Date   

Life affirming (amuletic) names #lithuania

Jrbaston
 

Sonia Kovitz asks whether there are life-affirming names
for women, just as "Chaim" is for men. These are called
"amuletic" names, which function as an "amulet" to
protect the wearer.

I had several experiences with amuletic names for women
in my family.

Gnesse" or "Gnesia" or "Nesha" can often be an amuletic
name, given when a young person is sick, to fool the
angel of death. It is a derivative of "Genana," which,
according to Rabbi Shmuel Gorr in his book, "Jewish
Personal Names," means "old woman." Thus, if a young
woman was sick, she might be renamed "Gnessa" or have
"Nesia" added to her name to fool the angel of death into
believing she was an old woman and thus not the one
he was seeking.

I had always believed my great-grandmother's name was
Haya Nesha; it said so on her papers and her tombstone.
Imagine my surprise when I found vital records that
referred to her as Fruma Feiga. She must have been ill
as a young woman and been transformed with a double
amuletic name -- Haya (Chaya) for "life" and "Nesha"
to fool the angel of death into believing she was an
old woman.

My father's sister was known by her amuletic name Altke
(old woman) even though on her son's birth record she was
listed as Chasia. For a man, that would be Alter (old).

Names such as Leyb or Aryeh or Zeev that denote strong
animals such as a lion or a wolf can also be given as
amuletic names. Of course, many Chayas and Chaims and
Zeevs and Leybs were given those names at birth, and
named after an ancestor.

But the presence of an amuletic name can help explain a
discrepancy between two vital records, or between
written record and oral tradition.

Judy Baston
Jrbaston@...
San Francisco, CA, USA


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Life affirming (amuletic) names #lithuania

Jrbaston
 

Sonia Kovitz asks whether there are life-affirming names
for women, just as "Chaim" is for men. These are called
"amuletic" names, which function as an "amulet" to
protect the wearer.

I had several experiences with amuletic names for women
in my family.

Gnesse" or "Gnesia" or "Nesha" can often be an amuletic
name, given when a young person is sick, to fool the
angel of death. It is a derivative of "Genana," which,
according to Rabbi Shmuel Gorr in his book, "Jewish
Personal Names," means "old woman." Thus, if a young
woman was sick, she might be renamed "Gnessa" or have
"Nesia" added to her name to fool the angel of death into
believing she was an old woman and thus not the one
he was seeking.

I had always believed my great-grandmother's name was
Haya Nesha; it said so on her papers and her tombstone.
Imagine my surprise when I found vital records that
referred to her as Fruma Feiga. She must have been ill
as a young woman and been transformed with a double
amuletic name -- Haya (Chaya) for "life" and "Nesha"
to fool the angel of death into believing she was an
old woman.

My father's sister was known by her amuletic name Altke
(old woman) even though on her son's birth record she was
listed as Chasia. For a man, that would be Alter (old).

Names such as Leyb or Aryeh or Zeev that denote strong
animals such as a lion or a wolf can also be given as
amuletic names. Of course, many Chayas and Chaims and
Zeevs and Leybs were given those names at birth, and
named after an ancestor.

But the presence of an amuletic name can help explain a
discrepancy between two vital records, or between
written record and oral tradition.

Judy Baston
Jrbaston@...
San Francisco, CA, USA


Help needed with translation of Birth certificates. #poland

apexsa@...
 

Sunday, July 18, 2004

Dear Listers

I need help with the translation of 3 with certificated written in Polish
from Warsaw 1887 and 1893. I do not have a scanner at my disposal at the
moment so I cannot post them to the viewmate site.

Would anybody be willing to let me fax them?

I can then receive an email or scan with back to me.

If any one is willing to help me this way, please email me with your fax
details including area codes and I will fax the certificates.

Many thanks

Shana Mink Katz

Johannesburg, South Africa

Email: katzfamily@... or <mailto:apexsa@...>
shanak@... or apexsa@...

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately


JRI Poland #Poland Help needed with translation of Birth certificates. #poland

apexsa@...
 

Sunday, July 18, 2004

Dear Listers

I need help with the translation of 3 with certificated written in Polish
from Warsaw 1887 and 1893. I do not have a scanner at my disposal at the
moment so I cannot post them to the viewmate site.

Would anybody be willing to let me fax them?

I can then receive an email or scan with back to me.

If any one is willing to help me this way, please email me with your fax
details including area codes and I will fax the certificates.

Many thanks

Shana Mink Katz

Johannesburg, South Africa

Email: katzfamily@... or <mailto:apexsa@...>
shanak@... or apexsa@...

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately


FW: beginning search #poland

mjlaskin <mjlaskin@...>
 

I am looking for my family roots on my fathers side. The family lived in or
around Bialystok until around 1900 when they emigrated to the United States.
The family name was Lizkovski. I am guessing at the spelling. There were
several brothers who left at the same time. My grandfather was Mordechai and
was married to Rachel. After arriving in the US, the name was changed to
Laskin, by my uncle, the oldest child. The other brothers moved to Rochester
New York and changed the name to Lasken.

Where do I go >from here? I'd appreciate some advice.

