Date   

Re: Soviet Extraordinary Commission reports #belarus

Irene Newhouse <einew@...>
 

It's true that the Soviet Extraordinary Commission reports are a unique
resource. Thinking about doing this work at all while an extremely
difficult war was still in progress is mind-boggling. These reports consist
of a narrative section describing Nazi genocidal activities in a town, then
a list of victims. The victim lists for Radun, Lida & Vasilishki have been
on the Lida District ShtetLink for years, thanks to the activities of
various volunteers. The entire narrative section for Vasilishki is likewise
up, again thanks to an amazing volunteer who managed to read some extremely
faded typing. The links are >from the Holocaust page,
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/holocaust.htm

The narrative portions of these lists were used by Dr. Leonid Smilovitsky in
a section of his book "Holocaust in Belarus", published in Russian in 2000.
I'm coordinating translation of this book into English for the Yizkor
Project. The table of contents can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belarus/Belarus.html . The Extraordinary
Commission narratives for the towns in the Lida District are already there,
so you can see the general format. A professional translator is already at
work, although more funds are needed to complete the book. You can donate
through the JewishGen-erosity web page. [As of the last financial report,
somewhat over 1/3 of the necessary funds had been donated].

All that said, there are some statistical anomalies regarding the victim
lists compiled by the Commission: there are only 300-some names for Lida,
but 800-some for Radun, whose Jewish Community was at best 1/5 the size of
that of Lida. By comparison, the list of victims in Sefer Lida contains
several thousand names. A comparison of the surname distribution among the
various lists (NOT an exact comparison, just the things that hit you in the
eye) shows that the Sefer Lida list has the same set of very common surnames
as the voter lists of the early 1900s, with names like Boyarski and Pupko
being the most common. The Extraordinary Commission list does NOT reflect
this surname distribution.

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI
Lida District ShtetLink webmaster
coordinator, Sefer Lida translation project
coordinator, "Holocaust in Belarus" translation project


List for 2005 conference questions/answers now ready #belarus

Elsebeth Paikin
 

Dear 'genners
The mailing list for everybody interested in, or planning to attend the
July 2005 IAJGS conference in Las Vegas, Nevada is ready for
registrants. This will be the list where you can seek roommates,
information about local activities (if you can tear yourselves away >from
the lectures and the networking <g>) and ask any general questions.

To subscribe to LV2005@lyris.jewishgen.org please go to
http://lyris.jewishgen.org/listmanager. JewishGen no longer supports
e-mail registration for mailing lists....web only.

Carol Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects


Belarus SIG #Belarus RE: Soviet Extraordinary Commission reports #belarus

Irene Newhouse <einew@...>
 

It's true that the Soviet Extraordinary Commission reports are a unique
resource. Thinking about doing this work at all while an extremely
difficult war was still in progress is mind-boggling. These reports consist
of a narrative section describing Nazi genocidal activities in a town, then
a list of victims. The victim lists for Radun, Lida & Vasilishki have been
on the Lida District ShtetLink for years, thanks to the activities of
various volunteers. The entire narrative section for Vasilishki is likewise
up, again thanks to an amazing volunteer who managed to read some extremely
faded typing. The links are >from the Holocaust page,
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/holocaust.htm

The narrative portions of these lists were used by Dr. Leonid Smilovitsky in
a section of his book "Holocaust in Belarus", published in Russian in 2000.
I'm coordinating translation of this book into English for the Yizkor
Project. The table of contents can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Belarus/Belarus.html . The Extraordinary
Commission narratives for the towns in the Lida District are already there,
so you can see the general format. A professional translator is already at
work, although more funds are needed to complete the book. You can donate
through the JewishGen-erosity web page. [As of the last financial report,
somewhat over 1/3 of the necessary funds had been donated].

