Date   

Re: "Animal names" among Ashkenazim #general

Charles Vitez <vitez@...>
 

Not really wishing to take sides in this argument, all I would say is that
because of the connotations (as to lack of intelligence) of calling a
daughter a duck or a goose, it is unlikely that a parent would have given
such a name to a daughter. I would also incline to the view that it is an
affectionate form of Katia, where the "t" has elided to "sh" and clean final
vowel to the all embracing "eh".

Charles Vitez

"Alexander Sharon" <a.sharon@...> wrote in message
news:Zf7Va.543716$3C2.14033913@......


< MBernet@... > wrote

killshot@... (Lowell Nigoff) writes:

<< I was told my grandmother's name, Kacze or Kachka, ment duck. She
was >from Stepan, Poland. >>

I don't know Polish but in Yiddish, for sure. Katshke is a duck.
(...)

According to Beider's "Personal Names" Katshke is a Slavic name derived
from Katharine;
(...)

Michael Bernet, New York
Michael,

I am a bit curious how do you manage to get >from the duck to Katharine.

Yidish 'kachke' (duck) is directly related to Polish 'Kaczka.' [kah
chkah].
With all my respect to Beider, Slavic female name that is derived from
Katharine is Kasia [kah shyah] or Kaska [Kah shkah] but not Katschke.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


Buhusi, Malini and Bacau - Romania #romania

storydevi@earthlink.net <storydevi@...>
 

Dear friends,

Trips to Romania are frought with a certain feeling of disappointment since
it is hard to find traces of Jewish History.The synagogue in Bacau is
beautiful and there are two cemetaries.The older one is not kept at all
but has some beautiful stone carving and it is possible to read the stones
nearer the house where the keepers live. The other is in good condition.
The area that was mainly Jewish is now a park and there is no marker.The
street that begins at the HOtel Dumbrova was once a very busy Jewish and
Armenian street.

In the city of Bacau, about 20 km north there are only five Jews left.
HOwveer the synagogue has been repainted and the city is still alive,
albeit very poor. There is a beautiful cemetary that is kept up and in a
barn there is the only horse drawn hearse that I have seen. It is in
excellent condition.If you go north past Falticeni which was a thriving Jewish Center (the
cemetary ahs been destroyed), you arrive in villages that are thriving.I
spent weeks in Malini and discovered that there is one Jewish family still
living there. I interviewed them with a video camera, but it was barely
enough time to move >from obvious details to real discussion.The mother in
the family named Rappaport previously (and now is Marcus) is 87 years old.
Her mother was born in Dorohoi. Near the downtown park was the house of the
David family where all 17 families before the war (during the war the jews
lost everything and were deported to work in terrible conditions in
Falticen) used that house for a synagogue;there was once a mikvah in the
park area. No cemetary. Falticeni was the closest city. It is unusual for
Jews to have lived in villages and they owned no land.

But it is worth the trip since seeing the countryside and how people are
living today can give you a feel of what it was like more than a hundred
years ago, particularly in the villages that have been well kept.

laura
MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all future messages with your full name
and location. While discussions of current Romanian Jewish life are
interesting, it is not genealogy. Please continue privately. For those
interested in funding a cemetery for inclusion in the JOWBR please
see www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/submit.htm


BAGUS, RUDERMAN, PODOLSKY, MASSARSKY, CARSON, KRICHEC, Babruvyi Kut, Western Mass JGS #ukraine

Jonathon Podolsky
 

1) I am interested in BAGUS, RUDERMAN, PODOLSKY, MASSARSKY, CARSON, KRICHEC
from Babruvi Kut, Ukraine. The ones I have found so far settled in Chicago
and worked in the grocery business or settled in Winnipeg. I am interested
in finding anyone interested in Babruvi Kut or the surnames I listed.

2) If you know anyone interested in Jewish genealogy who lives in Western
Massachusetts or Southern Vermont please let me know. I would like to tell
them about our new JGS.

Thanks,
--
Jonathon Podolsky
Founder, Western Massachusetts Jewish Genealogy Society
http://www.wmjgs.org
http://www.Podolsky.cc


Researching surnames: ABEND, HARTMANN, SEIDEN, WASSERMAN, SHIMAN, KRAUT
from Wola Ranizowska near Kolbuszowa, Poland (Galicia region).
PODOLSKY, BAGUS, RUDERMAN, MASSARSKY, CARSON, KRICHEC >from Babruvi Kut,
Ukraine.


