Date   

Re: Can anyone explain JONAS and COHEN? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

I have the 1849 ketubah of my gggrandparents. On this, according to
an Israeli friend who translated it, the bride's father is described
as Rabbi David ben Shimon Cohen. In the Bevis Marks records he is
described as David Jonas. I have seen this type of thing before and
wondered if anyone could explain it to me?
Peter Levene, Brighton
Dear Peter,

Normally the only full Hebrew names of males that would appear on a
ketubbah would be those of the bridegroom (in the text itself) and
those of the witnesses (who sign at the foot of the ketubbah). The
bride's father's name would appear only partially in the text of the
ketubbah , namely his own pesonal name would appear there but not
his father's name (thus, in this case, supposing the bride's name
was Ruth, the ketubbah would describe her as "Marat Ruth bat David
Ha-Cohen" (Ms. Ruth, daughter of David the Kohen) without
mentioning the name of David's father Shimon at all.

You did not state the exact Hebrew words which your Israeli friend
translated as "Rabbi David ben Shimon Cohen", nor where on the
document this appeared. So, is it possible that the bride's father
was one of the witnesses, in which case he would have signed his full
Hebrew name: " R. David ben R. Shimon ha-Kohen" -- at the foot of the
ketubbah. If so, that formula means simply "David son of Simon the
Kohen" (i.e. it means that the family were members of the caste of
Kohanim , but "Kohen" was not their actual surname. (In this case,
as the Bevis Marks records told you, the surname was actually Jonas.)

Note also that In the standard formula, "R. David ben R. Shimon
ha-Kohen." "R" does not stand for the title "Rabbi." It stands
for "Reb", which is simply the normal Yiddish abbreviation for"Mr"
(the Hebrew for Rabbi would be "ha-Rav" ). And the description
"ha-Kohen" is not the surname "Cohen" (though of course many Kohanim
do have that surname) but refers simply to the caste status of
"Kohen."

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Can anyone explain JONAS and COHEN? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

I have the 1849 ketubah of my gggrandparents. On this, according to
an Israeli friend who translated it, the bride's father is described
as Rabbi David ben Shimon Cohen. In the Bevis Marks records he is
described as David Jonas. I have seen this type of thing before and
wondered if anyone could explain it to me?
Peter Levene, Brighton
Dear Peter,

Normally the only full Hebrew names of males that would appear on a
ketubbah would be those of the bridegroom (in the text itself) and
those of the witnesses (who sign at the foot of the ketubbah). The
bride's father's name would appear only partially in the text of the
ketubbah , namely his own pesonal name would appear there but not
his father's name (thus, in this case, supposing the bride's name
was Ruth, the ketubbah would describe her as "Marat Ruth bat David
Ha-Cohen" (Ms. Ruth, daughter of David the Kohen) without
mentioning the name of David's father Shimon at all.

You did not state the exact Hebrew words which your Israeli friend
translated as "Rabbi David ben Shimon Cohen", nor where on the
document this appeared. So, is it possible that the bride's father
was one of the witnesses, in which case he would have signed his full
Hebrew name: " R. David ben R. Shimon ha-Kohen" -- at the foot of the
ketubbah. If so, that formula means simply "David son of Simon the
Kohen" (i.e. it means that the family were members of the caste of
Kohanim , but "Kohen" was not their actual surname. (In this case,
as the Bevis Marks records told you, the surname was actually Jonas.)

Note also that In the standard formula, "R. David ben R. Shimon
ha-Kohen." "R" does not stand for the title "Rabbi." It stands
for "Reb", which is simply the normal Yiddish abbreviation for"Mr"
(the Hebrew for Rabbi would be "ha-Rav" ). And the description
"ha-Kohen" is not the surname "Cohen" (though of course many Kohanim
do have that surname) but refers simply to the caste status of
"Kohen."

Judith Romney Wegner


Re: Russian Military Service #belarus

Irene Newhouse <einew@...>
 

I would like to add to Bruno Martuzan's very informative post on Russian
military service, that in the latter period, that is >from the 1880s on, the
following was observed among the draft records of my cousins searched for me
by a professional researcher in Vilnius a few years ago:

oldest sons were registered
only sons were registered
in a family with several sons, every single one was registered

In short, family circumstances don't seem to have entered into the equation
at all, and nothing about them was entered in the records themselves.

