Date   
Need suggestions on trip to Belarus and Silesia #general

AIChernoff@...
 

In the spring or early summer of 2004, my wife and I, as well as our 3
grown children, are planning a trip to Belarus, for genealogical purposes
related to my family, followed by a sight seeing trip to Breslau and
Ratibor, where my wife was born and lived as a child. I would be
interested in searching for information in Minsk (my mother's town), and
in Tsirin (Czyrin, near Mir and Baranovici) and Slonim, with which my
father's family is connected. My wife would like to revisit the sights of
her childhood days in present day Wroczlov and Ratzibor. In the Belarus
part, we need knowledgeable genealogical help, as well as interpreters and
guides; in Poland, interpreters and guides. I realize that Stetl
Shleppers has several trips scheduled to Minsk and Belarus for next April
and June, but timing, and duration are problems. I would appreciate any
advice >from those independent travelers who have taken similar journeys
about travel arrangements, potential guides and interpreters, as well as
the types of problems one is likely to encounter.
Your help would be greatly appreciated.
Please answer privately.
Amoz Chernoff
Potomac, MD
aichernoff@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Others interested in genealogical travel
can check out ShtetlSchleppers' schedule and destinations at <http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetlSchleppers/>.
Something new for 2004: Portugal! Details will be worked out,
so stay tuned.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need suggestions on trip to Belarus and Silesia #general

AIChernoff@...
 

In the spring or early summer of 2004, my wife and I, as well as our 3
grown children, are planning a trip to Belarus, for genealogical purposes
related to my family, followed by a sight seeing trip to Breslau and
Ratibor, where my wife was born and lived as a child. I would be
interested in searching for information in Minsk (my mother's town), and
in Tsirin (Czyrin, near Mir and Baranovici) and Slonim, with which my
father's family is connected. My wife would like to revisit the sights of
her childhood days in present day Wroczlov and Ratzibor. In the Belarus
part, we need knowledgeable genealogical help, as well as interpreters and
guides; in Poland, interpreters and guides. I realize that Stetl
Shleppers has several trips scheduled to Minsk and Belarus for next April
and June, but timing, and duration are problems. I would appreciate any
advice >from those independent travelers who have taken similar journeys
about travel arrangements, potential guides and interpreters, as well as
the types of problems one is likely to encounter.
Your help would be greatly appreciated.
Please answer privately.
Amoz Chernoff
Potomac, MD
aichernoff@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Others interested in genealogical travel
can check out ShtetlSchleppers' schedule and destinations at <http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetlSchleppers/>.
Something new for 2004: Portugal! Details will be worked out,
so stay tuned.

A BOF success story #belarus

Joy Weaver <joyweave@...>
 

Clear DayI thought I'd add another success story. It encourages me to read
others.

A few days ago, Jenni Buch, leader for Brest district, sent me a listing she
found in an 1880 newspaper >from St. Petersburg, Russia. It was a list of
all the "deserters" who did not show up at the age of 21 for their 25-year
stint in the Csar's army. On that list was (after translation):

Dajbog Schmuel son of Joshua Wisoke-Litovsk

This has to be my grandfather! I have written to the list before about my
search for the reason my grandmother traveled to America under the name
"Deibach," when the family name here was Feinberg. Now I know. Everything
fits: my grandfather's given name was Schmuel, his father was Yeheshua and
he came >from Wisoke-Litovsk. He gave his age as 40 when my mother was born
in 1902, so age 21 in 1880 is within reason.

Now I know what name to search for in Belarus records.

Thank you, Jenni, and thank you SIG for forming the BOF groups so that
others would know what we are each looking for.

Joy Weaver,
Islip, NY

POLAND (Krasnik, Zaklikow, Lublin): Blumberg, Fogiel, Rosenel./
BELARUS (Wisoke-Litovsk, Brest, Grodno): Feinberg, Vilner, Greenberg,
Petruskitz, Deibach.