PEKAR Relatives! #ukraine

danielle freedman <daniellefreedman640@...>
 

I too have relatives named PASERSKY /PEKARSKY- but >from the shtetl of
SAKAI (Lithuania) around 1800 - 1870!

Danielle Freedman

PASERSKY - SHAKAI LITHUANIA
ELMAN - TALNOYE UKRAINE
CHOSSID - BANDIR UKRAINE
FRIEDMAN - CIECHANOW WARSAW POLAND
DAVIDOVITCH - ROZALIMUS VOLOST - LITHUANIA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: "Animal names" among Ashkenazim #general

Charles Vitez <vitez@...>
 

Not really wishing to take sides in this argument, all I would say is that
because of the connotations (as to lack of intelligence) of calling a
daughter a duck or a goose, it is unlikely that a parent would have given
such a name to a daughter. I would also incline to the view that it is an
affectionate form of Katia, where the "t" has elided to "sh" and clean final
vowel to the all embracing "eh".

Charles Vitez

"Alexander Sharon" <a.sharon@...> wrote in message
news:Zf7Va.543716$3C2.14033913@......


< MBernet@... > wrote

killshot@... (Lowell Nigoff) writes:

<< I was told my grandmother's name, Kacze or Kachka, ment duck. She
was >from Stepan, Poland. >>

I don't know Polish but in Yiddish, for sure. Katshke is a duck.
(...)

According to Beider's "Personal Names" Katshke is a Slavic name derived
from Katharine;
(...)

Michael Bernet, New York
Michael,

I am a bit curious how do you manage to get >from the duck to Katharine.

Yidish 'kachke' (duck) is directly related to Polish 'Kaczka.' [kah
chkah].
With all my respect to Beider, Slavic female name that is derived from
Katharine is Kasia [kah shyah] or Kaska [Kah shkah] but not Katschke.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


Romania SIG #Romania Buhusi, Malini and Bacau - Romania #romania

storydevi@earthlink.net <storydevi@...>
 

Dear friends,

Trips to Romania are frought with a certain feeling of disappointment since
it is hard to find traces of Jewish History.The synagogue in Bacau is
beautiful and there are two cemetaries.The older one is not kept at all
but has some beautiful stone carving and it is possible to read the stones
nearer the house where the keepers live. The other is in good condition.
The area that was mainly Jewish is now a park and there is no marker.The
street that begins at the HOtel Dumbrova was once a very busy Jewish and
Armenian street.

In the city of Bacau, about 20 km north there are only five Jews left.
HOwveer the synagogue has been repainted and the city is still alive,
albeit very poor. There is a beautiful cemetary that is kept up and in a
barn there is the only horse drawn hearse that I have seen. It is in
excellent condition.If you go north past Falticeni which was a thriving Jewish Center (the
cemetary ahs been destroyed), you arrive in villages that are thriving.I
spent weeks in Malini and discovered that there is one Jewish family still
living there. I interviewed them with a video camera, but it was barely
enough time to move >from obvious details to real discussion.The mother in
the family named Rappaport previously (and now is Marcus) is 87 years old.
Her mother was born in Dorohoi. Near the downtown park was the house of the
David family where all 17 families before the war (during the war the jews
lost everything and were deported to work in terrible conditions in
Falticen) used that house for a synagogue;there was once a mikvah in the
park area. No cemetary. Falticeni was the closest city. It is unusual for
Jews to have lived in villages and they owned no land.

But it is worth the trip since seeing the countryside and how people are
living today can give you a feel of what it was like more than a hundred
years ago, particularly in the villages that have been well kept.

laura
MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all future messages with your full name
and location. While discussions of current Romanian Jewish life are
interesting, it is not genealogy. Please continue privately. For those
interested in funding a cemetery for inclusion in the JOWBR please
see www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/submit.htm


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine BAGUS, RUDERMAN, PODOLSKY, MASSARSKY, CARSON, KRICHEC, Babruvyi Kut, Western Mass JGS #ukraine

Jonathon Podolsky
 

1) I am interested in BAGUS, RUDERMAN, PODOLSKY, MASSARSKY, CARSON, KRICHEC
from Babruvi Kut, Ukraine. The ones I have found so far settled in Chicago
and worked in the grocery business or settled in Winnipeg. I am interested
in finding anyone interested in Babruvi Kut or the surnames I listed.

