Date   

Re: Confusion about JRI date listings #poland

Mark Jacobson
 

Hi Jack,

These are Galician records you are looking at. Galicia
was part of the Austrian Empire at the time - it was
difficult for Jews to 'civilly' marry in the Empire
due to numerous restrictions and laws that you can
read about if you search the archives of this listing.
Jews had religious marriages and bore children as
religiously married couples. Most never bothered to
legally marry. Most Jews who did 'legally' marry did
so later in life, often after their children were
grown, so it's very common to see people 'legally'
marrying years after their children were born in
cities which were part of Austrian Galicia. They most
likely didn't actually have children before they were
married, just before they had a 'civil' marriage which
was recorded.

They also most likely had other children born before
the one you found, and either those records no longer
exist, the records are in the Lviv Archive like other
Galician records, or the children weren't registered.
Galician Jews didn't fear the military draft like
Russian Jews, but it was still a bother to go to the
nearest city registration office when a child was born
or a child died. My g-g-grandparents registered the
deaths of 3 of their children in Drohobycz in Galicia
almost 20 years after the fact. If they didn't happen
to do this for whatever reason I would never have
known these children even existed. It was also very
common for people to continue having children into
their 40's, as long as they were still able to have
them. My grandfather's aunt had children born over a
25 year span, beginning when she was about 19 until
she was in her 40's.

Mark Jacobson
Boca Raton, FL



--- Jack <howdydo@comcast.net> wrote:


PODHAJCE listings for name PISTREICH.
---
---
First, can this be correct that this Orthodox Jewish
couple had a child
2 years before they were married? Can there be an
error on the dates in
the records?


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Confusion about JRI date listings #poland

Mark Jacobson
 

Hi Jack,

These are Galician records you are looking at. Galicia
was part of the Austrian Empire at the time - it was
difficult for Jews to 'civilly' marry in the Empire
due to numerous restrictions and laws that you can
read about if you search the archives of this listing.
Jews had religious marriages and bore children as
religiously married couples. Most never bothered to
legally marry. Most Jews who did 'legally' marry did
so later in life, often after their children were
grown, so it's very common to see people 'legally'
marrying years after their children were born in
cities which were part of Austrian Galicia. They most
likely didn't actually have children before they were
married, just before they had a 'civil' marriage which
was recorded.

They also most likely had other children born before
the one you found, and either those records no longer
exist, the records are in the Lviv Archive like other
Galician records, or the children weren't registered.
Galician Jews didn't fear the military draft like
Russian Jews, but it was still a bother to go to the
nearest city registration office when a child was born
or a child died. My g-g-grandparents registered the
deaths of 3 of their children in Drohobycz in Galicia
almost 20 years after the fact. If they didn't happen
to do this for whatever reason I would never have
known these children even existed. It was also very
common for people to continue having children into
their 40's, as long as they were still able to have
them. My grandfather's aunt had children born over a
25 year span, beginning when she was about 19 until
she was in her 40's.

Mark Jacobson
Boca Raton, FL



--- Jack <howdydo@comcast.net> wrote:


PODHAJCE listings for name PISTREICH.
---
---
First, can this be correct that this Orthodox Jewish
couple had a child
2 years before they were married? Can there be an
error on the dates in
the records?


Need Current EMail Addresses #poland

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Dear Folks,

The people listed below all have out of date email addresses. I am trying
to reach them regarding Rzeszow, Poland indexing projects.

If you are reading this please contact me. If anyone knows any of these
people, please let me know.

Willard Harzoff
Henry Krol
Arye Barkai
Hadassa Goldsmith
Gedalia Sharon
Robert Atlas
Daniel Ansell
Jonathan Ansell

Thanks,
Eden Joachim
Rzeszow PSA Archive Coordinator
Pomona, NY
esjoachim@optonline.net

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland Need Current EMail Addresses #poland

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Dear Folks,

The people listed below all have out of date email addresses. I am trying
to reach them regarding Rzeszow, Poland indexing projects.

If you are reading this please contact me. If anyone knows any of these
people, please let me know.

