Date   

Help needed in Akron OH #general

RuthrSF@...
 

I am looking for information on my great uncle, Louis Waldman, who lived
and is buried in Akron OH. I could not find him on the Social Security
Administration files, the Ellis Island files or the census records. He
was self employed. Born in Kupiskis Lithuania. I know he was buried in a
cemetary in Akron. Can anyone give me the name of the cemetary in Akron?
Is there any place I can call? He died between 1940-1945. On the
gravestone there maybe his parents names who were Yacov Meir and Hinda.

Any Help is appreciated

Ruth Rosenthal
San Rafael CA

Researching: SHAPRIO, WALDMAN, ZINMAN, KOLTUN, MUSEL all >from KUPISKIS
LITHUANIA
ROSENTHAL, ANDELMAN, ROSEMAN, FREMERMAN, SILVERMAN all >from MOLDOVA
(BRICHANY AND BRECHEVA)

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately unless the information is of
general interest to the Discussion Group and not limited to the individual
mentioned above.


BRONSTEIN / TROTZKY / DEICHOWSKY #general

Udi Cain
 

Dear all.

My ancestor Miriam Bathya (nee TROTZKY) ZALAZNIK, had to change her surname
together with her husband and youngest son, to DEICHOWSKY. I don't know
the reason for Leon BRONSTEIN to pick the surname TRTZKY, back in 1905,
but adopting a new surname requires a lot of knowledge with regard to the
background of the "new" surname, so one can assume that he borrowed it
from related family of his mother's side. Incidently, when he adopted it
in London, my G'G'grandmother, Miriam Bathya, was living in London.

Does any of our members have any comments for that ?

Best regards,
Udi Cain, Jerusalem.


Re: Ida as a Jewish Name #general

Israel Zamir <iczamir@...>
 

Really!
Also in Argentina the yiddish name "ITTE" was adpted like IDA....

Yours,

Israel Zamir

----- Original Message -----
From: "walter spector" <educonser@hotmail.com>
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Saturday, February 08, 2003 4:56 AM
Subject: Ida as a Jewish Name

My grandmother was an Ida, one of three in an extended family. On the
EIDB she is Itte. Now that seems like a reasonable translation. It will
lead to some discussion.

Walter Spector
educonser@hotmail.com


Discrepancy between SSDI and Form SS-5 #general

Mike Posnick
 

The Social Security Death Index lists a relative's date of birth as 15
August 1889. The relative's Form SS-5, Application for [Social Security]
Account Number, lists a different date of birth (10 September 1896). (I
know the SSDI listing and the Form SS-5 are for the same person. Among
other things, they share the same Social Security Number.)

Are such discrepancies between the SSDI and Form SS-5 common? What is the
source of information for the birth date used in the Social Security Death
Index? Does it come >from the Form SS-5, >from other Social Security
Administration records previously existing at the decedent's date of
death, or >from information newly furnished to the Social Security
Administration at or after the date of death?

Mike Posnick
Minneapolis, Minnesota
e-mail: mpoz@earthlink.net


Re: Jews in the Polish Army #general

CharlesPottins
 

Jews also enlisted in any army that was fighting Hitler. There were
antisemitic attitudes among Polish forces abroad and sometimes serious
incidents which led to Jewish soldiers asking to transfer. However, I
don't know how general this was. It was controversial here in Britain,
possibly because Jewish community leaders did not wish to "rock the boat"
in the war, but also perhaps because of suspicion that the issue might be
exagerrated for political reasons. Former soldiers I've met have not
mentioned it, though they did bitterly resent treatment by the Russians
(who after all had a pact with Hitler when Poland was invaded.) But it
would be interesting to hear more >from those with experience.

Charles Pottins


Re: Jews in the Polish Army #general

Harold Pollins <snillop@...>
 

Martin Kronman wrote:

< Unfortunatly, for Jews in the Polish army in WW II desertion and fleeing
Europe was not a viable option. >

Generally true , of course. But it was possible for some to get out of the
Polish Army. I was in a unit of the British Army in 1945 when two Jewish
soldiers were attached to us who had been in the Polish Army. They,
along with other Jewish soldiers in that army, were allowed to join the
British Army because they had been harrassed in the Polish Army. Before
D-Day they were told that the first bullets would be for the Jews among
them.

Harold Pollins
Oxford


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help needed in Akron OH #general

RuthrSF@...
 

I am looking for information on my great uncle, Louis Waldman, who lived
and is buried in Akron OH. I could not find him on the Social Security
Administration files, the Ellis Island files or the census records. He
was self employed. Born in Kupiskis Lithuania. I know he was buried in a
cemetary in Akron. Can anyone give me the name of the cemetary in Akron?
Is there any place I can call? He died between 1940-1945. On the
gravestone there maybe his parents names who were Yacov Meir and Hinda.