Thanks

Melvin Laskin


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland FW: beginning search #poland

mjlaskin <mjlaskin@...>
 

I am looking for my family roots on my fathers side. The family lived in or
around Bialystok until around 1900 when they emigrated to the United States.
The family name was Lizkovski. I am guessing at the spelling. There were
several brothers who left at the same time. My grandfather was Mordechai and
was married to Rachel. After arriving in the US, the name was changed to
Laskin, by my uncle, the oldest child. The other brothers moved to Rochester
New York and changed the name to Lasken.

Where do I go >from here? I'd appreciate some advice.

Thanks

Melvin Laskin


family roots in Bialystok #poland

uri veler <uri_veler@...>
 

B"H 1 Av 5764
Dear One and All:

I am looking for information regarding the Weller, Hepner, Ronyes,
Halperin families >from Bialystok.

Weller Yehiel and Lea, Weller Yaakov Shelomo. Weller Avraham Yitzhak.

Hepner Joel and Rivka Lea. Hepner Meir.

Ronyes Malca and Eliezer >from Mostova street, Bialystok.

Halperin Reytza and Mordechai. They had 2 sons, Joel and Yitzhak.
They lived in Kopitzka street.

Any information on these families would be much appreciated.

Thank you,

Uri Weller
Jerusalem


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland family roots in Bialystok #poland

uri veler <uri_veler@...>
 

B"H 1 Av 5764
Dear One and All:

I am looking for information regarding the Weller, Hepner, Ronyes,
Halperin families >from Bialystok.

Weller Yehiel and Lea, Weller Yaakov Shelomo. Weller Avraham Yitzhak.

Hepner Joel and Rivka Lea. Hepner Meir.

Ronyes Malca and Eliezer >from Mostova street, Bialystok.

Halperin Reytza and Mordechai. They had 2 sons, Joel and Yitzhak.
They lived in Kopitzka street.

Any information on these families would be much appreciated.

Thank you,

Uri Weller
Jerusalem


Re: Significance of name Chaim #lithuania

Kovitz, Sonia <Sonia.Kovitz@...>
 

Traditionally when a child became ill, he was given the additional name of
Chaim, preceding his existing name(s), to scare away the Angel of Death so
that the child would survive the illness.

Chaim is a boy's name. Does anyone know whether this tradition with a
different life-affirming name was used for girls who became ill?

Sonia Kovitz

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Was (Is) there any particular significance in naming a child Chaim?


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania RE: Significance of name Chaim #lithuania

Kovitz, Sonia <Sonia.Kovitz@...>
 

Traditionally when a child became ill, he was given the additional name of
Chaim, preceding his existing name(s), to scare away the Angel of Death so
that the child would survive the illness.

Chaim is a boy's name. Does anyone know whether this tradition with a
different life-affirming name was used for girls who became ill?

Sonia Kovitz

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Was (Is) there any particular significance in naming a child Chaim?


Anshei Krasnosielc #general

Jeff Kingsley <jking3@...>
 

There was a synagogue and landsmanshaft in New York >from the town of
Krasnosielc (Yid. Krasnshiltz) Poland, the name of the synagogue was
Chevra Moshe Yosef Anshei Krasnosielc. I suspect Moshe Yosef was the
name of a Rabbi. Is anyone familiar with this name?
Thanks.
Jeff Kingsley

Researching SKERKER, CHARNO, NOWOGRODER


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Anshei Krasnosielc #general

Jeff Kingsley <jking3@...>
 

There was a synagogue and landsmanshaft in New York >from the town of
Krasnosielc (Yid. Krasnshiltz) Poland, the name of the synagogue was
Chevra Moshe Yosef Anshei Krasnosielc. I suspect Moshe Yosef was the
name of a Rabbi. Is anyone familiar with this name?
Thanks.
Jeff Kingsley

Researching SKERKER, CHARNO, NOWOGRODER


Marriage in Auschwitz #general

Sam Lenger
 

Hi all
During the last IAJGS conference in Jerusalem I went to Yad Vashem and
searched with their computer the Page of Testemonies database. In the
search I found out someone that fill in a page of testimony for a brother of
my gf. and his wife. This lady called Miriam was their daughter and she
died 6 years ago in Israel. I succeed to identify her children and they told
me that Miriam a survivor of Auschwitz married another survivor of
Auschwitz when the camp was liberated. A jewish chaplain >from the US
Army performed the marriage.
My question is: It is possible to identify the jewish chaplain and the
record of the marriage?
Sam Lenger <sdfisr@...>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Marriage in Auschwitz #general

Sam Lenger
 

Hi all
During the last IAJGS conference in Jerusalem I went to Yad Vashem and
searched with their computer the Page of Testemonies database. In the
search I found out someone that fill in a page of testimony for a brother of
my gf. and his wife. This lady called Miriam was their daughter and she
died 6 years ago in Israel. I succeed to identify her children and they told
me that Miriam a survivor of Auschwitz married another survivor of
Auschwitz when the camp was liberated. A jewish chaplain >from the US
Army performed the marriage.
My question is: It is possible to identify the jewish chaplain and the
record of the marriage?
Sam Lenger <sdfisr@...>


Name Selection: Jewish women in Europe #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

To add a bit to Michael Bernet's comment on the names of our ancestors:

"There's no accounting for the names many Jewish men (and especially
women) chose."

