Date   

New Article in Belarus SIG Newsletter #general

Fran Bock
 

Dear Fellow Genners,

The second part of Julie Bashkin's honors thesis on the Holocaust in Byelorussia
has been posted in the online newsletter of the Belarus SIG:

http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/bnl_index.htm

Look for the conclusion early next month.

Fran Bock, Editor
Belarus SIG Online Newsletter
franbock@...


Philadelphia 1940-1950's - Abraham HOFSTEIN- Jeweler #general

Barry E Chernick
 

I am looking for information about a potential cousin, Abraham HOFSTEIN. He was a
jeweler in Philadelphia for many years. He is last listed in the Philadelphia
phone book in 1953.

The little that I do know. Per census records he arrived in the USA about 1905,
naturalized about 1914. He appears in the 1910 and 1920 Census in Philadelphia
(not in 1930?). He was born about 1885, his wife was Anna and his children were
Ida (b. 1908), Yetta (b. 1912) and Israel(b. 1916).

If anyone has any knowledge of him or his descendents please let me know.
Barry Chernick
Bellevue, WA
CHERNICK-Starokonstantinov, Krasilov, Volocisk, Samchik - Ukraine
MITTLEMAN-Tchan (Teofipol), Satanov - Ukraine
SCHULMAN, SHULMAN-Dolginovo, Minsk - Belarus
HOFSTEIN–Svencionys–Lithuania; Krotoschin–Poland; Dresden-Germany
KARP–Minsk, Logoysk, Pleshchenitsy - Belarus
BERCHANSKY–Bobrynets–Ukraine; Winnipeg-Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Article in Belarus SIG Newsletter #general

Fran Bock
 

Dear Fellow Genners,

The second part of Julie Bashkin's honors thesis on the Holocaust in Byelorussia
has been posted in the online newsletter of the Belarus SIG:

http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/bnl_index.htm

Look for the conclusion early next month.

Fran Bock, Editor
Belarus SIG Online Newsletter
franbock@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Philadelphia 1940-1950's - Abraham HOFSTEIN- Jeweler #general

Barry E Chernick
 

I am looking for information about a potential cousin, Abraham HOFSTEIN. He was a
jeweler in Philadelphia for many years. He is last listed in the Philadelphia
phone book in 1953.

The little that I do know. Per census records he arrived in the USA about 1905,
naturalized about 1914. He appears in the 1910 and 1920 Census in Philadelphia
(not in 1930?). He was born about 1885, his wife was Anna and his children were
Ida (b. 1908), Yetta (b. 1912) and Israel(b. 1916).

If anyone has any knowledge of him or his descendents please let me know.
Barry Chernick
Bellevue, WA
CHERNICK-Starokonstantinov, Krasilov, Volocisk, Samchik - Ukraine
MITTLEMAN-Tchan (Teofipol), Satanov - Ukraine
SCHULMAN, SHULMAN-Dolginovo, Minsk - Belarus
HOFSTEIN–Svencionys–Lithuania; Krotoschin–Poland; Dresden-Germany
KARP–Minsk, Logoysk, Pleshchenitsy - Belarus
BERCHANSKY–Bobrynets–Ukraine; Winnipeg-Canada


Mitchell ROBINSON, Boston - Any Relatives? #general

Reuben Rock <rsrock18@...>
 

Hi

I recently sent a message to JewishGen about Charles and Leon ROBINSON, who were
related to an Annie ROBINSON >from Kelme, Lithuania. I found a letter >from my Aunt,
Gertrude HITTNER, nee RAUCHAS to my father, Lazar ROCK sent in 1934, mentioning a
cousin Mitchell ROBINSON in Boston. In my previous message I wrote that Annie was
related to my gmother Taube Sarah RAUCHAS nee GOD and I was trying to find the
connection between them.

If anyone knew Mitchell ROBINSON or his family, I would greatly appreciate it if
you could give me any information so that I can try trace the family back to
Lithuania.

Thanks
Reuben Rock
Woodbridge, CT
USA


WW I US Military Records #general

Mark Fearer <milehigh@...>
 

Hi Genners,
I've looked thru the JewishGen site, and couldn't find an answer to this: I'm
looking for the U.S. military records of a Jacob FEFERLING, a probable
relationsip, during his service in WW I. I was told by someone that those records
are not yet accessible, does anyone have experience in getting WW I records (not
draft cards)?