Willard Harzoff
Henry Krol
Arye Barkai
Hadassa Goldsmith
Gedalia Sharon
Robert Atlas
Daniel Ansell
Jonathan Ansell

Thanks,
Eden Joachim
Rzeszow PSA Archive Coordinator
Pomona, NY
esjoachim@optonline.net

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Re: What country was Bialystok in? #poland

Steve Gabai <sgabai@...>
 

Since this threat keeps coming around, I thought I'd add my two cents.

One hundred years ago, all of Eastern Europe was the "Russian Empire."
My ggps were >from Bialystok but on all their census's, including 1930,
they say they were born in "Russia."

Central European borders were drawn with chalk and changed all the
time. But we have the same problem today.

For instance. If someone was born in Odessa 30 years ago, and they
immigrate to the US. Where are they from? The Soviet Union or Ukraine?

What about someone who was born in Ljubljana, Slovenia 20 years ago?

So these same things continue with today's ever changing boundry's.

Steve Gabai

Researching:

ABOUAF, ALGRANATI (ALGRANTI), BINDER*, CARMONA, CHASAN* (any spelling),
COHEN* (Brooklyn), FINKELSTEIN (NYC), GABAI (GABBAI - GABAY), GREENBAUM
(Odessa), GREENBERG*, INSKY*, KRAVITZ* (Brooklyn), MUSSAF* (NJ), PERLSTEIN*
(PEARLSTEIN), RATOVETSKY*, ROUSSO (RUSSO) (Italy/Turkey), SCHIMSKY*
(SCHIMKE - SCHYMSKER -SCHETZENSKY), SCHRAPATZ (SKROPOTICH) (Odessa),
SHWARTZ* (SCHWARTZ), SILVER*, SPECTOR* & TARANTO

* - Bialystok area


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re:What country was Bialystok in? #poland

Steve Gabai <sgabai@...>
 

Since this threat keeps coming around, I thought I'd add my two cents.

One hundred years ago, all of Eastern Europe was the "Russian Empire."
My ggps were >from Bialystok but on all their census's, including 1930,
they say they were born in "Russia."

Central European borders were drawn with chalk and changed all the
time. But we have the same problem today.

For instance. If someone was born in Odessa 30 years ago, and they
immigrate to the US. Where are they from? The Soviet Union or Ukraine?

What about someone who was born in Ljubljana, Slovenia 20 years ago?

So these same things continue with today's ever changing boundry's.

Steve Gabai

Researching:

ABOUAF, ALGRANATI (ALGRANTI), BINDER*, CARMONA, CHASAN* (any spelling),
COHEN* (Brooklyn), FINKELSTEIN (NYC), GABAI (GABBAI - GABAY), GREENBAUM
(Odessa), GREENBERG*, INSKY*, KRAVITZ* (Brooklyn), MUSSAF* (NJ), PERLSTEIN*
(PEARLSTEIN), RATOVETSKY*, ROUSSO (RUSSO) (Italy/Turkey), SCHIMSKY*
(SCHIMKE - SCHYMSKER -SCHETZENSKY), SCHRAPATZ (SKROPOTICH) (Odessa),
SHWARTZ* (SCHWARTZ), SILVER*, SPECTOR* & TARANTO

* - Bialystok area


Re: What country was Bialystok in? #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Laurence Morrell wrote:

Address your forum messages to <bialystok@lyris.jewishgen.org>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Bialystok, Russia or Bialystok, Poland ? I have the same situation for my
grandfather. His tomb stone has Bialystok, Poland, census records have
Russia. In reality it was Poland/Russia as far as I am concerned. Like some
other areas near the Lituanian border with Poland and Belarus, who was in
power at the time.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It appears that most Jews in Bialystok region had no really strong
national identification as either Russians or Poles? A relative few
became Polanized in the 1930's, and a relative few in earlier times
became Russian speakers and had an affinity for Russian culture. When
the Soviets occupied the area >from September of 1939 to June of 1941 as
part of the Hitler/Stalin pact, Poles felt that the Jews had welcomed the
Russians who were the Poles historic enemies. They accused the Jews of
betraying Poland. During the occupation by Russia many Jews could be
found among the Soviet Civil authorities including the NKVD (the secret
Police) and the Militia. Over one and a half million people were
arrested and sent to Siberia. Among them were a substantial number of
Jews, most arrested due to their "social profile". "Red" Jews were in
many instances particularly unmerciful toward their fellow Jews.

