Date   

NYC Municipal archives help please #general

Peter E. Sices, M.D. <sicesp@...>
 

I have tried online without success to find several relatives death and one
birth in NYC >from 1905 through 1943.

If anyone would be willing to do the research at the archives for me I would
be happy to pay for the time and expenses.

(Please respond privately)

Peter E. Sices (SICES/TIZES, EDELMAN/EDELMANN, BRAUN, et.al.)
South Bend, IN
sicesp@michianaweb.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NYC Municipal archives help please #general

Peter E. Sices, M.D. <sicesp@...>
 

I have tried online without success to find several relatives death and one
birth in NYC >from 1905 through 1943.

If anyone would be willing to do the research at the archives for me I would
be happy to pay for the time and expenses.

(Please respond privately)

Peter E. Sices (SICES/TIZES, EDELMAN/EDELMANN, BRAUN, et.al.)
South Bend, IN
sicesp@michianaweb.com


Jewish Given Names - Yitzhak, Isaac #general

Robert Zavos <rzavos@...>
 

The recent discussions on Jewish given names (Yosef Dov, Dov Joseph) has
raised a few questions. I though I had seen a Web table of Jewish given
name frequencies for certain locations and/or time periods. Can anyone
direct me to this?

Also, I recently found my GGM's matzevah (died 1911 and buried in Pittsburgh
PA) and was a little surprised to see "Sarah Rebeka bat Yitzhak Isaac".
Even though both names are extremely common I have not seen the combination
very often. Any thoughts on why both versions are given in this case?

Robert Zavos
Pittsburgh PA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Given Names - Yitzhak, Isaac #general

Robert Zavos <rzavos@...>
 

The recent discussions on Jewish given names (Yosef Dov, Dov Joseph) has
raised a few questions. I though I had seen a Web table of Jewish given
name frequencies for certain locations and/or time periods. Can anyone
direct me to this?

Also, I recently found my GGM's matzevah (died 1911 and buried in Pittsburgh
PA) and was a little surprised to see "Sarah Rebeka bat Yitzhak Isaac".
Even though both names are extremely common I have not seen the combination
very often. Any thoughts on why both versions are given in this case?

Robert Zavos
Pittsburgh PA


Passenger Manifest with Yiddish Actors #yiddish

David Harris <dorsharris@...>
 

In searching for the ship that brought Moses HOROWITZ (Yiddish
playwright) to New York in the mid 1880's, I came across the following
famous actors headed for the Yiddish theater on New York City's
Lower East Side:

The S.S. Alaska, Arrived >from Liverpool September 27, 1886
Passengers included
KESSLER, David (age 27)
MOGULESKO, Sigmund
BLANK, Lazar (Leon)
other actors and musicians, and in some cases, their families.
However, it did not include Moses Horowitz.

If members are searching for Yiddish theater personalities arriving in
America about that time, I would suggest seeking out the above manifest.

David Harris
Silver Spring, MD


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre Passenger Manifest with Yiddish Actors #yiddish

David Harris <dorsharris@...>
 

In searching for the ship that brought Moses HOROWITZ (Yiddish
playwright) to New York in the mid 1880's, I came across the following
famous actors headed for the Yiddish theater on New York City's
Lower East Side:

The S.S. Alaska, Arrived >from Liverpool September 27, 1886
Passengers included
KESSLER, David (age 27)
MOGULESKO, Sigmund
BLANK, Lazar (Leon)
other actors and musicians, and in some cases, their families.
However, it did not include Moses Horowitz.

If members are searching for Yiddish theater personalities arriving in
America about that time, I would suggest seeking out the above manifest.

David Harris
Silver Spring, MD


Another milestone! Another thank you! #usa

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

As many of you are aware, the "behind the scenes" team has been working
tirelessly (and endlessly) to implement our Central User Registration
Environment (CURE) and fine-tuning all the elements in this huge project.
CURE will enable us to better manage all our back office systems and ensure
integration of all JewishGen programs and projects into one central system.

Would you believe that we are fast approaching the 100,000 mark in user
registrations to JewishGen? An awesome number for a community that started
with slightly more than 100 people and one computer just 18 short years ago!
Now, to enable us to meet the user demand we are running 10 servers in a 24/7
secure co-location facility. It truly boggles the mind!

As busy as we have been behind the scenes, I wanted to take a moment to thank
all the many hundreds of our world wide volunteers who have contributed so
greatly to making JewishGen a vital community and recognized leader in the
field of Jewish genealogy.

