Date   

1950s Brooklyn, NY Phone Directory Information #general

Gay Lynne Kegan <glynne@...>
 

I have a Brooklyn, New York phone number for Anna MITELBERG >from the 1950s,
which begins with the exchange "EV". If you are familiar with how to
locate an address or any other information, I would appreciate hearing >from
you.

Abe Rosenthal
Minnesota
aberosenthal7@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1950s Brooklyn, NY Phone Directory Information #general

Gay Lynne Kegan <glynne@...>
 

I have a Brooklyn, New York phone number for Anna MITELBERG >from the 1950s,
which begins with the exchange "EV". If you are familiar with how to
locate an address or any other information, I would appreciate hearing >from
you.

Abe Rosenthal
Minnesota
aberosenthal7@...


Re: Polish Geography Question #general

News Subsystem <news@...>
 

On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 03:06:14 UTC, sonar230@... (Devin and Julia Van
Zandt , Home) opined:

Hello, I received a death certificate today which is a rather horrible
copy (but I am so grateful to have it). For place of birth the
certificate reads quite clearly, "City and State of S-(illegible
scribble), Poland." It definitely starts with an S, and it might be
Suvalki but I can't be certain. Can any of you who know Polish historical
geography better than me (that's all of you, actually) come up with any
OTHER gubernia or provinces that started with the letter S and contained a
city of the same name? This person was born around 1850. Her parents
last names were (again, awful copy) Veberman, or maybe Zeberman, and
Selay, or maybe Selaz. I don't see those names in Suwalki, so am
wondering if I'm looking in the wrong place.

Thank you very much, Julia VZ

Leaving aside the point that death *certificates* were not issued in
19th-century Congress Poland (what you have is a death *registration*, i.e.
an entry in an administrative log book), it would be much better to let us
see the document, than to present its interpretation as a kind of guessing game.

JewishGen has kindly provided a means for you to post a legible scanned
image to "Viewmate". Somebody here will likely be able to read it.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Polish Geography Question #general

News Subsystem <news@...>
 

On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 03:06:14 UTC, sonar230@... (Devin and Julia Van
Zandt , Home) opined:

Hello, I received a death certificate today which is a rather horrible
copy (but I am so grateful to have it). For place of birth the
certificate reads quite clearly, "City and State of S-(illegible
scribble), Poland." It definitely starts with an S, and it might be
Suvalki but I can't be certain. Can any of you who know Polish historical
geography better than me (that's all of you, actually) come up with any
OTHER gubernia or provinces that started with the letter S and contained a
city of the same name? This person was born around 1850. Her parents
last names were (again, awful copy) Veberman, or maybe Zeberman, and
Selay, or maybe Selaz. I don't see those names in Suwalki, so am
wondering if I'm looking in the wrong place.

Thank you very much, Julia VZ

Leaving aside the point that death *certificates* were not issued in
19th-century Congress Poland (what you have is a death *registration*, i.e.
an entry in an administrative log book), it would be much better to let us
see the document, than to present its interpretation as a kind of guessing game.

JewishGen has kindly provided a means for you to post a legible scanned
image to "Viewmate". Somebody here will likely be able to read it.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


my SZCZEKACZ family #poland

Ruth Wilnai <ruth@...>
 

Dear friends!

While participating in a creative writing class I wrote a story about
my SZCZEKACZ family. I would like to share the story with you.
As you will see in my story, I could not find the important facts about
my family without the help of JRI-Poland and CRARG -
Czestochowa-Radomsko Area Research Group.

Thanks
Ruthie Wilnai

My Story:

Thursday, February 10, 2005. The subject of one of the messages
catches my attention "Szczekacz family >from Czestochowa." My passion to
detect new relatives is fully awaken. I click on the screen, open the
message and browse through it. No, I have to delve into it. I have to
understand each word, each connection. I have to believe the words.
Trying to relax, to calm my excitement I read:
"I am researching the Szczekacz family >from Czestochowa, Poland, and I
found your name in the JewishGen Family Finder, which said that you are
researching Szczekacz also.

The surname of my wife is Secaz. Her father changed the surname. The
original surname was Szczekacz. Her father was Szczkacz Joseph born in
1919 Czestochowa, Poland, but he was a baby when he came to France&#8230;"

The letter continues to detail Joseph Szczekacz immediate ancestors.

Without a delay I lay out my family tree on the computer screen. I
view the index of the hundreds of Szczekacz family members in my tree
but I cannot find a link to the newly discovered Szczekacz Family.
Generation upon generation, the Szczekacz in Czestochow were one big
family, but I cannot attach the new family to my tree. Did I make a
mistake? Did I miss some information? Is my family tree inaccurate?