Thanks
Mark Fearer
Boulder, CO

Searching for PRAIL of Birzhai, Lithuania; FEARER of Suvenisik,Lithuania;
ZELBOVITZ of Lithuania; GOLDSTEIN, Pultusk, Poland;
FEFERLING, Warsaw, Poland; RAGOVIN, Volozhin, Belarus; PINK/PINKHAUSOVICH,
Ruzhany, Belarus; SMOLENSKY, Latvia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mitchell ROBINSON, Boston - Any Relatives? #general

Reuben Rock <rsrock18@...>
 

Hi

I recently sent a message to JewishGen about Charles and Leon ROBINSON, who were
related to an Annie ROBINSON >from Kelme, Lithuania. I found a letter >from my Aunt,
Gertrude HITTNER, nee RAUCHAS to my father, Lazar ROCK sent in 1934, mentioning a
cousin Mitchell ROBINSON in Boston. In my previous message I wrote that Annie was
related to my gmother Taube Sarah RAUCHAS nee GOD and I was trying to find the
connection between them.

If anyone knew Mitchell ROBINSON or his family, I would greatly appreciate it if
you could give me any information so that I can try trace the family back to
Lithuania.

Thanks
Reuben Rock
Woodbridge, CT
USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen WW I US Military Records #general

Mark Fearer <milehigh@...>
 

Hi Genners,
I've looked thru the JewishGen site, and couldn't find an answer to this: I'm
looking for the U.S. military records of a Jacob FEFERLING, a probable
relationsip, during his service in WW I. I was told by someone that those records
are not yet accessible, does anyone have experience in getting WW I records (not
draft cards)?

Thanks
Mark Fearer
Boulder, CO

Searching for PRAIL of Birzhai, Lithuania; FEARER of Suvenisik,Lithuania;
ZELBOVITZ of Lithuania; GOLDSTEIN, Pultusk, Poland;
FEFERLING, Warsaw, Poland; RAGOVIN, Volozhin, Belarus; PINK/PINKHAUSOVICH,
Ruzhany, Belarus; SMOLENSKY, Latvia


Quellen zur Geschichte der Juden in polnischen Archiven #germany

Julierog <julierog@...>
 

Jan Bousse wrote:
No so long ago, mention had been made of this book by Stefi-Jersch-Wenzel.
She is well known for the previous very useful book about such "Quellen" for
the "neuen Bundesländer", i.e. the former DDR. That first book contained six
parts and has proven for me to be of immense value for my research into
Henry CERF/Hirsch Levi >from Liebenwalde. This new book seems to consist of
only two parts, the first one only having come out yet, as far as I know.
My questions: has anybody yet had a chance to consult this first part? Where
is it available? I can't normally count on finding it here in Belgium, not
even in the UK. I went to consult the previous "Quellen" in the Germania
Judaica library in Cologne, does anyone know if the new one is there
already? Does the fact that this book will contain only two parts, as
opposed to the six parts of the previous one, mean that the amount of
archives and records available is much less great? ==========>
I've used the book a little. Volume 1 covers E. and W. Prussia, Pomerania,
Posen/Bromberg, and Eastern Brandenburg/Neumark--everything except Silesia, which
is the subject of Volume 2. (Just my luck!)

As to the volume of material--hard to say, since one entry can represent a single
page or a thousand pages.

V.1 is in three parts:
--items listed in previous inventories
--items in the Posen archive not previously inventoried
--attempted reconstruction of the Bromberg (Bydgoszcz) Synagogue Archive from
sources in Berlin, Posen, Israel, Moscow, and elsewhere.

Short of buying or borrowing one yourself, you'll have to contact major libraries
near you to see whether they have it on the shelves yet.

Best regards, Roger Lustig -- Princeton, NJ Researching Upper Silesia


German SIG #Germany Quellen zur Geschichte der Juden in polnischen Archiven #germany

Julierog <julierog@...>
 

Jan Bousse wrote:
No so long ago, mention had been made of this book by Stefi-Jersch-Wenzel.
She is well known for the previous very useful book about such "Quellen" for
the "neuen Bundesländer", i.e. the former DDR. That first book contained six
parts and has proven for me to be of immense value for my research into
Henry CERF/Hirsch Levi >from Liebenwalde. This new book seems to consist of
only two parts, the first one only having come out yet, as far as I know.
My questions: has anybody yet had a chance to consult this first part? Where
is it available? I can't normally count on finding it here in Belgium, not
even in the UK. I went to consult the previous "Quellen" in the Germania
Judaica library in Cologne, does anyone know if the new one is there
already? Does the fact that this book will contain only two parts, as
opposed to the six parts of the previous one, mean that the amount of
archives and records available is much less great? ==========>
I've used the book a little. Volume 1 covers E. and W. Prussia, Pomerania,
Posen/Bromberg, and Eastern Brandenburg/Neumark--everything except Silesia, which
is the subject of Volume 2. (Just my luck!)

As to the volume of material--hard to say, since one entry can represent a single
page or a thousand pages.