There was a difference in the ages at which young men registered. The
cousins who were apprenticed to skilled trademen registered at 12 to 15.
Since, at the time, bar mitzvah was a true rite of passage into adulthood,
this requirement was not out of line with the contemporary Jewish world
view, no matter how draconian it seems to us today, when bar mitzvah has
become more symbolic. The cousin who went to a Railway Engineering
Technical School registered at close to 20 and entered military service upon
graduation, so there was a sort of student deferrment.

There are many family stories about possible ways to avoid the draft in
Russia. The data on my Vilnius family suggest that birth order and number
of sons in the family were not considered by the authorities >from the 1880s
on.

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Russian Military Service #general

Irene Newhouse <einew@...>
 

I would like to add to Bruno Martuzan's very informative post on Russian
military service, that in the latter period, that is >from the 1880s on, the
following was observed among the draft records of my cousins searched for me
by a professional researcher in Vilnius a few years ago:

oldest sons were registered
only sons were registered
in a family with several sons, every single one was registered

In short, family circumstances don't seem to have entered into the equation
at all, and nothing about them was entered in the records themselves.

There was a difference in the ages at which young men registered. The
cousins who were apprenticed to skilled trademen registered at 12 to 15.
Since, at the time, bar mitzvah was a true rite of passage into adulthood,
this requirement was not out of line with the contemporary Jewish world
view, no matter how draconian it seems to us today, when bar mitzvah has
become more symbolic. The cousin who went to a Railway Engineering
Technical School registered at close to 20 and entered military service upon
graduation, so there was a sort of student deferrment.

There are many family stories about possible ways to avoid the draft in
Russia. The data on my Vilnius family suggest that birth order and number
of sons in the family were not considered by the authorities >from the 1880s
on.

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI


Re: KGB #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 03:08:55 UTC, mrl516@bellsouth.net (Marilyn F) opined:
X-No-archive: yes
I am trying to locate a cousin of mine whose husband who a member of the
KGB. Does anyone have any idea how I can find out more about someone who
worked for the KGB. Thanks for you ideas. Marilyn Feingold
The best bet, it seems to me, would be the succesor agency of the KGB,
called the Federal Security Service (in Russian. "Federal'naya Sluzhba
Bezopasnosti"), Organization and Personnel Service (in Russian, "Sluzhba
Organizatzii i Personal"), Moskva, Russia. Best to write in Russian, if you
can get someone to do that for you. Russian government agencies, in my
experience, have been as helpful as they can, but it would be asking a lot
to require that they relate promptly, or at all, to inquiries in foreign
languages, of which English is one.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com
For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: KGB #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 03:08:55 UTC, mrl516@bellsouth.net (Marilyn F) opined:
X-No-archive: yes
I am trying to locate a cousin of mine whose husband who a member of the
KGB. Does anyone have any idea how I can find out more about someone who
worked for the KGB. Thanks for you ideas. Marilyn Feingold
The best bet, it seems to me, would be the succesor agency of the KGB,
called the Federal Security Service (in Russian. "Federal'naya Sluzhba
Bezopasnosti"), Organization and Personnel Service (in Russian, "Sluzhba
Organizatzii i Personal"), Moskva, Russia. Best to write in Russian, if you
can get someone to do that for you. Russian government agencies, in my
experience, have been as helpful as they can, but it would be asking a lot
to require that they relate promptly, or at all, to inquiries in foreign
languages, of which English is one.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com
For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Re: Black Aprons worn at Shivas #general

Jean Perkin <jean@...>
 

I can always remember right up to the 50s and 60s, bereaved wives wearing a
black overall when sitting shiva. (This was in London). I always assumed
that putting a black overall on was taken >from the gentiles, who dress
completely in black as a sign of mourning.