My forbearance is short. I must find the link and immediately. I
consult my friend Daniel Kazez, who is in charge of the
Czestochowa-Radomsko Area Research Group (crarg.org). I request help
from my friend Michael in Israel. I call Stephane in France and we all
start exploring the records. Did we skip a record in our initial
Czestochowa's research? I decide that the next day I will revisit the
Mormon library in Santa Clara to get all the Szczekacz records.

The meaning of the word Szczekacz in Polish is "barking dog". I
discovered the word 'Szczekacz' only a couple of years ago. I first
heard the surname when I jumped into the ocean of researching my
family's history.

In my grandparents' bedroom, on the left corner above their bed, two
large framed, old and faded photos decorated the wall. A man and a
woman depicted in the two separate photos.

One photo was of a good-looking man maybe in his sixties, his white
suit and tie expressed elegance and nobility. Abraham Kaluzynski, the
womanizer, was a man deep in poverty. He looked at us carefully from
inside the frame. We all heard about him some nasty stories. He was my
great grandfather >from Czestochowa, the father of my beloved grand
father Josef Kaluzynski.

In the second photo, a very young beautiful woman, her long hair
wrapped around her head, her gaze goes far away. No one ever mentioned
her name. We were young and we did not express interest in those
ancient photos up on the wall. We did not question who she was, yet the
young woman in the photo was our great grandmother..

Years passed.

Step by step with help >from JRI-Poland and with help >from the
Czestochowa-Radomsko Area Research Group, I weaved together facts and
built a family tree.

>from one of the family tree's branches Abraham Kaluzynski stood out as
a man who was married three times. The records told us that Fraydle
Szczekacz, the melancholy looking young woman in the photo, was his
first wife, the mother of my grandfather. The records also continued
and told us that Abraham divorced Fraydle, an unheard of event in those
old days, and shortly after the shameful divorce, she passed away. She
was twenty-nine years old.

Fraydle Szczekacz, was >from a very large Szczekacz family in
Czestochowa. Hundreds of the Szczekacz people populate my family tree.
Where were they all? How many Szczekacz people survived the Holocaust?
Was my grandfather the only one to reach Israel before the Holocaust?

Deep in my thoughts, I looked through an Israeli phone book. Here, I
called loudly, I found an entry for a woman name Szczekacz Malka.

A young voice answered the phone, I told my story, the reaction was
suspicion and the conversation came quickly to a dead end.

I waited a few days and called again.

Suspicion was again in the background of the new conversation, but I
got an invitation to visit Malka Szczekacz at her humble home in Bnei
Brak, one of the most orthodox communities in Israel.

Malka, with her generous heart and kindness invited me in, even though
I was not dressed properly for a visit in an orthodox home, wearing
pants instead of a dress. The conversation was intimate, as though we
knew each other for a long time. We exchanged stories and experiences.
Through Malka I got to know Tova Ben Zvi and Zarach Shaket, both
descendants of the Szczekacz family. I was sure that the three of them
were my relatives, even though I was still searching among the family
tree's leaves where to link their branches.

A few amiable, quiet meetings, a few conversations about this and that
brought Malka and me closer. One sunny day the two of us were sitting
in Malka's small living room next to the dining table. She sat at the
head of the table, I sat next to her like one of her students. I had a
new unbelievable story:

"A stranger, >from a small settlement, called my ninety years old
uncle, my father's brother, on the phone, introduced himself and told
him that he found a book in the town's library that once belonged to
the Kaluzynski family. On the first page, there was an inscription and
he read it over the phone. As my uncle listened to the story, memories
came back to him. He remembered that my grandfather presented the book
to him on his Bar Mitzvah day. He recalled days of poverty that forced
the Kaluzynski family to sell their library. My uncle was excited and
the stranger sent him the book."

As I was telling Malka the story, she, suddenly, got up, opened the
glass doors of her family's religious library and pulled out a book.
An inscription in one of the book's pages, a dedication to Malka's
father by his father revealed the family dynasty, the missing link.
After a year's long detective path, I could connect Malka's family tree
with my family tree.


JRI Poland #Poland my SZCZEKACZ family #poland

Ruth Wilnai <ruth@...>
 

Dear friends!

While participating in a creative writing class I wrote a story about
my SZCZEKACZ family. I would like to share the story with you.
As you will see in my story, I could not find the important facts about
my family without the help of JRI-Poland and CRARG -
Czestochowa-Radomsko Area Research Group.

