Date   

Yizkor Book Project, August 2002 #courland #latvia

Joyce Field
 

Part of this update was included in a New Year's message to the
Yizkor Book Project Digest. As so many readers of JewishGen's mail
lists enjoy hearing of the new material on the Yizkor Book site, we
are posting this update even though it is later in the month than we
traditionally send these updates.

August 2002 update for Yizkor Book Project

As many of you have undoubtedly heard, the Yizkor Book Project was
honored in Toronto to receive an award by IAJGS, the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies. The press release
stated:

"The IAJGS Outstanding Contribution Award, which is to be presented
to a person, persons or organization in recognition of a contribution
via the Internet, print, or electronic product. This year's award was
made to
JewishGen for its Yizkor Book Project. Susan King, President of
JewishGen, and Joyce Field, Yizkor Book Project Manager, accepted the
award on behalf of JewishGen."

This award was made possible by all of you who have submitted
translations, who have worked hard as project coordinators to
encourage others to submit translations and to raise money for
professional translators, and by all of you who shared the dream
five years ago of what this project could offer to Jewish
genealogists. Also, without the volunteers who manage the Yizkor
Book Library file, the Yizkor Book Database, the Yizkor Book list of
translators, the Yizkor Book Digest, and the Necrology Index, this
Project could not operate as smoothly and efficiently as it does.
And without the daily work of our Permissions Coordinator, who
communicates so well with the Israeli landsmanschaftn, and the QA
Coordinator (the same person!), and our excellent team of htmlers,
we would never be able to get material online as rapidly as we do.
Our heartfelt thanks to all of you!

August 2002 production, despite our concentration on the Toronto
meeting, was excellent. We added four new books and 16 updates.

New Books:

-Czestochowa, Poland
-Krakow, Poland
-Szekesfehervar, Hungary
-Wloclawek, Poland

Updated Books:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Brzeziny, Poland
-Buchach, Ukraine
-Dubossary, Moldova
-Khorostkov, Ukraine
-Koden, Poland
-Lida,Belarus
-Lite (Lithuania)
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Olyka, Poland
-Piesk, Belarus
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Stawiski, Poland
-Thessalonika, Greece
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zgierz, Poland

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@jewishgen.org


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Yizkor Book Project, August 2002 #courland #latvia

Joyce Field
 

Part of this update was included in a New Year's message to the
Yizkor Book Project Digest. As so many readers of JewishGen's mail
lists enjoy hearing of the new material on the Yizkor Book site, we
are posting this update even though it is later in the month than we
traditionally send these updates.

August 2002 update for Yizkor Book Project

As many of you have undoubtedly heard, the Yizkor Book Project was
honored in Toronto to receive an award by IAJGS, the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies. The press release
stated:

"The IAJGS Outstanding Contribution Award, which is to be presented
to a person, persons or organization in recognition of a contribution
via the Internet, print, or electronic product. This year's award was
made to
JewishGen for its Yizkor Book Project. Susan King, President of
JewishGen, and Joyce Field, Yizkor Book Project Manager, accepted the
award on behalf of JewishGen."

This award was made possible by all of you who have submitted
translations, who have worked hard as project coordinators to
encourage others to submit translations and to raise money for
professional translators, and by all of you who shared the dream
five years ago of what this project could offer to Jewish
genealogists. Also, without the volunteers who manage the Yizkor
Book Library file, the Yizkor Book Database, the Yizkor Book list of
translators, the Yizkor Book Digest, and the Necrology Index, this
Project could not operate as smoothly and efficiently as it does.
And without the daily work of our Permissions Coordinator, who
communicates so well with the Israeli landsmanschaftn, and the QA
Coordinator (the same person!), and our excellent team of htmlers,
we would never be able to get material online as rapidly as we do.
Our heartfelt thanks to all of you!

August 2002 production, despite our concentration on the Toronto
meeting, was excellent. We added four new books and 16 updates.