Vilna Gaon-Chinitz #belarus

Jay Zitter <zitter@...>
 

Hi! I am researching the family of Yaakov Leib Chinitz, born about 1830 in
Slutsk-Starobin. Family tradition says that he was >from the Chinitz
descendants of the Gaon. Can anyone help me prove this. Thanks
Jay Zitter
Beit Shemesh
Brodetsky Chinitz (Starobin)
Zitter (Bukaczowce)
Zimmerman (Szczebrzeszyn)

Belarus SIG #Belarus A BOF success story #belarus

Joy Weaver <joyweave@...>
 

Clear DayI thought I'd add another success story. It encourages me to read
others.

A few days ago, Jenni Buch, leader for Brest district, sent me a listing she
found in an 1880 newspaper >from St. Petersburg, Russia. It was a list of
all the "deserters" who did not show up at the age of 21 for their 25-year
stint in the Csar's army. On that list was (after translation):

Dajbog Schmuel son of Joshua Wisoke-Litovsk

This has to be my grandfather! I have written to the list before about my
search for the reason my grandmother traveled to America under the name
"Deibach," when the family name here was Feinberg. Now I know. Everything
fits: my grandfather's given name was Schmuel, his father was Yeheshua and
he came >from Wisoke-Litovsk. He gave his age as 40 when my mother was born
in 1902, so age 21 in 1880 is within reason.

Now I know what name to search for in Belarus records.

Thank you, Jenni, and thank you SIG for forming the BOF groups so that
others would know what we are each looking for.

Joy Weaver,
Islip, NY

POLAND (Krasnik, Zaklikow, Lublin): Blumberg, Fogiel, Rosenel./
BELARUS (Wisoke-Litovsk, Brest, Grodno): Feinberg, Vilner, Greenberg,
Petruskitz, Deibach.

Belarus SIG #Belarus Vilna Gaon-Chinitz #belarus

Jay Zitter <zitter@...>
 

Hi! I am researching the family of Yaakov Leib Chinitz, born about 1830 in
Slutsk-Starobin. Family tradition says that he was >from the Chinitz
descendants of the Gaon. Can anyone help me prove this. Thanks
Jay Zitter
Beit Shemesh
Brodetsky Chinitz (Starobin)
Zitter (Bukaczowce)
Zimmerman (Szczebrzeszyn)

Thanks for the help! #belarus

Allison Vrolijk <allison_g@...>
 

Thank everyone who responded to me regarding what I
thought was the shtetl Aisenberg. I now know that was
the name of the Rabbi in Mir at the time of my Great
Uncle's birth.

Thanks again,
Allison

Belarus SIG #Belarus Thanks for the help! #belarus

Allison Vrolijk <allison_g@...>
 

Thank everyone who responded to me regarding what I
thought was the shtetl Aisenberg. I now know that was
the name of the Rabbi in Mir at the time of my Great
Uncle's birth.

Thanks again,
Allison

New Mexico Pioneer, Emanuel ROSENWALD #general

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

Fellow Researchers:

I am submitting this request for a friend who is working on her husband's
tree.

There is a fair amount of published information about Emanuel ROSENWALD,
the German-Jewish merchant who settled in Las Vegas, New Mesico sometime
after 1860. He established a thriving business and started what may have
been the first Jewish congregation in that territory.

Emanuel was a fairly prolific writer and left behind journals and letters
(in German) that describe his experience. An interesting and lesser
explored aspect of his life deals with his arrival in NYC in 1853 and
subsequent migration to Baltimore and then to Virginia. Apparently, his
Baltimore uncles were concerned that his NY unlce would keep him in NY, so
they enticed him to Baltimore. Now, who are these Baltimore uncles? In my
friend's research, the record is not clear. She first assumed that the
Baltimore uncles were of the ROSENWALD clan, but it now appears that they
may have been >from his mother's family - GUTMAN. I have turned up a lot of
information about Joel GUTMAN of Baltimore, an importer and retailer of
silks and other fabrics. Was Joel GUTMAN related to Emanuel ROSENWALD?

Apparently Emanuel did not stay in Baltimore for long. He opened a retail
store in Staunton, VA and sold men's clothing. This store failed after a
year and he moved on to open a business in Richmond, VA. In both places, he
sold clothing made by an H. GOODMAN of Baltimore. Had GUTMAN become GOODMAN
and was the "H" for another unlce or was GOODMAN another family?

