Date   

Need Help Deciphering Name of Town in Ship Manifest #general

Rochelle Gershenow
 

Jente SLONIMTKY (SLONIMSKY)>from Minsk arrived at Ellis Island on 4/26/1910
on the Estonia >from Libau. The ship's manifest lists her place of birth. I
cannot decipher it. Would someone look at it and see if you can decipher
the name of the town in which she was born. Please reply privately to me.

Rochelle Gershenow
Potomac, MD

Searching: AKINSKY/AGINSKY (Belarus); CHAIKIN (Priluki or Priluki area,
Ukraine); GERIS (Belarus); LECKERMAN/LAKERMAN (Podelski or Priluki, Ukraine;
or Pennsylvania, USA); LIFSCHITZ (Podelski or Priluki, Ukraine); SLONIMSKY
(Minsk, Belarus)or SLONIM (USA); SONDEK/SUNDOCK/SUNDACK (Lutzin, Belarus;
Ludza, Latvia; USA); PURINSON/PURINZON/PURRINSON (Priluki,Ukraine;
Argentina; Israel; USA); SOKOLOFF (Priluki or Priluki area, Ukraine)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need Help Deciphering Name of Town in Ship Manifest #general

Rochelle Gershenow
 

Jente SLONIMTKY (SLONIMSKY)>from Minsk arrived at Ellis Island on 4/26/1910
on the Estonia >from Libau. The ship's manifest lists her place of birth. I
cannot decipher it. Would someone look at it and see if you can decipher
the name of the town in which she was born. Please reply privately to me.

Rochelle Gershenow
Potomac, MD

Searching: AKINSKY/AGINSKY (Belarus); CHAIKIN (Priluki or Priluki area,
Ukraine); GERIS (Belarus); LECKERMAN/LAKERMAN (Podelski or Priluki, Ukraine;
or Pennsylvania, USA); LIFSCHITZ (Podelski or Priluki, Ukraine); SLONIMSKY
(Minsk, Belarus)or SLONIM (USA); SONDEK/SUNDOCK/SUNDACK (Lutzin, Belarus;
Ludza, Latvia; USA); PURINSON/PURINZON/PURRINSON (Priluki,Ukraine;
Argentina; Israel; USA); SOKOLOFF (Priluki or Priluki area, Ukraine)


Re: Curious phrase in death notice #general

Martin Fischer
 

Roy Ogus asked about the use of the phrase
"Chicago, Los Angeles papers please copy" in early 20th Century death
notices.

I have also encountered such phrases in late 19th Century and early 20th
Century newspapers. In earlier times it was fairly common for American
newspapers to extend this courtesy to other newspapers for the families of
the deceased. The death may have occurred in a location away >from their
hometown or, if the death did occur in the person's hometown, he or she may
have previously lived in another town where residents would still be
interested in the person's demise.

Also, there was then, and still is, a distinction that not everyone is aware
of between a death notice and an obituary. A death notice is usually a
classified advertisement that the deceased person's survivors pay to have
published. An obituary is an article that the newspaper publishes without
charge as a public service to its readers.

The phrase "Chicago, Los Angeles papers please copy" in a New York newspaper
death notice is an open invitation to the newspapers in the other cities to
publish an obituary about that person. If the deceased was a personage of
some reknown or notoriety, the newspapers in those cities might publish a
full obituary with its own headline. However, for less well-know people iin
the 19th Century and early 20th Century, the re-publication might not appear
in the form of a full article, but rather in a compilation of short items
under a heading of "Deaths elsewhere."

So, while doing genealogical research, we need to be mindful that newspapers
far and wide may have items of interest about a person in a variety of
formats. If you look only at paid death notices in a newspaper where a
person last resided, you could be missing valuable information about that
person that might appear in a more complete and more interesting obituary
prepared by a newspaper reporter.

(One of the major online subscription services, Ancestry.com, has a
searchable database of old newspapers that I have found useful in locating
information about a distant relative whose eccentricities in the early 20th
Century were, for a time, fodder for journalists all over the U.S.)

Martin Fischer
Oak Park, Illinois


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Curious phrase in death notice #general

Martin Fischer
 

Roy Ogus asked about the use of the phrase
"Chicago, Los Angeles papers please copy" in early 20th Century death
notices.

I have also encountered such phrases in late 19th Century and early 20th
Century newspapers. In earlier times it was fairly common for American
newspapers to extend this courtesy to other newspapers for the families of
the deceased. The death may have occurred in a location away >from their
hometown or, if the death did occur in the person's hometown, he or she may
have previously lived in another town where residents would still be
interested in the person's demise.