All that said, there are some statistical anomalies regarding the victim
lists compiled by the Commission: there are only 300-some names for Lida,
but 800-some for Radun, whose Jewish Community was at best 1/5 the size of
that of Lida. By comparison, the list of victims in Sefer Lida contains
several thousand names. A comparison of the surname distribution among the
various lists (NOT an exact comparison, just the things that hit you in the
eye) shows that the Sefer Lida list has the same set of very common surnames
as the voter lists of the early 1900s, with names like Boyarski and Pupko
being the most common. The Extraordinary Commission list does NOT reflect
this surname distribution.

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI
Lida District ShtetLink webmaster
coordinator, Sefer Lida translation project
coordinator, "Holocaust in Belarus" translation project


Belarus SIG #Belarus List for 2005 conference questions/answers now ready #belarus

Elsebeth Paikin
 

Dear 'genners
The mailing list for everybody interested in, or planning to attend the
July 2005 IAJGS conference in Las Vegas, Nevada is ready for
registrants. This will be the list where you can seek roommates,
information about local activities (if you can tear yourselves away >from
the lectures and the networking <g>) and ask any general questions.

To subscribe to LV2005@lyris.jewishgen.org please go to
http://lyris.jewishgen.org/listmanager. JewishGen no longer supports
e-mail registration for mailing lists....web only.

Carol Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects


Re: Mitnaged/Chassidic Family Schism #rabbinic

Yisrael Asper
 

The Chassidim in Vilna I read were forced to leave by the Vilna
Gaon. I am descended >from the famous antiChassidic rabbi the Noda
Byehuda through Aleksanderer Chassidim. To this day in family
wedding invitations >from my Gerer Chassidic relatives they many
times write of our descent >from the Noda Byehuda which stems from
that line. Viceversa with Misnagdim mentioning Chassidic relatives
has many times not been done. Does anybody know of how Rav Moshe
FEINSTEIN was reportedly descended >from Chassidim as well as
Misnagdim? I read that he had some Chassidic ancestry in the Jewish
Press.

Yisrael Asper
Pittsburgh


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: Mitnaged/Chassidic Family Schism #rabbinic

Yisrael Asper
 

The Chassidim in Vilna I read were forced to leave by the Vilna
Gaon. I am descended >from the famous antiChassidic rabbi the Noda
Byehuda through Aleksanderer Chassidim. To this day in family
wedding invitations >from my Gerer Chassidic relatives they many
times write of our descent >from the Noda Byehuda which stems from
that line. Viceversa with Misnagdim mentioning Chassidic relatives
has many times not been done. Does anybody know of how Rav Moshe
FEINSTEIN was reportedly descended >from Chassidim as well as
Misnagdim? I read that he had some Chassidic ancestry in the Jewish
Press.

Yisrael Asper
Pittsburgh


Budapest Ghetto #hungary

Adina Michelsohn <mapleleafpq@...>
 

Dear H-SIG,

I would like to thank everyone who provided
information in response to my query about the Budapest
ghetto, especially those who sent maps and supplied
primary source materials. I think I have enough info
for now. This SIG is really the greatest.

Adina Michelsohn
Baltimore, Maryland


Hungary SIG #Hungary Budapest Ghetto #hungary

Adina Michelsohn <mapleleafpq@...>
 

Dear H-SIG,

I would like to thank everyone who provided
information in response to my query about the Budapest
ghetto, especially those who sent maps and supplied
primary source materials. I think I have enough info
for now. This SIG is really the greatest.

Adina Michelsohn
Baltimore, Maryland


Birth certificate from Hungary #hungary

Stephen P Casey <spdanhan@...>
 

Dear John,
about the subject of Hungarian birth certificates.

