Date   

Re: Loggers in Poland #general

éåðúï áï àøé <yonatan@...>
 

Did anyone replying to Josh Brown's questions on loggers in Poland come
across a logging trade name sounding similiar to the word Katzoff or
variant.

Thanks

Yoni Ben-Ari

In a message dated 1/27/2003 5:35:59 AM Eastern Standard Time,
gettysburg63@msn.com writes:

<< Does anyone know anything about loggers in Poland,
and where they were located?

Does anyone know of a specific river that logs were floated down? Any
help or suggestions would be appreciated. >>

==Logging was very much a Jewish trade. The logs were floated down the
Najman river to the Baltic Sea

Michael Bernet,
New York


Availability of school and medical records #general

Jerome Seligsohn <jselig1315@...>
 

Genners:
As a retired school supervisor who has had extensive
experience in examining school records I would advise
my fellow seekers to consider very carefully the
opening of records to the general family. Now and then
frustrated school personnel are apt to put damaging
evaluations of pupil behavior.
Have you ever had a doctor who for some subjective
reason views you as a serious neurotic and who passes
on his judgments to other concerned doctors ?
I do not consider privacy an absolute right but I am
concerned for the subjective judgment which reveal the
evaluator more than it does the evaluated.
Let us carefully consider this subject and possibly,
putting our collective minds to the task, come up with
some sensible guidelines.

Jerry Seligsohn
NYC


Re: SSDI doesn't show any entries - suggestions? #general

Peter Zavon <PZavon@...>
 

A lot of this depends on when.

When did they die? You have not said. The SSDI does not have many entries
for deaths prior to about 1965, even though the system was begun in the
1930's. (the mid '60's is when they began to computerize the tracking of
payment of death benefits.)

Another element is whether the dead person had a Social Security account.
Almost everyone in the US has one now. But for many years railroad workers
had an entirely separate retirement system, as did the military, government
workers, and others. And the self-employed were not originally part of the
system either.

Further, in the days when women were expected to be full-time "home makers,"
a wife did not have an account in her own right and might not be listed
unless her husband pre-deceased her. Admittedly, that was not uncommon, but
a wife who died before her husband would not have created a record for
Social Security to be concerned with. If the husband died first, the widow
would have been receiving survivors benefits, if she was old enough, and so
would have created a record with the Social Security Administration.

Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY 14526

PZavon@Rochester.RR.Com

Merle Kastner wrote:

I have been searching for 4 names in the
SSDI Records - only one is shown.

I tried entering only the last name and the
state, no dates, but still no luck. Then I
tried entering no state - same thing.

I know these people died in Pennsylvania,
and have even seen the graves which
show the dates of birth & death.

Also - would a wife be listed with her
husband or separately?

Any suggestions?

Merle Kastner
Montreal, Canada
merlek@vif.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Loggers in Poland #general

éåðúï áï àøé <yonatan@...>
 

Did anyone replying to Josh Brown's questions on loggers in Poland come
across a logging trade name sounding similiar to the word Katzoff or
variant.

Thanks

Yoni Ben-Ari

In a message dated 1/27/2003 5:35:59 AM Eastern Standard Time,
gettysburg63@msn.com writes:

<< Does anyone know anything about loggers in Poland,
and where they were located?

Does anyone know of a specific river that logs were floated down? Any
help or suggestions would be appreciated. >>

==Logging was very much a Jewish trade. The logs were floated down the
Najman river to the Baltic Sea

Michael Bernet,
New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Availability of school and medical records #general

Jerome Seligsohn <jselig1315@...>
 

Genners:
As a retired school supervisor who has had extensive
experience in examining school records I would advise
my fellow seekers to consider very carefully the
opening of records to the general family. Now and then
frustrated school personnel are apt to put damaging
evaluations of pupil behavior.
Have you ever had a doctor who for some subjective
reason views you as a serious neurotic and who passes
on his judgments to other concerned doctors ?
I do not consider privacy an absolute right but I am
concerned for the subjective judgment which reveal the
evaluator more than it does the evaluated.
Let us carefully consider this subject and possibly,
putting our collective minds to the task, come up with
some sensible guidelines.