V.1 is in three parts:
--items listed in previous inventories
--items in the Posen archive not previously inventoried
--attempted reconstruction of the Bromberg (Bydgoszcz) Synagogue Archive from
sources in Berlin, Posen, Israel, Moscow, and elsewhere.

Short of buying or borrowing one yourself, you'll have to contact major libraries
near you to see whether they have it on the shelves yet.

Best regards, Roger Lustig -- Princeton, NJ Researching Upper Silesia


Can a Person who was Imprisoned have been Naturalized? #general

Marilwebb@...
 

I am trying to determine if someone is my great-grandfather or not. (There may be
two people with the same name; or maybe not.) Can a person who was convicted of a
crime and then served time in Sing Sing have come out and then be able to be
naturalized as a US citizen? Does anyone know? This would have been in the 1898 to
1905 period.

(If so, then my great grandfather was in prison since the names match, but then he
was naturalized. So I want to know if this is him.)

Thanks very much.
Marilyn Webb


Looking for E-Mail Address of Ida and Joseph M. Schwarcz #general

Cindy Gallard <cmgcmg@...>
 

Can anyone help with the e-mail address of Ida and Joseph Schwarcz? The Schwarczs
live in Israel. The address I had been using, which is the same one registered
with FTJP, is no longer valid. Your help is appreciated.

Cindy Gallard
Denver, CO
MODERATOR NOTE: Non-working email addresses should also be reported to
LostNFound@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Can a Person who was Imprisoned have been Naturalized? #general

Marilwebb@...
 

I am trying to determine if someone is my great-grandfather or not. (There may be
two people with the same name; or maybe not.) Can a person who was convicted of a
crime and then served time in Sing Sing have come out and then be able to be
naturalized as a US citizen? Does anyone know? This would have been in the 1898 to
1905 period.

(If so, then my great grandfather was in prison since the names match, but then he
was naturalized. So I want to know if this is him.)

Thanks very much.
Marilyn Webb


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for E-Mail Address of Ida and Joseph M. Schwarcz #general

Cindy Gallard <cmgcmg@...>
 

Can anyone help with the e-mail address of Ida and Joseph Schwarcz? The Schwarczs
live in Israel. The address I had been using, which is the same one registered
with FTJP, is no longer valid. Your help is appreciated.

Cindy Gallard
Denver, CO
MODERATOR NOTE: Non-working email addresses should also be reported to
LostNFound@...


Re: Before and After Name Adoptions #general

Ury Link
 

Dear Genners,
Monica Leonards asked the next qustion:

>>I'm wondering how people who lived and died before the adoption of surnames are
listed in the European vital records after the adoption of surnames. Let me be
more clear. Suppose you have a woman born before surname adoption in that area,
who married. Some time after her marriage, Jews were required to adopt surnames,
and her surname became that of her husband. Let us assume that at the time of
surname adoption, both her parents were dead. When this woman died, how would her
"maiden name" or parents names be indicated on the death record? When her children
married, how would her "maiden name" be entered?(I know that not all vital records
asked for the maiden name of a deceased woman, or the maiden name of bride/groom
mothers, but some did.)>>>

You question is a correct question, but you give in you letter the answer also,
"I know that not all vital records asked for the maiden name of a deceased woman,
or the maiden name of bride/groom mothers,""

This is one of the biggest problem of a genealogist, to find you family before
the adopting of the family names. In this period of the adopting of family names
in Europe begin of the 19 century we have to deal with another system that we
have today. I have a little experience with documents >from this period and I know
that in the most of the case you can not find the maiden name of a women , the
only think that we know is the name and the name of the father and if she was
married the name of her husband. You have also deal with different country and
different low system. it is dependent in which area you seek you family in
Western Europe or in East or South Europe . But if you have the time and the
patience for research you can find a lot about women names also before the
adoption of family names.One of the best ways is to find the marriage books of a
town that you family lived in (if the have it) look on the name that you seek and
find the name of her mother and father and look also on the names of the witness,
perhaps you find a brother of the bride as a witness. Through this way you can
find what was the family name of the masculine part of the women family that you
seek and look to what name the change if you have documents about it. I promise
you it is not easy but you can have success with this way. In the Jewish burial
books normal you don't find a maiden name of a women in the begin of the 19
century or before.
Best regards
Ury Link
Amsterdam
Holland


Re: Can a Person who was Imprisoned have been Naturalized? #general

L. Altman <altmanlh@...>
 

It is possible. There would have been no way to easily verify that he was in
prison. All he needed were 2 witnesses to state that he had been living in the US
for the required number of years and that he was a good ctizen. It is very
possible that he had 2 friends who would do that for him. Sing-Sing is a minimal
security prison. You did not say why your grandfather would have been there, but
it would not have been for a dangerous felony like 1st degree murder or armed
robbery. One of my family memebers was there for violating a court order.

