Date   

Ukraine SIG #Ukraine FHL ROLL FILM #ukraine

BERNARD SIVAK <gasdoc@...>
 

Group:
Do we have a similar DB as JRI-Poland ? I have the Family History
Library film roll for Cherkasy 1850-1860 written in archaic cyrillic
script, but impossible to read.
It has births, deaths, and divorces duplicated in Hebrew or Yiddish on
adjoining pages.


Bernard Sivak (signed by Moderator)


FHL ROLL FILM #ukraine

BERNARD SIVAK <gasdoc@...>
 

Group:
Do we have a similar DB as JRI-Poland ? I have the Family History
Library film roll for Cherkasy 1850-1860 written in archaic cyrillic
script, but impossible to read.
It has births, deaths, and divorces duplicated in Hebrew or Yiddish on
adjoining pages.


Bernard Sivak (signed by Moderator)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: 19th Century Podolia - Sephardic Prayer book? #ukraine

Bronstein Family <sygaa@...>
 

When the Hasidic Movement began, one of their innovations was the
adaptation of the Sefardic prayerbook for their use.
Thus, what is known as Nusach Sefard came about. It is not the liturgical
pattern of the Spanish Sefardim but a synthesis of the Ashkenazic prayer style
(Nusach) and that of the Sefardim. It was greatly influenced by what is known
as Nusach Ari (followed today by the Lubavitch Hasidim). Thus, many immigrant
shuls in the early 20th century had the words Nusach Sefard attached to them,
indicating their Hasidic origins. Nusach Sefard was the most widespread
liturgical style in the area where Hasidism predominated. It did not 'catch
on' in Germany, parts of Poland & Lithuania where the Mitnagdim (opponents of
Hasidism) predominated. Interestingly, in Israel today, Nusach Sefard is very
popular as it serves as a bridge between the Ashkenazic Nusach and that of
those who come >from North Africa, etc.
Shabbat Shalom -

Shalom Bronstein, Jerusalem
Researching - SHULMAN/SHILLMAN - Panevezys; BLOCH - Krekanava (Lithuania);
the DIMMERMAN, BECK & GELMAN families >from Ostrog & vicinity (Volhyn);
BRONSTEIN, BROWNSTEIN, RUNSTEIN, ROCHMANN - Kishinev (Moldava); GOLDSTEIN -
Iasi (Romania) - those who came to America all settled in Philadelphia;
GOLDZWEIG & LETZTER - Cholojow/Uzlovoye (Eastern Galicia/Ukraine)


From: Michelle Frager [mailto:lulu_brooks@...] writes in part:

Does anyone know if there were Sephardim, or Sephard-descended
families in southwestern Podolia? Apparently my family used a
Sephardic prayer book in Snitkov at least around 1900 to WW I years.
I haven't yet come across any info in English to suggest a migration
pattern.


Re: 19th Century Podolia - Sephardic Prayer book? #ukraine

Bronstein Family <sygaa@...>
 

When the Hasidic Movement began, one of their innovations was the
adaptation of the Sefardic prayerbook for their use.
Thus, what is known as Nusach Sefard came about. It is not the liturgical
pattern of the Spanish Sefardim but a synthesis of the Ashkenazic prayer style
(Nusach) and that of the Sefardim. It was greatly influenced by what is known
as Nusach Ari (followed today by the Lubavitch Hasidim). Thus, many immigrant
shuls in the early 20th century had the words Nusach Sefard attached to them,
indicating their Hasidic origins. Nusach Sefard was the most widespread
liturgical style in the area where Hasidism predominated. It did not 'catch
on' in Germany, parts of Poland & Lithuania where the Mitnagdim (opponents of
Hasidism) predominated. Interestingly, in Israel today, Nusach Sefard is very
popular as it serves as a bridge between the Ashkenazic Nusach and that of
those who come >from North Africa, etc.
Shabbat Shalom -

