Date   

Fw: Loking for my family #general

arie meir
 

hi to all of you

It's already more than ten years that I'm looking for my family who
disappeared in world war 2

Here are the details: My grand father Chaim GLASER >from Przemysl Poland his
daughter Debora (Dora) born in 1927. His wife who passed away( as I was told)
before the war was Rachla (maiden name STOLZBERG). They got married in 1926.

Chaim Glaser was married in Vienna to Helena Glaser and had three children
Cilli, Herman, David. He got divorced in the early twenties And moved to
Przemysl where he got married again.

The last time my late mother heard >from them was in 1939.

Enclosed is viewmate of my grandfathe uf some one of the readers have any
information of him or his daughter dvora please contact me. The viewmat is VM5425

Arieh Mayer
Haifa
Israel
P.S. my email is meir1935@netvision.net.il

MODERATOR NOTE: Direct url is:
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5425


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Fw: Loking for my family #general

arie meir
 

hi to all of you

It's already more than ten years that I'm looking for my family who
disappeared in world war 2

Here are the details: My grand father Chaim GLASER >from Przemysl Poland his
daughter Debora (Dora) born in 1927. His wife who passed away( as I was told)
before the war was Rachla (maiden name STOLZBERG). They got married in 1926.

Chaim Glaser was married in Vienna to Helena Glaser and had three children
Cilli, Herman, David. He got divorced in the early twenties And moved to
Przemysl where he got married again.

The last time my late mother heard >from them was in 1939.

Enclosed is viewmate of my grandfathe uf some one of the readers have any
information of him or his daughter dvora please contact me. The viewmat is VM5425

Arieh Mayer
Haifa
Israel
P.S. my email is meir1935@netvision.net.il

MODERATOR NOTE: Direct url is:
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=5425


Gdow records #galicia

bikerick
 

Hi: >from the Yad Vashem records it appears that my Zimmerspitz ancestors
were in Gdow, Poland in the 1860-1870s. The only records >from there on the
Jewish Record Indexing are some post-1900 marriages. The Routes-To-Routes
website did not list any available records >from Gdow, nor does the Family
History Center show any. Does anyone know if there may be vital 19th century
Jewish records >from Gdow or how I might go about determining if there are
such records?

Rick Hyman, California
ZIMMERSPITZ: Chorowice, Skawina, Gdow
HUPERT: Wielke Drogie


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Gdow records #galicia

bikerick
 

Hi: >from the Yad Vashem records it appears that my Zimmerspitz ancestors
were in Gdow, Poland in the 1860-1870s. The only records >from there on the
Jewish Record Indexing are some post-1900 marriages. The Routes-To-Routes
website did not list any available records >from Gdow, nor does the Family
History Center show any. Does anyone know if there may be vital 19th century
Jewish records >from Gdow or how I might go about determining if there are
such records?

Rick Hyman, California
ZIMMERSPITZ: Chorowice, Skawina, Gdow
HUPERT: Wielke Drogie


Re: Meaning of Name FRIEDMAN #general

Avrohom Krauss <krauss@...>
 

I believe this confusion stems >from the meaning of "Fried" in
German/Yiddish. In Yiddish, "freid' or "freed" means "happy" (eg. tzu
frieden). ("Free man" could be a translation had this name originated as
English name, which it did not). However, if I am not mistaken, in Old
German, "freed" means "peace," and that is said to be the meaning for
"Friedman."

Avrohom Krauss
Telz-Stone Israel

Researching FRIEDMAN (FRYDMAN,FRIDMAN) of Korosten and Zitomir in Ukraine.I
havemaintained that our family name of FRIEDMAN translates to "man of peace".
Others say it means "freed man " or "free man".I would appreciate some
elucidation in this matter. Thank you.
Elmer Friedman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Meaning of Name FRIEDMAN #general

Avrohom Krauss <krauss@...>
 

I believe this confusion stems >from the meaning of "Fried" in
German/Yiddish. In Yiddish, "freid' or "freed" means "happy" (eg. tzu
frieden). ("Free man" could be a translation had this name originated as
English name, which it did not). However, if I am not mistaken, in Old
German, "freed" means "peace," and that is said to be the meaning for
"Friedman."