Just before the beginning of the war in June, 1941 the Soviet commissar (a
Jew) of Zabludow ordered that part of the Jewish cemetery be plowed
under in order to expand a Soviet Military airport. Many synagogues were
closed and turned into warehouses. In Zabludow the Rabbis son was sent
to Siberia and he never returned. The Soviets were very skilled at
propaganda, and were able to gain the allegiance of many of the Jewish
young people. When the Germans invaded in June of 1941, the Poles
unleashed their vengeance on the Jews. Hundreds, perhaps even thousands
were killed in the Bialystok region not so much by Germans but by
Poles.

The whole point of this is that the issue of national
identification and the particular position of the Jews was very
significant in effecting events.

Tilford Bartman


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: What country was Bialystok in? #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Laurence Morrell wrote:

Address your forum messages to <bialystok@lyris.jewishgen.org>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Bialystok, Russia or Bialystok, Poland ? I have the same situation for my
grandfather. His tomb stone has Bialystok, Poland, census records have
Russia. In reality it was Poland/Russia as far as I am concerned. Like some
other areas near the Lituanian border with Poland and Belarus, who was in
power at the time.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It appears that most Jews in Bialystok region had no really strong
national identification as either Russians or Poles? A relative few
became Polanized in the 1930's, and a relative few in earlier times
became Russian speakers and had an affinity for Russian culture. When
the Soviets occupied the area >from September of 1939 to June of 1941 as
part of the Hitler/Stalin pact, Poles felt that the Jews had welcomed the
Russians who were the Poles historic enemies. They accused the Jews of
betraying Poland. During the occupation by Russia many Jews could be
found among the Soviet Civil authorities including the NKVD (the secret
Police) and the Militia. Over one and a half million people were
arrested and sent to Siberia. Among them were a substantial number of
Jews, most arrested due to their "social profile". "Red" Jews were in
many instances particularly unmerciful toward their fellow Jews.

Just before the beginning of the war in June, 1941 the Soviet commissar (a
Jew) of Zabludow ordered that part of the Jewish cemetery be plowed
under in order to expand a Soviet Military airport. Many synagogues were
closed and turned into warehouses. In Zabludow the Rabbis son was sent
to Siberia and he never returned. The Soviets were very skilled at
propaganda, and were able to gain the allegiance of many of the Jewish
young people. When the Germans invaded in June of 1941, the Poles
unleashed their vengeance on the Jews. Hundreds, perhaps even thousands
were killed in the Bialystok region not so much by Germans but by
Poles.

The whole point of this is that the issue of national
identification and the particular position of the Jews was very
significant in effecting events.

Tilford Bartman


Yiddish translation needed - one word #general

Fbussgang@...
 

Does anyone have any idea what griskelekh are?

The sentence in the Brzeziny Yizkor book is as follows:

"The ginger cake baker sold sweet baked goods -- honey-ginger cakes,
cheesecakes, pastries filled with berries or cherries, long strudels and sweet
griskelekh."

Fay Bussgang, Lexington, MA
Please answer privately to: fbussgang@post.harvard.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yiddish translation needed - one word #general

Fbussgang@...
 

Does anyone have any idea what griskelekh are?

The sentence in the Brzeziny Yizkor book is as follows:

"The ginger cake baker sold sweet baked goods -- honey-ginger cakes,
cheesecakes, pastries filled with berries or cherries, long strudels and sweet
griskelekh."

Fay Bussgang, Lexington, MA
Please answer privately to: fbussgang@post.harvard.edu


REISS mohels in Poland #general

Roni S. Liebowitz
 

Dear REISS researchers,

I think you might be interested to know that in the Sandomierz Museum, there
is a photo of Sandomierz mohels, showing 2 REISS mohels assumed to be father
and son given the age difference and caption on back of the picture. Both
are described as "circumcisers." This might be of importance for you as
researchers of the REISS family.

If you are interested in requesting copies of the picture, write to:
Muzeum Okregowe w Sandomierzu
Zamek
12 Zamkowa Street
27-600 Sandomierz, Poland

You can also get in touch with them through:

iwacha@op.pl

Please do not ask me anything else about it because this is the total of
what I know :-) Contact the museum. Good luck---hope you find a
connection.