Shalom Bronstein, Jerusalem
Researching - SHULMAN/SHILLMAN - Panevezys; BLOCH - Krekanava (Lithuania);
the DIMMERMAN, BECK & GELMAN families >from Ostrog & vicinity (Volhyn);
BRONSTEIN, BROWNSTEIN, RUNSTEIN, ROCHMANN - Kishinev (Moldava); GOLDSTEIN -
Iasi (Romania) - those who came to America all settled in Philadelphia;
GOLDZWEIG & LETZTER - Cholojow/Uzlovoye (Eastern Galicia/Ukraine)


From: Michelle Frager [mailto:lulu_brooks@...] writes in part:

Does anyone know if there were Sephardim, or Sephard-descended
families in southwestern Podolia? Apparently my family used a
Sephardic prayer book in Snitkov at least around 1900 to WW I years.
I haven't yet come across any info in English to suggest a migration
pattern.


Romania SIG #Romania Pinkas HaKehillot Romania-Table of Contents needed #romania

Joyce Field
 

In the Yizkor Book Translation Project we have only a few chapters of
the Pinkas HaKehillot volumes on Romania translated at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania.html.
Actually, two chapters >from volume 1 and four chapters >from volume 2
are online. It would be very helpful if someone would create a table
of contents for these two volumes just as Ada Holtzman did for the
seven volumes on Poland and the one volume on Slovakia.

You would have to work >from the Pinkasim in a nearby library,
needless to say, unless you own a copy or know someone who does.
However, this effort would result in an extremely worthwhile project
for someone who can translate Hebrew as having the table of contents
online would certainly stimulate interest in getting more chapters
translated. And that helps us all.

Please contact me privately if you are interested in helping.

Many thanks.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Pinkas HaKehillot Romania-Table of Contents needed #romania

Joyce Field
 

In the Yizkor Book Translation Project we have only a few chapters of
the Pinkas HaKehillot volumes on Romania translated at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania.html.
Actually, two chapters >from volume 1 and four chapters >from volume 2
are online. It would be very helpful if someone would create a table
of contents for these two volumes just as Ada Holtzman did for the
seven volumes on Poland and the one volume on Slovakia.

You would have to work >from the Pinkasim in a nearby library,
needless to say, unless you own a copy or know someone who does.
However, this effort would result in an extremely worthwhile project
for someone who can translate Hebrew as having the table of contents
online would certainly stimulate interest in getting more chapters
translated. And that helps us all.

Please contact me privately if you are interested in helping.

Many thanks.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic New Procedures to Search the JGFF #rabbinic

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

Dear JewishGen'rs,

Within the next few days, you will notice a change when you visit
the JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF). We are now implementing a
registration screen similar to that which has been in use for
searching the Family Tree of the Jewish People (FTJP) for the last
few weeks.

This change is part of a major project which has been under
development for nearly a year called "CURE" -- the Central User
Registration Environment. The intent is to cure many of the ongoing
challenges JewishGen has faced due to the phenemonal growth we
continue to experience. These challenges include forgotten
passwords, lost researchers, and duplicate registrations. Most
critical is the increasing need for tightened security which will
result in greater protection for the data you provide.

CURE will integrate all the separate registration processes for the
JGFF, the FTJP, all Lyris Mailing Lists, ViewMate, ShtetlSchleppers,
JewishGen-erosity, the JewishGen Mall, the Guest Book, and the
interactive databases. CURE will also serve to integrate the
systems used for JewishGen's administrative functions. Over the
coming months, all of these interfaces will be replaced with a
single central logon and registration point -- CURE.

Here's how it works. When accessing the JGFF to perform a search,
you will now be asked to logon using either your e-mail address or
your JewishGen ID Number (JGID, formerly called the "JGFF Researcher
Code"), and your Password. If you have forgotten either, they can
now be retrieved automatically by using
< http://www.jewishgen.org/CURE/password.html >.

What CURE will do for JewishGen is enable us to better manage all
of our programs, assist in our planning process and provide the
information we need to better serve our constituents.