We applaud their efforts and their dedication and commitment to this
organization. To those who have blessed us with their financial support
over the years, please know we are ever so grateful! We could not have gotten
where we are today without you.

My personal thanks go out to all the JewishGen Vice Presidents, the SIG
Leaders and the JewishGen Board for their significant contributions,
commitment and dedication to the missions and goals of this organization.
With your help we have achieved yet another milestone in our development. We
look forward to using our new tools to create the building blocks for an even
greater and more efficient JewishGen in the months and years to come.

Susan King, President, JewishGen


Early American SIG #USA Another milestone! Another thank you! #usa

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

As many of you are aware, the "behind the scenes" team has been working
tirelessly (and endlessly) to implement our Central User Registration
Environment (CURE) and fine-tuning all the elements in this huge project.
CURE will enable us to better manage all our back office systems and ensure
integration of all JewishGen programs and projects into one central system.

Would you believe that we are fast approaching the 100,000 mark in user
registrations to JewishGen? An awesome number for a community that started
with slightly more than 100 people and one computer just 18 short years ago!
Now, to enable us to meet the user demand we are running 10 servers in a 24/7
secure co-location facility. It truly boggles the mind!

As busy as we have been behind the scenes, I wanted to take a moment to thank
all the many hundreds of our world wide volunteers who have contributed so
greatly to making JewishGen a vital community and recognized leader in the
field of Jewish genealogy.

We applaud their efforts and their dedication and commitment to this
organization. To those who have blessed us with their financial support
over the years, please know we are ever so grateful! We could not have gotten
where we are today without you.

My personal thanks go out to all the JewishGen Vice Presidents, the SIG
Leaders and the JewishGen Board for their significant contributions,
commitment and dedication to the missions and goals of this organization.
With your help we have achieved yet another milestone in our development. We
look forward to using our new tools to create the building blocks for an even
greater and more efficient JewishGen in the months and years to come.

Susan King, President, JewishGen


INTRO - Seeking GRUNAUR - Cammin, Pommern > USA 1860s #germany

bspinner@...
 

I am researching a Jewish German family [GRUNAUR] who emigrated to the USA
in about the 1860s.
Would the (Kirchenbuch) church register (parish) records 1713-1850, of
Cammin, Pommern include records of this Jewish family's births and
marriages? I ask because the LDS has a microfilm of these exact registers.
Before I borrow the film, I would like to answer this question.

In England, the Established Church (of the State), was - in some centuries -
the only place where anybody could be married or buried. Hence people of
different religions are usually found in these parish registers, until after
a certain date when they were allowed to keep their own religious records
separately. Thank you,

Barry Spinner in Hamilton Ontario Canada

MOD NOTE: list of families being researched deleted because family names
were not typed in ALL CAPS.


German SIG #Germany INTRO - Seeking GRUNAUR - Cammin, Pommern > USA 1860s #germany

bspinner@...
 

I am researching a Jewish German family [GRUNAUR] who emigrated to the USA
in about the 1860s.
Would the (Kirchenbuch) church register (parish) records 1713-1850, of
Cammin, Pommern include records of this Jewish family's births and
marriages? I ask because the LDS has a microfilm of these exact registers.
Before I borrow the film, I would like to answer this question.

In England, the Established Church (of the State), was - in some centuries -
the only place where anybody could be married or buried. Hence people of
different religions are usually found in these parish registers, until after
a certain date when they were allowed to keep their own religious records
separately. Thank you,

Barry Spinner in Hamilton Ontario Canada

MOD NOTE: list of families being researched deleted because family names
were not typed in ALL CAPS.


Death Certificate #general

walter spector <educonser@...>
 

Dear Genners,

How can I obtain a Death Certificate for someone who died in Delray Beach,
Palm Beach County, FL. in 1995?

Walter Spector
educonser@hotmail.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Our Vital Records InfoFiles at
<http://www2.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/#Vitals> contain a link to
"USA: Where to Write for Vital Records." Click on that, then
click on any state name to find prices and procedures for
ordering that state's birth, death, and marriage certificates.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Death Certificate #general

walter spector <educonser@...>
 

Dear Genners,

How can I obtain a Death Certificate for someone who died in Delray Beach,
Palm Beach County, FL. in 1995?

Walter Spector
educonser@hotmail.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Our Vital Records InfoFiles at
<http://www2.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/#Vitals> contain a link to
"USA: Where to Write for Vital Records." Click on that, then
click on any state name to find prices and procedures for
ordering that state's birth, death, and marriage certificates.