Happy Chanukah.
Roni

[Roni Seibel Liebowitz]
New York

SEIBEL and SZAEFER ---Klimontow, Nadbrzezie, Konary, Grebow, Krakow, Baronow
Sandomierski, Rozwadow, Tarnobrzeg, Zukow in Poland; Lviv in Ukraine (Galicia)
KLOSS and OSER ---Klimontow, Konary, Radom in Poland
PRZYBYLSKI (later BILSKY) and PIASKOWSKI ---Belchatow, Lodz in Poland
URBACH, RUKALSKI, ROZICKA, MANDELBAUM --- Wegrow, Czerwonka, Warsaw, Minsk
Mazowiecki, Radom in Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen REISS mohels in Poland #general

Roni S. Liebowitz
 

Dear REISS researchers,

I think you might be interested to know that in the Sandomierz Museum, there
is a photo of Sandomierz mohels, showing 2 REISS mohels assumed to be father
and son given the age difference and caption on back of the picture. Both
are described as "circumcisers." This might be of importance for you as
researchers of the REISS family.

If you are interested in requesting copies of the picture, write to:
Muzeum Okregowe w Sandomierzu
Zamek
12 Zamkowa Street
27-600 Sandomierz, Poland

You can also get in touch with them through:

iwacha@op.pl

Please do not ask me anything else about it because this is the total of
what I know :-) Contact the museum. Good luck---hope you find a
connection.

Happy Chanukah.
Roni

[Roni Seibel Liebowitz]
New York

SEIBEL and SZAEFER ---Klimontow, Nadbrzezie, Konary, Grebow, Krakow, Baronow
Sandomierski, Rozwadow, Tarnobrzeg, Zukow in Poland; Lviv in Ukraine (Galicia)
KLOSS and OSER ---Klimontow, Konary, Radom in Poland
PRZYBYLSKI (later BILSKY) and PIASKOWSKI ---Belchatow, Lodz in Poland
URBACH, RUKALSKI, ROZICKA, MANDELBAUM --- Wegrow, Czerwonka, Warsaw, Minsk
Mazowiecki, Radom in Poland


the Yiddish word SCHVITZ #general

Lilli Sprintz <spri0037@...>
 

I've been wondering about this for along time, for cultural reasons and
for the reason that I grew up out East in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania,
USA), and men used to go to a "schvitz" which was like a turkish bath.
Which is why i've always wondered where culturally both the practice and
the word come from.

Lilli

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately unless your answer is genealogically
relevant.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen the Yiddish word SCHVITZ #general

Lilli Sprintz <spri0037@...>
 

I've been wondering about this for along time, for cultural reasons and
for the reason that I grew up out East in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania,
USA), and men used to go to a "schvitz" which was like a turkish bath.
Which is why i've always wondered where culturally both the practice and
the word come from.

Lilli

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately unless your answer is genealogically
relevant.


Re: Krakow Schools for Jewish girls #general

NFatouros@...
 

I wanted to respond before to the inquiry about Krakow Schools for girls in
the 1880s which Ira Freedman placed at Jewishgen on Oct. 24,03 and to same
one he sent earlier to one its SIGs, but I have been busy with a hundred
other questions. Other Jewishgenners may have responded to Mr. Freedman
privately, but I haven't noticed any public response.

It is my impression that the answer to his question about the education of
Jewish girls in Krakow (or elsewhere in Poland) around 1880 would largely
depend on how religious their families were and whether or not their families were
at least partly assimilated. It was not customary at the time, for most
Russian and Polish girls, whether or not they were Jewish, to be educated. The
formal education of most females was not developed anywhere in the world until
the 20th century. A girl's knowledge of "Kinder, Kirsch and Kuche" were thought
to have been sufficient; girls didn't need to know how to read or to learn
other subject matter. Moreover, most Jewish sons were not allowed, much less
encouraged, to study anything but Torah and Talmud. Relatively few Jewish boys
took up secular studies, and usually, they indulged in them on the sly,
risking expulsion >from their yeshivas and maybe also ejection >from the family
bosom.