Do not forget, that a current Hungarian birth
certificate does not contain the religion of the
person, no matter the year he/she was born or the
original document had the religion listed, as it was
till 1945.
If somebody would like to have a birth certificate
with the Jewish ("Izraelita") religion stated, the
Jewish Community has the records and for a small fee
(about $US7 or 8)will provide it.
You can find their email address at the site

http://www.zsido.hu/guide/english.htm

The lady looking after these matters is extremely
helpful

Regards from
Stephen


Presov question #hungary

Lawrence Korman <korman3@...>
 

A friend of mine will be going to his ancestral town of Presov in June. He
wants to see the synagogue. Does anyone know if the synagogue is closed on
certain days of the week, or if one has to make arrangements in advance to
see the inside? It would be terrible for him to have gone all that way
only to find out it was closed.

All help appreciated. Please reply privately

Debbi Korman
Van Nuys, CA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Birth certificate from Hungary #hungary

Stephen P Casey <spdanhan@...>
 

Dear John,
about the subject of Hungarian birth certificates.

Do not forget, that a current Hungarian birth
certificate does not contain the religion of the
person, no matter the year he/she was born or the
original document had the religion listed, as it was
till 1945.
If somebody would like to have a birth certificate
with the Jewish ("Izraelita") religion stated, the
Jewish Community has the records and for a small fee
(about $US7 or 8)will provide it.
You can find their email address at the site

http://www.zsido.hu/guide/english.htm

The lady looking after these matters is extremely
helpful

Regards from
Stephen


Hungary SIG #Hungary Presov question #hungary

Lawrence Korman <korman3@...>
 

A friend of mine will be going to his ancestral town of Presov in June. He
wants to see the synagogue. Does anyone know if the synagogue is closed on
certain days of the week, or if one has to make arrangements in advance to
see the inside? It would be terrible for him to have gone all that way
only to find out it was closed.

All help appreciated. Please reply privately

Debbi Korman
Van Nuys, CA


* Hungarian online auction site #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

[Moderator: As a one time commercial information]

For those who speak Hungarian at
http://www.vatera.hu/index.php
you will find a Hungarian auction site. Many times they feature interesting Jewish memorabilia items and WW2 documents. Worth of a visit.

Note: I have no commercial interest in or relationship to this site

Regards
Tom
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Re: [litvaksig] Trying to Locate border town across from Kubat - Success #general

meir yohanah
 

Dear Members,

Thanks to all those who replied. The general
consensus was that this town was Kibart Lithuania
which did have a school in Eydtkuhnen across the
border in the German ruled Prussia. And now from
reading about it, all the rest of my families notes
relating to there stay at this location all match
to every detail. Thank you everyone for your replies.
The notes were originally given in broken English and
Yiddish so it would have been easy to write down Kubat
for Kibart. And in one place Godonya for Kedainiai.

Sincerely,
Meir Yohanah

--- meir yohanah <meir320@yahoo.com> wrote:

In my families notes >from Lithuania it says that at
some point they moved >from their farm to a location
near the German Border. It says they crossed a border
bridge (every day) with guards on both sides to attend
a school in Germany. And they were searched on the way
back for German goods. They noted there was a male and
female guard. It also said that they thought the name
of the town on the German side was Kubat.

We believe the farm was near Surviliskis, Triskove or
Krekenava. >from the farm, we know they moved to
Kedainiai for a long time, then to Kovno. I am not
sure where the German border was in relation to these
parts of Lithuania between 1882-1902. I didn't think
it touched Lithuania at all.

Does anyone know of a location like this?


Re: Photographs on Certificates of Naturalization #general

s_wiener@...
 

Hi, Genners,

I have read the JewishGen responses to this initial
query as well as receiving a few privately. I see a
variation in the forms we are each reviewing.

Could someone explain the difference between the
Certificate of Naturalization and the Certificate of
Citizenship? Perhaps the likelyhood of a photograph
was determined, in part, by which document one
received?

Many thanks,
Shellie Wiener
San Francisco, CA


Hungary SIG #Hungary * Hungarian online auction site #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

[Moderator: As a one time commercial information]

For those who speak Hungarian at
http://www.vatera.hu/index.php
you will find a Hungarian auction site. Many times they feature interesting Jewish memorabilia items and WW2 documents. Worth of a visit.