Avrohom Krauss
Telz-Stone Israel

Researching FRIEDMAN (FRYDMAN,FRIDMAN) of Korosten and Zitomir in Ukraine.I
havemaintained that our family name of FRIEDMAN translates to "man of peace".
Others say it means "freed man " or "free man".I would appreciate some
elucidation in this matter. Thank you.
Elmer Friedman


Re: Meaning of Name FRIEDMAN #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Researching FRIEDMAN (FRYDMAN,FRIDMAN) of Korosten and Zitomir in
Ukraine.I have
maintained that our family name of FRIEDMAN translates to "man of
peace". Others
say it means "freed man " or "free man".I would appreciate some elucidation in
this matter. Thank you.
Elmer Friedman
Dear Elmer,

Frieden (pronounced Free-den) is German/ Yiddish for peace. So
by all means go with your own idea, which happens to be the correct
answer!

The German (and Yiddish) word for free is frei, Note three things
about that word:
(1) there's no "d" in it
(2) the "e" and "i" in the word "frei" are in *that* order and not "i e"
(3) German words with e before i are *always* pronounced like the
English word "fry" and *never* like the word "free."

So, please tell your relatives who held the contrary opinion that
there is absolutely no connection between the name Fried and the
German word "frei."

This mistake arose because of a common American misconception that
German words spelled with "IE" are pronounced like the English
pronoun "I", while those spelled with "EI" are pronounced "EE." In
fact, the exact reverse is the case! Your relatives may have
wrongly assumed that the German adjective "frei" -- which means
"free" but is pronounced "fry" -- was actually pronounced free --
and therefore, they assumed that the word "frei" must have some
connection with the name Friedman (Frydman, Fridman But in fact, the
German word "frei" meaning "free" has nothing whatsoever to do with
the German word Frieden (pronounced freeden), meaning "peace."

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Meaning of Name FRIEDMAN #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Researching FRIEDMAN (FRYDMAN,FRIDMAN) of Korosten and Zitomir in
Ukraine.I have
maintained that our family name of FRIEDMAN translates to "man of
peace". Others
say it means "freed man " or "free man".I would appreciate some elucidation in
this matter. Thank you.
Elmer Friedman
Dear Elmer,

Frieden (pronounced Free-den) is German/ Yiddish for peace. So
by all means go with your own idea, which happens to be the correct
answer!

The German (and Yiddish) word for free is frei, Note three things
about that word:
(1) there's no "d" in it
(2) the "e" and "i" in the word "frei" are in *that* order and not "i e"
(3) German words with e before i are *always* pronounced like the
English word "fry" and *never* like the word "free."

So, please tell your relatives who held the contrary opinion that
there is absolutely no connection between the name Fried and the
German word "frei."

This mistake arose because of a common American misconception that
German words spelled with "IE" are pronounced like the English
pronoun "I", while those spelled with "EI" are pronounced "EE." In
fact, the exact reverse is the case! Your relatives may have
wrongly assumed that the German adjective "frei" -- which means
"free" but is pronounced "fry" -- was actually pronounced free --
and therefore, they assumed that the word "frei" must have some
connection with the name Friedman (Frydman, Fridman But in fact, the
German word "frei" meaning "free" has nothing whatsoever to do with
the German word Frieden (pronounced freeden), meaning "peace."

Judith Romney Wegner


Re: Australian Website #general

Vernon Kronenberg <vkronenb@...>
 

Stephen,

These are the reference numbers that you would use to ask for a copy of the
relevant documents to be sent to you.

Specifically, they are the case file series >from 1930 onwards >from the State
of Victoria for the federal Department of Immigration, totalling 3253
metres, so some of the other numbers may help the experts to narrow down
their search, should you go ahead and ask.

As some of the documents have not yet been security-cleared, a request may
take an extra 30 days or so to process - a detail I mention so that you
should not schvitz while waiting for delivery.

--
Vernon Kronenberg vkronenb at pcug dot org dot au
Australia
Member, AJGS and RAOGK;
Searching: BLUMENKOPF (Garwolin& Warsaw); BOROWY; FISZ (Poland); GRUETZMANN;
KRONENBERG (Lodz & Warsaw); KUPERMAN & LEDERER (Bronx 1940s); ORZEL; REZNIK
(Warsaw & Jerusalem); RUDZYNSKI

<NJ55TURTLE@aol.com> wrote
The other day, a genner gave the following web site for searching governmental
records in Australia.

www.naa.gov.au/the_collection/recordsearch.html

I entered the name PICKHOLZ, and it came up with a Jerzy PICKHOLZ. I then
went and clicked on more details. This page gave me a lot of reference numbers,
that mean nothing to me. Before I try to get copies of these records, could
someone tell me what I found?