2) If you know anyone interested in Jewish genealogy who lives in Western
Massachusetts or Southern Vermont please let me know. I would like to tell
them about our new JGS.

Thanks,
--
Jonathon Podolsky
Founder, Western Massachusetts Jewish Genealogy Society
http://www.wmjgs.org
http://www.Podolsky.cc


Researching surnames: ABEND, HARTMANN, SEIDEN, WASSERMAN, SHIMAN, KRAUT
from Wola Ranizowska near Kolbuszowa, Poland (Galicia region).
PODOLSKY, BAGUS, RUDERMAN, MASSARSKY, CARSON, KRICHEC >from Babruvi Kut,
Ukraine.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine PEKAR Relatives! #ukraine

danielle freedman <daniellefreedman640@...>
 

I too have relatives named PASERSKY /PEKARSKY- but >from the shtetl of
SAKAI (Lithuania) around 1800 - 1870!

Danielle Freedman

PASERSKY - SHAKAI LITHUANIA
ELMAN - TALNOYE UKRAINE
CHOSSID - BANDIR UKRAINE
FRIEDMAN - CIECHANOW WARSAW POLAND
DAVIDOVITCH - ROZALIMUS VOLOST - LITHUANIA


Images from Kremenets Vital Records #ukraine

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, part of JRI-Poland, has been translating
from Russian and Hebrew/Yiddish to English the vital records (birth,
marriage, and death) obtained >from the LDS under an agreement with the
Ukraine Archives. We have developed a set of transliteration aides to
assist our translators with personal names, town names, and keywords
that they encounter in these handwritten records. These transliteration
aides were mentioned at the recent IAJGS Conference in Washington D.C.
Since then we have received several hundred hits on our Shtetlinks
website (http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/) >from people who
wanted to see the image files posted there. Unfortunately, the files
were pretty messed up ... until this morning. Our webmaster, Max Roth,
fixed the problems, and the image files now are available, and visible
the way they were supposed to be. So, if you visited the website before
this morning, please return and take another look.

Here is a list of some of the transliteration aides that you may find
useful in your own research. Each file contains images of the
Hebrew/Yiddish and Russian name (or word/phrase) that appears in the
record, along with the English transliteration we are using on the
Kremenets project. All are accessible on the Kremenets Shtetlinks
website. Point your browser to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/and
scroll down to the appropriate file.

* “Given Names, Male, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of male given names >from the vital records along
with the English transliteration of each name. The images and
transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Given_Names_Male.htm

* “Given Names, Female, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of female given names >from the vital records
along with the English transliteration of each name. The images
and transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go
to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Given_Names_Female.htm

* “Occupations, Social Classes & Keywords, Hebrew and Russian
graphics", a file containing images of the occupations listed in
the vital records along with the English translation of each. The
occupations images are in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Keywords,%20Hebrew%20and%20Russian%20graphics.htm

* "Town names, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of about 80 town names appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Town_Names-Kremenets.htm

* "Causes of Death, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of the causes of death appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Causes_of_Death_Hebrew_and_Russian_graphics.htm

Keep in mind that development of these image files is an ongoing effort.
As new translations are completed, we add to (and occasionally correct)
the files. Please let me know if you spot a name or word that needs to
be corrected.

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Images from Kremenets Vital Records #ukraine

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, part of JRI-Poland, has been translating
from Russian and Hebrew/Yiddish to English the vital records (birth,
marriage, and death) obtained >from the LDS under an agreement with the
Ukraine Archives. We have developed a set of transliteration aides to
assist our translators with personal names, town names, and keywords
that they encounter in these handwritten records. These transliteration
aides were mentioned at the recent IAJGS Conference in Washington D.C.
Since then we have received several hundred hits on our Shtetlinks
website (http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/) >from people who
wanted to see the image files posted there. Unfortunately, the files
were pretty messed up ... until this morning. Our webmaster, Max Roth,
fixed the problems, and the image files now are available, and visible
the way they were supposed to be. So, if you visited the website before
this morning, please return and take another look.

Here is a list of some of the transliteration aides that you may find
useful in your own research. Each file contains images of the
Hebrew/Yiddish and Russian name (or word/phrase) that appears in the
record, along with the English transliteration we are using on the
Kremenets project. All are accessible on the Kremenets Shtetlinks
website. Point your browser to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/and
scroll down to the appropriate file.