Still, during the last quarter of the 19th century some Polish and Russian
females, Jewish and Gentiles, did go to Germany and Switzerland for higher
education. I have found nothing so far to suggest that girls attended
universities in Poland, in the 19th century, although I did find a reference to an
article or book by Michael Shank entitled "A Female University Student in Medieval
Krakow" but I am sure she was exceptional. Public schools in Poland and
Russia did not exist everywhere, although some Jewish children did manage to
attend gymnasia and of these some went on to universities. But even when Jewish
parents were "enlightened" they feared lest their children's pursuit of higher
education would cause them to question and abandon their religous beliefs and
practice and maybe become political revolutionaries!

In the US, until the 1960s, or so, if a girl attended a college or
university it was to find a husband, and to become educated enough so that she would
not shame her husband before his friends and business associates and maybe
acquire some knowledge of things other than household matters and children to
talk about with him. ("Mona Lisa's Smile" a recently issued movie, which I
haven't seen, starring Julia Roberts as an enlightened art teacher, portrays this
foolish attitude toward higher education which I myself, rebel that I was as a
young woman, nevertheless shared to a great extent.)

>from my readings in history, I believe that most Jewish girls in Poland
during the 19th century were educated at home. They may have been taught to read
Yiddish by their parents or siblings, or even by a rebbitsin who would go >from
house to house. If their father was a well-to-do merchant he may have known
enough Polish and maybe German to have taught it to his children.

Probably many late 19th century Jewish daughters would at least be able
to read Yiddish prayers so that while in synagogue, they would not have to rely
on the zogerin. Think of the movie Yentl, if not also of the original story
of Yentl and her struggle to obtain a Jewish education. Historically
speaking,Yentl's story was not exceptional. During the 1920's a Krakow seamstres
named Sarah Shenirer or Schnerir, was a pioneer in founding schools for
ultra-Orthodox Jewish girls where, if they could not study Torah because they were
only female, could indulge their intellect in advanced biblical studies.

The book "Found Treasures" edited by Frieda Forman, Ethel Raicus, Sarah
Silbertstein Swartz and Margie Wolff contains some discussion of the education
or its lack of many Jewish women. One of the stories, by Malka Lee who
emigrated to America in 1920's describes how much Malka wanted to write poetry and
how at first her father objected to her "consorting to such wickedness." You
can imagine that if in the 1920s her father was so unenlightened as to attempt
to burn her poems in the fireplace, how many pious Jewish parents during the
19th century would have been shocked at such frivolity and how few Jewish girls
would have had the courage to keep writing poetry as Malka did.

If Mr. Freedman did receive privately mailed responses I hope he will share
their contents with the rest of us.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY and BIELKOWSKY, Odessa,St. Petersburg and
Berdichev;ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets;
LEVY, WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS or SASS,Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk,
Berdichev; BEHAM, Salok and Kharkov; WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Krakow Schools for Jewish girls #general

NFatouros@...
 

I wanted to respond before to the inquiry about Krakow Schools for girls in
the 1880s which Ira Freedman placed at Jewishgen on Oct. 24,03 and to same
one he sent earlier to one its SIGs, but I have been busy with a hundred
other questions. Other Jewishgenners may have responded to Mr. Freedman
privately, but I haven't noticed any public response.

It is my impression that the answer to his question about the education of
Jewish girls in Krakow (or elsewhere in Poland) around 1880 would largely
depend on how religious their families were and whether or not their families were
at least partly assimilated. It was not customary at the time, for most
Russian and Polish girls, whether or not they were Jewish, to be educated. The
formal education of most females was not developed anywhere in the world until
the 20th century. A girl's knowledge of "Kinder, Kirsch and Kuche" were thought
to have been sufficient; girls didn't need to know how to read or to learn
other subject matter. Moreover, most Jewish sons were not allowed, much less
encouraged, to study anything but Torah and Talmud. Relatively few Jewish boys
took up secular studies, and usually, they indulged in them on the sly,
risking expulsion >from their yeshivas and maybe also ejection >from the family
bosom.