Jerry Seligsohn
NYC


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: SSDI doesn't show any entries - suggestions? #general

Peter Zavon <PZavon@...>
 

A lot of this depends on when.

When did they die? You have not said. The SSDI does not have many entries
for deaths prior to about 1965, even though the system was begun in the
1930's. (the mid '60's is when they began to computerize the tracking of
payment of death benefits.)

Another element is whether the dead person had a Social Security account.
Almost everyone in the US has one now. But for many years railroad workers
had an entirely separate retirement system, as did the military, government
workers, and others. And the self-employed were not originally part of the
system either.

Further, in the days when women were expected to be full-time "home makers,"
a wife did not have an account in her own right and might not be listed
unless her husband pre-deceased her. Admittedly, that was not uncommon, but
a wife who died before her husband would not have created a record for
Social Security to be concerned with. If the husband died first, the widow
would have been receiving survivors benefits, if she was old enough, and so
would have created a record with the Social Security Administration.

Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY 14526

PZavon@Rochester.RR.Com

Merle Kastner wrote:

I have been searching for 4 names in the
SSDI Records - only one is shown.

I tried entering only the last name and the
state, no dates, but still no luck. Then I
tried entering no state - same thing.

I know these people died in Pennsylvania,
and have even seen the graves which
show the dates of birth & death.

Also - would a wife be listed with her
husband or separately?

Any suggestions?

Merle Kastner
Montreal, Canada
merlek@vif.com


Detroit/Medical Records/BRUNER #general

Lynne Shapiro <lynneshap@...>
 

Thanks to someone on this list (to whom I hope I sent a big thank you), I
recently learned of a website listing Detroit area Jewish burials
(www.thisisfederation.org), and was able to obtain some information about
my grandmother's cousin, Eva BRUNER, >from the cemetery in which she was
buried in 1960. They told me that she (a woman who had never married)
was hospitalized at Northville State Hospital in the months before her
death, died there, and that the information in cemetery records came from
the hospital. I looked up the hospital name on the web, and >from what I
read, I believe it was closed just a couple of years ago. I hope someone
can answer some questions about it.

First of all, am I correct in understanding that Northville is not in
Detroit proper, and that I should request Eva's death certificate from
the state of Michigan rather than the city of Detroit? Is Northville the
name of the town where the hospital was located? Is the hospital
completely closed? Is/was Northville a mental institution? Would anyone
know where I could write to try and obtain records of a former patient of
the hospital?

Lynne Shapiro
Western Mass.


Subject: Looking for Hamburg ancestors #general

Fritz Neubauer
 

Joan wrote:

My grandmother Johanna ELSAS ANBUHL had two brothers Rudy and Theo ELSAS.

Rudy had two children Hildegaard and Robert who emigrated to Brazil.


My comment:

The Theresienstadt Memorial Book lists

ELSAS Max, born 10 Mar 1858, deported >from Stuttgart

With kind regards

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany


Yiddish/German translations #general

Jerry Zahler <jzahler@...>
 

Friends:
I've recently come into a treasure trove of letter correspondence
between my grandfather, Wolf Zahler, and relatives in and around
Kolomyya, Gallicia. They date >from roughly 1914 to 1922, and are in
German and yiddish. I could use some help with their translation,
particularly the German. A German-origin friend has had limited success
with these letters as the writing is non-standard, perhaps somewhat
illiterate. >from my own limited German, I would have to agree. They
are the only first-hand information available for my grandfather's
generation as no one previously paid much attention to lineage and
histories were not recorded.

Can anyone help? Please reply privately.

Jerry Zahler
jzahler@dwsd.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Detroit/Medical Records/BRUNER #general

Lynne Shapiro <lynneshap@...>
 

Thanks to someone on this list (to whom I hope I sent a big thank you), I
recently learned of a website listing Detroit area Jewish burials
(www.thisisfederation.org), and was able to obtain some information about
my grandmother's cousin, Eva BRUNER, >from the cemetery in which she was
buried in 1960. They told me that she (a woman who had never married)
was hospitalized at Northville State Hospital in the months before her
death, died there, and that the information in cemetery records came from
the hospital. I looked up the hospital name on the web, and >from what I
read, I believe it was closed just a couple of years ago. I hope someone
can answer some questions about it.