* “Given Names, Male, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of male given names >from the vital records along
with the English transliteration of each name. The images and
transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Given_Names_Male.htm

* “Given Names, Female, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of female given names >from the vital records
along with the English transliteration of each name. The images
and transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go
to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Given_Names_Female.htm

* “Occupations, Social Classes & Keywords, Hebrew and Russian
graphics", a file containing images of the occupations listed in
the vital records along with the English translation of each. The
occupations images are in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Keywords,%20Hebrew%20and%20Russian%20graphics.htm

* "Town names, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of about 80 town names appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Town_Names-Kremenets.htm

* "Causes of Death, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of the causes of death appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Causes_of_Death_Hebrew_and_Russian_graphics.htm

Keep in mind that development of these image files is an ongoing effort.
As new translations are completed, we add to (and occasionally correct)
the files. Please let me know if you spot a name or word that needs to
be corrected.

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP


Re: Cousin marriages #general

Stan Goodman <safeqSPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Tue, 29 Jul 2003 03:10:17 UTC, MBernet@... opined:

In a message dated 7/28/2003 1:55:22 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
marie@... writes:
----------snip--------

==That is indeed so. Cousin marriages are not forbidden in Jewish law
(Lev. ch 18) and a man may even marry his brother/sister's daughter (but
not his aunt). I do not understand why Americans (and Christians in
general) view cousin marriages as incestuous. The practice was common
among Jews for many centuries. If it has decreased in recent years I
would assume that it reflects the greater opportunity to meet a
bride/groom thanks to greater mobility and better communications.

Naturally, village Jews would tend to marry someone >from a relatively
close village, and inevitably almost everybody was somehow related to
everyone else.
What is also common is multiple marriages between siblings: the brother
of my mother's mother married the sister of my mother's father. On my
father's side, three siblings in the Goldschmidt family married three
siblings in the Gutenstein family.

In part, marrying one's child off to a cousin meant that one knew
everything about the other family's social, moral, health and wealth
qualities. It also ensured descendants who would work in the family
business, inherit the business, and like Tzelafchad's daughter, keep
everything in the family.

This was especially important among the socially prominent, the wealthy,
and the Jewish community leaders. My Goldschmidt and Gutenstein
ancestors were all three--and it wouldn't surprise me if they themselves
were cousin.

A cousin of one of my cousins married her cousin in the 1950s. They
were afraid of possible genetic diseases and agreed beforehand never to
have children.
I understand (but I'm very willing to be corrected by someone more
knowledgable) that geneticists today hold the danger of genetic diseases
from a cousin marriage is not significantly higher than a marriage
outside the family, if proper genetic screening is conducted.

-------snip-------


Michael Bernet, New York

To Michael's excellent summary, I would add only the following:

The cousin-marriage inclination he describes is certainly not a Jewish
peculiarity. In Norway, where until recently, valley villages were
effectively isolated by intervening mountains, village identity was
pretty much synonymous with family. Anyone who has travelled in the
Sinai Peninsula, which has a sparse Beduin population isolated >from
metropolitan Egypt is impressed by the identical visage shared by all
the locals -- unsurprising, given the size of the gene pool.

The argument against cousin marriage is that the partners, because
they share much of their genetic makeup, have an enhanced probability
of passing undesirable recessive genes to their offspring; with
partners less closely related, there is more likelihood that such a
gene in one partner would be 'overcome' by a dominant in the other.
Here in Israel, where cousin marriages are very routine among the Arab
population, with consequently enhanced genetic problems such as
albinism and mental retardation, this is well illustrated. The effect
is, in fact, what is behind the widely held taboo of marriages between
even more closely-related partners.

There is a counter argument: Given that undesirable genes are
expressed in marriages between cousins, they die out very quickly, and
do not remain latent, to propagate through many generations, since the
offspring that carry them tend not to live to reproduce. The long-term
effect on the population is therefore not as damaging as one might
otherwise think. Evolution is cruel.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

Please remove the CAPITAL LETTERS >from my address in order to send me
email, and include "JEWISHGEN" in the subject line, else your message
will be deleted automatically, unread.