Thanks.

Stephen Pickholtz
Tabernacle, NJ
USA
searching-- PICKHOLTZ (all spellings), WINITSKY (all spellings) and KLEIN/KLINE
(of the Phila. JCC family)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Australian Website #general

Vernon Kronenberg <vkronenb@...>
 

Stephen,

These are the reference numbers that you would use to ask for a copy of the
relevant documents to be sent to you.

Specifically, they are the case file series >from 1930 onwards >from the State
of Victoria for the federal Department of Immigration, totalling 3253
metres, so some of the other numbers may help the experts to narrow down
their search, should you go ahead and ask.

As some of the documents have not yet been security-cleared, a request may
take an extra 30 days or so to process - a detail I mention so that you
should not schvitz while waiting for delivery.

--
Vernon Kronenberg vkronenb at pcug dot org dot au
Australia
Member, AJGS and RAOGK;
Searching: BLUMENKOPF (Garwolin& Warsaw); BOROWY; FISZ (Poland); GRUETZMANN;
KRONENBERG (Lodz & Warsaw); KUPERMAN & LEDERER (Bronx 1940s); ORZEL; REZNIK
(Warsaw & Jerusalem); RUDZYNSKI

<NJ55TURTLE@aol.com> wrote
The other day, a genner gave the following web site for searching governmental
records in Australia.

www.naa.gov.au/the_collection/recordsearch.html

I entered the name PICKHOLZ, and it came up with a Jerzy PICKHOLZ. I then
went and clicked on more details. This page gave me a lot of reference numbers,
that mean nothing to me. Before I try to get copies of these records, could
someone tell me what I found?

Thanks.

Stephen Pickholtz
Tabernacle, NJ
USA
searching-- PICKHOLTZ (all spellings), WINITSKY (all spellings) and KLEIN/KLINE
(of the Phila. JCC family)


Genealogy and mixed Marriages #general

Beryl. B <balden@...>
 

Dear Genners
Many thanks for the replies both privately and on
the Digest to the question "Genealogy and Mixed
Marriages".

My personal opinions are similar to those offered
in the replies received.

The reason behind my question was because this question
was posed by a member of my genealogy group and I decided
to do a personal survey regarding the matter,
with International Genealogy members.

Once again, many thanks for your co-operation.

Sincerely
Beryl Baleson
Israel.
balden@zahav.net.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Genealogy and mixed Marriages #general

Beryl. B <balden@...>
 

Dear Genners
Many thanks for the replies both privately and on
the Digest to the question "Genealogy and Mixed
Marriages".

My personal opinions are similar to those offered
in the replies received.

The reason behind my question was because this question
was posed by a member of my genealogy group and I decided
to do a personal survey regarding the matter,
with International Genealogy members.

Once again, many thanks for your co-operation.

Sincerely
Beryl Baleson
Israel.
balden@zahav.net.il


Re: Genealogy and Mixed Marriage #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

In a message dated 2/1/2005 10:57:41 PM Eastern Standard Time,
balden@zahav.net.il writes:

< The topic "Genealogy and mixed Marriage" has cropped up in my circle, and
although I personally have my own views, I would like to hear the views of
professional Genealogists on this. Is it fair to exclude a member of one's
family
from a family tree due to intermarriage? >
This is an interesting question which I will respond to in terms of my own
research >from many years ago. I was researching Colonial Jewish families
and used Rabbi Malcolm H. Stern's book "First American Jewish Families" as a
resource. Unfortunately, Rabbi Stern did not believe in the inclusion of
non-Jewish descendants and therefore left them out.

While I understood his reason for this and respect it, it was annoying as I
was unable to connect a number of people to their appropriate family trees.
Some of these non-Jews had descendants who eventually married Jews once
again as it so happens in our multi-ethnic society and they wanted to know
about that earlier ancestry.