Seek dates of Holocaust death -LOEWENSTEIN & BARUCH #germany

Elizabeth Levy <ealevygen@...>
 

Dear Friends,
We lost many people in the Holocaust, some of whom we know what happened,
others not.
I am looking for more information - particularly date of death - for the
following persons. Maybe someone has a list or information that would be
helpful....

1. Elli (geb. WALLACH) LOEWENSTEIN (b. 1909), her husband, Siegmund
LOEWENSTEIN, and their young son, Bernd LOEWENSTEIN (b. 1938), last living
in Frankfurt/Main, and presumably shot to death in the Kaiserwald near Riga.

2. Emilie or Emmy (geb. KATZ) BARUCH (b. 1890), her husband, Julius
BARUCH, and their two kids: Kurt and Ruth. Emmy was born in Flieden,
Hessen and Julius was >from Bergheim/Waldeck.

3. Jonny (Yonny) BARUCH (son of Julius >from his previous marriage to Bella
KATZ BARUCH, sister of Emmy). Lived in Berheim/Waldeck. Thanks.

Elizabeth Levy Mevassaret Zion

MOD NOTE: For archive search reasons, you should include at least one spelling
of the name as LOWENSTEIN (0 umlaut).


German SIG #Germany Seek dates of Holocaust death -LOEWENSTEIN & BARUCH #germany

Elizabeth Levy <ealevygen@...>
 

Dear Friends,
We lost many people in the Holocaust, some of whom we know what happened,
others not.
I am looking for more information - particularly date of death - for the
following persons. Maybe someone has a list or information that would be
helpful....

1. Elli (geb. WALLACH) LOEWENSTEIN (b. 1909), her husband, Siegmund
LOEWENSTEIN, and their young son, Bernd LOEWENSTEIN (b. 1938), last living
in Frankfurt/Main, and presumably shot to death in the Kaiserwald near Riga.

2. Emilie or Emmy (geb. KATZ) BARUCH (b. 1890), her husband, Julius
BARUCH, and their two kids: Kurt and Ruth. Emmy was born in Flieden,
Hessen and Julius was >from Bergheim/Waldeck.

3. Jonny (Yonny) BARUCH (son of Julius >from his previous marriage to Bella
KATZ BARUCH, sister of Emmy). Lived in Berheim/Waldeck. Thanks.

Elizabeth Levy Mevassaret Zion

MOD NOTE: For archive search reasons, you should include at least one spelling
of the name as LOWENSTEIN (0 umlaut).


Seeking translations from German Gothic Script #germany

Amanda Jermyn <astrogirl200@...>
 

Hello,
In our family we have a lot of old family letters,
postcards and documents in German, many in Gothic
script. We are looking for someone to translate these
into English. We are willing to pay for this service.
Please contact me if you know of anyone who might want
to do this, preferably someone in Connecticut or Western Massachusetts.

Amanda Katz Jermyn Longmeadow, Massachusetts, USA


German SIG #Germany Seeking translations from German Gothic Script #germany

Amanda Jermyn <astrogirl200@...>
 

Hello,
In our family we have a lot of old family letters,
postcards and documents in German, many in Gothic
script. We are looking for someone to translate these
into English. We are willing to pay for this service.
Please contact me if you know of anyone who might want
to do this, preferably someone in Connecticut or Western Massachusetts.

Amanda Katz Jermyn Longmeadow, Massachusetts, USA


Re: SUFRIN family from Munchen/Munich #germany

petiealznauer@earthlink.net <petiealznauer@...>
 

For some time now I have intended to post and let people know that I have
the City Directory (Stadtbuch) for Munchen (Munich), Germany >from the year
1934. I bought it at an antiquariat dealer in Munich in 1985 or 86 when I
was a graduate student at the university.

In the frontispiece there is a full page photo of the Reichschancellor,
and his home address, telephone and occupation are listed inside
along with Thomas Mann, the Nobel prize winning author and other worthier Germans.

I would be glad to look up information on the SUFRIN and any other
individuals or families >from this directory BUT I cannot do it right now
because the directory is in storage until I finish having my apartment renovated.

Please email me privately for more information.

Alexandra Alznauer San Francisco, CA


German SIG #Germany Re: SUFRIN family from Munchen/Munich #germany

petiealznauer@earthlink.net <petiealznauer@...>
 

For some time now I have intended to post and let people know that I have
the City Directory (Stadtbuch) for Munchen (Munich), Germany >from the year
1934. I bought it at an antiquariat dealer in Munich in 1985 or 86 when I
was a graduate student at the university.