Thanks
Ruthie Wilnai

My Story:

Thursday, February 10, 2005. The subject of one of the messages
catches my attention "Szczekacz family >from Czestochowa." My passion to
detect new relatives is fully awaken. I click on the screen, open the
message and browse through it. No, I have to delve into it. I have to
understand each word, each connection. I have to believe the words.
Trying to relax, to calm my excitement I read:
"I am researching the Szczekacz family >from Czestochowa, Poland, and I
found your name in the JewishGen Family Finder, which said that you are
researching Szczekacz also.

The surname of my wife is Secaz. Her father changed the surname. The
original surname was Szczekacz. Her father was Szczkacz Joseph born in
1919 Czestochowa, Poland, but he was a baby when he came to France&#8230;"

The letter continues to detail Joseph Szczekacz immediate ancestors.

Without a delay I lay out my family tree on the computer screen. I
view the index of the hundreds of Szczekacz family members in my tree
but I cannot find a link to the newly discovered Szczekacz Family.
Generation upon generation, the Szczekacz in Czestochow were one big
family, but I cannot attach the new family to my tree. Did I make a
mistake? Did I miss some information? Is my family tree inaccurate?

My forbearance is short. I must find the link and immediately. I
consult my friend Daniel Kazez, who is in charge of the
Czestochowa-Radomsko Area Research Group (crarg.org). I request help
from my friend Michael in Israel. I call Stephane in France and we all
start exploring the records. Did we skip a record in our initial
Czestochowa's research? I decide that the next day I will revisit the
Mormon library in Santa Clara to get all the Szczekacz records.

The meaning of the word Szczekacz in Polish is "barking dog". I
discovered the word 'Szczekacz' only a couple of years ago. I first
heard the surname when I jumped into the ocean of researching my
family's history.

In my grandparents' bedroom, on the left corner above their bed, two
large framed, old and faded photos decorated the wall. A man and a
woman depicted in the two separate photos.

One photo was of a good-looking man maybe in his sixties, his white
suit and tie expressed elegance and nobility. Abraham Kaluzynski, the
womanizer, was a man deep in poverty. He looked at us carefully from
inside the frame. We all heard about him some nasty stories. He was my
great grandfather >from Czestochowa, the father of my beloved grand
father Josef Kaluzynski.

In the second photo, a very young beautiful woman, her long hair
wrapped around her head, her gaze goes far away. No one ever mentioned
her name. We were young and we did not express interest in those
ancient photos up on the wall. We did not question who she was, yet the
young woman in the photo was our great grandmother..

Years passed.

Step by step with help >from JRI-Poland and with help >from the
Czestochowa-Radomsko Area Research Group, I weaved together facts and
built a family tree.

>from one of the family tree's branches Abraham Kaluzynski stood out as
a man who was married three times. The records told us that Fraydle
Szczekacz, the melancholy looking young woman in the photo, was his
first wife, the mother of my grandfather. The records also continued
and told us that Abraham divorced Fraydle, an unheard of event in those
old days, and shortly after the shameful divorce, she passed away. She
was twenty-nine years old.

Fraydle Szczekacz, was >from a very large Szczekacz family in
Czestochowa. Hundreds of the Szczekacz people populate my family tree.
Where were they all? How many Szczekacz people survived the Holocaust?
Was my grandfather the only one to reach Israel before the Holocaust?

Deep in my thoughts, I looked through an Israeli phone book. Here, I
called loudly, I found an entry for a woman name Szczekacz Malka.

A young voice answered the phone, I told my story, the reaction was
suspicion and the conversation came quickly to a dead end.

I waited a few days and called again.

Suspicion was again in the background of the new conversation, but I
got an invitation to visit Malka Szczekacz at her humble home in Bnei
Brak, one of the most orthodox communities in Israel.

Malka, with her generous heart and kindness invited me in, even though
I was not dressed properly for a visit in an orthodox home, wearing
pants instead of a dress. The conversation was intimate, as though we
knew each other for a long time. We exchanged stories and experiences.
Through Malka I got to know Tova Ben Zvi and Zarach Shaket, both
descendants of the Szczekacz family. I was sure that the three of them
were my relatives, even though I was still searching among the family
tree's leaves where to link their branches.