New Books:

-Czestochowa, Poland
-Krakow, Poland
-Szekesfehervar, Hungary
-Wloclawek, Poland

Updated Books:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Brzeziny, Poland
-Buchach, Ukraine
-Dubossary, Moldova
-Khorostkov, Ukraine
-Koden, Poland
-Lida,Belarus
-Lite (Lithuania)
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Olyka, Poland
-Piesk, Belarus
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Stawiski, Poland
-Thessalonika, Greece
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zgierz, Poland

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@jewishgen.org


Sefardim in Ashkenaz territory #galicia

Miriam Solon <msolon@...>
 

There is an ongoing myth in my family that we are descended >from
Sefardim who migrated east after 1492 and wound up in Central and
Eastern Europe. Is there any documentation for such a phenomenon?
--
Miriam Solon


Yizkor Book Project, August 2002 #galicia

Joyce Field
 

Part of this update was included in a New Year's message to the
Yizkor Book Project Digest. As so many readers of JewishGen's mail
lists enjoy hearing of the new material on the Yizkor Book site, we
are posting this update even though it is later in the month than we
traditionally send these updates.

August 2002 update for Yizkor Book Project

As many of you have undoubtedly heard, the Yizkor Book Project was
honored in Toronto to receive an award by IAJGS, the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies. The press release
stated:

"The IAJGS Outstanding Contribution Award, which is to be presented
to a person, persons or organization in recognition of a contribution
via the Internet, print, or electronic product. This year's award was
made to
JewishGen for its Yizkor Book Project. Susan King, President of
JewishGen, and Joyce Field, Yizkor Book Project Manager, accepted the
award on behalf of JewishGen."

This award was made possible by all of you who have submitted
translations, who have worked hard as project coordinators to
encourage others to submit translations and to raise money for
professional translators, and by all of you who shared the dream
five years ago of what this project could offer to Jewish
genealogists. Also, without the volunteers who manage the Yizkor
Book Library file, the Yizkor Book Database, the Yizkor Book list of
translators, the Yizkor Book Digest, and the Necrology Index, this
Project could not operate as smoothly and efficiently as it does.
And without the daily work of our Permissions Coordinator, who
communicates so well with the Israeli landsmanschaftn, and the QA
Coordinator (the same person!), and our excellent team of htmlers,
we would never be able to get material online as rapidly as we do.
Our heartfelt thanks to all of you!

August 2002 production, despite our concentration on the Toronto
meeting, was excellent. We added four new books and 16 updates.

New Books:

-Czestochowa, Poland
-Krakow, Poland
-Szekesfehervar, Hungary
-Wloclawek, Poland

Updated Books:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Brzeziny, Poland
-Buchach, Ukraine
-Dubossary, Moldova
-Khorostkov, Ukraine
-Koden, Poland
-Lida,Belarus
-Lite (Lithuania)
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Olyka, Poland
-Piesk, Belarus
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Stawiski, Poland
-Thessalonika, Greece
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zgierz, Poland

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@jewishgen.org


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Sefardim in Ashkenaz territory #galicia

Miriam Solon <msolon@...>
 

There is an ongoing myth in my family that we are descended >from
Sefardim who migrated east after 1492 and wound up in Central and
Eastern Europe. Is there any documentation for such a phenomenon?
--
Miriam Solon


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Yizkor Book Project, August 2002 #galicia

Joyce Field
 

Part of this update was included in a New Year's message to the
Yizkor Book Project Digest. As so many readers of JewishGen's mail
lists enjoy hearing of the new material on the Yizkor Book site, we
are posting this update even though it is later in the month than we
traditionally send these updates.

August 2002 update for Yizkor Book Project

As many of you have undoubtedly heard, the Yizkor Book Project was
honored in Toronto to receive an award by IAJGS, the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies. The press release
stated:

"The IAJGS Outstanding Contribution Award, which is to be presented
to a person, persons or organization in recognition of a contribution
via the Internet, print, or electronic product. This year's award was
made to
JewishGen for its Yizkor Book Project. Susan King, President of
JewishGen, and Joyce Field, Yizkor Book Project Manager, accepted the
award on behalf of JewishGen."

This award was made possible by all of you who have submitted
translations, who have worked hard as project coordinators to
encourage others to submit translations and to raise money for
professional translators, and by all of you who shared the dream
five years ago of what this project could offer to Jewish
genealogists. Also, without the volunteers who manage the Yizkor
Book Library file, the Yizkor Book Database, the Yizkor Book list of
translators, the Yizkor Book Digest, and the Necrology Index, this
Project could not operate as smoothly and efficiently as it does.
And without the daily work of our Permissions Coordinator, who
communicates so well with the Israeli landsmanschaftn, and the QA
Coordinator (the same person!), and our excellent team of htmlers,
we would never be able to get material online as rapidly as we do.
Our heartfelt thanks to all of you!

