" for the name R*****, I found a woman by
that name. As is done for each survivor in this record, she listed her own
mother's maiden name. That was my big clue: it was the same maiden surname
as that of my father's mother. Moreover, Mrs. R***** listed her mother's
first name. So, for the first time, I knew a name my father had not been
able to remember - the first name of his mother's sister.

My next step was to scan the same list for any children of Mrs. R*****. I
found two sons, who identified the maiden name of their mother as the former
Miss C*******, and their current home address as the same one where their
mother currently lived.

In an on-line telephone book of Hungary, I found only 5 people with the
surname R*****, and with one of the two first names. I wrote by snail-mail
to the only one in Budapest, including a photocopy of the relevant page of
"Counted Remnant" and a genealogy tree to show how we might be related.

You can imagine my thrill to receive a reply by snail mail! This was indeed
my second cousin. My father's mother and his mother's mother were sisters.
(Those sisters were daughters of Avraham Zvi Hersch BEUTEL the Hosid, who
was born in Skalat on April 16, 1852 and died in Vienna on May 7, 1936. I
can not find further information about him; so if anyone knows where I can
look, I would be happy to receive suggestions. The IKG Wien has no further
information; and I can not find out where Skalat records might be -
apparently they are not in Skalat - if any have indeed survived to this
day.)

The daughter of BEUTEL who lived in Budapest became the mother of three
daughters of her own. One was the mother of the the two R***** brothers
whom I discovered very recently. The second moved with her family to
France; my father lived with them >from the time he fled Vienna in 1938 until
the battle of Dunkirk in 1940; alas, I have confirmed (Klarsfeld) that all
perished at Auschwitz. The third sister (probably the oldest) and her
family may have moved to France, but they or some children may have stayed
in Hungary. No one seems to know or remember their surname.

It turns out that the wife of the younger R***** brother has cousins in Las
Vegas; they are very close, and telephone each other several times a month.
The younger R***** brother told his cousins about the letter that I had sent
to the older brother. A few weeks ago, the younger brother and his wife
traveled to Las Vegas to visit these cousins. Because I live in nearby
Tucson, I went to meet them. It was instant family!

The younger brother speaks only Hungarian; and because his wife is a
Hungarian government worker, their number is not in the telephone book for
reasons of privacy. The cousins in Las Vegas are multilingual (the wife
survived Bergen-Belsen, the husband was a partisan) and every word back and
forth had to be translated - but with such warmth and joy! My cousin hugs
just like my father did; we could not stop hugging each other. We had a
huge traditional Czechoslovakian / Hungarian dinner!

The younger brother knows little about his past, because his mother, who
died only a few years ago, could not bear to talk about her losses,
including the murders of her husband and father. His older brother, also,
finds it hard to talk about those times. The earliest memory of the brother
I met, is the occasion when Jews were herded brutally toward a ghetto in
Budapest; a soldier shoved his beloved grandfather, who could not move
"quickly enough", making him fall down, and then shot him on the spot.

When the Nazis demanded that Jews join the labor battalions, the older son
tried to convince his father that they should run away together and join the
partisans. The father said he was a WWI veteran, this was his fate, etc. -
and paid for this with his life, as did so many other decent Jews. The
older son fled, and survived as a partisan.

The younger son and his mother were saved by the extraordinary and
unforgettable heroism of Raoul Wallenberg; they lived in one of the
safe-houses till the end of WWII.

The younger son brought to Las Vegas a stack of ancient photographs; he had
found them in his mother's room after she died. She had never shown them to
him, or talked about them with him. He had planned to leave all of them
with me, so that I could photograph them and then mail them back to him.
But in the end, he could not bear to part with any that showed his father,
whom he does not remember at all. He also hung on to all the photos of his
mother. I find it very touching that he is such a devoted son.