In addition to greater security for your contact information, your
benefits will include not having to worry about updating your
contact information individually in each program or mailing list,
but to update it in one place and one place only -- CURE. We expect
this "one stop update" to be a great convenience and believe it will
also result in far fewer "lost researchers" who forget to change
their e-mail address in each and every place it is listed on
JewishGen.

The new CURE logon screen will apply to the JewishGen Family Finder
(JGFF) within the next few days. For complete information about the
JGFF, see the "JGFF FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions about the JGFF"
at < http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html >.

In the coming weeks, this logon screen will also be implemented
across other JewishGen programs and databases and we will be posting
notices accordingly in each of our mailing lists.

We welcome your feedback and comments on the new system so that we
can continue to make this process easier!

Susan E. King
Managing Director


New Procedures to Search the JGFF #rabbinic

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

Dear JewishGen'rs,

Within the next few days, you will notice a change when you visit
the JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF). We are now implementing a
registration screen similar to that which has been in use for
searching the Family Tree of the Jewish People (FTJP) for the last
few weeks.

This change is part of a major project which has been under
development for nearly a year called "CURE" -- the Central User
Registration Environment. The intent is to cure many of the ongoing
challenges JewishGen has faced due to the phenemonal growth we
continue to experience. These challenges include forgotten
passwords, lost researchers, and duplicate registrations. Most
critical is the increasing need for tightened security which will
result in greater protection for the data you provide.

CURE will integrate all the separate registration processes for the
JGFF, the FTJP, all Lyris Mailing Lists, ViewMate, ShtetlSchleppers,
JewishGen-erosity, the JewishGen Mall, the Guest Book, and the
interactive databases. CURE will also serve to integrate the
systems used for JewishGen's administrative functions. Over the
coming months, all of these interfaces will be replaced with a
single central logon and registration point -- CURE.

Here's how it works. When accessing the JGFF to perform a search,
you will now be asked to logon using either your e-mail address or
your JewishGen ID Number (JGID, formerly called the "JGFF Researcher
Code"), and your Password. If you have forgotten either, they can
now be retrieved automatically by using
< http://www.jewishgen.org/CURE/password.html >.

What CURE will do for JewishGen is enable us to better manage all
of our programs, assist in our planning process and provide the
information we need to better serve our constituents.

In addition to greater security for your contact information, your
benefits will include not having to worry about updating your
contact information individually in each program or mailing list,
but to update it in one place and one place only -- CURE. We expect
this "one stop update" to be a great convenience and believe it will
also result in far fewer "lost researchers" who forget to change
their e-mail address in each and every place it is listed on
JewishGen.

The new CURE logon screen will apply to the JewishGen Family Finder
(JGFF) within the next few days. For complete information about the
JGFF, see the "JGFF FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions about the JGFF"
at < http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html >.

In the coming weeks, this logon screen will also be implemented
across other JewishGen programs and databases and we will be posting
notices accordingly in each of our mailing lists.

We welcome your feedback and comments on the new system so that we
can continue to make this process easier!

Susan E. King
Managing Director


New Procedures to Search the JGFF #dna

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

Within the next few days, you will notice a change when you visit
the JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF). We are now implementing a
registration screen similar to that which has been in use for
searching the Family Tree of the Jewish People (FTJP) for the last
few weeks.

This change is part of a major project which has been under
development for nearly a year called "CURE" -- the Central User
Registration Environment. The intent is to cure many of the ongoing
challenges JewishGen has faced due to the phenemonal growth we
continue to experience. These challenges include forgotten
passwords, lost researchers, and duplicate registrations. Most
critical is the increasing need for tightened security which will
result in greater protection for the data you provide.

CURE will integrate all the separate registration processes for the
JGFF, the FTJP, all Lyris Mailing Lists, ViewMate, ShtetlSchleppers,
JewishGen-erosity, the JewishGen Mall, the Guest Book, and the
interactive databases. CURE will also serve to integrate the
systems used for JewishGen's administrative functions. Over the
coming months, all of these interfaces will be replaced with a
single central logon and registration point -- CURE.