Any Help is appreciated

Ruth Rosenthal
San Rafael CA

Researching: SHAPRIO, WALDMAN, ZINMAN, KOLTUN, MUSEL all >from KUPISKIS
LITHUANIA
ROSENTHAL, ANDELMAN, ROSEMAN, FREMERMAN, SILVERMAN all >from MOLDOVA
(BRICHANY AND BRECHEVA)

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately unless the information is of
general interest to the Discussion Group and not limited to the individual
mentioned above.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BRONSTEIN / TROTZKY / DEICHOWSKY #general

Udi Cain
 

Dear all.

My ancestor Miriam Bathya (nee TROTZKY) ZALAZNIK, had to change her surname
together with her husband and youngest son, to DEICHOWSKY. I don't know
the reason for Leon BRONSTEIN to pick the surname TRTZKY, back in 1905,
but adopting a new surname requires a lot of knowledge with regard to the
background of the "new" surname, so one can assume that he borrowed it
from related family of his mother's side. Incidently, when he adopted it
in London, my G'G'grandmother, Miriam Bathya, was living in London.

Does any of our members have any comments for that ?

Best regards,
Udi Cain, Jerusalem.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Ida as a Jewish Name #general

Israel Zamir <iczamir@...>
 

Really!
Also in Argentina the yiddish name "ITTE" was adpted like IDA....

Yours,

Israel Zamir

----- Original Message -----
From: "walter spector" <educonser@hotmail.com>
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Saturday, February 08, 2003 4:56 AM
Subject: Ida as a Jewish Name

My grandmother was an Ida, one of three in an extended family. On the
EIDB she is Itte. Now that seems like a reasonable translation. It will
lead to some discussion.

Walter Spector
educonser@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Discrepancy between SSDI and Form SS-5 #general

Mike Posnick
 

The Social Security Death Index lists a relative's date of birth as 15
August 1889. The relative's Form SS-5, Application for [Social Security]
Account Number, lists a different date of birth (10 September 1896). (I
know the SSDI listing and the Form SS-5 are for the same person. Among
other things, they share the same Social Security Number.)

Are such discrepancies between the SSDI and Form SS-5 common? What is the
source of information for the birth date used in the Social Security Death
Index? Does it come >from the Form SS-5, >from other Social Security
Administration records previously existing at the decedent's date of
death, or >from information newly furnished to the Social Security
Administration at or after the date of death?

Mike Posnick
Minneapolis, Minnesota
e-mail: mpoz@earthlink.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jews in the Polish Army #general

CharlesPottins
 

Jews also enlisted in any army that was fighting Hitler. There were
antisemitic attitudes among Polish forces abroad and sometimes serious
incidents which led to Jewish soldiers asking to transfer. However, I
don't know how general this was. It was controversial here in Britain,
possibly because Jewish community leaders did not wish to "rock the boat"
in the war, but also perhaps because of suspicion that the issue might be
exagerrated for political reasons. Former soldiers I've met have not
mentioned it, though they did bitterly resent treatment by the Russians
(who after all had a pact with Hitler when Poland was invaded.) But it
would be interesting to hear more >from those with experience.

Charles Pottins


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jews in the Polish Army #general

Harold Pollins <snillop@...>
 

Martin Kronman wrote:

< Unfortunatly, for Jews in the Polish army in WW II desertion and fleeing
Europe was not a viable option. >

Generally true , of course. But it was possible for some to get out of the
Polish Army. I was in a unit of the British Army in 1945 when two Jewish
soldiers were attached to us who had been in the Polish Army. They,
along with other Jewish soldiers in that army, were allowed to join the
British Army because they had been harrassed in the Polish Army. Before
D-Day they were told that the first bullets would be for the Jews among
them.

Harold Pollins
Oxford


Re: Female name "Polya"--and other name abbreviations #general

Alexander Sharon
 

< MBernet@aol.com > wrote

==In the light of other recent speculation, is it possible that Polya is
really an abbreviated form of Polyanna
Rather very odd for Eastern Europe. Polina derives >from Apollon (Apolo)

Michael Bernet,
New York
Alexander Sharon
Calgary


CARASICK 1920 or 1930 Philadelphia Listing #general

Bud484BG@...
 

In searching the 1920 and 1930 US Census Index for Philadelphia , I
believe I've exhausted all of the variable spellings for the name
CARASICK, in combination with the soundex search. I am looking for a
listing for Nathan and/or wife, Jennie CARASICK. They emigrated to and
resided in Philadelphia in 1913-1914 through 1960. They had three
children: Mary, Harry and Isadore.

The Philadelphia Archives just advised me that there is no listing in
their 1920 or 1930 Philadelphia City Directories. Nathan Carasick came
to the USA >from Kiev where he was schooled as a barber and that was his
life's vocation. Does anyone know of any Barber or Hairdressers Union or
Association in Philadelphia that I might contact??


Please reply privately to:
Beatrice Markel
Redondo Beach, California
EMail: bud484bg@aol.com


Re: Pessia in Warsaw - not Paulina #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Rose Feldman" wrote

The Pessia in our family was called Pelgia in Polish (or something close
to that)

Rose Feldman
Rose,
This was most probably 'Pelagia', a classical Greek name associated with
the sea.