Linda Altman
Raleigh NC
I am trying to determine if someone is my great-grandfather or not. (There
may be two people with the same name; or maybe not.) Can a person who was
convicted of a crime and then served time in Sing Sing have come out and then be
able to be naturalized as a US citizen? Does anyone know? This would have been in
the 1898 to 1905 period.
Thanks very much.
Marilyn Webb>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:Before and After Name Adoptions #general

Ury Link
 

Dear Genners,
Monica Leonards asked the next qustion:

>>I'm wondering how people who lived and died before the adoption of surnames are
listed in the European vital records after the adoption of surnames. Let me be
more clear. Suppose you have a woman born before surname adoption in that area,
who married. Some time after her marriage, Jews were required to adopt surnames,
and her surname became that of her husband. Let us assume that at the time of
surname adoption, both her parents were dead. When this woman died, how would her
"maiden name" or parents names be indicated on the death record? When her children
married, how would her "maiden name" be entered?(I know that not all vital records
asked for the maiden name of a deceased woman, or the maiden name of bride/groom
mothers, but some did.)>>>

You question is a correct question, but you give in you letter the answer also,
"I know that not all vital records asked for the maiden name of a deceased woman,
or the maiden name of bride/groom mothers,""

This is one of the biggest problem of a genealogist, to find you family before
the adopting of the family names. In this period of the adopting of family names
in Europe begin of the 19 century we have to deal with another system that we
have today. I have a little experience with documents >from this period and I know
that in the most of the case you can not find the maiden name of a women , the
only think that we know is the name and the name of the father and if she was
married the name of her husband. You have also deal with different country and
different low system. it is dependent in which area you seek you family in
Western Europe or in East or South Europe . But if you have the time and the
patience for research you can find a lot about women names also before the
adoption of family names.One of the best ways is to find the marriage books of a
town that you family lived in (if the have it) look on the name that you seek and
find the name of her mother and father and look also on the names of the witness,
perhaps you find a brother of the bride as a witness. Through this way you can
find what was the family name of the masculine part of the women family that you
seek and look to what name the change if you have documents about it. I promise
you it is not easy but you can have success with this way. In the Jewish burial
books normal you don't find a maiden name of a women in the begin of the 19
century or before.
Best regards
Ury Link
Amsterdam
Holland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Can a Person who was Imprisoned have been Naturalized? #general

L. Altman <altmanlh@...>
 

It is possible. There would have been no way to easily verify that he was in
prison. All he needed were 2 witnesses to state that he had been living in the US
for the required number of years and that he was a good ctizen. It is very
possible that he had 2 friends who would do that for him. Sing-Sing is a minimal
security prison. You did not say why your grandfather would have been there, but
it would not have been for a dangerous felony like 1st degree murder or armed
robbery. One of my family memebers was there for violating a court order.

Linda Altman
Raleigh NC
I am trying to determine if someone is my great-grandfather or not. (There
may be two people with the same name; or maybe not.) Can a person who was
convicted of a crime and then served time in Sing Sing have come out and then be
able to be naturalized as a US citizen? Does anyone know? This would have been in
the 1898 to 1905 period.
Thanks very much.
Marilyn Webb>


Re: ROZENTALs or ROSENTHALs from Warka. #general

Marilyn Hoffman <qofhearts2002@...>
 

I am seeking any information on the ROZENTAL or ROSENTHAL family >from Warka,
Poland. My Grandparents were Szmul and Sura ROZENTAL and their children were
Shlomo, Szrul or Israel, Frajda or Freida and Ruth ROZENTAL. There was a sister
who died >from tuberculosis before the war. My Uncle Szrul went to Israel after the
war and my Father Shlomo went to America. We do not know what happened to his
sisters and I believe his parents Szmul and Sura died in the Warsaw Ghetto. My
Grandfather Szmul made the tops of shoes and is listed in the Warka business
directory.
Thank you,
Marilyn Hoffman
qofhearts2002@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: ROZENTALs or ROSENTHALs from Warka. #general

Marilyn Hoffman <qofhearts2002@...>
 

I am seeking any information on the ROZENTAL or ROSENTHAL family >from Warka,
Poland. My Grandparents were Szmul and Sura ROZENTAL and their children were
Shlomo, Szrul or Israel, Frajda or Freida and Ruth ROZENTAL. There was a sister
who died >from tuberculosis before the war. My Uncle Szrul went to Israel after the
war and my Father Shlomo went to America. We do not know what happened to his
sisters and I believe his parents Szmul and Sura died in the Warsaw Ghetto. My
Grandfather Szmul made the tops of shoes and is listed in the Warka business
directory.
Thank you,
Marilyn Hoffman
qofhearts2002@...