I hope that those who feel as Rabbi Stern did realize that while your tree
is your own business to construct as you wish, limiting it to Jews only
withholds your heritage >from those who may want to share it despite the fact
that they may not be halachicly Jewish.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Genealogy and Mixed Marriage #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

In a message dated 2/1/2005 10:57:41 PM Eastern Standard Time,
balden@zahav.net.il writes:

< The topic "Genealogy and mixed Marriage" has cropped up in my circle, and
although I personally have my own views, I would like to hear the views of
professional Genealogists on this. Is it fair to exclude a member of one's
family
from a family tree due to intermarriage? >
This is an interesting question which I will respond to in terms of my own
research >from many years ago. I was researching Colonial Jewish families
and used Rabbi Malcolm H. Stern's book "First American Jewish Families" as a
resource. Unfortunately, Rabbi Stern did not believe in the inclusion of
non-Jewish descendants and therefore left them out.

While I understood his reason for this and respect it, it was annoying as I
was unable to connect a number of people to their appropriate family trees.
Some of these non-Jews had descendants who eventually married Jews once
again as it so happens in our multi-ethnic society and they wanted to know
about that earlier ancestry.

I hope that those who feel as Rabbi Stern did realize that while your tree
is your own business to construct as you wish, limiting it to Jews only
withholds your heritage >from those who may want to share it despite the fact
that they may not be halachicly Jewish.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


Naming protocols and "Manzana" in Argentina #general

Carlos Glikson
 

In "Re: Success Story re: Argentina" Rochelle Gershenow asked about naming
protocols in lists in Argentina.

I have a question regarding a naming protocol for women. If the name
appears as Salem de Purinzon Sarah which is maiden name, mother's name, or
married name
In a typed text list offline, instead of a display of data base fields
online, this would probably be written as "Salem de Purinzon, Sarah", and if
she was listed with her name first, "Sarah Salem de Purinzon".

In both styles including “Salem de Purinzon”, Salem is the maiden name,
and Purinzon is the married name.

Rochelle added

and, if name is Purinzon Ana Katzman which is maiden name, mother's name,
or married name.
The “Purinzon Ana Katzman” is not very usual. The “de” is missing, and this
notation would probably imply a form which usually looks like "Purinzon, Ana
Katzman de". In a text list offline, with the name first, and if this would
be the implied form, the name would probably be "Ana Katzman de Purinzon".

In “Katzman de Purinzon”, Katzman is the maiden name, and Purinzon is the
married name.

Finally Rochelle mentions:

Also, on the cemetery listing what is the translation of "Manzana?" When
I tried translating it, it translated as "Apple" which made no sense since
it was over a number.
Spanish city plans in flat South American land were usually divided in
square blocks. They usually had sides of 100 meters minus the street and
sidewalk width, if I´m not wrong. Manzana is not only "apple", but also a
term used in urban design to describe these square urban blocks.

In the case of “Manzana” as used in the referred cemetery site, it may or
may be not a square with 100 meter sides as in nearby urban Buenos Aires – I
think not, but never asked or thought about it! - but it definitely
identifies a sector of the cemetery.

The specification of location of tombs may vary >from cemetery to cemetery,
but in this case is given identifying the particular area of the cemetery by
Manzana (block), and inside the Manzana, precising the Fila (row in that
block) and Sepultura (which tomb in that row).

Hope this helps.

Carlos Glikson
Buenos Aires


Re: Genealogy and Mixed Marriage #general

Israel P
 

I include them, but do not include Jewish dates in their references, as I do for
the Jews.

Nor do I include "Hebrew names" of children whose mother is not Jewish - on the
odd chance I know that fact. (Of course, that does not preclude a note explaining
whom the person was named for, when I know that.)

You must include family members who marry out. If nothing else, it saves
someone else's asking "whatever happened to so-and-so?"

Israel Pickholtz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Naming protocols and "Manzana" in Argentina #general

Carlos Glikson
 

In "Re: Success Story re: Argentina" Rochelle Gershenow asked about naming
protocols in lists in Argentina.

I have a question regarding a naming protocol for women. If the name
appears as Salem de Purinzon Sarah which is maiden name, mother's name, or
married name
In a typed text list offline, instead of a display of data base fields
online, this would probably be written as "Salem de Purinzon, Sarah", and if
she was listed with her name first, "Sarah Salem de Purinzon".