August 2002 production, despite our concentration on the Toronto
meeting, was excellent. We added four new books and 16 updates.

New Books:

-Czestochowa, Poland
-Krakow, Poland
-Szekesfehervar, Hungary
-Wloclawek, Poland

Updated Books:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Brzeziny, Poland
-Buchach, Ukraine
-Dubossary, Moldova
-Khorostkov, Ukraine
-Koden, Poland
-Lida,Belarus
-Lite (Lithuania)
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Olyka, Poland
-Piesk, Belarus
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Stawiski, Poland
-Thessalonika, Greece
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zgierz, Poland

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@jewishgen.org


Looking for my Aunt - GLASER #galicia

arie meir
 

Looking for my aunt Dvora Jeanty GLASER who was born in Przemysl in 1927
to her father Chaim GLASER (who was my grandfather) and to her mother
Rachela, whose former name was STOLZBERG. They married in Przemysl in 1926.

Chaim GLASER was previously married to my grandmother Chaia-Helena. Her
former name was MONDERER.

They got married in Vienna and had three children. One of them was Cilli
Glaser MAYER, who was my mother. Chaim Glaser divorced my grandmother in
the early twenties, left Vienna and moved to Przemysl, where he married
Rachela and had this one daughter, I am looking for. The last time my
family heard >from them was in 1939, a short time before World War Two
broke out. If anyone has information on what happened to them please let
me know .

Arieh Meyer
Israel
my email is: meir1935@netvision.net.il


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Looking for my Aunt - GLASER #galicia

arie meir
 

Looking for my aunt Dvora Jeanty GLASER who was born in Przemysl in 1927
to her father Chaim GLASER (who was my grandfather) and to her mother
Rachela, whose former name was STOLZBERG. They married in Przemysl in 1926.

Chaim GLASER was previously married to my grandmother Chaia-Helena. Her
former name was MONDERER.

They got married in Vienna and had three children. One of them was Cilli
Glaser MAYER, who was my mother. Chaim Glaser divorced my grandmother in
the early twenties, left Vienna and moved to Przemysl, where he married
Rachela and had this one daughter, I am looking for. The last time my
family heard >from them was in 1939, a short time before World War Two
broke out. If anyone has information on what happened to them please let
me know .

Arieh Meyer
Israel
my email is: meir1935@netvision.net.il


French Peerage #france

Jon Myers <emquad@...>
 

A little question has come up. It concerns my cousin Eva Estelle NOAH (for
details, please see my family tree at the address below), who married in
1894 in London a man named Adrian Clifford J H D (Antoine) de FLEURY,
listed on the transcribed MC (on FreeBMD) as a Duke.

In the UK Census of 1901, which recently went on-line, Adrian is listed
without title as a solocitor in London, age 31, while his wife is listed in
Brighton as a Countess, age 30, his son Esme, age 6, is listed as a
Viscount, and there is another son Roy, age 1. Duke? Count? Viscount? Or
just plain fraud? (I note he called his second son king!)

Adrian is also listed (in 1901) as having been born in Paris and being a
naturalized British subject. But he is not listed in the 1997 Burke's
Peerage. In fact, no de Fleury is listed in Burke's. The question is
whether he was, in fact, a French peer.

I suppose it might help if I can have someone find his British
naturalizaton record. I'm not sure whether it would be open to the public,
but I suppose so, figuring his naturalization (if true) occurred sometime
1869-1901. He was born about 1869/70 per his MC. (How old did one have to
be to become naturalized?)

Ernest Kallmann has told me that there were numerous de FLEURY families in
France, so I'm simply hoping someone will recognize this particular one.

Many thanks for any suggestions.

Jon Myers
New York
Try the Myers family tree search engine:
http://emquad.home.att.net/ancestry.html
NB. For reasons unknown, some browsers
will reject this address the first time
it is entered but accept it the second.


French SIG #France French Peerage #france

Jon Myers <emquad@...>
 

A little question has come up. It concerns my cousin Eva Estelle NOAH (for
details, please see my family tree at the address below), who married in
1894 in London a man named Adrian Clifford J H D (Antoine) de FLEURY,
listed on the transcribed MC (on FreeBMD) as a Duke.