Also, there was then, and still is, a distinction that not everyone is aware
of between a death notice and an obituary. A death notice is usually a
classified advertisement that the deceased person's survivors pay to have
published. An obituary is an article that the newspaper publishes without
charge as a public service to its readers.

The phrase "Chicago, Los Angeles papers please copy" in a New York newspaper
death notice is an open invitation to the newspapers in the other cities to
publish an obituary about that person. If the deceased was a personage of
some reknown or notoriety, the newspapers in those cities might publish a
full obituary with its own headline. However, for less well-know people iin
the 19th Century and early 20th Century, the re-publication might not appear
in the form of a full article, but rather in a compilation of short items
under a heading of "Deaths elsewhere."

So, while doing genealogical research, we need to be mindful that newspapers
far and wide may have items of interest about a person in a variety of
formats. If you look only at paid death notices in a newspaper where a
person last resided, you could be missing valuable information about that
person that might appear in a more complete and more interesting obituary
prepared by a newspaper reporter.

(One of the major online subscription services, Ancestry.com, has a
searchable database of old newspapers that I have found useful in locating
information about a distant relative whose eccentricities in the early 20th
Century were, for a time, fodder for journalists all over the U.S.)

Martin Fischer
Oak Park, Illinois


Re: Curious phrase in death notice #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 04:51:15 UTC, r_ogus@... (Roy Ogus) opined:

A few times I've come across the following curious phrase in a death notice
during the early part of the 20th Century. For example, in a 1922 death
notice in the New York Times for a person who died in NY, and who evidently
had family in Chicago and Los Angeles, I found the following phrase which
was included in the notice:

"Chicago, Los Angeles papers please copy"

Does anyone know whether other newspapers would actually copy the death
notice in their own newspapers, or do something else with the information?
I wouldn't know if papers in other cities would actually copy the
announcement.

It would seem unlikely that they would run their own death noticed, if the
death notices were paid items. If not, what did this phrase actually mean?

Just curious!
There are, of course, circumstances in which even an obituary notice can
represent news, and be worth printing even without fee.

The sentence means exactly what it says. My guess is that the obituary would
be copied if the deceased were reasonably prominent, and if his departure
could be of interest to the local readership. I doubt if such a sentence
would be printed (or if it were, would be effective) in a newspaper of
strictly local readership: an editor of the Los Angeles Times would be
unlikely to ever see it in e.g. the Poughkeepsie Journal, whereas it might
catch his eye in the New York Times.

If your interest should progress beyond idle curiousity, you might search
Chicago and Los Angeles newspapers that appeared a few days after the
sentence that you saw. It's easy enough.


--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Curious phrase in death notice #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 04:51:15 UTC, r_ogus@... (Roy Ogus) opined:

A few times I've come across the following curious phrase in a death notice
during the early part of the 20th Century. For example, in a 1922 death
notice in the New York Times for a person who died in NY, and who evidently
had family in Chicago and Los Angeles, I found the following phrase which
was included in the notice:

"Chicago, Los Angeles papers please copy"

Does anyone know whether other newspapers would actually copy the death
notice in their own newspapers, or do something else with the information?
I wouldn't know if papers in other cities would actually copy the
announcement.

It would seem unlikely that they would run their own death noticed, if the
death notices were paid items. If not, what did this phrase actually mean?

Just curious!
There are, of course, circumstances in which even an obituary notice can
represent news, and be worth printing even without fee.

The sentence means exactly what it says. My guess is that the obituary would
be copied if the deceased were reasonably prominent, and if his departure
could be of interest to the local readership. I doubt if such a sentence
would be printed (or if it were, would be effective) in a newspaper of
strictly local readership: an editor of the Los Angeles Times would be
unlikely to ever see it in e.g. the Poughkeepsie Journal, whereas it might
catch his eye in the New York Times.

If your interest should progress beyond idle curiousity, you might search
Chicago and Los Angeles newspapers that appeared a few days after the
sentence that you saw. It's easy enough.


--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Re: Intro: request for information on the rabbinate in Latvia, specifically Libau, Piltene and Kuldiga #latvia

martha <martha@...>
 

The new book on the Jews of Latvia, which I wrote about a couple of
weeks ago would help you out with your religious/rabbinical questions.
[Check the SIG archives.]

Migrations - as you put it - between Latvia and Lita were freely and
frequently made. Each was like the back yard of the other and families
flowed freely between them.

Martha Lev-Zion
Israel

On 9 Feb 2005, at 21:21, Shoshana L. Boublil wrote:
..snip..
1st how can I find additional information about religious institute
in Latvia. 2nd, why would someone born in Piltene, be listed as born
in "Zagare Lithuania" in the pages of testimony (his sister)?