Any assistance would be appreciated.

Marlene Bishow
Rockville, MD

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Mexico Pioneer, Emanuel ROSENWALD #general

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

Fellow Researchers:

I am submitting this request for a friend who is working on her husband's
tree.

There is a fair amount of published information about Emanuel ROSENWALD,
the German-Jewish merchant who settled in Las Vegas, New Mesico sometime
after 1860. He established a thriving business and started what may have
been the first Jewish congregation in that territory.

Emanuel was a fairly prolific writer and left behind journals and letters
(in German) that describe his experience. An interesting and lesser
explored aspect of his life deals with his arrival in NYC in 1853 and
subsequent migration to Baltimore and then to Virginia. Apparently, his
Baltimore uncles were concerned that his NY unlce would keep him in NY, so
they enticed him to Baltimore. Now, who are these Baltimore uncles? In my
friend's research, the record is not clear. She first assumed that the
Baltimore uncles were of the ROSENWALD clan, but it now appears that they
may have been >from his mother's family - GUTMAN. I have turned up a lot of
information about Joel GUTMAN of Baltimore, an importer and retailer of
silks and other fabrics. Was Joel GUTMAN related to Emanuel ROSENWALD?

Apparently Emanuel did not stay in Baltimore for long. He opened a retail
store in Staunton, VA and sold men's clothing. This store failed after a
year and he moved on to open a business in Richmond, VA. In both places, he
sold clothing made by an H. GOODMAN of Baltimore. Had GUTMAN become GOODMAN
and was the "H" for another unlce or was GOODMAN another family?

Any assistance would be appreciated.

Marlene Bishow
Rockville, MD

Re: Righteous of the Nations #general

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Hi,

I've just returned >from Israel where I attended a ceremony at Yad Vashem
to induct the Polish family that saved my cousin Palter Lopata and three
of his friends during the war into the righteous of the nations as
Polish holocaust rescuers. The ceremony was attended by the Danieluk's
surviving daughter Raisa and her two sons who traveled to Israel >from
Poland. The Danieluks lived in a tiny crossroads of Solniki just
Southeast of Bialystok and very near Zabludow. Some of my Lopata family
members >from Israel and the US attended, as well as the three Israeli
daughters of one of the other survivors. It was one of the most
interesting and moving experiences of my life.

The Danieluks are a Russian Orthodox family. Raisa's parents were
simple poor farmers. They were not political at all, but rather
religious. After the end of the war during Easter 1945, the Danileuk's
and the survivors were having a celebration at the Danieluk home when it
was attacked by members of a small partisan group commanded by "The
Eagle" who was >from Zabludow. According to the Danieluks' "The Eagle"
was later hung, and they told us that his intention was to "mix the
blood of the Jews and the Orthodox", as in killing two birds with one
stone?. Raisa's father, sister, one of the holocaust survivors, and four
others were murdered. Raisa's sons are quite successful. One is an
attorney and the other works for Toyota in Warsaw.

The ceremony was covered by the Israeli TV news, and the print press. We
hired a guide and took the Danieluks on a tour of the stations of the
cross in Jerusalem. It was quite exhausting but very interesting. Along
the way several people recognized the Danieluks >from TV and
congratulated them. After the ceremony we had a party at the home of
one of my relatives in Jerusalem where the conversation was very
emotional, with everyone >from the young members of the family to the
older sharing their feelings about the day. Polish, Hebrew, and English
languages were flowing freely. A very strong bond has been formed
between the Danieluk family, my Lopata relatives, and the family of the
other survivors Israel Bramson.

We're still looking for the son of my survivor relative Palter Lopata.
We think he is living somewhere in Poland. We're also looking for any
relatives of survivor Yizhok Koplinsky, and Moshe Flicker.