In the UK Census of 1901, which recently went on-line, Adrian is listed
without title as a solocitor in London, age 31, while his wife is listed in
Brighton as a Countess, age 30, his son Esme, age 6, is listed as a
Viscount, and there is another son Roy, age 1. Duke? Count? Viscount? Or
just plain fraud? (I note he called his second son king!)

Adrian is also listed (in 1901) as having been born in Paris and being a
naturalized British subject. But he is not listed in the 1997 Burke's
Peerage. In fact, no de Fleury is listed in Burke's. The question is
whether he was, in fact, a French peer.

I suppose it might help if I can have someone find his British
naturalizaton record. I'm not sure whether it would be open to the public,
but I suppose so, figuring his naturalization (if true) occurred sometime
1869-1901. He was born about 1869/70 per his MC. (How old did one have to
be to become naturalized?)

Ernest Kallmann has told me that there were numerous de FLEURY families in
France, so I'm simply hoping someone will recognize this particular one.

Many thanks for any suggestions.

Jon Myers
New York
Try the Myers family tree search engine:
http://emquad.home.att.net/ancestry.html
NB. For reasons unknown, some browsers
will reject this address the first time
it is entered but accept it the second.


Yizkor Book Project, August 2002 #france

Joyce Field
 

Part of this update was included in a New Year's message to the
Yizkor Book Project Digest. As so many readers of JewishGen's mail
lists enjoy hearing of the new material on the Yizkor Book site, we
are posting this update even though it is later in the month than we
traditionally send these updates.

August 2002 update for Yizkor Book Project

As many of you have undoubtedly heard, the Yizkor Book Project was
honored in Toronto to receive an award by IAJGS, the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies. The press release
stated:

"The IAJGS Outstanding Contribution Award, which is to be presented
to a person, persons or organization in recognition of a contribution
via the Internet, print, or electronic product. This year's award was
made to
JewishGen for its Yizkor Book Project. Susan King, President of
JewishGen, and Joyce Field, Yizkor Book Project Manager, accepted the
award on behalf of JewishGen."

This award was made possible by all of you who have submitted
translations, who have worked hard as project coordinators to
encourage others to submit translations and to raise money for
professional translators, and by all of you who shared the dream
five years ago of what this project could offer to Jewish
genealogists. Also, without the volunteers who manage the Yizkor
Book Library file, the Yizkor Book Database, the Yizkor Book list of
translators, the Yizkor Book Digest, and the Necrology Index, this
Project could not operate as smoothly and efficiently as it does.
And without the daily work of our Permissions Coordinator, who
communicates so well with the Israeli landsmanschaftn, and the QA
Coordinator (the same person!), and our excellent team of htmlers,
we would never be able to get material online as rapidly as we do.
Our heartfelt thanks to all of you!

August 2002 production, despite our concentration on the Toronto
meeting, was excellent. We added four new books and 16 updates.

New Books:

-Czestochowa, Poland
-Krakow, Poland
-Szekesfehervar, Hungary
-Wloclawek, Poland

Updated Books:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Brzeziny, Poland
-Buchach, Ukraine
-Dubossary, Moldova
-Khorostkov, Ukraine
-Koden, Poland
-Lida,Belarus
-Lite (Lithuania)
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Olyka, Poland
-Piesk, Belarus
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Stawiski, Poland
-Thessalonika, Greece
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zgierz, Poland

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@jewishgen.org


French SIG #France Yizkor Book Project, August 2002 #france

Joyce Field
 

Part of this update was included in a New Year's message to the
Yizkor Book Project Digest. As so many readers of JewishGen's mail
lists enjoy hearing of the new material on the Yizkor Book site, we
are posting this update even though it is later in the month than we
traditionally send these updates.

August 2002 update for Yizkor Book Project

As many of you have undoubtedly heard, the Yizkor Book Project was
honored in Toronto to receive an award by IAJGS, the International
Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies. The press release
stated:

"The IAJGS Outstanding Contribution Award, which is to be presented
to a person, persons or organization in recognition of a contribution
via the Internet, print, or electronic product. This year's award was
made to
JewishGen for its Yizkor Book Project. Susan King, President of
JewishGen, and Joyce Field, Yizkor Book Project Manager, accepted the
award on behalf of JewishGen."