However, he agreed to lend me photos that showed people he did not know. I
could not believe what I saw! There was a photo of my father at about 3
years old, with his mother and older sister, similar to the one SIGAL family
photo my father had been able to save. There were several photos of the two
sisters of the mother of the R***** brothers, each with spouses and / or
children. I knew who these people were, only because names on the backs of
some photos were those my father had mentioned. I was able to tell my
cousin, "This was your aunt! These were your little cousins!"

Some of the other photos showed a person or persons whose name on the back I
do not know; others provided no name or information, and I did not recognize
the person. But I found a wonderful turn-of-the-century photo of the
exquisite eldest aunt of the R***** brothers, with her three sparklingly
beautiful little children - and their first names are on the back of the
photo. Any such clue is a help in further research!

Now I must visit my cousins in Budapest, in order to meet all of them and
their families, and to see the rest of the photographs! I still have a
thousand questions, and I want to find more family. More important, we are
alive and we need to celebrate life. I must locate a person who speaks both
Hungarian and English, and with whom all of us can feel comfortable in
Budapest and / or Vienna.

I have found these relatives in large part due to the existence of JewishGen
and its various SIGs and sources of information. Thank you, also, to the
dozens of Genners and SIGgers who have helped me with all kinds of advice; I
have tried to thank each of you personally. My financial contribution will
be on its way to JewishGen.

Shana Tova to all. May we see peace in Israel and throughout the world,
this year.

Marilyn Sheridan (Miriam SIGAL)
Tucson, AZ, USA


Polish-Russian Names #general

Sandra and Donald Hirschhorn <donsandyh@...>
 

The email below led me to an opposite question. Part of my family
was also >from Bialystok and an aunt who died in the Holocaust was
always known to me as "Aunt Rose." I have not been successful in
finding her birth certificate although I have obtained them for all
her siblings.

Both my mother and my uncle used "American" names here in the U.S.
different >from their birth names and I assume the same is true of my
aunt who remained in Europe.

So, what I would like to know is what was most likely her "real" name
in Poland?

Thank you.

Sandra Hirschhorn
Boca Raton, Florida
Researching BRUMER, LITWIN, KOGAN, Bialystok, Lodz, Poland

"karina holthoff" <holthoffk@attbi.com> wrote ...


My Great Grand Parents and my grand parents were >from Bialystok
and my grandmother's name was Fanja or Fania too.

It seems to be a common name.

Several days ago I posed a query about Russian-Polish names.
I was looking for the most probable religious *and* secular
names for the following:

All were born in Bialystock region:
... female: called Fania in the US

....Most correspondents suggested Feige for Fania, and I think
it most likely.

Barbara S Mannlein
Tucson, AZ


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Success story - just in time for the New Year! #galicia

Marilyn Sheridan <marilyns@...>
 

Dear members of JewishGen Discussion Group, and BohMor SIG, France SIG,
Galicia SIG, and Hungary SIG,

Thanks to JewishGen (and to some other wonderful Jewish organizations) I
have recently found lost family in Budapest!

Not long before my father died, he mentioned that when he was a young child,
his mother would take him by train >from Vienna to visit his C******* cousins
in Budapest. He had three girl cousins, all older than himself. He
remembered only the first name of one cousin, and that another cousin had
married a man with the surname R*****.

My father could not tell me how he was related to these cousins, but I
suspected that his own mother and the mother of the cousins were sisters.
This proved to be correct, as I found when I looked recently in a book
called "Counted Remnant: Register of the Jewish Survivors in Budapest" that
was published in Budapest in 1946.

When I searched the list under "R" for the name R*****, I found a woman by
that name. As is done for each survivor in this record, she listed her own
mother's maiden name. That was my big clue: it was the same maiden surname
as that of my father's mother. Moreover, Mrs. R***** listed her mother's
first name. So, for the first time, I knew a name my father had not been
able to remember - the first name of his mother's sister.