Correction: Images from Kremenets Vital Records #ukraine

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

Yesterday, I sent out a message announcing the availability of various
given name images, and other useful transliteration guides on the
Kremenets Shtetlinks website. Unfortunately, there were some misstated
instruction in the message. Here's how to get to the links:

1. Point your browser to the Kremenets Shtetlinks website, main menu page:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/kmain.html
2. Click on Item 4, Kremenets Records Translation Guides
3. On the menu page that appears, click on items 10, 11, 13, 14, or 15.
These are the various image files described in the message.

Feel free to explore the other guides too, and don't forget to look at all
the other interesting items we have on our Shtetlinks site.

The original, but corrected, message is repeated below in case you need it.

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP/JRI-Poland
----------------------------------------------------------------

The Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, part of JRI-Poland, has been translating
from Russian and Hebrew/Yiddish to English the vital records (birth,
marriage, and death) obtained >from the LDS under an agreement with the
Ukraine Archives. We have developed a set of transliteration aides to
assist our translators with personal names, town names, and keywords
that they encounter in these handwritten records. These transliteration
aides were mentioned at the recent IAJGS Conference in Washington D.C.
Since then we have received several hundred hits on our Shtetlinks
website (http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/) >from people who
wanted to see the image files posted there. Unfortunately, the files
were pretty messed up ... until this morning. Our webmaster, Max Roth,
fixed the problems, and the image files now are available, and visible
the way they were supposed to be. So, if you visited the website before
this morning, please return and take another look.

Here is a list of some of the transliteration aides that you may find
useful in your own research. Each file contains images of the
Hebrew/Yiddish and Russian name (or word/phrase) that appears in the
record, along with the English transliteration we are using on the
Kremenets project. All are accessible on the Kremenets Shtetlinks
website by pointing your browser to

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/kmain.html

and then by working your way through the translation guides menus to the
appropriate links

* “Given Names, Male, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of male given names >from the vital records along
with the English transliteration of each name. The images and
transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew.

* “Given Names, Female, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of female given names >from the vital records
along with the English transliteration of each name. The images
and transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew.

* “Occupations, Social Classes & Keywords, Hebrew and Russian
graphics", a file containing images of the occupations listed in
the vital records along with the English translation of each. The
occupations images are in both Russian and Hebrew.

* "Town names, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of about 80 town names appearing in the records we have
translated to date.

* "Causes of Death, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of the causes of death appearing in the records we have
translated to date.

Keep in mind that development of these image files is an ongoing effort.
As new translations are completed, we add to (and occasionally correct)
the files. Please let me know if you spot a name or word that needs to
be corrected.

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Cousin marriages #general

Stan Goodman <safeqSPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Tue, 29 Jul 2003 03:10:17 UTC, MBernet@... opined:

In a message dated 7/28/2003 1:55:22 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
marie@... writes:
----------snip--------

==That is indeed so. Cousin marriages are not forbidden in Jewish law
(Lev. ch 18) and a man may even marry his brother/sister's daughter (but
not his aunt). I do not understand why Americans (and Christians in
general) view cousin marriages as incestuous. The practice was common
among Jews for many centuries. If it has decreased in recent years I
would assume that it reflects the greater opportunity to meet a
bride/groom thanks to greater mobility and better communications.

Naturally, village Jews would tend to marry someone >from a relatively
close village, and inevitably almost everybody was somehow related to
everyone else.
What is also common is multiple marriages between siblings: the brother
of my mother's mother married the sister of my mother's father. On my
father's side, three siblings in the Goldschmidt family married three
siblings in the Gutenstein family.

In part, marrying one's child off to a cousin meant that one knew
everything about the other family's social, moral, health and wealth
qualities. It also ensured descendants who would work in the family
business, inherit the business, and like Tzelafchad's daughter, keep
everything in the family.

This was especially important among the socially prominent, the wealthy,
and the Jewish community leaders. My Goldschmidt and Gutenstein
ancestors were all three--and it wouldn't surprise me if they themselves
were cousin.

A cousin of one of my cousins married her cousin in the 1950s. They
were afraid of possible genetic diseases and agreed beforehand never to
have children.
I understand (but I'm very willing to be corrected by someone more
knowledgable) that geneticists today hold the danger of genetic diseases
from a cousin marriage is not significantly higher than a marriage
outside the family, if proper genetic screening is conducted.