Bellow I have a link to a webpage where I have the entire story
including photos of the ceremony at Yad Vashem.

http://www.zabludow.com/Paltierstestimony.html

Tilford Bartman

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE:Righteous of the Nations #general

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Hi,

I've just returned >from Israel where I attended a ceremony at Yad Vashem
to induct the Polish family that saved my cousin Palter Lopata and three
of his friends during the war into the righteous of the nations as
Polish holocaust rescuers. The ceremony was attended by the Danieluk's
surviving daughter Raisa and her two sons who traveled to Israel >from
Poland. The Danieluks lived in a tiny crossroads of Solniki just
Southeast of Bialystok and very near Zabludow. Some of my Lopata family
members >from Israel and the US attended, as well as the three Israeli
daughters of one of the other survivors. It was one of the most
interesting and moving experiences of my life.

The Danieluks are a Russian Orthodox family. Raisa's parents were
simple poor farmers. They were not political at all, but rather
religious. After the end of the war during Easter 1945, the Danileuk's
and the survivors were having a celebration at the Danieluk home when it
was attacked by members of a small partisan group commanded by "The
Eagle" who was >from Zabludow. According to the Danieluks' "The Eagle"
was later hung, and they told us that his intention was to "mix the
blood of the Jews and the Orthodox", as in killing two birds with one
stone?. Raisa's father, sister, one of the holocaust survivors, and four
others were murdered. Raisa's sons are quite successful. One is an
attorney and the other works for Toyota in Warsaw.

The ceremony was covered by the Israeli TV news, and the print press. We
hired a guide and took the Danieluks on a tour of the stations of the
cross in Jerusalem. It was quite exhausting but very interesting. Along
the way several people recognized the Danieluks >from TV and
congratulated them. After the ceremony we had a party at the home of
one of my relatives in Jerusalem where the conversation was very
emotional, with everyone >from the young members of the family to the
older sharing their feelings about the day. Polish, Hebrew, and English
languages were flowing freely. A very strong bond has been formed
between the Danieluk family, my Lopata relatives, and the family of the
other survivors Israel Bramson.

We're still looking for the son of my survivor relative Palter Lopata.
We think he is living somewhere in Poland. We're also looking for any
relatives of survivor Yizhok Koplinsky, and Moshe Flicker.

Bellow I have a link to a webpage where I have the entire story
including photos of the ceremony at Yad Vashem.

http://www.zabludow.com/Paltierstestimony.html

Tilford Bartman

ITKINs from Belarus #general

Pavel Bernshtam <pavelb@...>
 

Hi!

I have created the full list of all known me ITKINs >from Belarus,
including records >from jewishgen databases and private trees arrived to me.

You can access this MS word file at
http://javax.netfirms.com/genealogy/BelarusItkin.doc

Searching for:
ITKIN - Kolyshki, Vitebsk gubernia; Kharkov
BENIOMENSON - Khislavichi (Mstislav uyezd), Kharkov
BERNSHTAM - Akimovka (Melitopol oblast), Melitopol, Povolzh'e
ALTSHULER - Priazovskoe (Pokrovka)(Melitopol oblast) , Melitopol,
Chausy (Mogilev gubernia)
KANTOR - Polonnoe (Volyn gubernia), Baranovka (Volyn gubernia), Zhitomir

Pavel Bernshtam
email: pavelb@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ITKINs from Belarus #general

Pavel Bernshtam <pavelb@...>
 

Hi!

I have created the full list of all known me ITKINs >from Belarus,
including records >from jewishgen databases and private trees arrived to me.

You can access this MS word file at
http://javax.netfirms.com/genealogy/BelarusItkin.doc

Searching for:
ITKIN - Kolyshki, Vitebsk gubernia; Kharkov
BENIOMENSON - Khislavichi (Mstislav uyezd), Kharkov
BERNSHTAM - Akimovka (Melitopol oblast), Melitopol, Povolzh'e
ALTSHULER - Priazovskoe (Pokrovka)(Melitopol oblast) , Melitopol,
Chausy (Mogilev gubernia)
KANTOR - Polonnoe (Volyn gubernia), Baranovka (Volyn gubernia), Zhitomir

Pavel Bernshtam
email: pavelb@...

Lviv Cemeteries #general

Errol Schneegurt
 

While I was searching the International Association of Jewish Genealogical
Societies - Cemetery project - they write about 2 books (below) that
relate to the cemeteries in the city of Lviv.
Has anyone read these books or have seen what information they contain?