This puzzles me. I have always (in the manner of Ashenazi Jews) wished
mourners 'Long Life' at a Shiva and on a Yahrtzeit. Unfortunately there
have been recent bereavements in my family both in the U.S and Israel. I
have, according to our custom, wished the mourners long life. Neither the
Americans or the Israelis knew what I was talking about. Is this a purely
English custom?

J Perkin
UK

"Anita Benson" <anita.benson@virgin.net> wrote

My aunt now in her 80's remembers at her father in law's shiva in 1950 his
daughters wearing black aprons whilst sitting shiva, this was in London and
all were English born. Unfortunately she does not know any further details
i.e where they originally came from.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Black Aprons worn at Shivas #general

Jean Perkin <jean@...>
 

I can always remember right up to the 50s and 60s, bereaved wives wearing a
black overall when sitting shiva. (This was in London). I always assumed
that putting a black overall on was taken >from the gentiles, who dress
completely in black as a sign of mourning.

This puzzles me. I have always (in the manner of Ashenazi Jews) wished
mourners 'Long Life' at a Shiva and on a Yahrtzeit. Unfortunately there
have been recent bereavements in my family both in the U.S and Israel. I
have, according to our custom, wished the mourners long life. Neither the
Americans or the Israelis knew what I was talking about. Is this a purely
English custom?

J Perkin
UK

"Anita Benson" <anita.benson@virgin.net> wrote

My aunt now in her 80's remembers at her father in law's shiva in 1950 his
daughters wearing black aprons whilst sitting shiva, this was in London and
all were English born. Unfortunately she does not know any further details
i.e where they originally came from.


Re: Black Aprons worn at Shivas #general

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

At 12:00 AM 1/25/2005, Judith Romney Wegner wrote

As we left England in 1957, I didn't get to attend shivas in my
mother's extensive London-born family, so I don't know whether the
mourners wore black aprons or not. But if they did I would think
this was a gentile influence -- and most likely Dutch, as aprons
(normally white, I suppose) were a standard Dutch item of clothing
and many London-born Jews dying around 1950 would have been born to
Jewish families already in London *before* the floodtide of
immigration >from Eastern Europe; most such London-born Jews families
did have Dutch antecedents.

The pinned-on black ribbon worn by Jewish mourners in America today
is presumably an adaptation of the gentile black-armband tradition;
authentic Jewish tradition is to tear an actual rip in the shirt or
other outer garment worn to the funeral and during the shiva (which
certainly need not be black). Wearing black clothes to a funeral
is a Christian, not Jewish, custom, though many American Jews seem
to have adopted it.

Judith Romney Wegner
I received several private responses to my question and some confirm that
this was the custom in England, Germany and other places.

I am just wondering if this apron was used for "Kriah" (rending of
clothes). People were very poor in the shtetlach and rending a blouse or
dress would be a hardship. The apron would be a solution that complied
with "Kryah" and saved the clothing.

As far as an apron being a Dutch custom, it was very much the custom in
Eastern Europe for Jewish women to wear an apron. I have seen it in many
photos >from Galicia. They wore it when they were not "dressed up" but in
everyday clothing There were two types of apron : The more usual one tied
to the waist and one that looked almost like a long vest, sleeveless and
half covering the dress.

In Chassidic circles women wore (still wear?) a white apron for Shabat and
Yom Kippur.

Susana Leistner Bloch


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Black Aprons worn at Shivas #general

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

At 12:00 AM 1/25/2005, Judith Romney Wegner wrote

As we left England in 1957, I didn't get to attend shivas in my
mother's extensive London-born family, so I don't know whether the
mourners wore black aprons or not. But if they did I would think
this was a gentile influence -- and most likely Dutch, as aprons
(normally white, I suppose) were a standard Dutch item of clothing
and many London-born Jews dying around 1950 would have been born to
Jewish families already in London *before* the floodtide of
immigration >from Eastern Europe; most such London-born Jews families
did have Dutch antecedents.

The pinned-on black ribbon worn by Jewish mourners in America today
is presumably an adaptation of the gentile black-armband tradition;
authentic Jewish tradition is to tear an actual rip in the shirt or
other outer garment worn to the funeral and during the shiva (which
certainly need not be black). Wearing black clothes to a funeral
is a Christian, not Jewish, custom, though many American Jews seem
to have adopted it.