Still, during the last quarter of the 19th century some Polish and Russian
females, Jewish and Gentiles, did go to Germany and Switzerland for higher
education. I have found nothing so far to suggest that girls attended
universities in Poland, in the 19th century, although I did find a reference to an
article or book by Michael Shank entitled "A Female University Student in Medieval
Krakow" but I am sure she was exceptional. Public schools in Poland and
Russia did not exist everywhere, although some Jewish children did manage to
attend gymnasia and of these some went on to universities. But even when Jewish
parents were "enlightened" they feared lest their children's pursuit of higher
education would cause them to question and abandon their religous beliefs and
practice and maybe become political revolutionaries!

In the US, until the 1960s, or so, if a girl attended a college or
university it was to find a husband, and to become educated enough so that she would
not shame her husband before his friends and business associates and maybe
acquire some knowledge of things other than household matters and children to
talk about with him. ("Mona Lisa's Smile" a recently issued movie, which I
haven't seen, starring Julia Roberts as an enlightened art teacher, portrays this
foolish attitude toward higher education which I myself, rebel that I was as a
young woman, nevertheless shared to a great extent.)

>from my readings in history, I believe that most Jewish girls in Poland
during the 19th century were educated at home. They may have been taught to read
Yiddish by their parents or siblings, or even by a rebbitsin who would go >from
house to house. If their father was a well-to-do merchant he may have known
enough Polish and maybe German to have taught it to his children.

Probably many late 19th century Jewish daughters would at least be able
to read Yiddish prayers so that while in synagogue, they would not have to rely
on the zogerin. Think of the movie Yentl, if not also of the original story
of Yentl and her struggle to obtain a Jewish education. Historically
speaking,Yentl's story was not exceptional. During the 1920's a Krakow seamstres
named Sarah Shenirer or Schnerir, was a pioneer in founding schools for
ultra-Orthodox Jewish girls where, if they could not study Torah because they were
only female, could indulge their intellect in advanced biblical studies.

The book "Found Treasures" edited by Frieda Forman, Ethel Raicus, Sarah
Silbertstein Swartz and Margie Wolff contains some discussion of the education
or its lack of many Jewish women. One of the stories, by Malka Lee who
emigrated to America in 1920's describes how much Malka wanted to write poetry and
how at first her father objected to her "consorting to such wickedness." You
can imagine that if in the 1920s her father was so unenlightened as to attempt
to burn her poems in the fireplace, how many pious Jewish parents during the
19th century would have been shocked at such frivolity and how few Jewish girls
would have had the courage to keep writing poetry as Malka did.

If Mr. Freedman did receive privately mailed responses I hope he will share
their contents with the rest of us.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY and BIELKOWSKY, Odessa,St. Petersburg and
Berdichev;ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets;
LEVY, WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS or SASS,Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk,
Berdichev; BEHAM, Salok and Kharkov; WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


GREENFIELD, BYER, BLIACHER #general

russ <russ@...>
 

Hi,

I am interested in any information regarding a Julius BYER married to a
Bessie GREENFIELD sister of Riva BLIACHER who resided in Vilnius,
Lithuania. Any information would be appreciated.

Russ Byer
Rochester, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GREENFIELD, BYER, BLIACHER #general

russ <russ@...>
 

Hi,

I am interested in any information regarding a Julius BYER married to a
Bessie GREENFIELD sister of Riva BLIACHER who resided in Vilnius,
Lithuania. Any information would be appreciated.

Russ Byer
Rochester, New York


Re: Photos of Losice, Poland #general

Alice Josephs
 

You may find something of interest at
http://www.asmallpieceofhistory.co.uk/
on www.historychannel.co.uk

Have a look at the second video recording, Losice Ghetto.

Alice Josephs
England


Subject: Photos of Losice, Poland.
From: Viktor Lewin <viklewin@shaw.ca>
Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2003 15:18:24 -0600

I am seeking photos of Losice, Poland during the years of 1935 to 1945.
Viktor Lewin < viklewin@shaw.ca >.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Photos of Losice, Poland #general

Alice Josephs
 

You may find something of interest at
http://www.asmallpieceofhistory.co.uk/
on www.historychannel.co.uk

Have a look at the second video recording, Losice Ghetto.

Alice Josephs
England


Subject: Photos of Losice, Poland.
From: Viktor Lewin <viklewin@shaw.ca>
Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2003 15:18:24 -0600

I am seeking photos of Losice, Poland during the years of 1935 to 1945.
Viktor Lewin < viklewin@shaw.ca >.