This award was made possible by all of you who have submitted
translations, who have worked hard as project coordinators to
encourage others to submit translations and to raise money for
professional translators, and by all of you who shared the dream
five years ago of what this project could offer to Jewish
genealogists. Also, without the volunteers who manage the Yizkor
Book Library file, the Yizkor Book Database, the Yizkor Book list of
translators, the Yizkor Book Digest, and the Necrology Index, this
Project could not operate as smoothly and efficiently as it does.
And without the daily work of our Permissions Coordinator, who
communicates so well with the Israeli landsmanschaftn, and the QA
Coordinator (the same person!), and our excellent team of htmlers,
we would never be able to get material online as rapidly as we do.
Our heartfelt thanks to all of you!

August 2002 production, despite our concentration on the Toronto
meeting, was excellent. We added four new books and 16 updates.

New Books:

-Czestochowa, Poland
-Krakow, Poland
-Szekesfehervar, Hungary
-Wloclawek, Poland

Updated Books:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Brzeziny, Poland
-Buchach, Ukraine
-Dubossary, Moldova
-Khorostkov, Ukraine
-Koden, Poland
-Lida,Belarus
-Lite (Lithuania)
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Olyka, Poland
-Piesk, Belarus
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Stawiski, Poland
-Thessalonika, Greece
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zgierz, Poland

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
jfield@jewishgen.org


Use of maternal surnames #general

Carlos Glikson
 

Piotr Kaczmarzyk asked "What was the rule of giving surnames to children in
Jewish families? Was it always father's surname? In which case it could be
mother's surname?"

A couple of years ago I asked about changes of surnames and use of mother's
surname. I got so many possible reasons I posted a summary. These were some
of the explanations JGenners forwarded "for different dates, areas, and
circumstances - different >from the unfairly blamed clerk in Ellis
Island!"... They could help to look into other cases and pinpoint the
reason for the change in names:

+Different policies in terms of recording Jewish marriages and legislating
use of surnames among Jews.

+Jewish marriages not being recognized, and children being given documents
with their mothers maiden name

+Religious Marriage considered sufficient. Never bothering to register a
civil marriage with the authorities, with the option for children of taking
either surname

+Having religious marriages, in general not registering until after the
first child was born, and scoffing at the notations of illegitimacy in the
eyes of the Polish government as of no consequence at all.

+Not being able to afford the fee for a civil marriage - children born of
the religious marriage had to take the surname of the mother

+Only one marriage permit issued per Jew family descendance under
Austro-Hungarian law, and only if a significant fee was paid. So marriage
of more than one children would not be recorded by the civil authorities
and children of such couples would be listed in the Austro-Hungarian
metrical records as illegitimate.

+Times when governments in Poland and in Hungary did not allow Jews to
marry more than once (even if his spouse was deceased). In that case, they
were married only by Jewish ceremony and the children of this second (etc.)
marriage bore the family name of the mother.

+Civil marriages being conducted in front of a cross. Jews who refused to
marry in front of a cross were technically illegitimate

+Marriages performed elsewhere and not formally registered in cities where
children were born

+Many people in the United States, Irish in particular, had a particular
dislike for Russians, or what they perceived as Russian sounding names...
Consequently, many Russian or East-European Jews Germanized their names.

+Thinking that having a close maternal relative with the same surname in
the States would make it easier to be admitted if using the maternal
surname

+Desire to avoid the authorities for some reason, probably connected with
military service - either to avoid conscription or to evade punishment
after deserting

+In Russia outside the Kingdom of Poland, Jewish men except the first born
were draftable and sometimes not permitted to marry - so baby boys were
never registered or sometimes registered as the child of another couple
with no boys.

+Inherited surnames were still relatively new and not especially desired by
Jews since they were forced on them by the government in an effort to keep
track of who was who (and draftable, etc.)

+A Jew emmigrating to the US may give no second thought to getting rid of a
name forced on him by the Czar.

+Inconsistent use amongst European Jews of what we consider to
be "surnames" (family names uniformly reflecting the paternal line) until
the 19th century as the earliest.

+Marriages governed by religious law until fairly recently (typically the
19th century) with individual names recorded in official documents being a
totally different question.

+In 20th century not recognition of the state or synagogue as a power
proper for marriage authorization, not for reasons related to religion,
but for political ones

+Need to be sponsored by a family member in order to be accepted as an
immigrant, and pretending to be related to the sponsor using papers in the
new name.

+Jews who needed a surname often used the wife's name if they were (as
often occured) living with the wife's family.