My next step was to scan the same list for any children of Mrs. R*****. I
found two sons, who identified the maiden name of their mother as the former
Miss C*******, and their current home address as the same one where their
mother currently lived.

In an on-line telephone book of Hungary, I found only 5 people with the
surname R*****, and with one of the two first names. I wrote by snail-mail
to the only one in Budapest, including a photocopy of the relevant page of
"Counted Remnant" and a genealogy tree to show how we might be related.

You can imagine my thrill to receive a reply by snail mail! This was indeed
my second cousin. My father's mother and his mother's mother were sisters.
(Those sisters were daughters of Avraham Zvi Hersch BEUTEL the Hosid, who
was born in Skalat on April 16, 1852 and died in Vienna on May 7, 1936. I
can not find further information about him; so if anyone knows where I can
look, I would be happy to receive suggestions. The IKG Wien has no further
information; and I can not find out where Skalat records might be -
apparently they are not in Skalat - if any have indeed survived to this
day.)

The daughter of BEUTEL who lived in Budapest became the mother of three
daughters of her own. One was the mother of the the two R***** brothers
whom I discovered very recently. The second moved with her family to
France; my father lived with them >from the time he fled Vienna in 1938 until
the battle of Dunkirk in 1940; alas, I have confirmed (Klarsfeld) that all
perished at Auschwitz. The third sister (probably the oldest) and her
family may have moved to France, but they or some children may have stayed
in Hungary. No one seems to know or remember their surname.

It turns out that the wife of the younger R***** brother has cousins in Las
Vegas; they are very close, and telephone each other several times a month.
The younger R***** brother told his cousins about the letter that I had sent
to the older brother. A few weeks ago, the younger brother and his wife
traveled to Las Vegas to visit these cousins. Because I live in nearby
Tucson, I went to meet them. It was instant family!

The younger brother speaks only Hungarian; and because his wife is a
Hungarian government worker, their number is not in the telephone book for
reasons of privacy. The cousins in Las Vegas are multilingual (the wife
survived Bergen-Belsen, the husband was a partisan) and every word back and
forth had to be translated - but with such warmth and joy! My cousin hugs
just like my father did; we could not stop hugging each other. We had a
huge traditional Czechoslovakian / Hungarian dinner!

The younger brother knows little about his past, because his mother, who
died only a few years ago, could not bear to talk about her losses,
including the murders of her husband and father. His older brother, also,
finds it hard to talk about those times. The earliest memory of the brother
I met, is the occasion when Jews were herded brutally toward a ghetto in
Budapest; a soldier shoved his beloved grandfather, who could not move
"quickly enough", making him fall down, and then shot him on the spot.

When the Nazis demanded that Jews join the labor battalions, the older son
tried to convince his father that they should run away together and join the
partisans. The father said he was a WWI veteran, this was his fate, etc. -
and paid for this with his life, as did so many other decent Jews. The
older son fled, and survived as a partisan.

The younger son and his mother were saved by the extraordinary and
unforgettable heroism of Raoul Wallenberg; they lived in one of the
safe-houses till the end of WWII.

The younger son brought to Las Vegas a stack of ancient photographs; he had
found them in his mother's room after she died. She had never shown them to
him, or talked about them with him. He had planned to leave all of them
with me, so that I could photograph them and then mail them back to him.
But in the end, he could not bear to part with any that showed his father,
whom he does not remember at all. He also hung on to all the photos of his
mother. I find it very touching that he is such a devoted son.

However, he agreed to lend me photos that showed people he did not know. I
could not believe what I saw! There was a photo of my father at about 3
years old, with his mother and older sister, similar to the one SIGAL family
photo my father had been able to save. There were several photos of the two
sisters of the mother of the R***** brothers, each with spouses and / or
children. I knew who these people were, only because names on the backs of
some photos were those my father had mentioned. I was able to tell my
cousin, "This was your aunt! These were your little cousins!"