A few amiable, quiet meetings, a few conversations about this and that
brought Malka and me closer. One sunny day the two of us were sitting
in Malka's small living room next to the dining table. She sat at the
head of the table, I sat next to her like one of her students. I had a
new unbelievable story:

"A stranger, >from a small settlement, called my ninety years old
uncle, my father's brother, on the phone, introduced himself and told
him that he found a book in the town's library that once belonged to
the Kaluzynski family. On the first page, there was an inscription and
he read it over the phone. As my uncle listened to the story, memories
came back to him. He remembered that my grandfather presented the book
to him on his Bar Mitzvah day. He recalled days of poverty that forced
the Kaluzynski family to sell their library. My uncle was excited and
the stranger sent him the book."

As I was telling Malka the story, she, suddenly, got up, opened the
glass doors of her family's religious library and pulled out a book.
An inscription in one of the book's pages, a dedication to Malka's
father by his father revealed the family dynasty, the missing link.
After a year's long detective path, I could connect Malka's family tree
with my family tree.


My email address just changed. #lithuania

david rubin <dovrubin1@...>
 

Dear LitvakSig members,

My email address has just changed:

FROM: dovrubin1@...

TO: dovrubin1@...

Sincerely,
David Rubin
U.S.A.


MILLER & LANDAU Families from Riga #lithuania

Mike Berger <smberg@...>
 

Recent discussion with my father-in-law, Benjamin Miller, born 1908 in
Philadelphia, and now living in a retirement home in Los Angeles,
produced the following family information which might lead to
connections for my spouse, Sandra Miller Berger.

Benjamin's father, Harris MILLER, came >from Riga, Latvia at the end of
the 19th century and settled in Philadelphia. He died about 1960.

Benjamin's mother, Rita (Rebecca) LANDAU, also came >from Riga to
Philadelphia. Her father was Abraham LANDAU. Rita had eleven
siblings: Katie, Lena, Harry (?) - who lived in Atlantic City, NJ, and
eight more.

Harris and Rita were married in Philadelphia and had five children:
Benjamin, Helen (married name FOX), Frances (married name KORN) who
settled in California, Sarah (known as Laine) who married Harry ALBERTS,
and Bessie (Betty).

This is about all the details he could provide. Any family connections
would be most appreciated. Please feel free to respond directly to us at
smberg@....

Mike and Sandy Berger
Vienna, VA


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania My email address just changed. #lithuania

david rubin <dovrubin1@...>
 

Dear LitvakSig members,

My email address has just changed:

FROM: dovrubin1@...

TO: dovrubin1@...

Sincerely,
David Rubin
U.S.A.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania MILLER & LANDAU Families from Riga #lithuania

Mike Berger <smberg@...>
 

Recent discussion with my father-in-law, Benjamin Miller, born 1908 in
Philadelphia, and now living in a retirement home in Los Angeles,
produced the following family information which might lead to
connections for my spouse, Sandra Miller Berger.

Benjamin's father, Harris MILLER, came >from Riga, Latvia at the end of
the 19th century and settled in Philadelphia. He died about 1960.

Benjamin's mother, Rita (Rebecca) LANDAU, also came >from Riga to
Philadelphia. Her father was Abraham LANDAU. Rita had eleven
siblings: Katie, Lena, Harry (?) - who lived in Atlantic City, NJ, and
eight more.

Harris and Rita were married in Philadelphia and had five children:
Benjamin, Helen (married name FOX), Frances (married name KORN) who
settled in California, Sarah (known as Laine) who married Harry ALBERTS,
and Bessie (Betty).

This is about all the details he could provide. Any family connections
would be most appreciated. Please feel free to respond directly to us at
smberg@....

Mike and Sandy Berger
Vienna, VA


Help with Russian translation #general

Nicolas <paulsimonREMOVE@...>
 

Hello,

I've uploaded record of my Glasman family >from Staszow, Poland. The records
are in Russian and are on my website.

The regular details (names, ages, places) would be really appreciated!

Thanks for your help (Please answer privatly: trokiner@...)

Link: http://trokiner.free.fr/records/

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris-France
trokiner@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help with Russian translation #general

Nicolas <paulsimonREMOVE@...>
 

Hello,

I've uploaded record of my Glasman family >from Staszow, Poland. The records
are in Russian and are on my website.

The regular details (names, ages, places) would be really appreciated!

Thanks for your help (Please answer privatly: trokiner@...)

Link: http://trokiner.free.fr/records/

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris-France
trokiner@...


Camp des Milles #france

suzetarica@...
 

Hello, I have just visited the site: www.campdesmilles.org and had no
problem going through the various links. After the opening page,
click on enter or acces.

Regards,
Suzanne Tarica


French SIG #France Camp des Milles #france

suzetarica@...
 

Hello, I have just visited the site: www.campdesmilles.org and had no
problem going through the various links. After the opening page,
click on enter or acces.