Here's how it works. When accessing the JGFF to perform a search,
you will now be asked to logon using either your e-mail address or
your JewishGen ID Number (JGID, formerly called the "JGFF Researcher
Code"), and your Password. If you have forgotten either, they can
now be retrieved automatically by using
< http://www.jewishgen.org/CURE/password.html >.

What CURE will do for JewishGen is enable us to better manage all
of our programs, assist in our planning process and provide the
information we need to better serve our constituents.

In addition to greater security for your contact information, your
benefits will include not having to worry about updating your
contact information individually in each program or mailing list,
but to update it in one place and one place only -- CURE. We expect
this "one stop update" to be a great convenience and believe it will
also result in far fewer "lost researchers" who forget to change
their e-mail address in each and every place it is listed on
JewishGen.

The new CURE logon screen will apply to the JewishGen Family Finder
(JGFF) within the next few days. For complete information about the
JGFF, see the "JGFF FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions about the JGFF"
at < http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html >.

In the coming weeks, this logon screen will also be implemented
across other JewishGen programs and databases and we will be posting
notices accordingly in each of our mailing lists.

We welcome your feedback and comments on the new system so that we
can continue to make this process easier!

Susan E. King
Managing Director


DNA Research #DNA New Procedures to Search the JGFF #dna

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

Within the next few days, you will notice a change when you visit
the JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF). We are now implementing a
registration screen similar to that which has been in use for
searching the Family Tree of the Jewish People (FTJP) for the last
few weeks.

This change is part of a major project which has been under
development for nearly a year called "CURE" -- the Central User
Registration Environment. The intent is to cure many of the ongoing
challenges JewishGen has faced due to the phenemonal growth we
continue to experience. These challenges include forgotten
passwords, lost researchers, and duplicate registrations. Most
critical is the increasing need for tightened security which will
result in greater protection for the data you provide.

CURE will integrate all the separate registration processes for the
JGFF, the FTJP, all Lyris Mailing Lists, ViewMate, ShtetlSchleppers,
JewishGen-erosity, the JewishGen Mall, the Guest Book, and the
interactive databases. CURE will also serve to integrate the
systems used for JewishGen's administrative functions. Over the
coming months, all of these interfaces will be replaced with a
single central logon and registration point -- CURE.

Here's how it works. When accessing the JGFF to perform a search,
you will now be asked to logon using either your e-mail address or
your JewishGen ID Number (JGID, formerly called the "JGFF Researcher
Code"), and your Password. If you have forgotten either, they can
now be retrieved automatically by using
< http://www.jewishgen.org/CURE/password.html >.

What CURE will do for JewishGen is enable us to better manage all
of our programs, assist in our planning process and provide the
information we need to better serve our constituents.

In addition to greater security for your contact information, your
benefits will include not having to worry about updating your
contact information individually in each program or mailing list,
but to update it in one place and one place only -- CURE. We expect
this "one stop update" to be a great convenience and believe it will
also result in far fewer "lost researchers" who forget to change
their e-mail address in each and every place it is listed on
JewishGen.

The new CURE logon screen will apply to the JewishGen Family Finder
(JGFF) within the next few days. For complete information about the
JGFF, see the "JGFF FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions about the JGFF"
at < http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html >.

In the coming weeks, this logon screen will also be implemented
across other JewishGen programs and databases and we will be posting
notices accordingly in each of our mailing lists.

We welcome your feedback and comments on the new system so that we
can continue to make this process easier!

Susan E. King
Managing Director


#Ciechanow #Poland New Procedures to Search the JGFF #ciechanow #poland

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

Within the next few days, you will notice a change when you visit the
JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF). We are now implementing a registration
screen similar to that which has been in use for searching the Family
Tree of the Jewish People (FTJP) for the last few weeks.

This change is part of a major project which has been under development
for nearly a year called "CURE" -- the Central User Registration
Environment. The intent is to cure many of the ongoing challenges
JewishGen has faced due to the phenemonal growth we continue to
experience. These challenges include forgotten passwords, lost
researchers, and duplicate registrations. Most critical is the
increasing need for tightened security which will result in greater
protection for the data you provide.