Here's an anecdote heard >from my Transcarpathian third cousins on how
their Hungarian names came to be "Americanized." When they were
preparing to leave Csap/Cop in 1921, this very observant Jewish family
went to the local Catholic priest for English lessons, because he was the
only person in town who knew the language. They also asked him to
suggest more assimilated-sounding names.

Marketa became Margaret

Andor, Alex and Oscar stayed the same.

But "Ferenc" (whose Hebrew name was Efraim) became "Frances,"
probably based on the "foreignness" of Ferenc and the priest's narrow
(and religion-based) knowledge of appropriate English names. When
"Frances" began school in Yonkers, New York and realized that both boys
and girls were known by that name he became upset and changed his
name quickly to Frank.
Two of these "children" (ages 87 and 90) just recently told me this story
first-hand....so it's not simply legend...and just goes to prove the truth
of Michael's comment. In genealogy we should assume nothing...and
expect everything.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Name Selection: Jewish women in Europe #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

To add a bit to Michael Bernet's comment on the names of our ancestors:

"There's no accounting for the names many Jewish men (and especially
women) chose."

Here's an anecdote heard >from my Transcarpathian third cousins on how
their Hungarian names came to be "Americanized." When they were
preparing to leave Csap/Cop in 1921, this very observant Jewish family
went to the local Catholic priest for English lessons, because he was the
only person in town who knew the language. They also asked him to
suggest more assimilated-sounding names.

Marketa became Margaret

Andor, Alex and Oscar stayed the same.

But "Ferenc" (whose Hebrew name was Efraim) became "Frances,"
probably based on the "foreignness" of Ferenc and the priest's narrow
(and religion-based) knowledge of appropriate English names. When
"Frances" began school in Yonkers, New York and realized that both boys
and girls were known by that name he became upset and changed his
name quickly to Frank.
Two of these "children" (ages 87 and 90) just recently told me this story
first-hand....so it's not simply legend...and just goes to prove the truth
of Michael's comment. In genealogy we should assume nothing...and
expect everything.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...


Re: STEINBERG in Indianapolis #general

Bizsak
 

I don't know whether this will help you; but the older Jewish cemeteries in
Indianapolis are located on Kelly Street. The Congregations still active are:
Beth El Congregation, Bnai Torah and Anshe Sfard(on 64th Street).
... all these congregations are located on Hoover Rd. Perhaps one of
them will still have information on the burials in all of the different sections
of the Kelly Street properties or can guide you to the proper sources.
Mickey Snitzer Izsak


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: STEINBERG in Indianapolis #general

Bizsak
 

I don't know whether this will help you; but the older Jewish cemeteries in
Indianapolis are located on Kelly Street. The Congregations still active are:
Beth El Congregation, Bnai Torah and Anshe Sfard(on 64th Street).
... all these congregations are located on Hoover Rd. Perhaps one of
them will still have information on the burials in all of the different sections
of the Kelly Street properties or can guide you to the proper sources.
Mickey Snitzer Izsak


Jerusalem Conference Thanks #general

Arthur Meyers <marciarthur@...>
 

Dear Israel Genealogical Society Friends,

We attended the 24th Annual Conference in Jerusalem and received much
information >from the various lectures we attended.

Unfortunately, on Thursday, July 8, we both became ill and were taken to
Hadassah Hospital for treatment. Arthur was in the hospital for the day and
Marcia was in for four days.

We want to thank the Israel Genealogical Society for their concern and for
the visit and calls >from members Miriam Haringman-Goitein and Mathilde
Tagger. In addition to the excellent medical care of the hospital staff,
their reaching out meant much to our full recovery.

We can happily report that "We Went to Hadassah Hospital and Did Not
See the Chagall Windows At First!" But we did eventually see the
Windows and much more in beautiful and inspiring Israel.

Thank you for a wonderfully well-planned conference and making all the
participants feel at home.

With love and Shalom, Marcia Indianer Meyers and Arthur Meyers


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jerusalem Conference Thanks #general

Arthur Meyers <marciarthur@...>
 

Dear Israel Genealogical Society Friends,

We attended the 24th Annual Conference in Jerusalem and received much
information >from the various lectures we attended.

Unfortunately, on Thursday, July 8, we both became ill and were taken to
Hadassah Hospital for treatment. Arthur was in the hospital for the day and
Marcia was in for four days.

We want to thank the Israel Genealogical Society for their concern and for
the visit and calls >from members Miriam Haringman-Goitein and Mathilde
Tagger. In addition to the excellent medical care of the hospital staff,
their reaching out meant much to our full recovery.

We can happily report that "We Went to Hadassah Hospital and Did Not
See the Chagall Windows At First!" But we did eventually see the
Windows and much more in beautiful and inspiring Israel.

Thank you for a wonderfully well-planned conference and making all the
participants feel at home.

With love and Shalom, Marcia Indianer Meyers and Arthur Meyers