+Men marrying into a well known Rabbinical family taking the father-in-
law's family name

+Men going into their father-in-law's profession, and the family's name
changing according to that profession

+Anglicization, easier spelling or pronounciation, and even choosing a name
more in their liking, and ease in the States to "call yourself anything you
wanted"

+Travelling under the mother's maiden name and resuming the father's name
on arrival

+Travels under the mother's maiden name being thus noted by the authorities
on their certificate of arrival or naturalization papers.

Hope the summary helps Piotr and other Genners looking for reasons find a
"possible"!

Carlos GLIKSON
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Searching for

GLIKSON, GLICKSON, GLUCKSOHN, GLUECKSOHN: Marijampole, Suwalki, Augustow,
Sejny,Sopotkin,Koenigsberg. POKROISKY, POKROJSKI, POKROY: Suwalki,
Seirijai. Lomza. ALPEROVICH, ALPEROWICZ: Kremenchug, Vilnius. HOLLANDERSKY,
HOLLENDERSKI, HOLLANDER: Suwalki, Seirijai, Lomza. TARNOPOLSKY, TARNOPOL:
Kremenchug, Kharkov. FELCHINSKY: Kremenchug, Vilnius, Felschtin?. KARP:
Grodno.SMELIENSKY(?),KRASNAPOLSKY(?), BLUMIGDAL (?), GOLUMBIEWSKY,GOLOMB(?)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Use of maternal surnames #general

Carlos Glikson
 

Piotr Kaczmarzyk asked "What was the rule of giving surnames to children in
Jewish families? Was it always father's surname? In which case it could be
mother's surname?"

A couple of years ago I asked about changes of surnames and use of mother's
surname. I got so many possible reasons I posted a summary. These were some
of the explanations JGenners forwarded "for different dates, areas, and
circumstances - different >from the unfairly blamed clerk in Ellis
Island!"... They could help to look into other cases and pinpoint the
reason for the change in names:

+Different policies in terms of recording Jewish marriages and legislating
use of surnames among Jews.

+Jewish marriages not being recognized, and children being given documents
with their mothers maiden name

+Religious Marriage considered sufficient. Never bothering to register a
civil marriage with the authorities, with the option for children of taking
either surname

+Having religious marriages, in general not registering until after the
first child was born, and scoffing at the notations of illegitimacy in the
eyes of the Polish government as of no consequence at all.

+Not being able to afford the fee for a civil marriage - children born of
the religious marriage had to take the surname of the mother

+Only one marriage permit issued per Jew family descendance under
Austro-Hungarian law, and only if a significant fee was paid. So marriage
of more than one children would not be recorded by the civil authorities
and children of such couples would be listed in the Austro-Hungarian
metrical records as illegitimate.

+Times when governments in Poland and in Hungary did not allow Jews to
marry more than once (even if his spouse was deceased). In that case, they
were married only by Jewish ceremony and the children of this second (etc.)
marriage bore the family name of the mother.

+Civil marriages being conducted in front of a cross. Jews who refused to
marry in front of a cross were technically illegitimate

+Marriages performed elsewhere and not formally registered in cities where
children were born

+Many people in the United States, Irish in particular, had a particular
dislike for Russians, or what they perceived as Russian sounding names...
Consequently, many Russian or East-European Jews Germanized their names.

+Thinking that having a close maternal relative with the same surname in
the States would make it easier to be admitted if using the maternal
surname

+Desire to avoid the authorities for some reason, probably connected with
military service - either to avoid conscription or to evade punishment
after deserting

+In Russia outside the Kingdom of Poland, Jewish men except the first born
were draftable and sometimes not permitted to marry - so baby boys were
never registered or sometimes registered as the child of another couple
with no boys.

+Inherited surnames were still relatively new and not especially desired by
Jews since they were forced on them by the government in an effort to keep
track of who was who (and draftable, etc.)

+A Jew emmigrating to the US may give no second thought to getting rid of a
name forced on him by the Czar.

+Inconsistent use amongst European Jews of what we consider to
be "surnames" (family names uniformly reflecting the paternal line) until
the 19th century as the earliest.

+Marriages governed by religious law until fairly recently (typically the
19th century) with individual names recorded in official documents being a
totally different question.

+In 20th century not recognition of the state or synagogue as a power
proper for marriage authorization, not for reasons related to religion,
but for political ones

+Need to be sponsored by a family member in order to be accepted as an
immigrant, and pretending to be related to the sponsor using papers in the
new name.

