Date   

INTRO - Seek LEWIN, HOFFMAN , LOWENBERG #germany

Ann Lewin <lewinr@...>
 

Hello
I am trying to trace both sides of Family. The Hoffman famiy lived in
Stettin, Germany (now Poland) Martha and Dagobert Hoffman owned a
furniture store in Stettin and had two daughters. I do not know where
either were born and do not know how to get that information. Also do not
know name of parents. Any help appreciated as to what to do next.

Lewin family : Jakob LEWIN born 9/26/1823
Married Emma LOWENBERG
Had 4 sons (1 named Paul, 1 named ?Sanny?)and two others
names unknown
Paul LEWIN born in Halle u/s later married Rosa BOEHM
(born in Oberlangstadt Had 6 children who emigrated (>from there on I have
info)

Any information or help appreciated. Know that Paul and Rosa divorced in
1921 in Weisbaden. I also know that Sanny(?) moved to the San Diego area
before the holocaust.

THANKS For any help you can give as to researh or connection to family
tree.

Ann Lewin CITY? STATE?


German SIG #Germany INTRO - Seek LEWIN, HOFFMAN , LOWENBERG #germany

Ann Lewin <lewinr@...>
 

Hello
I am trying to trace both sides of Family. The Hoffman famiy lived in
Stettin, Germany (now Poland) Martha and Dagobert Hoffman owned a
furniture store in Stettin and had two daughters. I do not know where
either were born and do not know how to get that information. Also do not
know name of parents. Any help appreciated as to what to do next.

Lewin family : Jakob LEWIN born 9/26/1823
Married Emma LOWENBERG
Had 4 sons (1 named Paul, 1 named ?Sanny?)and two others
names unknown
Paul LEWIN born in Halle u/s later married Rosa BOEHM
(born in Oberlangstadt Had 6 children who emigrated (>from there on I have
info)

Any information or help appreciated. Know that Paul and Rosa divorced in
1921 in Weisbaden. I also know that Sanny(?) moved to the San Diego area
before the holocaust.

THANKS For any help you can give as to researh or connection to family
tree.

Ann Lewin CITY? STATE?


Beryl SCHVEID #general

Marilyn Feingold <mrl@...>
 

I am searching for Beryl Schveid >from Vertuzhany in the district of Soroca.
Beryl came to the United States, married, had a son, divorced and went back
to Vertuzhany. Beryl' son remained in the United States with his mother.
Beryl's father was Menasha. His mother was Zelda. I would like to find
Beryl's descedents. I am looked on Ellis Island with no success. Does
anyone out there have any ideas for me? Thanks. Marilyn Feingold


Family Tree Volume 64 #general

waldingerz <epic@...>
 

Greetings, Genners:

Does anyone have World Family Tree Volume 64? I am specifically looking for
Tree 2235. Please respond privately.

Amy Waldinger
http://waldinger.net
http://zarchin.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Beryl SCHVEID #general

Marilyn Feingold <mrl@...>
 

I am searching for Beryl Schveid >from Vertuzhany in the district of Soroca.
Beryl came to the United States, married, had a son, divorced and went back
to Vertuzhany. Beryl' son remained in the United States with his mother.
Beryl's father was Menasha. His mother was Zelda. I would like to find
Beryl's descedents. I am looked on Ellis Island with no success. Does
anyone out there have any ideas for me? Thanks. Marilyn Feingold


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Family Tree Volume 64 #general

waldingerz <epic@...>
 

Greetings, Genners:

Does anyone have World Family Tree Volume 64? I am specifically looking for
Tree 2235. Please respond privately.

Amy Waldinger
http://waldinger.net
http://zarchin.com


Re: Holocaust records: "Rzezak i kantor" #poland

Kris Murawski <kris.murawski@...>
 

In Holocaust-era records for the town of Czestochowa, I find these
three words as a person's profession:

"Rzezak i kantor"

Several native Polish speakers were unable to translate these into
English. Can anyone help with this?

Dan
"Rzezak" performed circumcision.
"Kantor" means singer (in the sinagogue).

Kris Murawski
Annandale, VA


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Holocaust records: "Rzezak i kantor" #poland

Kris Murawski <kris.murawski@...>
 

In Holocaust-era records for the town of Czestochowa, I find these
three words as a person's profession:

"Rzezak i kantor"

Several native Polish speakers were unable to translate these into
English. Can anyone help with this?

Dan
"Rzezak" performed circumcision.
"Kantor" means singer (in the sinagogue).

Kris Murawski
Annandale, VA


Take a look at this Timeline #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

I received this message posted on the LitvakSIG newsgroup and have
permission to post it on ours. I think you should take a look at the site
as Nancy has done a great job with the Historical details. It points out
just how much information is required for just one Country. She has
focussed on Belarus. I think that this page will also be of interest to
Latvian Researchers. She has done a great deal of work and is to be commended.

Arlene Beare
UK


Dear Fellow Litvaks,

This message is being posted at the request of Edward Rosenbaum, webmaster
of the Belarus SIG, who is not a LitvakSIG subscriber.

A new and very useful feature created by Nancy Holden, has been added to
the BelarusSIG website:

"Timeline Consequences of Border Changes-the History of the
Administrative-Territorial Division of Belarus" spans the years
1569-January 2000 and provides information on the ruling country,
district(s) involved and comments which explain the direct consequences on
the Jewish population. Many Gubernias and uezds of modern day Lithuania are
included in the District column.

It can be accessed using the following URL:

http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/borders_timeline.htm

This timeline clarified several questions I had regarding the borders of
the Vilna Gubernia, administratvie district of Oshmyany (today in Belarus)
which was part of the "Lithuanian" area of the Russian Empire in the
1830'-1840's when my ancestors lived there.

It should prove very useful to Litvak researchers with questions regarding
administrative border changes and their timeframes.

Eden S. Joachim
Pomona, New York

BARON, KAPLAN, GOLDBERG,HALPERN - Aukstadvaris, Trakai Uezd, Vilnius,
Oshmiany, Belarus and Stokliskes

EDENSARA@aol.com


Latvia SIG #Latvia Take a look at this Timeline #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

I received this message posted on the LitvakSIG newsgroup and have
permission to post it on ours. I think you should take a look at the site
as Nancy has done a great job with the Historical details. It points out
just how much information is required for just one Country. She has
focussed on Belarus. I think that this page will also be of interest to
Latvian Researchers. She has done a great deal of work and is to be commended.

Arlene Beare
UK


Dear Fellow Litvaks,

This message is being posted at the request of Edward Rosenbaum, webmaster
of the Belarus SIG, who is not a LitvakSIG subscriber.

A new and very useful feature created by Nancy Holden, has been added to
the BelarusSIG website:

"Timeline Consequences of Border Changes-the History of the
Administrative-Territorial Division of Belarus" spans the years
1569-January 2000 and provides information on the ruling country,
district(s) involved and comments which explain the direct consequences on
the Jewish population. Many Gubernias and uezds of modern day Lithuania are
included in the District column.

It can be accessed using the following URL:

http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/borders_timeline.htm

This timeline clarified several questions I had regarding the borders of
the Vilna Gubernia, administratvie district of Oshmyany (today in Belarus)
which was part of the "Lithuanian" area of the Russian Empire in the
1830'-1840's when my ancestors lived there.

It should prove very useful to Litvak researchers with questions regarding
administrative border changes and their timeframes.

Eden S. Joachim
Pomona, New York

BARON, KAPLAN, GOLDBERG,HALPERN - Aukstadvaris, Trakai Uezd, Vilnius,
Oshmiany, Belarus and Stokliskes

EDENSARA@aol.com


Re: occupation: scourer??? #general

tediboy <rmod@...>
 

In article <3DB81414.80100@sciti.com>,
Stephanie Weiner <laguna@sciti.com> wrote:

I have found information on a relative living in Amesbury, MA in
1903-1904. His occupation is listed as "scourer." Anyone have a clue
what a scourer did??
It seems likely to me that the occupation would be a wool scourer or scourer
of some other form of textile. >from my limited knowlege of the US. I think
that region had a lot of textile mills during that era.(it still may have
for all I know)
One textile industry that still exists in some small towns, in the sheep
grazing lands of inland eastern Australia where I live, is a wool scour
where the grease & burrs etc. are removed >from fleeces. Those who work in
this industry are often called scourers.
I hope this helps,
Myer O'Donnell


where is Dow Field? #general

Howard Zakai
 

Hello,

I have a picture of my grandfather dressed in uniform sometime during Waorld
War II. Someone wrote in "Dow Field." Any clue where this would be?

He was registered into the Service in the Bronx, New York and was in the Army
Air Force.

Howie Zakai
Staten Island, NY


Looking for Abby Grissinger #general

Cindy Gallard <dg2286@...>
 

Looking for researcher #3591, Abby Grissinger, researching
Lobatch family. Thank you
Cindy Gallard
Denver, CO

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


Re: Occupation #france

Elliott Terman <meterman@...>
 

Dear Ms Weiner
It is most likely that your relative in Amesbury, MA was working in the
Textile Industry. During the time frame that you noted, 1903 - 1904,
the Textile Industry was probably the main employer, aside >from Fishery,
in MA and the entire New England area.
A Scourer had a hard, WET and HOT job during any season of the
year...especially during the Summer.
Although fabric processed in the area included all types of fibers,
Scouring most often referred to the cleaning of raw wool fibers, prior
to spinning into yarn for weaving. The raw stock SMELLED AWFUL. It was
dirty work..."what kind of job was that for a Jewish boy...?
Elliott Terman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: occupation: scourer??? #general

tediboy <rmod@...>
 

In article <3DB81414.80100@sciti.com>,
Stephanie Weiner <laguna@sciti.com> wrote:

I have found information on a relative living in Amesbury, MA in
1903-1904. His occupation is listed as "scourer." Anyone have a clue
what a scourer did??
It seems likely to me that the occupation would be a wool scourer or scourer
of some other form of textile. >from my limited knowlege of the US. I think
that region had a lot of textile mills during that era.(it still may have
for all I know)
One textile industry that still exists in some small towns, in the sheep
grazing lands of inland eastern Australia where I live, is a wool scour
where the grease & burrs etc. are removed >from fleeces. Those who work in
this industry are often called scourers.
I hope this helps,
Myer O'Donnell


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen where is Dow Field? #general

Howard Zakai
 

Hello,

I have a picture of my grandfather dressed in uniform sometime during Waorld
War II. Someone wrote in "Dow Field." Any clue where this would be?

He was registered into the Service in the Bronx, New York and was in the Army
Air Force.

Howie Zakai
Staten Island, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for Abby Grissinger #general

Cindy Gallard <dg2286@...>
 

Looking for researcher #3591, Abby Grissinger, researching
Lobatch family. Thank you
Cindy Gallard
Denver, CO

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Occupation #general

Elliott Terman <meterman@...>
 

Dear Ms Weiner
It is most likely that your relative in Amesbury, MA was working in the
Textile Industry. During the time frame that you noted, 1903 - 1904,
the Textile Industry was probably the main employer, aside >from Fishery,
in MA and the entire New England area.
A Scourer had a hard, WET and HOT job during any season of the
year...especially during the Summer.
Although fabric processed in the area included all types of fibers,
Scouring most often referred to the cleaning of raw wool fibers, prior
to spinning into yarn for weaving. The raw stock SMELLED AWFUL. It was
dirty work..."what kind of job was that for a Jewish boy...?
Elliott Terman


Re: Jewish names based on location #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 10/26/2002 7:19:48 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Irvjs@aol.com
writes:

<< I do not dispute that many Jewish names in Germany were based on
place-names with which the person was associated but in my own family I have
found some hard-to explain family names. My ggf, Leib Speier (which is
already a place name, though the Speiers came >from HOF), wrote in the "Family
Book" in 1872 that he took the mane HOLSTEIN, though the family; lived near
Kassel and had no apparent connection with the province of Holstein.

Leib Speier-Holstein also traces his ancestry to the PLAUT Family of
Neuenbrunslar, which again is not near Schleswig-Holstein. Another mystery
regarding the "taking" of additional names are the various descendants of
Josef Plaut who added names such as Dannenberg, Stern and Koenig to the Plaut
name. Often the original name (Plaut, Speier) was dropped and only the newer
name retained by future generations. >>

Irwin Schiffres has raised an important point. The rational for people
"taking" a specific family name is often as inexpicable as the ashes of the
red heifer.

Who can guess today? Names weren't necessarily taken, they were also given,
long before the laws required it, by members of the community, by members of
the family, even, to distinguish one clan >from another or one person >from
others with the same name.

There may have been some connections, or it may have been a whimsy. In my own
ancestral family, some had taken/been given the village name, Frensdorf, as
family name by the very early 18th cent (especially one rabbinical family in
Hanover and Hamburg, who doubled the final F. There was another rabbi, Uri
Feist of nearby-Bamberg whom researchers assumed to be a member of my
family--but he wasn't. His father Samuel Feist had been known as Samuel
Frensdorf because he briefly lived in the village.

In 1813 when the law demanded it, my extended family took eight different
family names, including Elkan (after an Elchanan ancestor) and Feldheim (for
no known reason) and Bernet (because the Bavarian villagers pronounced the
name YomTov as YomDov and "everyone" knows a Dov [Heb] is a Baer [Ger.] and
"renamed" an earlier YomTov as Jondef Behr.)

The different names in my family were taken almost of necessity: in the
previous century my ancestral family accounted for something like 70% of the
Jewish population of the tiny village, and they spread by marriage, business
and inclination to the neighboring town (Bamberg). Even so, there were so
many BERNET's in the region that one branch changed the name to BERNERT, and
no less than three of the young men of the Bamberg community who gave their
lives in WW 1 were Bernets.

I'm still trying to link together all the FRENSDORF[F]s. All the BERNETs who
came to America in th 19th century became BARNET on their arrival (BERNATs
for those who felt too crowded by their relatives). Today, only two Jewish
BERNET families remain: I amd my descendants, and the grandson of my
grandfather's cousin, and his descendants in California.

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@aol.com>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jewish names based on location #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 10/26/2002 7:19:48 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Irvjs@aol.com
writes:

<< I do not dispute that many Jewish names in Germany were based on
place-names with which the person was associated but in my own family I have
found some hard-to explain family names. My ggf, Leib Speier (which is
already a place name, though the Speiers came >from HOF), wrote in the "Family
Book" in 1872 that he took the mane HOLSTEIN, though the family; lived near
Kassel and had no apparent connection with the province of Holstein.

Leib Speier-Holstein also traces his ancestry to the PLAUT Family of
Neuenbrunslar, which again is not near Schleswig-Holstein. Another mystery
regarding the "taking" of additional names are the various descendants of
Josef Plaut who added names such as Dannenberg, Stern and Koenig to the Plaut
name. Often the original name (Plaut, Speier) was dropped and only the newer
name retained by future generations. >>

Irwin Schiffres has raised an important point. The rational for people
"taking" a specific family name is often as inexpicable as the ashes of the
red heifer.

Who can guess today? Names weren't necessarily taken, they were also given,
long before the laws required it, by members of the community, by members of
the family, even, to distinguish one clan >from another or one person >from
others with the same name.

There may have been some connections, or it may have been a whimsy. In my own
ancestral family, some had taken/been given the village name, Frensdorf, as
family name by the very early 18th cent (especially one rabbinical family in
Hanover and Hamburg, who doubled the final F. There was another rabbi, Uri
Feist of nearby-Bamberg whom researchers assumed to be a member of my
family--but he wasn't. His father Samuel Feist had been known as Samuel
Frensdorf because he briefly lived in the village.

In 1813 when the law demanded it, my extended family took eight different
family names, including Elkan (after an Elchanan ancestor) and Feldheim (for
no known reason) and Bernet (because the Bavarian villagers pronounced the
name YomTov as YomDov and "everyone" knows a Dov [Heb] is a Baer [Ger.] and
"renamed" an earlier YomTov as Jondef Behr.)

The different names in my family were taken almost of necessity: in the
previous century my ancestral family accounted for something like 70% of the
Jewish population of the tiny village, and they spread by marriage, business
and inclination to the neighboring town (Bamberg). Even so, there were so
many BERNET's in the region that one branch changed the name to BERNERT, and
no less than three of the young men of the Bamberg community who gave their
lives in WW 1 were Bernets.

I'm still trying to link together all the FRENSDORF[F]s. All the BERNETs who
came to America in th 19th century became BARNET on their arrival (BERNATs
for those who felt too crowded by their relatives). Today, only two Jewish
BERNET families remain: I amd my descendants, and the grandson of my
grandfather's cousin, and his descendants in California.

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@aol.com>