Book: Matsevot kodesh vezikhron tsadikim (Holy graves and memorials to the
Just), by G. Suchestov. New York, 1993. 4 volumes in 1 volume (Reprint of
G. Hirtz books, Lvov 1863-1897. Hebrew. S88A2184. Notes: see G. Hirtz
books S38A847 and R70A5484.


Book: Sefer matsevet kodesh. po ba'ir L'vov (Book of holy graves in the
city of L'vov), by G. Suchestov. Ashdod, 1996. 1 volume, Hebrew. S2
96A5718. Notes: Facsimile reproduction of G. Hirtz book S38A847.

Errol Schneegurt LI NY ESLVIV@...

Re: Percentage of Jews with Polish heritage #general

Paul M Lieberman <paulmlieberman@...>
 

As part of the discussion of what it means to be "a Jew of Polish
heritage" started by Lilli Sprintz, Arie L. Wishnia raised the issue of
intermarriage:

Just because someone has a Polish sounding name doesn't mean that he/she
is Polish (or has Polish heritage). yes, some people inter-married, but
their families and community would have noting to do with them (I heard
those stories as a kid). Anielewicz was a Jew, so was Berko Joselowicz
I don't think this is what Lilli is wondering about. I think she meant
"Polish Jew", not a Jew who has gentile Polish ancestors. Michael
Bernet's comment on this are most relevant, but I think the question of
what percentage of Jews "have someone in their family of Polish
heritage" is still of interest and not totally unanswerable, though
certainly not a question that can be answered with mathematical certainty.

I have often mulled over the question of what influences were exerted on
me by the places that my ancestors spent their lives. My mothers family
were "Hungarian Jews", and, like most non-Hasidic Jews in Hungary proper
(in other words, not in Galicia), they were more assimilated than my
grandmother's family in Galicia, or my great-grandparents in Odessa. So
I grew up hearing Hungarian music and spoken Hungarian, and eating
Hungarian food, and wondering why my Galizianer grandmother's stuffed
cabbage tasted so different >from my Hungarian grandmother's (it wasn't
because the recipe was in Yiddish). If asked, I'd say I'm 100% American,
100% Jew, 50% Hungarian, 25% Galizianer and 25% Russian Jew.

As we JewishGenners have expanded our understanding of our Yiddishe
roots over the last decade, it's become clear that most of our families
moved around, some a great deal, some not so much. It's become clear to
me that I will never be able to trace my Hungarian family beyond the
early nineteenth century. If I were able, though, I'm sure I would find
that my ancestors came to Hungary >from other parts of the world (Spain?
Turkey?) sometime before 1800, and possibly not long before. And then,
between 1890 and 1921, all my immediate ancestors came to America. So,
even though they may have been in Hungary less than 200 years, Hungarian
culture has made an indelible mark on me, on who I am and how I identify
myself.

Let's keep asking these questions, and looking for the answers that are
meaningful to us and our lives.

- Paul M Lieberman

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lviv Cemeteries #general

Errol Schneegurt
 

While I was searching the International Association of Jewish Genealogical
Societies - Cemetery project - they write about 2 books (below) that
relate to the cemeteries in the city of Lviv.
Has anyone read these books or have seen what information they contain?

Book: Matsevot kodesh vezikhron tsadikim (Holy graves and memorials to the
Just), by G. Suchestov. New York, 1993. 4 volumes in 1 volume (Reprint of
G. Hirtz books, Lvov 1863-1897. Hebrew. S88A2184. Notes: see G. Hirtz
books S38A847 and R70A5484.


Book: Sefer matsevet kodesh. po ba'ir L'vov (Book of holy graves in the
city of L'vov), by G. Suchestov. Ashdod, 1996. 1 volume, Hebrew. S2
96A5718. Notes: Facsimile reproduction of G. Hirtz book S38A847.