+Jews who needed a surname often used the wife's name if they were (as
often occured) living with the wife's family.

+Men marrying into a well known Rabbinical family taking the father-in-
law's family name

+Men going into their father-in-law's profession, and the family's name
changing according to that profession

+Anglicization, easier spelling or pronounciation, and even choosing a name
more in their liking, and ease in the States to "call yourself anything you
wanted"

+Travelling under the mother's maiden name and resuming the father's name
on arrival

+Travels under the mother's maiden name being thus noted by the authorities
on their certificate of arrival or naturalization papers.

Hope the summary helps Piotr and other Genners looking for reasons find a
"possible"!

Carlos GLIKSON
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Searching for

GLIKSON, GLICKSON, GLUCKSOHN, GLUECKSOHN: Marijampole, Suwalki, Augustow,
Sejny,Sopotkin,Koenigsberg. POKROISKY, POKROJSKI, POKROY: Suwalki,
Seirijai. Lomza. ALPEROVICH, ALPEROWICZ: Kremenchug, Vilnius. HOLLANDERSKY,
HOLLENDERSKI, HOLLANDER: Suwalki, Seirijai, Lomza. TARNOPOLSKY, TARNOPOL:
Kremenchug, Kharkov. FELCHINSKY: Kremenchug, Vilnius, Felschtin?. KARP:
Grodno.SMELIENSKY(?),KRASNAPOLSKY(?), BLUMIGDAL (?), GOLUMBIEWSKY,GOLOMB(?)


Re: family finder #general

Stephen Mednick <lists.genealogy@...>
 

To assist people with their emails, whether they are for this list or for
other correspondence, people might like to click on the following link
http://www.infinisource.com/lifestyles/effective-email.html for some simple
Dos and Donts with email. Most of them are common sense but while this
thread is going it might be an opportune time to remind everyone.

Stephen Mednick
Sydney, Australia
steve@css.au.com

Researching:
MEDNICK (Kalius,UKR & London,ENG)
SACHS/SACKS (Kalius,UKR & London,ENG)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: family finder #general

Stephen Mednick <lists.genealogy@...>
 

To assist people with their emails, whether they are for this list or for
other correspondence, people might like to click on the following link
http://www.infinisource.com/lifestyles/effective-email.html for some simple
Dos and Donts with email. Most of them are common sense but while this
thread is going it might be an opportune time to remind everyone.

Stephen Mednick
Sydney, Australia
steve@css.au.com

Researching:
MEDNICK (Kalius,UKR & London,ENG)
SACHS/SACKS (Kalius,UKR & London,ENG)


Re: Yiddish translation #belarus

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 9/16/2002 10:11:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
katie2727@attbi.com writes:

<< "Brody Bangasse" . . . . I thought Bangasse meant Austria. As I
learned >from fellow Genners, Bangasse does *not* mean Austria. I
searched in Google, 'Bangasse', and it is a place in Africa >>

==Searching Google, and Shtettelseeker is always a good idea.

==In this case, however, the word is German. Bahn is German for railroad,
Gasse means "lane." So Bahngasse would be the road leading to or fronting
on the local railroad station

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@aol.com>

WOLFF (Pfungstadt,Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina);BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


Re: Yiddish translation #belarus

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Perhaps he lived near the railroad. The German word "Bahngasse" would
mean "rail lane" or "rail alley"--a little street near (or parallel to)
the tracks. Transliterated into Yiddish, it could easily lose the 'h'.

All we need now is a city map of Brody with or without such a street name.

Roger Lustig


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish translation #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 9/16/2002 10:11:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
katie2727@attbi.com writes:

<< "Brody Bangasse" . . . . I thought Bangasse meant Austria. As I
learned >from fellow Genners, Bangasse does *not* mean Austria. I
searched in Google, 'Bangasse', and it is a place in Africa >>

==Searching Google, and Shtettelseeker is always a good idea.

==In this case, however, the word is German. Bahn is German for railroad,
Gasse means "lane." So Bahngasse would be the road leading to or fronting
on the local railroad station

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@aol.com>

WOLFF (Pfungstadt,Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina);BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish translation #general

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Perhaps he lived near the railroad. The German word "Bahngasse" would
mean "rail lane" or "rail alley"--a little street near (or parallel to)
the tracks. Transliterated into Yiddish, it could easily lose the 'h'.

All we need now is a city map of Brody with or without such a street name.

Roger Lustig