-------snip-------


Michael Bernet, New York

To Michael's excellent summary, I would add only the following:

The cousin-marriage inclination he describes is certainly not a Jewish
peculiarity. In Norway, where until recently, valley villages were
effectively isolated by intervening mountains, village identity was
pretty much synonymous with family. Anyone who has travelled in the
Sinai Peninsula, which has a sparse Beduin population isolated >from
metropolitan Egypt is impressed by the identical visage shared by all
the locals -- unsurprising, given the size of the gene pool.

The argument against cousin marriage is that the partners, because
they share much of their genetic makeup, have an enhanced probability
of passing undesirable recessive genes to their offspring; with
partners less closely related, there is more likelihood that such a
gene in one partner would be 'overcome' by a dominant in the other.
Here in Israel, where cousin marriages are very routine among the Arab
population, with consequently enhanced genetic problems such as
albinism and mental retardation, this is well illustrated. The effect
is, in fact, what is behind the widely held taboo of marriages between
even more closely-related partners.

There is a counter argument: Given that undesirable genes are
expressed in marriages between cousins, they die out very quickly, and
do not remain latent, to propagate through many generations, since the
offspring that carry them tend not to live to reproduce. The long-term
effect on the population is therefore not as damaging as one might
otherwise think. Evolution is cruel.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

Please remove the CAPITAL LETTERS >from my address in order to send me
email, and include "JEWISHGEN" in the subject line, else your message
will be deleted automatically, unread.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Correction: Images from Kremenets Vital Records #ukraine

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

Yesterday, I sent out a message announcing the availability of various
given name images, and other useful transliteration guides on the
Kremenets Shtetlinks website. Unfortunately, there were some misstated
instruction in the message. Here's how to get to the links:

1. Point your browser to the Kremenets Shtetlinks website, main menu page:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/kmain.html
2. Click on Item 4, Kremenets Records Translation Guides
3. On the menu page that appears, click on items 10, 11, 13, 14, or 15.
These are the various image files described in the message.

Feel free to explore the other guides too, and don't forget to look at all
the other interesting items we have on our Shtetlinks site.

The original, but corrected, message is repeated below in case you need it.

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP/JRI-Poland
----------------------------------------------------------------

The Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, part of JRI-Poland, has been translating
from Russian and Hebrew/Yiddish to English the vital records (birth,
marriage, and death) obtained >from the LDS under an agreement with the
Ukraine Archives. We have developed a set of transliteration aides to
assist our translators with personal names, town names, and keywords
that they encounter in these handwritten records. These transliteration
aides were mentioned at the recent IAJGS Conference in Washington D.C.
Since then we have received several hundred hits on our Shtetlinks
website (http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/) >from people who
wanted to see the image files posted there. Unfortunately, the files
were pretty messed up ... until this morning. Our webmaster, Max Roth,
fixed the problems, and the image files now are available, and visible
the way they were supposed to be. So, if you visited the website before
this morning, please return and take another look.

Here is a list of some of the transliteration aides that you may find
useful in your own research. Each file contains images of the
Hebrew/Yiddish and Russian name (or word/phrase) that appears in the
record, along with the English transliteration we are using on the
Kremenets project. All are accessible on the Kremenets Shtetlinks
website by pointing your browser to

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/kmain.html

and then by working your way through the translation guides menus to the
appropriate links

* “Given Names, Male, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of male given names >from the vital records along
with the English transliteration of each name. The images and
transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew.

* “Given Names, Female, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of female given names >from the vital records
along with the English transliteration of each name. The images
and transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew.

* “Occupations, Social Classes & Keywords, Hebrew and Russian
graphics", a file containing images of the occupations listed in
the vital records along with the English translation of each. The
occupations images are in both Russian and Hebrew.

* "Town names, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of about 80 town names appearing in the records we have
translated to date.

* "Causes of Death, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of the causes of death appearing in the records we have
translated to date.

Keep in mind that development of these image files is an ongoing effort.
As new translations are completed, we add to (and occasionally correct)
the files. Please let me know if you spot a name or word that needs to
be corrected.

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP


Re: Timing of Census Enumeration #general

Stan Goodman <safeqSPAM_FOILER@...>
 

Samara99@... (Sam Schleman) opined:

Hello All.
Would anyone have any idea of the timing as to when the census was taken in
Manhattan for the 1900 census?