Some of the other photos showed a person or persons whose name on the back I
do not know; others provided no name or information, and I did not recognize
the person. But I found a wonderful turn-of-the-century photo of the
exquisite eldest aunt of the R***** brothers, with her three sparklingly
beautiful little children - and their first names are on the back of the
photo. Any such clue is a help in further research!

Now I must visit my cousins in Budapest, in order to meet all of them and
their families, and to see the rest of the photographs! I still have a
thousand questions, and I want to find more family. More important, we are
alive and we need to celebrate life. I must locate a person who speaks both
Hungarian and English, and with whom all of us can feel comfortable in
Budapest and / or Vienna.

I have found these relatives in large part due to the existence of JewishGen
and its various SIGs and sources of information. Thank you, also, to the
dozens of Genners and SIGgers who have helped me with all kinds of advice; I
have tried to thank each of you personally. My financial contribution will
be on its way to JewishGen.

Shana Tova to all. May we see peace in Israel and throughout the world,
this year.

Marilyn Sheridan (Miriam SIGAL)
Tucson, AZ, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Polish-Russian Names #general

Sandra and Donald Hirschhorn <donsandyh@...>
 

The email below led me to an opposite question. Part of my family
was also >from Bialystok and an aunt who died in the Holocaust was
always known to me as "Aunt Rose." I have not been successful in
finding her birth certificate although I have obtained them for all
her siblings.

Both my mother and my uncle used "American" names here in the U.S.
different >from their birth names and I assume the same is true of my
aunt who remained in Europe.

So, what I would like to know is what was most likely her "real" name
in Poland?

Thank you.

Sandra Hirschhorn
Boca Raton, Florida
Researching BRUMER, LITWIN, KOGAN, Bialystok, Lodz, Poland

"karina holthoff" <holthoffk@attbi.com> wrote ...


My Great Grand Parents and my grand parents were >from Bialystok
and my grandmother's name was Fanja or Fania too.

It seems to be a common name.

Several days ago I posed a query about Russian-Polish names.
I was looking for the most probable religious *and* secular
names for the following:

All were born in Bialystock region:
... female: called Fania in the US

....Most correspondents suggested Feige for Fania, and I think
it most likely.

Barbara S Mannlein
Tucson, AZ


Galicia map, thanks #galicia

Jerome Silverbush <jsilverbus@...>
 

Thanks to all who helped me with my question about a map clearly showing
the borders of Galicia, Bukovina and Romania. I didn't get exactly what
I want but I got some good maps.
http://romansky.dnsalias.org/oldmaps/image6.htm is a good compact map of
Bukovina showing the surrounding countries.
http://historicaltextarchive.com/hungary/map13.gif shows the entire
Austro Hungarian empire in 1914.

Jerry Silverbush
Durham, NC


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Galicia map, thanks #galicia

Jerome Silverbush <jsilverbus@...>
 

Thanks to all who helped me with my question about a map clearly showing
the borders of Galicia, Bukovina and Romania. I didn't get exactly what
I want but I got some good maps.
http://romansky.dnsalias.org/oldmaps/image6.htm is a good compact map of
Bukovina showing the surrounding countries.
http://historicaltextarchive.com/hungary/map13.gif shows the entire
Austro Hungarian empire in 1914.

Jerry Silverbush
Durham, NC


To Loouis Schonfeld #hungary

BruceKitty@...
 

Louis, I received the "Land of Hagar" book this morning. It is indeed a very
beautifully
written and illustrated book. Thank you so much for making this book
available.
Best wishes for a Happy and Healthy New Year!
Kitty Sauber <brucekitty@aol.com>


Hungary SIG #Hungary To Loouis Schonfeld #hungary

BruceKitty@...
 

Louis, I received the "Land of Hagar" book this morning. It is indeed a very
beautifully
written and illustrated book. Thank you so much for making this book
available.
Best wishes for a Happy and Healthy New Year!
Kitty Sauber <brucekitty@aol.com>