Alexander Sharon


We Remember the Jews of Tomaszow Mazowiecki, Poland! #general

Ada Holtzman <ada01@...>
 

I have posted the translated list of the Holocaust martyrs of Tomaszow
Mazowiecki, Poland at:

http://www.zchor.org/tomaszow/necrology.htm

It was also submitted to JewishGen the Necrology database and Yizkor
books translations database.

Shalom,

Ada Holtzman
Web Site: http://www.zchor.org


Re: Jews in the Polish Army #general

ariewish@...
 

Hi,

It has been written that the Jews "attached" them self to the Polish Army.
This needs clarification:
1. My father in law was drafted to the Polish Army as a soldier in a Ulany
(Cavalry) Regiment some time in 1925. *He was drafted*.
2. My 2 Uncles were drafted in 1939 (just as the war broke out.
3. In 1942 my father was drafted by the Red Army and because he did
speak "German" (Yiddish), he was a "Naczalnik" in charge of german POW.
4. Another Uncle joined (attached himself) to Anders Army (Polish), but
when he found out that the direction of Anders Army) was not West, where
his parents, sister and younger brothers were, he deserted and enlisted in
the Red Army.

I would like to point out that we "the Jews" are the only group of people
that (already in biblical times)had a day of rest, a day of fest and few
days of feast. We also "invented" communism, capitalism and of course
socialism.

Throughout the ages (in Diaspora), we obeyed the Torah. Some of us waited
for the Messiah and did nothing, some waited for the Messiah and did
something (to be ready for his call) and some of us wished to became a
part of the country we were living in. Well, some of the Polish Jews
thought that being a Polish Citizen didn't mean a conversion to
Christianity and among them, Anielewitz or Joselowitz (Berko). It was
their believe that you can be a Pole and observe the Jewish Religion at
the same time. We (the American Jews) do the same thing here what our
parents did in Poland. It is easier for us, but I'm sure that my
grandfather didn't enjoy the same "Civil Rights" in 1924 (in the States)
as I do today.

In short, everybody had a reason to "attach" them self to the Polish Army,
the same reason as Ben Gurion and others that offered to form a Jewish
Brigade to fight alongside the British in WW I.

Sincerely

Arie L. Wishnia
Ft. Myers, Fl.

MODERATOR NOTE: Please limit any replies to the subject of genealogy.


Naval Photo ID #general

jon glazer
 

Hi,
I have a photo of a "Mystery Man" who is thought to be one of my
ancestors. No one knows who he is (though a friend says he looks like
me). He is wearing an unadorned formal uniform with a plumed hat and a
sword. There is a small cross embroidered? on the lower left sleeve. His
belt buckle (under magnification) bears the words Nav_ _ US arched across
the top and Commandry across the bottom. There is a raised "42" centered
on the buckle. The plume on the hat is white and fluffy and it extends
backward rather than up. I have been told that the cross means he was a
chaplain (even though he was Jewish).
I would like to identify the uniform, especially as to the years it
was worn. Perhaps this would lead to an identification of the man in
it. Where do I start? I could scan it and e-mail copies wherever
useful. The photo is in black and white, about 8 1/2 by 11. The paper
itself is yellowed.

Jon Glazer


Russian Military History Question #general

Aaron Slotnik
 

Hello everyone,

I know that my gg and ggg-grandfathers made a living supplying the Russian
army with provisions, primarily food, at the Modlin fortress near Warsaw.
According to family sources, my ggg-grandfather's surname was originally
ZOLOTNIK (an old Russian measure of weight) and was >from the Volhynia
gubernia but followed the Russian army to Modlin. Based on historical
research, I suspect this may have been during the 1831 Polish uprising
against Russian rule; however, he could have arrived earlier or later than
that. >from vital records around 1850, I also recently learned that
someone who I think was my ggg-grandfather's brother was first a soldier
(zolnierz)and then a musician (muzykant) with the First Sapper Reserve
Battalion stationed at Modlin. Any information or recommendations for
researching these two occupations, the fortress, troop movements >from
Volhynia to Warsaw, and this particular battalion would be greatly
appreciated.
Thanks!!

Sincerely,
Aaron Slotnik
Chicago, IL USA

WOROSHILSKY - Bialystok area, Poland
GOLDBERG - Dabrowa Bialostocka, Poland
ZLOTNIK - Warsaw area, Poland
BLUMENTHAL, SCHAPIRA - Gusyatin, Gorodenka, Ukraine
BLUM, KATZ, MARTON - Salaj and Maramures Counties, Romania


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Female name "Polya"--and other name abbreviations #general

Alexander Sharon
 

< MBernet@aol.com > wrote

==In the light of other recent speculation, is it possible that Polya is
really an abbreviated form of Polyanna
Rather very odd for Eastern Europe. Polina derives >from Apollon (Apolo)

Michael Bernet,
New York
Alexander Sharon
Calgary