In both styles including “Salem de Purinzon”, Salem is the maiden name,
and Purinzon is the married name.

Rochelle added

and, if name is Purinzon Ana Katzman which is maiden name, mother's name,
or married name.
The “Purinzon Ana Katzman” is not very usual. The “de” is missing, and this
notation would probably imply a form which usually looks like "Purinzon, Ana
Katzman de". In a text list offline, with the name first, and if this would
be the implied form, the name would probably be "Ana Katzman de Purinzon".

In “Katzman de Purinzon”, Katzman is the maiden name, and Purinzon is the
married name.

Finally Rochelle mentions:

Also, on the cemetery listing what is the translation of "Manzana?" When
I tried translating it, it translated as "Apple" which made no sense since
it was over a number.
Spanish city plans in flat South American land were usually divided in
square blocks. They usually had sides of 100 meters minus the street and
sidewalk width, if I´m not wrong. Manzana is not only "apple", but also a
term used in urban design to describe these square urban blocks.

In the case of “Manzana” as used in the referred cemetery site, it may or
may be not a square with 100 meter sides as in nearby urban Buenos Aires – I
think not, but never asked or thought about it! - but it definitely
identifies a sector of the cemetery.

The specification of location of tombs may vary >from cemetery to cemetery,
but in this case is given identifying the particular area of the cemetery by
Manzana (block), and inside the Manzana, precising the Fila (row in that
block) and Sepultura (which tomb in that row).

Hope this helps.

Carlos Glikson
Buenos Aires


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Genealogy and Mixed Marriage #general

Israel P
 

I include them, but do not include Jewish dates in their references, as I do for
the Jews.

Nor do I include "Hebrew names" of children whose mother is not Jewish - on the
odd chance I know that fact. (Of course, that does not preclude a note explaining
whom the person was named for, when I know that.)

You must include family members who marry out. If nothing else, it saves
someone else's asking "whatever happened to so-and-so?"

Israel Pickholtz


January 2005 Yizkor Book Report #lodz #poland

Joyce Field
 

To begin the year of 2005, the Yizkor Book Project put online two new
books, three new entries ,and 16 updates during January. All are
available at the Index page,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. Included is a
Russian translation of a book that has been online for some time, To
Survive and Tell. The Russian version can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lipkany/lipr001.html.

New Books:

-Brest, Belarus : volume 2
-Ryki, Poland

New Entries:

-Bukowina: Tragedy of the Bukowina Jews (volume 2), History of
Massada (volume 1) , and The Massada in Israel (volume 1)
-Frumisca, Romania: Pinkas Hakehillot Romania, volume 1
-Radzyn Podlaski, Kehila List

Updates:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Belzec: Prototype of the Final Solution, Chapters 7-9
-Belchatow, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland: The Jews of Czestochowa
-Czestochowa, Poland: supplement
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Druzhkopol, Ukraine
-Gorodets, Belarus
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Lipkany, Moldova: translation into Russian of Survive and Tell.
-Lita, volume 1
-Rejowiec, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Svisloch, Belarus
-Zloczew, Poland


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland January 2005 Yizkor Book Report #lodz #poland

Joyce Field
 

To begin the year of 2005, the Yizkor Book Project put online two new
books, three new entries ,and 16 updates during January. All are
available at the Index page,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. Included is a
Russian translation of a book that has been online for some time, To
Survive and Tell. The Russian version can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/lipkany/lipr001.html.

New Books:

-Brest, Belarus : volume 2
-Ryki, Poland

New Entries:

-Bukowina: Tragedy of the Bukowina Jews (volume 2), History of
Massada (volume 1) , and The Massada in Israel (volume 1)
-Frumisca, Romania: Pinkas Hakehillot Romania, volume 1
-Radzyn Podlaski, Kehila List

Updates:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Belzec: Prototype of the Final Solution, Chapters 7-9
-Belchatow, Poland
-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland: The Jews of Czestochowa
-Czestochowa, Poland: supplement
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Druzhkopol, Ukraine
-Gorodets, Belarus
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Lipkany, Moldova: translation into Russian of Survive and Tell.
-Lita, volume 1
-Rejowiec, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Svisloch, Belarus
-Zloczew, Poland