I am researching a family that arrived in May, 1900. I would prefer to know
now whether they are likely to be included in the 1900 census, before I
order an index tape, wait six weeks, then order the actual census records,
wait another six weeks, etc.

Thanks.

Sam
1900-census enumeration sheets that I have for EDs in New Jersey are
dated in early July. This being a US census, I assume that it was
conducted simultaneously everywhere in the US, even in New York City.


--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

Please remove the CAPITAL LETTERS >from my address in order to send me
email, and include "JEWISHGEN" in the subject line, else your message
will be deleted automatically, unread.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Timing of Census Enumeration #general

Stan Goodman <safeqSPAM_FOILER@...>
 

Samara99@... (Sam Schleman) opined:

Hello All.
Would anyone have any idea of the timing as to when the census was taken in
Manhattan for the 1900 census?

I am researching a family that arrived in May, 1900. I would prefer to know
now whether they are likely to be included in the 1900 census, before I
order an index tape, wait six weeks, then order the actual census records,
wait another six weeks, etc.

Thanks.

Sam
1900-census enumeration sheets that I have for EDs in New Jersey are
dated in early July. This being a US census, I assume that it was
conducted simultaneously everywhere in the US, even in New York City.


--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

Please remove the CAPITAL LETTERS >from my address in order to send me
email, and include "JEWISHGEN" in the subject line, else your message
will be deleted automatically, unread.


Ralph Turica (at Washington IAJGS Conf) #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

At my lecture at the IAJGS conference last week ("Jewish Genealogy Resources
in Istanbul"), I met a very nice person who offered to help me translate
some of my Solitreo records. His name is Ralph Turica. In the commotion
after my lecture, I did not have a chance to write down his e-mail address.
Does anyone know how I can contact Ralph Turica?

Dan Kazez

P.S. Here are 11 samples of what Solitreo looks like:

http://www4.wittenberg.edu/academics/music/kazez/Ist-Marr/

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
Springfield, Ohio USA
KAZEZ-KAZES, ALHADEF-ELHADEF, FRESKO-FRESCO, HABIB, DEVIDAS-DE VIDAS
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/dk/elh-kaz-fre.html

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ralph Turica (at Washington IAJGS Conf) #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

At my lecture at the IAJGS conference last week ("Jewish Genealogy Resources
in Istanbul"), I met a very nice person who offered to help me translate
some of my Solitreo records. His name is Ralph Turica. In the commotion
after my lecture, I did not have a chance to write down his e-mail address.
Does anyone know how I can contact Ralph Turica?

Dan Kazez

P.S. Here are 11 samples of what Solitreo looks like:

http://www4.wittenberg.edu/academics/music/kazez/Ist-Marr/

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
Springfield, Ohio USA
KAZEZ-KAZES, ALHADEF-ELHADEF, FRESKO-FRESCO, HABIB, DEVIDAS-DE VIDAS
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/dk/elh-kaz-fre.html

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Grouitzi #general

Spunberg Robert <robertspunberg@...>
 

I am looking for a town, village, hamlet or shtetl whose name I have
found in my maternal grand mother's marriage record. It is called
"Grouitzi".

My unsuccessful attempts thus far have highlighted similar names, such
as Gruzdi, Gruzdie, Gruzdi'az etc . . . This leads me to think that
this spelling may simply be a phonetic transcription.

Since my grandmother spoke French quite badly when she arrived, I
imagine that this may have further distorted the pronunciation. She
came either >from the region of Warsaw or Krakow.

I hope that someone might have a clue >from their understanding of Poland
and her history.

Sincere thanks,
Robert Spunberg.
Lyon, France.

robertspunberg@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Grouitzi #general

Spunberg Robert <robertspunberg@...>
 

I am looking for a town, village, hamlet or shtetl whose name I have
found in my maternal grand mother's marriage record. It is called
"Grouitzi".

My unsuccessful attempts thus far have highlighted similar names, such
as Gruzdi, Gruzdie, Gruzdi'az etc . . . This leads me to think that
this spelling may simply be a phonetic transcription.

Since my grandmother spoke French quite badly when she arrived, I
imagine that this may have further distorted the pronunciation. She
came either >from the region of Warsaw or Krakow.

I hope that someone might have a clue >from their understanding of Poland
and her history.

Sincere thanks,
Robert Spunberg.
Lyon, France.

robertspunberg@...