Judith Romney Wegner
I received several private responses to my question and some confirm that
this was the custom in England, Germany and other places.

I am just wondering if this apron was used for "Kriah" (rending of
clothes). People were very poor in the shtetlach and rending a blouse or
dress would be a hardship. The apron would be a solution that complied
with "Kryah" and saved the clothing.

As far as an apron being a Dutch custom, it was very much the custom in
Eastern Europe for Jewish women to wear an apron. I have seen it in many
photos >from Galicia. They wore it when they were not "dressed up" but in
everyday clothing There were two types of apron : The more usual one tied
to the waist and one that looked almost like a long vest, sleeveless and
half covering the dress.

In Chassidic circles women wore (still wear?) a white apron for Shabat and
Yom Kippur.

Susana Leistner Bloch


British Jews: Dutch, German or East European? (was black aprons) #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/24/2005 10:15:13 PM Eastern Standard Time,
jrw@brown.edu writes:

< many London-born Jews dying around 1950 would have been born to
Jewish families already in London *before* the floodtide of
immigration >from Eastern Europe; >

==that is partly correct, of course. The influx into Britain of
most of the Jews >from Eastern Europe (predominantly Litta) started
in 1880.

==however, the mean life expectancy of Jews born in England around
1880 was probably around 55, and the majority would not have
survived to the age of 70.

< most such London-born Jews families did have Dutch antecedents. >

==Not so. Ashkenazim (mostly >from German speaking countries--Germany,
Austria, Northern France, Bohemia, Holland--and following the Western
Ashkenazi rituals) started arriving in Britain within three decades of
the arrival of the Sefardi Jews >from Holland, and soon outnumbered
them. By the mid-19th century, for sure, they formed by far the larger
and more influential (not necessarily the richer) Jewish communty.

==The Jewish Chronicle (founded 1841) and Jew's College (1855), the
Beth Din, the Chief Rabbinate, United Synagogue ("established" in 1870
by an act of Parliament), were all "Ashkenazi" oriented, and strongly
related to German-Jewish practices. When I left the UK in 1948, the vast
majority of synagogues based their ritual on that of Western Ashkenazim.

==I guess that the confusion of "black" and "apron" stems >from
German/Yiddish "schwartz/schwartze" and "Schuerze[n]/Schirtze[n]"
respectively. This confusion of terms happens frequently in Jewish
folklore and practice, e.g. emptying pockets ("teschlech") for Tashlich,
eating Hamantaschen ("Mohntaschen") on Purim, reciting "Kol Mevasser" on
Hoshanah Rabba (feast of the water supplication).

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen British Jews: Dutch, German or East European? (was black aprons) #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/24/2005 10:15:13 PM Eastern Standard Time,
jrw@brown.edu writes:

< many London-born Jews dying around 1950 would have been born to
Jewish families already in London *before* the floodtide of
immigration >from Eastern Europe; >

==that is partly correct, of course. The influx into Britain of
most of the Jews >from Eastern Europe (predominantly Litta) started
in 1880.

==however, the mean life expectancy of Jews born in England around
1880 was probably around 55, and the majority would not have
survived to the age of 70.

< most such London-born Jews families did have Dutch antecedents. >

==Not so. Ashkenazim (mostly >from German speaking countries--Germany,
Austria, Northern France, Bohemia, Holland--and following the Western
Ashkenazi rituals) started arriving in Britain within three decades of
the arrival of the Sefardi Jews >from Holland, and soon outnumbered
them. By the mid-19th century, for sure, they formed by far the larger
and more influential (not necessarily the richer) Jewish communty.

==The Jewish Chronicle (founded 1841) and Jew's College (1855), the
Beth Din, the Chief Rabbinate, United Synagogue ("established" in 1870
by an act of Parliament), were all "Ashkenazi" oriented, and strongly
related to German-Jewish practices. When I left the UK in 1948, the vast
majority of synagogues based their ritual on that of Western Ashkenazim.