Note: I have no commercial interest in or relationship to this site

Regards
Tom
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: [litvaksig] Trying to Locate border town across from Kubat - Success #general

meir yohanah
 

Dear Members,

Thanks to all those who replied. The general
consensus was that this town was Kibart Lithuania
which did have a school in Eydtkuhnen across the
border in the German ruled Prussia. And now from
reading about it, all the rest of my families notes
relating to there stay at this location all match
to every detail. Thank you everyone for your replies.
The notes were originally given in broken English and
Yiddish so it would have been easy to write down Kubat
for Kibart. And in one place Godonya for Kedainiai.

Sincerely,
Meir Yohanah

--- meir yohanah <meir320@yahoo.com> wrote:

In my families notes >from Lithuania it says that at
some point they moved >from their farm to a location
near the German Border. It says they crossed a border
bridge (every day) with guards on both sides to attend
a school in Germany. And they were searched on the way
back for German goods. They noted there was a male and
female guard. It also said that they thought the name
of the town on the German side was Kubat.

We believe the farm was near Surviliskis, Triskove or
Krekenava. >from the farm, we know they moved to
Kedainiai for a long time, then to Kovno. I am not
sure where the German border was in relation to these
parts of Lithuania between 1882-1902. I didn't think
it touched Lithuania at all.

Does anyone know of a location like this?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Photographs on Certificates of Naturalization #general

s_wiener@...
 

Hi, Genners,

I have read the JewishGen responses to this initial
query as well as receiving a few privately. I see a
variation in the forms we are each reviewing.

Could someone explain the difference between the
Certificate of Naturalization and the Certificate of
Citizenship? Perhaps the likelyhood of a photograph
was determined, in part, by which document one
received?

Many thanks,
Shellie Wiener
San Francisco, CA


Re: British Jews: Dutch, German or East European? (was black aprons) #general

Sue <clamp@...>
 

In article <6.2.0.14.2.20050126005720.04e5f610@pop.mts.net>,
Susana Leistner Bloch <bloch@mts.net> wrote:
In my case however, speaking fluently in Yiddish with my mother,
there was no way the word "Schuerze[/Schirtze" [German for shirt] could
be confused with the word "hemd" [Yiddish for shirt ].At least this is
how we Galicianers called a shirt.
My German dictionary confirms that Hemd is the German word for shirt and
that Schuerze is apron.

Sue Clamp

--
Sue Clamp
Cambridgeshire, UK.
Researching: ROSENBERG/ROZENBERG, SKOWRONEK, HERSZENKRUG,
KRIEGSMANN/KRIGSMAN/KRYKSMAN, CHENCINER and DRUSZN/DROZEN/DROSSEN, Warsaw.
Getting round to (eventually!): BLEETMAN, Odessa, GOLDSTEIN and SALAMONSKI.

Remove .cut.invalid >from email address to reply.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: British Jews: Dutch, German or East European? (was black aprons) #general

Sue <clamp@...>
 

In article <6.2.0.14.2.20050126005720.04e5f610@pop.mts.net>,
Susana Leistner Bloch <bloch@mts.net> wrote:
In my case however, speaking fluently in Yiddish with my mother,
there was no way the word "Schuerze[/Schirtze" [German for shirt] could
be confused with the word "hemd" [Yiddish for shirt ].At least this is
how we Galicianers called a shirt.
My German dictionary confirms that Hemd is the German word for shirt and
that Schuerze is apron.

Sue Clamp

--
Sue Clamp
Cambridgeshire, UK.
Researching: ROSENBERG/ROZENBERG, SKOWRONEK, HERSZENKRUG,
KRIEGSMANN/KRIGSMAN/KRYKSMAN, CHENCINER and DRUSZN/DROZEN/DROSSEN, Warsaw.
Getting round to (eventually!): BLEETMAN, Odessa, GOLDSTEIN and SALAMONSKI.

Remove .cut.invalid >from email address to reply.