Errol Schneegurt LI NY ESLVIV@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Percentage of Jews with Polish heritage #general

Paul M Lieberman <paulmlieberman@...>
 

As part of the discussion of what it means to be "a Jew of Polish
heritage" started by Lilli Sprintz, Arie L. Wishnia raised the issue of
intermarriage:

Just because someone has a Polish sounding name doesn't mean that he/she
is Polish (or has Polish heritage). yes, some people inter-married, but
their families and community would have noting to do with them (I heard
those stories as a kid). Anielewicz was a Jew, so was Berko Joselowicz
I don't think this is what Lilli is wondering about. I think she meant
"Polish Jew", not a Jew who has gentile Polish ancestors. Michael
Bernet's comment on this are most relevant, but I think the question of
what percentage of Jews "have someone in their family of Polish
heritage" is still of interest and not totally unanswerable, though
certainly not a question that can be answered with mathematical certainty.

I have often mulled over the question of what influences were exerted on
me by the places that my ancestors spent their lives. My mothers family
were "Hungarian Jews", and, like most non-Hasidic Jews in Hungary proper
(in other words, not in Galicia), they were more assimilated than my
grandmother's family in Galicia, or my great-grandparents in Odessa. So
I grew up hearing Hungarian music and spoken Hungarian, and eating
Hungarian food, and wondering why my Galizianer grandmother's stuffed
cabbage tasted so different >from my Hungarian grandmother's (it wasn't
because the recipe was in Yiddish). If asked, I'd say I'm 100% American,
100% Jew, 50% Hungarian, 25% Galizianer and 25% Russian Jew.

As we JewishGenners have expanded our understanding of our Yiddishe
roots over the last decade, it's become clear that most of our families
moved around, some a great deal, some not so much. It's become clear to
me that I will never be able to trace my Hungarian family beyond the
early nineteenth century. If I were able, though, I'm sure I would find
that my ancestors came to Hungary >from other parts of the world (Spain?
Turkey?) sometime before 1800, and possibly not long before. And then,
between 1890 and 1921, all my immediate ancestors came to America. So,
even though they may have been in Hungary less than 200 years, Hungarian
culture has made an indelible mark on me, on who I am and how I identify
myself.

Let's keep asking these questions, and looking for the answers that are
meaningful to us and our lives.

- Paul M Lieberman

Location of Cemetery in York, PA #general

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

In about 1908, a baby boy was born to Charles and Tillie SOMMERS who were
living in Gettysburg, PA. The baby did not live long and he was buried "in
the old Jewish cemetery in York."

Does anyone know what cemetery the family stories may have been referring
to and where it is located today? My husband is the oldest son of Lillian
SOMMERS BISHOW, the third daughter of Charles and Tillie SOMMERS. The
family eventually moved to Taneytown, MD and then to Baltimore.

Regards,
Marlene BISHOW
Rockville, MD
Researching:
HANTMAN/GANTMAN: Belarus >NYC > CT
KATZ: Zhuravno, Galicia > NYC
DEUTSCHER, NUSSBAUM: Rozniatow, Galicia > NYC
PETT, SINGER: Belarus (Grodno?) > NY > CT
SOMMERS: Lithuania > Whales > Gettysburg >Baltimore
BISHOW (BISHOVSKY) : Russia (Ukraine?) > New Orleans > Baltimore

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Location of Cemetery in York, PA #general

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

In about 1908, a baby boy was born to Charles and Tillie SOMMERS who were
living in Gettysburg, PA. The baby did not live long and he was buried "in
the old Jewish cemetery in York."

Does anyone know what cemetery the family stories may have been referring
to and where it is located today? My husband is the oldest son of Lillian
SOMMERS BISHOW, the third daughter of Charles and Tillie SOMMERS. The
family eventually moved to Taneytown, MD and then to Baltimore.

Regards,
Marlene BISHOW
Rockville, MD
Researching:
HANTMAN/GANTMAN: Belarus >NYC > CT
KATZ: Zhuravno, Galicia > NYC
DEUTSCHER, NUSSBAUM: Rozniatow, Galicia > NYC
PETT, SINGER: Belarus (Grodno?) > NY > CT
SOMMERS: Lithuania > Whales > Gettysburg >Baltimore
BISHOW (BISHOVSKY) : Russia (Ukraine?) > New Orleans > Baltimore