==I guess that the confusion of "black" and "apron" stems >from
German/Yiddish "schwartz/schwartze" and "Schuerze[n]/Schirtze[n]"
respectively. This confusion of terms happens frequently in Jewish
folklore and practice, e.g. emptying pockets ("teschlech") for Tashlich,
eating Hamantaschen ("Mohntaschen") on Purim, reciting "Kol Mevasser" on
Hoshanah Rabba (feast of the water supplication).

Michael Bernet, New York


pictures on naturalization & citizenship papers #general

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

My father's US naturalization papers >from 1942 has his picture on it with
his name change on the back.
And my mother's citizenship certificate >from 1931 has her picture on it.
Rose Feldman
GITNER, REZNIK Litin & Kalinovka Ukraine
EPSTEIN, BOYARKSY Ruzhany, Kossovo, Mscibow Belarus
TREPPER, TREPMAN, FELDMAN, LICHT, SOICHER, SLOVIK, SZPERBER, ORENSTEIN
Warsaw Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen pictures on naturalization & citizenship papers #general

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

My father's US naturalization papers >from 1942 has his picture on it with
his name change on the back.
And my mother's citizenship certificate >from 1931 has her picture on it.
Rose Feldman
GITNER, REZNIK Litin & Kalinovka Ukraine
EPSTEIN, BOYARKSY Ruzhany, Kossovo, Mscibow Belarus
TREPPER, TREPMAN, FELDMAN, LICHT, SOICHER, SLOVIK, SZPERBER, ORENSTEIN
Warsaw Poland


Re: Photographs on Certificates of Naturalization #general

Susan&David
 

My father was naturalized in Massachusetts 1927. I have the Certificate
of Naturalization. It does not have his picture. I also have another
certificate entitled Certificate of Citizenship issued in 1937. This
one does have his picture.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

Alan Steinfeld wrote:

I have seen photographs of the individual on certificates of
naturalization >from the 1950s. Does anyone know when photographs
began to be attached to these documents? Is it likely that a
certificate issued in the 1920s would have a photograph attached?


Re: Photographs on Certificates of Naturalization #general

s_wiener@...
 

Dean Alan & other genners,

While I cannot attest to the first issuance of a
Certificate of Naturalization including a photograph,
I can offer the information >from those of my
grandparents.

My grandfather was naturalized in Brooklyn, New York
on May 24, 1927. We have the original Certificate of
Citizenship however the photograph was lost. One can
see the glue residue where the photo once was. My
grandmother was naturalized in Brooklyn, New York on
July 30, 1929. On her original Certificate of
Citizenship the photograph is still affixed.

I look forward to postings regarding the earliest
known Certificates with photographs.

Shellie Wiener
San Francisco, CA
Researching relative to this posting:
WINDWER and variants - Kolomyya and vicinity in
Galicia
RUBINGER - Putila, Czernowitz, Vatra Dorna in Bukovina
---
Alan Steinfeld <alansteinfeld@optonline.net> writes:

I have seen photographs of the individual on
certificates of naturalization >from the 1950s. Does
anyone know when photographs began to be attached to
these documents? Is it likely that a certificate
issued in the 1920s would have a photograph attached?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Photographs on Certificates of Naturalization #general

Susan&David
 

My father was naturalized in Massachusetts 1927. I have the Certificate
of Naturalization. It does not have his picture. I also have another
certificate entitled Certificate of Citizenship issued in 1937. This
one does have his picture.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

Alan Steinfeld wrote:

I have seen photographs of the individual on certificates of
naturalization >from the 1950s. Does anyone know when photographs
began to be attached to these documents? Is it likely that a
certificate issued in the 1920s would have a photograph attached?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Photographs on Certificates of Naturalization #general

s_wiener@...
 

Dean Alan & other genners,

While I cannot attest to the first issuance of a
Certificate of Naturalization including a photograph,
I can offer the information >from those of my
grandparents.

My grandfather was naturalized in Brooklyn, New York
on May 24, 1927. We have the original Certificate of
Citizenship however the photograph was lost. One can
see the glue residue where the photo once was. My
grandmother was naturalized in Brooklyn, New York on
July 30, 1929. On her original Certificate of
Citizenship the photograph is still affixed.

I look forward to postings regarding the earliest
known Certificates with photographs.

Shellie Wiener
San Francisco, CA
Researching relative to this posting:
WINDWER and variants - Kolomyya and vicinity in
Galicia
RUBINGER - Putila, Czernowitz, Vatra Dorna in Bukovina
---
Alan Steinfeld <alansteinfeld@optonline.net> writes:

I have seen photographs of the individual on
certificates of naturalization >from the 1950s. Does
anyone know when photographs began to be attached to
these documents? Is it likely that a certificate
issued in the 1920s would have a photograph attached?


1891 census lookup - Liverpool research #unitedkingdom

Lois Kaufman <lois@...>
 

Please could someone who has access to the 1891 census look up a first
cousin/brother in law of my g-grandfather for me? His name was Jacob Aarons
and his wife was Elizabeth (Moss). He was born in Liverpool in about 1851,
so would be around 40 at the time of the census. I have an 1887 address of 8
Sandon Terrace, Upper Duke Street for him - I assume that this would be in
Liverpool as at the time he was described as Keeper of the Princes Road
Synagogue. In 1888 I have a reference to him living at 1 Hope Place, though
this may be the address of the Liverpool Old Congregation where he was
Keeper, and in 1889 there is a reference to Jacob Aarons, sexton, at 2
Carter Street.

Jacob Aarons and his many brothers and sisters (Mary, Sophia, Solomon,
Caroline, Walter, Alfred, Mitchel, Rachel, Abraham, Rosa) were orphaned in
1874, when the youngest, Rosa was 11. I have managed to trace descendents of
the eldest sibling, Mary as she married her first cousin, Solomon Henry
Myers, older brother of my g-grandfather; and with the help of FreeBMD and
the Jewishgen family finder I have managed to find a living descendent of
the youngest, Rosa. However, what happened to the others is a mystery. In
1871 the family was living at 64 Russell Street Liverpool. In 1881 I have
Mary Aarons/Myers and family living at an address in Liverpool, but no
amount of searching the 1881 census has turned up the other Aarons siblings.
So now I have some leads, >from trade directories supplied by a researcher in
Liverpool, and am hopeful that these may turn up something on this family.

Thank you.

Regards,

Lois Kaufman
London


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom 1891 census lookup - Liverpool research #unitedkingdom

Lois Kaufman <lois@...>
 

Please could someone who has access to the 1891 census look up a first
cousin/brother in law of my g-grandfather for me? His name was Jacob Aarons
and his wife was Elizabeth (Moss). He was born in Liverpool in about 1851,
so would be around 40 at the time of the census. I have an 1887 address of 8
Sandon Terrace, Upper Duke Street for him - I assume that this would be in
Liverpool as at the time he was described as Keeper of the Princes Road
Synagogue. In 1888 I have a reference to him living at 1 Hope Place, though
this may be the address of the Liverpool Old Congregation where he was
Keeper, and in 1889 there is a reference to Jacob Aarons, sexton, at 2
Carter Street.

Jacob Aarons and his many brothers and sisters (Mary, Sophia, Solomon,
Caroline, Walter, Alfred, Mitchel, Rachel, Abraham, Rosa) were orphaned in
1874, when the youngest, Rosa was 11. I have managed to trace descendents of
the eldest sibling, Mary as she married her first cousin, Solomon Henry
Myers, older brother of my g-grandfather; and with the help of FreeBMD and
the Jewishgen family finder I have managed to find a living descendent of
the youngest, Rosa. However, what happened to the others is a mystery. In
1871 the family was living at 64 Russell Street Liverpool. In 1881 I have
Mary Aarons/Myers and family living at an address in Liverpool, but no
amount of searching the 1881 census has turned up the other Aarons siblings.
So now I have some leads, >from trade directories supplied by a researcher in
Liverpool, and am hopeful that these may turn up something on this family.

Thank you.

Regards,

Lois Kaufman
London