CURE will integrate all the separate registration processes for the
JGFF, the FTJP, all Lyris Mailing Lists, ViewMate, ShtetlSchleppers,
JewishGen-erosity, the JewishGen Mall, the Guest Book, and the
interactive databases. CURE will also serve to integrate the systems
used for JewishGen's administrative functions. Over the coming months,
all of these interfaces will be replaced with a single central logon and
registration point -- CURE.

Here's how it works. When accessing the JGFF to perform a search, you
will now be asked to logon using either your e-mail address or your
JewishGen ID Number (JGID, formerly called the "JGFF Researcher Code"),
and your Password. If you have forgotten either, they can now be
retrieved automatically by using <
http://www.jewishgen.org/CURE/password.html >.

What CURE will do for JewishGen is enable us to better manage all of our
programs, assist in our planning process and provide the information we
need to better serve our constituents.

In addition to greater security for your contact information, your
benefits will include not having to worry about updating your contact
information individually in each program or mailing list, but to update
it in one place and one place only -- CURE. We expect this "one stop
update" to be a great convenience and believe it will also result in far
fewer "lost researchers" who forget to change their e-mail address in
each and every place it is listed on JewishGen.

The new CURE logon screen will apply to the JewishGen Family
Finder(JGFF) within the next few days. For complete information about
the JGFF, see the "JGFF FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions about the JGFF"
at < http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html >.

In the coming weeks, this logon screen will also be implemented across
other JewishGen programs and databases and we will be posting notices
accordingly in each of our mailing lists. =20

We welcome your feedback and comments on the new system so that we can
continue to make this process easier!

Susan E. King
Managing Director


New Procedures to Search the JGFF #ciechanow #poland

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

Within the next few days, you will notice a change when you visit the
JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF). We are now implementing a registration
screen similar to that which has been in use for searching the Family
Tree of the Jewish People (FTJP) for the last few weeks.

This change is part of a major project which has been under development
for nearly a year called "CURE" -- the Central User Registration
Environment. The intent is to cure many of the ongoing challenges
JewishGen has faced due to the phenemonal growth we continue to
experience. These challenges include forgotten passwords, lost
researchers, and duplicate registrations. Most critical is the
increasing need for tightened security which will result in greater
protection for the data you provide.

CURE will integrate all the separate registration processes for the
JGFF, the FTJP, all Lyris Mailing Lists, ViewMate, ShtetlSchleppers,
JewishGen-erosity, the JewishGen Mall, the Guest Book, and the
interactive databases. CURE will also serve to integrate the systems
used for JewishGen's administrative functions. Over the coming months,
all of these interfaces will be replaced with a single central logon and
registration point -- CURE.

Here's how it works. When accessing the JGFF to perform a search, you
will now be asked to logon using either your e-mail address or your
JewishGen ID Number (JGID, formerly called the "JGFF Researcher Code"),
and your Password. If you have forgotten either, they can now be
retrieved automatically by using <
http://www.jewishgen.org/CURE/password.html >.

What CURE will do for JewishGen is enable us to better manage all of our
programs, assist in our planning process and provide the information we
need to better serve our constituents.

In addition to greater security for your contact information, your
benefits will include not having to worry about updating your contact
information individually in each program or mailing list, but to update
it in one place and one place only -- CURE. We expect this "one stop
update" to be a great convenience and believe it will also result in far
fewer "lost researchers" who forget to change their e-mail address in
each and every place it is listed on JewishGen.

The new CURE logon screen will apply to the JewishGen Family
Finder(JGFF) within the next few days. For complete information about
the JGFF, see the "JGFF FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions about the JGFF"
at < http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/jgff-faq.html >.

In the coming weeks, this logon screen will also be implemented across
other JewishGen programs and databases and we will be posting notices
accordingly in each of our mailing lists. =20

We welcome your feedback and comments on the new system so that we can
continue to make this process easier!

Susan E. King
Managing Director


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "Forged" signatures in birth records? #general

Sue Clamp <clamp@...>
 

The translation of a collection of birth records >from Serock have revealed
that the documents record the births of children of two different couples
- Itsek and Etka ROZENBERG, and Iosek and Sura Ryfka ROZENBERG. The
records were written sequentially on two dates in 1875 and 1878. All the
records >from the 1875 group appear to have been signed by the same person,
and likewise the records >from 1878, albeit by a different hand. It seems
that the signatures on at least some, if not all, of the records have
therefore been signed on behalf of the father. Does anyone know if this
was common practice?
The signatures can be seen at
http://www.clamp.dsl.pipex.com/birthrecs/sigs.html

Sue

--
Cambridgeshire, UK.
Researching: ROSENBERG/ROZENBERG, SKOWRONEK, HERSZENKRUG,
KRIEGSMANN/KRIGSMAN/KRYKSMAN, CHENCINER and DRUSZN/DROZEN/DROSSEN, Warsaw.
Getting round to (eventually!): BLEETMAN, Odessa, GOLDSTEIN and SALAMONSKI.

Remove .cut.invalid >from email address to reply.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for BERNSTEIN/Roxbury Mass #general

stephen field
 

I am searching for Michael BERNSTEIN,
his sister Leah, and mother Ann, that
lived on Walnut Avenue, Roxbury Mass.,
during the 40's & 50's.
Relativly speaking, I lost track of
them.
I am Stephen Field
stemarfie@...


Searching for BERNSTEIN/Roxbury Mass #general

stephen field
 

I am searching for Michael BERNSTEIN,
his sister Leah, and mother Ann, that
lived on Walnut Avenue, Roxbury Mass.,
during the 40's & 50's.
Relativly speaking, I lost track of
them.
I am Stephen Field
stemarfie@...


"Forged" signatures in birth records? #general

Sue Clamp <clamp@...>
 

The translation of a collection of birth records >from Serock have revealed
that the documents record the births of children of two different couples
- Itsek and Etka ROZENBERG, and Iosek and Sura Ryfka ROZENBERG. The
records were written sequentially on two dates in 1875 and 1878. All the
records >from the 1875 group appear to have been signed by the same person,
and likewise the records >from 1878, albeit by a different hand. It seems
that the signatures on at least some, if not all, of the records have
therefore been signed on behalf of the father. Does anyone know if this
was common practice?
The signatures can be seen at
http://www.clamp.dsl.pipex.com/birthrecs/sigs.html

Sue

--
Cambridgeshire, UK.
Researching: ROSENBERG/ROZENBERG, SKOWRONEK, HERSZENKRUG,
KRIEGSMANN/KRIGSMAN/KRYKSMAN, CHENCINER and DRUSZN/DROZEN/DROSSEN, Warsaw.
Getting round to (eventually!): BLEETMAN, Odessa, GOLDSTEIN and SALAMONSKI.

Remove .cut.invalid >from email address to reply.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NUSBAUM family #general

Sara Lynns
 

Anyone related to Nathan or Sam Nusbaum (father/son)
New York
Nathan born appx. 1869
Sam born appx. 1900

thanks
Jacqueline Lerner-Aderman

please reply to saralynn7@...


NUSBAUM family #general

Sara Lynns
 

Anyone related to Nathan or Sam Nusbaum (father/son)
New York
Nathan born appx. 1869
Sam born appx. 1900

thanks
Jacqueline Lerner-Aderman

please reply to saralynn7@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ALTROWITZ #general

Jerry Segal <jsegal1269@...>
 

anyone know persons with last name of ALTROWITZ - >from Zvanitz, Podolsk
(Russia or Ukraine)? Email me please


ALTROWITZ #general

Jerry Segal <jsegal1269@...>
 

anyone know persons with last name of ALTROWITZ - >from Zvanitz, Podolsk
(Russia or Ukraine)? Email me please