Also, where can I read about the migrations of jews between Latvia
and Lithuania?
..snip..


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Intro: request for information on the rabbinate in Latvia, specifically Libau, Piltene and Kuldiga #latvia

martha <martha@...>
 

The new book on the Jews of Latvia, which I wrote about a couple of
weeks ago would help you out with your religious/rabbinical questions.
[Check the SIG archives.]

Migrations - as you put it - between Latvia and Lita were freely and
frequently made. Each was like the back yard of the other and families
flowed freely between them.

Martha Lev-Zion
Israel

On 9 Feb 2005, at 21:21, Shoshana L. Boublil wrote:
..snip..
1st how can I find additional information about religious institute
in Latvia. 2nd, why would someone born in Piltene, be listed as born
in "Zagare Lithuania" in the pages of testimony (his sister)?

Also, where can I read about the migrations of jews between Latvia
and Lithuania?
..snip..


Thank You #poland

Linda Shefler <linsilv@...>
 

In case I missed thanking anyone personally, I want to thank all of you who
took the time to respond to my query regarding RABBI SHIMON of Checiny. As
usual your insights and suggestions have been most helpful.

Thanks again.

Shabbat shalom,
Linda Silverman Shefler
Cary, NC


JRI Poland #Poland Thank You #poland

Linda Shefler <linsilv@...>
 

In case I missed thanking anyone personally, I want to thank all of you who
took the time to respond to my query regarding RABBI SHIMON of Checiny. As
usual your insights and suggestions have been most helpful.

Thanks again.

Shabbat shalom,
Linda Silverman Shefler
Cary, NC


Vital Records Indexing Project Donor Form in Excel Format #lithuania

Richard H. Hoffman/LitvakSIG Treasurer/Membership Chair <litvaksigmembership@...>
 

To assist those who are interested in the Vital Records Indexing Project, I
have re-created the list of towns in a 3 column Excel worksheet as an
expansion of the portion of the donor form.

If you are interested in receiving this worksheet by e-mail, please e-mail
litvaksigmembership@... and I will reply to the individual e-mails
with the atttached form. Requests should not be made to the digest. We
hope to have this form available for download in the not too distant future.

For general questions regarding the project, please contact Joel Ratner,
at joelrat1@...

Richard H. Hoffman
LitvakSIG Treasurer/Membership Chair
litvaksigmembership@...
www.jewishgen.org/litvak/


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Vital Records Indexing Project Donor Form in Excel Format #lithuania

Richard H. Hoffman/LitvakSIG Treasurer/Membership Chair <litvaksigmembership@...>
 

To assist those who are interested in the Vital Records Indexing Project, I
have re-created the list of towns in a 3 column Excel worksheet as an
expansion of the portion of the donor form.

If you are interested in receiving this worksheet by e-mail, please e-mail
litvaksigmembership@... and I will reply to the individual e-mails
with the atttached form. Requests should not be made to the digest. We
hope to have this form available for download in the not too distant future.

For general questions regarding the project, please contact Joel Ratner,
at joelrat1@...

Richard H. Hoffman
LitvakSIG Treasurer/Membership Chair
litvaksigmembership@...
www.jewishgen.org/litvak/


Re: telephone directories #poland #warsaw

Nicole Berline <Nicole.Berline@...>
 

The Library of Congress also has many polish directories, prewar and postwar.
the 1948 directories should be very interesting !

you can find the list and a description on the page
Retrospective Telephone Directories >from Poland
at the Library of Congress
http://www.loc.gov/rr/european/phonepo/pophone.html


regards
Nicole Berline, Paris


Rose Feldman wrote:

A few ideas -
1. I keep an excel page where I keep all the addresses I have
accumulated for our relatives in Warsaw.
This way I can see if they moved around a lot. If you remember what
Hadassah wrote me, you can translate the house number on the marriage
registation and other documents into an adderss by using the 1870 Home
Owners html.
2. In the Jewish Historical Institute there is a 1910 directory I hear.
3. In the CAHJP in Jerusalem and I think in Yad Vashem there is a copy
of the 1939-40 directoy.
4. Hadassah says there are some more directories in the NY public
library -


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Re: telephone directories #warsaw #poland

Nicole Berline <Nicole.Berline@...>
 

The Library of Congress also has many polish directories, prewar and postwar.
the 1948 directories should be very interesting !

you can find the list and a description on the page
Retrospective Telephone Directories >from Poland
at the Library of Congress
http://www.loc.gov/rr/european/phonepo/pophone.html


regards
Nicole Berline, Paris


Rose Feldman wrote:

A few ideas -
1. I keep an excel page where I keep all the addresses I have
accumulated for our relatives in Warsaw.
This way I can see if they moved around a lot. If you remember what
Hadassah wrote me, you can translate the house number on the marriage
registation and other documents into an adderss by using the 1870 Home
Owners html.
2. In the Jewish Historical Institute there is a 1910 directory I hear.
3. In the CAHJP in Jerusalem and I think in Yad Vashem there is a copy
of the 1939-40 directoy.
4. Hadassah says there are some more directories in the NY public
library -


Re: Back of 1913 NYC death certificate #general

Lynne Shapiro <lynneshap@...>
 

I have a certified copy of a death certificate originally issued by the
NYC Dept. of Health for my great-grandfather, who died in September, 1913
in Brooklyn. But my document was issued just a few years ago. The only
thing on the back is a stamp >from the NYC Municipal Archives stating that
the document should not be accepted unless the raised seal is affixed,
and stating that the govt. does not certify that the information on the
document is true. If there was any additional information on the back of
the original, it was not sent to me. The only next of kin listed on the
front is the names of his parents. The name and address of the
undertaker and the place of burial are shown on the front. The cemetery
may be able to tell you who they have listed as next of kin.

Lynne Shapiro
Western Mass.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Back of 1913 NYC death certificate #general

Lynne Shapiro <lynneshap@...>
 

I have a certified copy of a death certificate originally issued by the
NYC Dept. of Health for my great-grandfather, who died in September, 1913
in Brooklyn. But my document was issued just a few years ago. The only
thing on the back is a stamp >from the NYC Municipal Archives stating that
the document should not be accepted unless the raised seal is affixed,
and stating that the govt. does not certify that the information on the
document is true. If there was any additional information on the back of
the original, it was not sent to me. The only next of kin listed on the
front is the names of his parents. The name and address of the
undertaker and the place of burial are shown on the front. The cemetery
may be able to tell you who they have listed as next of kin.

Lynne Shapiro
Western Mass.


Re: Curious phrase in death notice #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Roy Ogus asked:

A few times I've come across the following curious phrase in a death notice
during the early part of the 20th Century. For example, in a 1922 death
notice in the New York Times for a person who died in NY, and who evidently
had family in Chicago and Los Angeles, I found the following phrase which
was included in the notice:

"Chicago, Los Angeles papers please copy"

Does anyone know whether other newspapers would actually copy the death
notice in their own newspapers, or do something else with the information?
It would seem unlikely that they would run their own death noticed, if the
death notices were paid items. If not, what did this phrase actually mean?

Dear Roy,

This seems to have been quite a common practice. Many of my
Anglo-Jewish ancestors and collaterals emigrated to Australia and New
Zealand in the mid 19th century, but some returned to London. Later
on, death notices posted in the Jewish Chronicle (the main London
Jewish paper) often said: "Australian and NZ papers please copy."

I am under the impression that this was a courtesy that newspapers
extended to each other, and that this probably was done at no cost to
anybody. Does anybody have a better idea?

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Curious phrase in death notice #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Roy Ogus asked:

A few times I've come across the following curious phrase in a death notice
during the early part of the 20th Century. For example, in a 1922 death
notice in the New York Times for a person who died in NY, and who evidently
had family in Chicago and Los Angeles, I found the following phrase which
was included in the notice:

"Chicago, Los Angeles papers please copy"

Does anyone know whether other newspapers would actually copy the death
notice in their own newspapers, or do something else with the information?
It would seem unlikely that they would run their own death noticed, if the
death notices were paid items. If not, what did this phrase actually mean?

Dear Roy,

This seems to have been quite a common practice. Many of my
Anglo-Jewish ancestors and collaterals emigrated to Australia and New
Zealand in the mid 19th century, but some returned to London. Later
on, death notices posted in the Jewish Chronicle (the main London
Jewish paper) often said: "Australian and NZ papers please copy."

I am under the impression that this was a courtesy that newspapers
extended to each other, and that this probably was done at no cost to
anybody. Does anybody have a better idea?

Judith Romney Wegner


Munya #general

hekenvin@...
 

Dear Anita,

My [male] cousin was called "Munya." In the registration of his birth, his name
is given as Mendel, which is a kinui (like a nickname) of Menachem. Menachem-
Mendel is a common double-name in Galicia.

Helene Kenvin


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Munya #general

hekenvin@...
 

Dear Anita,

My [male] cousin was called "Munya." In the registration of his birth, his name
is given as Mendel, which is a kinui (like a nickname) of Menachem. Menachem-
Mendel is a common double-name in Galicia.

Helene Kenvin