In the frontispiece there is a full page photo of the Reichschancellor,
and his home address, telephone and occupation are listed inside
along with Thomas Mann, the Nobel prize winning author and other worthier Germans.

I would be glad to look up information on the SUFRIN and any other
individuals or families >from this directory BUT I cannot do it right now
because the directory is in storage until I finish having my apartment renovated.

Please email me privately for more information.

Alexandra Alznauer San Francisco, CA


Re: No family name ideas #general

Gary Luke <feraltek@...>
 

At 12:25 AM 27/08/2004, you wrote:

Avigdor

A few more thoughts about indexing -

For indexes for personal use anything which helps is ok. A published
transcription though, should stick to the details in the original document,
even if some details are known to be incorrect or incomplete. Some indexes
are published stand-alone without a transcription, sometimes they are
published with a transcription. Each type requires different considerations.

Some archivists and professional indexers insist an index should mimic the
details in the original, some allow a fair bit of latitude. A newly
compiled index as a finding aid is not part of the original document. For
instance, if it is known that a person listed in the record changed their
name >from Moses to Moss after the recorded event, one indexer would only
allow "Moses", while another might have both names in the index. The usual
practice when an index departs >from details in the original is to place a
preceding note explaining any conventions used.

re Angela Shire's index for the transcription of Great Synagogue marriages
- Her method of using "No Surname" for patronymics is one valid
interpretation for indexing the transcribed entry. She probably thought
long about it, and discussed it with others. My idea of using "bat xxx" was
prompted by the extra work as an end user of her index. Without that I
might not have thought about other ways to handle patronymics while
sticking as close as possible to the transcribed details.

Gary

====

Gary Luke mentioned one method which I routinely use when registering
incomplete names in my database and that is to append the father (or
mother's) name with ben or bat in the field for surname. To sometimes write
"unknown" is very poor practice as it is totally useless. If pressed for
time and I lack parents' first names, too, I make up a clearly substitute
surname by wife or husband's first name, thus: Miriam Moshewife Siegel for
Miriam married to Moshe Siegel. For an unknown married male, Unknown
Miramhusband (last name of wife). Does anyone have any comments about these
tools? It seems to help me sort families better even when I am told by my
program: husband and wife have same surname.
Avigdor Ben-Dov
Director of Special Projects
Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute
Kedumim Israel

Gary Luke ~ feraltek@zeta.org.au
Sydney, Australia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: No family name ideas #general

Gary Luke <feraltek@...>
 

At 12:25 AM 27/08/2004, you wrote:

Avigdor

A few more thoughts about indexing -

For indexes for personal use anything which helps is ok. A published
transcription though, should stick to the details in the original document,
even if some details are known to be incorrect or incomplete. Some indexes
are published stand-alone without a transcription, sometimes they are
published with a transcription. Each type requires different considerations.

Some archivists and professional indexers insist an index should mimic the
details in the original, some allow a fair bit of latitude. A newly
compiled index as a finding aid is not part of the original document. For
instance, if it is known that a person listed in the record changed their
name >from Moses to Moss after the recorded event, one indexer would only
allow "Moses", while another might have both names in the index. The usual
practice when an index departs >from details in the original is to place a
preceding note explaining any conventions used.

re Angela Shire's index for the transcription of Great Synagogue marriages
- Her method of using "No Surname" for patronymics is one valid
interpretation for indexing the transcribed entry. She probably thought
long about it, and discussed it with others. My idea of using "bat xxx" was
prompted by the extra work as an end user of her index. Without that I
might not have thought about other ways to handle patronymics while
sticking as close as possible to the transcribed details.

Gary

====

Gary Luke mentioned one method which I routinely use when registering
incomplete names in my database and that is to append the father (or
mother's) name with ben or bat in the field for surname. To sometimes write
"unknown" is very poor practice as it is totally useless. If pressed for
time and I lack parents' first names, too, I make up a clearly substitute
surname by wife or husband's first name, thus: Miriam Moshewife Siegel for
Miriam married to Moshe Siegel. For an unknown married male, Unknown
Miramhusband (last name of wife). Does anyone have any comments about these
tools? It seems to help me sort families better even when I am told by my
program: husband and wife have same surname.
Avigdor Ben-Dov
Director of Special Projects
Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute
Kedumim Israel

Gary Luke ~ feraltek@zeta.org.au
Sydney, Australia