First of all, am I correct in understanding that Northville is not in
Detroit proper, and that I should request Eva's death certificate from
the state of Michigan rather than the city of Detroit? Is Northville the
name of the town where the hospital was located? Is the hospital
completely closed? Is/was Northville a mental institution? Would anyone
know where I could write to try and obtain records of a former patient of
the hospital?

Lynne Shapiro
Western Mass.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Subject: Looking for Hamburg ancestors #general

Fritz Neubauer
 

Joan wrote:

My grandmother Johanna ELSAS ANBUHL had two brothers Rudy and Theo ELSAS.

Rudy had two children Hildegaard and Robert who emigrated to Brazil.


My comment:

The Theresienstadt Memorial Book lists

ELSAS Max, born 10 Mar 1858, deported >from Stuttgart

With kind regards

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yiddish/German translations #general

Jerry Zahler <jzahler@...>
 

Friends:
I've recently come into a treasure trove of letter correspondence
between my grandfather, Wolf Zahler, and relatives in and around
Kolomyya, Gallicia. They date >from roughly 1914 to 1922, and are in
German and yiddish. I could use some help with their translation,
particularly the German. A German-origin friend has had limited success
with these letters as the writing is non-standard, perhaps somewhat
illiterate. >from my own limited German, I would have to agree. They
are the only first-hand information available for my grandfather's
generation as no one previously paid much attention to lineage and
histories were not recorded.

Can anyone help? Please reply privately.

Jerry Zahler
jzahler@dwsd.org


LYS or LIS or LISS -- family from Nikolayev (Mikolayev), Ukraine #ukraine

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

I would like to learn of anyone who is interested in the LIS family from
Nikolayev (Mikolayev), Ukraine. My research, based on documents in several
archives in Ukraine, suggests that there was only one (or at most two) LIS
families in Nikolayev. I have placed my acquired archival information here:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/guberman-lis.html


My LIS heritage, all >from Nikolayev, until a move (through marriage)
to Zaslav in the 1890s:

[presumably] Iosiov Lys, born before 1760
| Berko Iosiovich Lys (born about 1776; died 1824)
| | Mordko Gersh Lis (born 1794)
| | | Shaya Lys (born 1819)
| | | | Chava Lys Oberman (1851-1938)
| | | | | [Brone] Bertha (Oberman) Talman (1895-1977)

Other details on my Ukraine family:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/oberman/
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/fam/city/Ob-cit.html

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>

Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA
Ukraine: OBERMAN-HOBERMAN-GUBERMAN, LISS, SOBLE-SOBEL, STEIN, AXMAN
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/fam-ent/


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine LYS or LIS or LISS -- family from Nikolayev (Mikolayev), Ukraine #ukraine

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

I would like to learn of anyone who is interested in the LIS family from
Nikolayev (Mikolayev), Ukraine. My research, based on documents in several
archives in Ukraine, suggests that there was only one (or at most two) LIS
families in Nikolayev. I have placed my acquired archival information here:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/guberman-lis.html


My LIS heritage, all >from Nikolayev, until a move (through marriage)
to Zaslav in the 1890s:

[presumably] Iosiov Lys, born before 1760
| Berko Iosiovich Lys (born about 1776; died 1824)
| | Mordko Gersh Lis (born 1794)
| | | Shaya Lys (born 1819)
| | | | Chava Lys Oberman (1851-1938)
| | | | | [Brone] Bertha (Oberman) Talman (1895-1977)

Other details on my Ukraine family:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/oberman/
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/fam/city/Ob-cit.html

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>

Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA
Ukraine: OBERMAN-HOBERMAN-GUBERMAN, LISS, SOBLE-SOBEL, STEIN, AXMAN
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/fam-ent/


Re: Seeemingly un-Jewish names and "Christian" names #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/27/2003 10:54:47 PM Eastern Standard Time, Dan Goodman,
dsgood@visi.com correctly commented on my remark

==Add the confusion that "christian name" is the common English-language term
for first-name . . .

with the true statement

-- I don't think it's used much in the US; I can't remember ever hearing it
rather than "first name". --

==Of course, it might depend on how you define "English." An Englishman
might wonder whether Americans speak English. I know that when I came to the
USA, having been educated in Britain, I was often misunderstood, as when the
chemist (sorry, drugstore) sent me over to the ironmonger (sorry, hardware
store) when I asked for a box of plasters. I remember being unable to find
drawing pins until finally I drew a picture and the shopgirl (sorry, vendor)
produced thumbtacks. Our one-year old made incredible messes because we
couldn't find nappies. And when I called the police on a man I saw climing
through the window of the house next door, they were alarmed when I told them
he was using a torch. (All useful information for genners who need reminding
that what something or someone or sometowne is named in one province is not
necessarily the name used ten miles away.)

==Seriously, though, I think it is only in England and in no other West
European country, that "Chrisitan name" was used--all other countries had for
long been referring to Vorname, prenom etc. Under "Christian name," my
American dictionary gives both "baptismal name" and "first name." I assume
that the term had come to the Americas with the Pilgrims but I don't know
when the usage starting changing in the US, probably in accordance with its
principal of church-state separation and greater acceptance of minority
religions.

The issue of the discussion, of course, hinges on this sort of linguistic
confusion and the assumption that Maria can be only a Christian's name and
Michael must be an Irish name, or that a "civil" name (or culture) in Europe
is essentially "Christian."

Michael Bernet, New York.


Ill. 1930 U.S. Federal Census #general

Sara <esterbrook@...>
 

Is there any reason why one would not be able to locate a person in the
1930's census when you know that person was there at the time? My father
was born in 1928 and lived in Chicago at that time. Wouldn't he have to be
in the census?

Thank you.

Sara Rebecca Rice
Palos Verdes, California U.S.A.


Immigration; No One Rule Applied prior to 1906 #general

Nancy Ring Kendrick <bogus@...>
 

In response to the discussion of women traveling alone when immigrating,
it was not uncommon, although depending on the year of immigration a
"sponsor" (usually a relative) was often required to meet them upon
arrival. Wages for women in those days were very low, and retrictions
and laws were implemented to prevent the increase of female slavery,
slave labor, prostitution, and more.

The Immigration Act of 1891 set the stage for women and children
immigrating into the United States during the late 19th century and into
the early part of the 20th century. The Immigration and Naturalization
Service web site offers a great overview of the INS History at:
http://www.ins.usdoj.gov/graphics/aboutins/history/articles/oview.htm
Here is just one fact >from that site; "Between 1824 to 1906, minor
aliens who had lived in the United States 5 years before their 23rd
birthday could file both their declarations of intent and petitions at
the same time."

Another interesting page >from the same web site is "Changing Immigrant
Names" and the reasons located at:
http://www.ins.usdoj.gov/graphics/aboutins/history/articles/NAMES.htm
It dispells "some" of the myths and folklore about names being changed
when entering the United States.

And yet another great source for the history of immigrant women to the
United States is the National Archives. One article educates the reader
as to why there is no ONE rule that applies to U. S. Naturalization
records and why genealogists who do not research the history of
immigration may spend valuable time searching for records that do not
exist. Women and Naturalization, ca. 1802-1940, By Marian L. Smith is a
great tool for genealogists:
http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/summer_1998_women_and_naturalization_1.html
This is a must read and something I refer to many, many times to assist
my research.

One of my favorite sources for women's genealogy is a book entitled "The
Hidden Half of the Family." It's author Christina Kassabian Schaeer has
done an excellent job helping the reader to understand laws, custom's,
etc. that prevented women >from owning real estate, entering into
contracts, or write a will. It demonstates how women have been written
out of genealogy history and teaches how to find those elusive records.
You may find the book and its availability by using your favorite search
engine and search the title "The Hidden Half of the Family."

JewishGen is another great tool to educate yourself in the topic of
immigration and answers tons of questions relating to the topic.

When researching, sometimes one needs to remove themselves >from the
search of family members for a time and concentrate on the searching the
background and history of laws, regulations, etc. that applied to our
ancestors. A bit of knowledge and self-education on the history of
immigration, naturalization, State laws, Federal laws can simplify your
research. It is important to remember that history is a major part of
genealogy research, and by giving yourself an occasional history lesson
you might be amazed at the direction your research can be taken.

Good luck to all in your research, and thanks to all the subscribers on
this list who are always ready to help and assist fellow subscribers.

Nancy Ring-Kendrick Reply to: bogus@taring.org or adamsny@f2s.com
Daytona Beach, FL. Searching BLOCH and RING. If you are searching these
surnames you may find detailed records and information at the web site
below to see if there is a link to us:
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/k/e/n/Nancy-R-Kendrick/?Welcome=1043839624


Re: name origin #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/29/2003 9:55:12 AM Eastern Standard Time,
lilibel@cox.net writes:

<< I can trace my ancestors back to Saulls Isaaks Cohen Belinfante (1713)
and Marianna Josephs (1714), m. June 16,1740 but am curious as where
they might have been born. Names sound Dutch to me. >>
The BELINFANTE family was Sephardi, >from Portugal. The name means "good
child" and the family may be related to the Spanish TOV ELEM (Heb for good
child) or the French BONFILS rabbinical families.

Joseph Cohen BELINFANTE, escaped >from Portugal to the Balkans in 1526. A
descendant, who lived in Belgrade, MEIR HAYYIM left for Amsterdam in 1721.
His son ZADDIK (1675=E2=80=931750), author of works on the Talmud, settled in
Amsterdam, where he became chief rabbi.

You will find all three families mentioned in the Enc. Judaica. Some believe
that Harry BELAFONTE has some connection to this family.

Michael Bernet,
New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Seeemingly un-Jewish names and "Christian" names #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/27/2003 10:54:47 PM Eastern Standard Time, Dan Goodman,
dsgood@visi.com correctly commented on my remark

==Add the confusion that "christian name" is the common English-language term
for first-name . . .

with the true statement

-- I don't think it's used much in the US; I can't remember ever hearing it
rather than "first name". --

==Of course, it might depend on how you define "English." An Englishman
might wonder whether Americans speak English. I know that when I came to the
USA, having been educated in Britain, I was often misunderstood, as when the
chemist (sorry, drugstore) sent me over to the ironmonger (sorry, hardware
store) when I asked for a box of plasters. I remember being unable to find
drawing pins until finally I drew a picture and the shopgirl (sorry, vendor)
produced thumbtacks. Our one-year old made incredible messes because we
couldn't find nappies. And when I called the police on a man I saw climing
through the window of the house next door, they were alarmed when I told them
he was using a torch. (All useful information for genners who need reminding
that what something or someone or sometowne is named in one province is not
necessarily the name used ten miles away.)

==Seriously, though, I think it is only in England and in no other West
European country, that "Chrisitan name" was used--all other countries had for
long been referring to Vorname, prenom etc. Under "Christian name," my
American dictionary gives both "baptismal name" and "first name." I assume
that the term had come to the Americas with the Pilgrims but I don't know
when the usage starting changing in the US, probably in accordance with its
principal of church-state separation and greater acceptance of minority
religions.

The issue of the discussion, of course, hinges on this sort of linguistic
confusion and the assumption that Maria can be only a Christian's name and
Michael must be an Irish name, or that a "civil" name (or culture) in Europe
is essentially "Christian."

Michael Bernet, New York.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ill. 1930 U.S. Federal Census #general

Sara <esterbrook@...>
 

Is there any reason why one would not be able to locate a person in the
1930's census when you know that person was there at the time? My father
was born in 1928 and lived in Chicago at that time. Wouldn't he have to be
in the census?

Thank you.

Sara Rebecca Rice
Palos Verdes, California U.S.A.