Regards,
Suzanne Tarica


Alexander Sender HAUSER (1795-1790) #france

Pierre Hahn <pierre28@...>
 

Alexander Sender HAUSER is in my direct ancestral line (6th g-grandfather).
My problem is uncertainty with his father Daniel HAUSER.

In AA Frankel (page 392 n) a Daniel HAUSER son of David maries Bluemel
Bategay LEVY (1 Mar 1765). It also gives the following indication that
"Sender (most likely Alexander Sender) son of Daniel, uncle of Daniel has
acquired the right to live in Durmenach...". So now is this Daniel that just
married the father or nephew of Sender. I am confused (that is not new !)
with the relationship and placement of this Daniel in the family tree.

To confuse this further, according to a study done by M Gutmann, Alexander
Sender HAUSER's father, Daniel, dies before 1735.

Any help to clarify the relationships will be appreciated

Pierre M Hahn, San Francisco


French SIG #France Alexander Sender HAUSER (1795-1790) #france

Pierre Hahn <pierre28@...>
 

Alexander Sender HAUSER is in my direct ancestral line (6th g-grandfather).
My problem is uncertainty with his father Daniel HAUSER.

In AA Frankel (page 392 n) a Daniel HAUSER son of David maries Bluemel
Bategay LEVY (1 Mar 1765). It also gives the following indication that
"Sender (most likely Alexander Sender) son of Daniel, uncle of Daniel has
acquired the right to live in Durmenach...". So now is this Daniel that just
married the father or nephew of Sender. I am confused (that is not new !)
with the relationship and placement of this Daniel in the family tree.

To confuse this further, according to a study done by M Gutmann, Alexander
Sender HAUSER's father, Daniel, dies before 1735.

Any help to clarify the relationships will be appreciated

Pierre M Hahn, San Francisco


blank form in French: requests for information on individuals and families #france

MBernet@...
 

I am looking for a blank form in French (and also one in Hebrew) that I can
send to family overseas when I ask them to send me information on individuals
and families.

Such forms are readily available in English, to be downloaded or
photocopied. Can anyone help me find such forms in French (and perhaps in Hebrew,
separately, of course).

Many thanks:

Michael Bernet

Please click on my web page, < _www.mem-Ber.net_ (http://www.mem-Ber.net)

for more information on me and my books


French SIG #France blank form in French: requests for information on individuals and families #france

MBernet@...
 

I am looking for a blank form in French (and also one in Hebrew) that I can
send to family overseas when I ask them to send me information on individuals
and families.

Such forms are readily available in English, to be downloaded or
photocopied. Can anyone help me find such forms in French (and perhaps in Hebrew,
separately, of course).

Many thanks:

Michael Bernet

Please click on my web page, < _www.mem-Ber.net_ (http://www.mem-Ber.net)

for more information on me and my books


bouncing e-mails ??? #france

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Folks,
When a message you send to another researcher listed in the JGFF or FTJP,
fails to be delivered, please report the bounce to
<lostNfound@...>. In your message, provide your own full
name and JGID, and the name and JGID of the person with the bounced e-mail.

Under the leadership of Saul Goldstone we have a considerable group of
volunteers who contact people in their local area who have changed their
e-mail addresses but have neglected to notify JewishGen. The ability to
connect with another researcher who may have a connection to your own
research is vital and the reason we established the lostNfound help desk.

If you are willing to devote some time to helping in this effort, please
contact Saul at
<sgoldstone@...> and provide him with your home address and
specify the towns to which you are willing to make phone calls. These can
be as wide an area as you like. Please consider joining in the effort to
find all researchers who are lost.

Many thanks for helping with this.
Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects


French SIG #France bouncing e-mails ??? #france

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Folks,
When a message you send to another researcher listed in the JGFF or FTJP,
fails to be delivered, please report the bounce to
<lostNfound@...>. In your message, provide your own full
name and JGID, and the name and JGID of the person with the bounced e-mail.

Under the leadership of Saul Goldstone we have a considerable group of
volunteers who contact people in their local area who have changed their
e-mail addresses but have neglected to notify JewishGen. The ability to
connect with another researcher who may have a connection to your own
research is vital and the reason we established the lostNfound help desk.

If you are willing to devote some time to helping in this effort, please
contact Saul at
<sgoldstone@...> and provide him with your home address and
specify the towns to which you are willing to make phone calls. These can
be as wide an area as you like. Please consider joining in the effort to
find all researchers who are lost.

Many thanks for helping with this.
Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects