Date   

Re: Gen 101: What to do with SSNs? #general

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

When I received my grandfather's SSN application, it listed the maiden
name of his mother. Up until that time, I had thought that Chasse
"Martha" who had married David LEVINSON also had the maiden name of
Levinson, since that was what was written on her tombstone. However, it
turned out that the tombstone had been in such bad condition that
cousins had replaced it and no one knew her actual maiden name. The
stone mason read it as Levinson. Thanks to my gf's application for
social security, I found out that it was LIEBERTHAL.

Martha [who was named for Chasse] Lev-Zion
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Gen 101: What to do with SSNs? #general

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

When I received my grandfather's SSN application, it listed the maiden
name of his mother. Up until that time, I had thought that Chasse
"Martha" who had married David LEVINSON also had the maiden name of
Levinson, since that was what was written on her tombstone. However, it
turned out that the tombstone had been in such bad condition that
cousins had replaced it and no one knew her actual maiden name. The
stone mason read it as Levinson. Thanks to my gf's application for
social security, I found out that it was LIEBERTHAL.

Martha [who was named for Chasse] Lev-Zion
Israel


Re: What to do with SSNs? #general

Ken Meyerson <br0nxl1ng@...>
 

Hello, Micah

SSDI records can be a rich source of information in the areas that you
described. JG has an excellent info file on this topic, and here is the
link:

http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/us-ssa.txt

For the single-surname project I am working on, SSDI data has proved
invaluable in filling in many missing pieces, and in my view is well
worth pursuing. I wish you the best in your research efforts.

My Best,
Ken Meyerson

Researching KIPNIS, everywhere, anywhere.
Visit our website at http://www.kipnis.org

-----Original Message-----
Subject: Gen 101: What to do with SSNs?
From: "S. Micah Salb" <msalb@...>

I have a few relatives for whom I've found Social Security Numbers from
SS Death Records. But I haven't found any use for these SSNs. How can I use
SSNs to advance to other information, such as place of birth and parent names
and immigration data and so on?

Micah Salb
Washington, D.C.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: What to do with SSNs? #general

Ken Meyerson <br0nxl1ng@...>
 

Hello, Micah

SSDI records can be a rich source of information in the areas that you
described. JG has an excellent info file on this topic, and here is the
link:

http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/us-ssa.txt

For the single-surname project I am working on, SSDI data has proved
invaluable in filling in many missing pieces, and in my view is well
worth pursuing. I wish you the best in your research efforts.

My Best,
Ken Meyerson

Researching KIPNIS, everywhere, anywhere.
Visit our website at http://www.kipnis.org

-----Original Message-----
Subject: Gen 101: What to do with SSNs?
From: "S. Micah Salb" <msalb@...>

I have a few relatives for whom I've found Social Security Numbers from
SS Death Records. But I haven't found any use for these SSNs. How can I use
SSNs to advance to other information, such as place of birth and parent names
and immigration data and so on?

Micah Salb
Washington, D.C.


Re: My Faceless Grandfather/How to get grandmother's picture? #belarus

Lynne Shapiro <lynneshap@...>
 

Jeff and Group,

I am in the same boat re: my grandmother, Lena CHAIT, nee: KABUSCHETSKI
(various spellings, but all family members changed that to KAPLAN after
her marriage), originally >from Lyskovo, which is now in Belarus. I have
never seen her picture, though I am named after her. I had thought of
asking this same question, though I would probably have done so with the
general discussion group, only it came up here first. I visit my
grandmother's grave every year, and there are no photos on it (I've never
seen a photo on a Jewish tombstone, but apparently there are some.) She
came to the U.S. late in 1905 to join her husband, my grandfather, never
attended school in the U.S., never became a U.S. citizen. To my
knowledge, she never belonged to a synagogue. As I recall, the only
organization I heard she was involved in was a group that raised funds
for orphans, but I don't know its name; I think I have somewhere, can't
lay my hands on it right now, the surname of the woman who led the group,
which was in the Brownsville section of Brooklyn, N.Y. My grandmother
had three children, born between 1909 and 1914, and when they were still
quite young, she was incapacitated by a stroke and became an invalid.
She died in 1934, just before her eldest daughter was married.

I doubt she ever had a U.S. passport. Is there any way to know for sure?
Would it be in the info. files? I have not checked her name out with
the N.Y. Times, but though she lived in N.Y.C., I'd say the odds are
quite slim that she was ever mentioned there. Any other ideas? One
thing that occurred to me, strangely enough, after reading Jeff's
question, is that there could have been a picture taken at a family
event, such as a sibling's or niece's wedding. I don't think in those
days poor Jewish immigrant families hired photographers who went around
from table to table and captured on film everyone at the event. But does
anyone know to what extent photos were taken at family events >from the
end of WWI to the early 1930s? The photo would have to be labelled,
however, because I don't know of anyone alive now who would be able to
identify her >from such a photo.

When I read my grandmother's Ellis Island manifest, it occurred to me
that she may not have wanted her photo taken - because she had probably
had a stroke before she even came to the U.S. She had "hemiplegia",
which is defined in my Random House dictionary as a paralysis of one side
of the body. But I have never seen a photo taken before the 1940s of her
husband, my grandfather, either. And I know of just one photo of the
children when they were young. They were poor and photos were probably
just not a priority. If anyone has any thoughts or ideas, I'd like to
hear them.

Lynne Shapiro
Western Mass.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: My Faceless Grandfather/How to get grandmother's picture? #belarus

Lynne Shapiro <lynneshap@...>
 

Jeff and Group,

I am in the same boat re: my grandmother, Lena CHAIT, nee: KABUSCHETSKI
(various spellings, but all family members changed that to KAPLAN after
her marriage), originally >from Lyskovo, which is now in Belarus. I have
never seen her picture, though I am named after her. I had thought of
asking this same question, though I would probably have done so with the
general discussion group, only it came up here first. I visit my
grandmother's grave every year, and there are no photos on it (I've never
seen a photo on a Jewish tombstone, but apparently there are some.) She
came to the U.S. late in 1905 to join her husband, my grandfather, never
attended school in the U.S., never became a U.S. citizen. To my
knowledge, she never belonged to a synagogue. As I recall, the only
organization I heard she was involved in was a group that raised funds
for orphans, but I don't know its name; I think I have somewhere, can't
lay my hands on it right now, the surname of the woman who led the group,
which was in the Brownsville section of Brooklyn, N.Y. My grandmother
had three children, born between 1909 and 1914, and when they were still
quite young, she was incapacitated by a stroke and became an invalid.
She died in 1934, just before her eldest daughter was married.

I doubt she ever had a U.S. passport. Is there any way to know for sure?
Would it be in the info. files? I have not checked her name out with
the N.Y. Times, but though she lived in N.Y.C., I'd say the odds are
quite slim that she was ever mentioned there. Any other ideas? One
thing that occurred to me, strangely enough, after reading Jeff's
question, is that there could have been a picture taken at a family
event, such as a sibling's or niece's wedding. I don't think in those
days poor Jewish immigrant families hired photographers who went around
from table to table and captured on film everyone at the event. But does
anyone know to what extent photos were taken at family events >from the
end of WWI to the early 1930s? The photo would have to be labelled,
however, because I don't know of anyone alive now who would be able to
identify her >from such a photo.

When I read my grandmother's Ellis Island manifest, it occurred to me
that she may not have wanted her photo taken - because she had probably
had a stroke before she even came to the U.S. She had "hemiplegia",
which is defined in my Random House dictionary as a paralysis of one side
of the body. But I have never seen a photo taken before the 1940s of her
husband, my grandfather, either. And I know of just one photo of the
children when they were young. They were poor and photos were probably
just not a priority. If anyone has any thoughts or ideas, I'd like to
hear them.

Lynne Shapiro
Western Mass.


Books by Society for the History of CZ Jews #austria-czech

Vitdoc@...
 

Several people have written to me privately with questions
about the books written many years ago by the Society for the
History of CZ Jews, so I am sending this to the entire group as
it might be of interest. The first volume was published in 1968.
The third in 1984. The last review was published in 1993.
There were six in all and I don't have copies of all of them.
Rabbi Patz and his assistant Lesly Cohen can be reached at their
synagogue in New Jersey. The phone number at one time was: 973 239-2333.
They may have some books left but these books are also often
available >from libraries. I am not sure about the Reviews which are
more like journals. Online book selling websites may have used
copies. On my website <www.czechtorah.org >is one story >from
Volume 3 written by Joseph Pick, The Story of the CZ Srolls.
I was given permission to reproduce it on my web site. It will give
you an idea of what type of stories the books have in them. The articles
in the books were written after the war and many who wrote were survivors.
They covered a variety of subjects like holocaust, history, art,
music and the economy as they related to the CZ Jews. These
articles were written by some of the following: Hana Volavkova,
Guido Kisch, Hugo Stransky, Gertrude Hirschler, Avigdor Dagan,
Theodore Rabb, Oskar Rabinowicz, Kurt Wehle, Wilma Iggers, and
Erich Kulka to name a few. I am sure there are others on the SIG
who have these books or have read them.

Susan Boyer LA CA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Books by Society for the History of CZ Jews #austria-czech

Vitdoc@...
 

Several people have written to me privately with questions
about the books written many years ago by the Society for the
History of CZ Jews, so I am sending this to the entire group as
it might be of interest. The first volume was published in 1968.
The third in 1984. The last review was published in 1993.
There were six in all and I don't have copies of all of them.
Rabbi Patz and his assistant Lesly Cohen can be reached at their
synagogue in New Jersey. The phone number at one time was: 973 239-2333.
They may have some books left but these books are also often
available >from libraries. I am not sure about the Reviews which are
more like journals. Online book selling websites may have used
copies. On my website <www.czechtorah.org >is one story >from
Volume 3 written by Joseph Pick, The Story of the CZ Srolls.
I was given permission to reproduce it on my web site. It will give
you an idea of what type of stories the books have in them. The articles
in the books were written after the war and many who wrote were survivors.
They covered a variety of subjects like holocaust, history, art,
music and the economy as they related to the CZ Jews. These
articles were written by some of the following: Hana Volavkova,
Guido Kisch, Hugo Stransky, Gertrude Hirschler, Avigdor Dagan,
Theodore Rabb, Oskar Rabinowicz, Kurt Wehle, Wilma Iggers, and
Erich Kulka to name a few. I am sure there are others on the SIG
who have these books or have read them.

Susan Boyer LA CA


Society For The History Of Czechoslovakian Jews - Memorial Service #austria-czech

Charlie Roberts <charlie.roberts@...>
 

Michael Bernet need not be so reticent about his posting regarding the
Society for the History of Czechoslovak Jews. Indeed the Society is
preserving our historic cultural and religious links with the Jewish
communities of the Czech lands. They have published various books and
articles much of which has genealogical reference by informing us of the
past communities. One of the Mitzvot which this organisation sponsors is the
annual Memorial Service for Czechoslovak Jewish Victims of Nazism lead by
Rabbi Norman Patz at which a special Kaddish is made for Czech Jews who have
died including those in the Holocaust. Concurrent with this service a
beautiful memorial booklet is published in which people can list the names
of their loved ones. The listed names indicate those who were murdered in
the Holocaust and shows whom they are remembered by. I have included some
members of my family for the past 7 years. The list might be helpful in
putting families in touch with each other. If anyone would like more
information on the society they may contact Lesly Cohen at
tswe@...

Charlie Roberts ne Aufrichtig (London,England)

Researching AUFRICHTIG IN Boskovice,Czech Republic,
Slovakia, Vienna, Austria , Worldwide
LOCKSCHAN, WODAK, HUSSERL in Boskovice and Vienna.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Society For The History Of Czechoslovakian Jews - Memorial Service #austria-czech

Charlie Roberts <charlie.roberts@...>
 

Michael Bernet need not be so reticent about his posting regarding the
Society for the History of Czechoslovak Jews. Indeed the Society is
preserving our historic cultural and religious links with the Jewish
communities of the Czech lands. They have published various books and
articles much of which has genealogical reference by informing us of the
past communities. One of the Mitzvot which this organisation sponsors is the
annual Memorial Service for Czechoslovak Jewish Victims of Nazism lead by
Rabbi Norman Patz at which a special Kaddish is made for Czech Jews who have
died including those in the Holocaust. Concurrent with this service a
beautiful memorial booklet is published in which people can list the names
of their loved ones. The listed names indicate those who were murdered in
the Holocaust and shows whom they are remembered by. I have included some
members of my family for the past 7 years. The list might be helpful in
putting families in touch with each other. If anyone would like more
information on the society they may contact Lesly Cohen at
tswe@...

Charlie Roberts ne Aufrichtig (London,England)

Researching AUFRICHTIG IN Boskovice,Czech Republic,
Slovakia, Vienna, Austria , Worldwide
LOCKSCHAN, WODAK, HUSSERL in Boskovice and Vienna.


Re: Can you recognize the uniform? #austria-czech

VMotor <vmotor@...>
 

--- Claire Sztern <claire.sztern@...> wrote:
This picture was taken in Poland, maybe around 1900.
Do you recognize the uniform of the soldier? -snip-

My limited knowledge gained >from trying to identify a photo of
my grandfather wearing a uniform and medal in 1917, leads me to
believe that the photo at
< http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v131/HomeWork/soldier.jpg >

does not depict an Austrian uniform. The telltale signs are the
cap and the indication of rank on the collar.

More and interesting info can be found at the following sites:

http://www.bukovinasociety.org/museum/uniforms-in-bukovina.html

http://www.austro-hungarian-army.co.uk/index.htm

cheers,

Karel Vanek
Belleville
Canada

AUERBACH - Vienna, Becov nad Teplou
HELFGOTT - Vienna, Becov nad Teplou
STEINER - Oschelin


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Can you recognize the uniform? #austria-czech

VMotor <vmotor@...>
 

--- Claire Sztern <claire.sztern@...> wrote:
This picture was taken in Poland, maybe around 1900.
Do you recognize the uniform of the soldier? -snip-

My limited knowledge gained >from trying to identify a photo of
my grandfather wearing a uniform and medal in 1917, leads me to
believe that the photo at
< http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v131/HomeWork/soldier.jpg >

does not depict an Austrian uniform. The telltale signs are the
cap and the indication of rank on the collar.

More and interesting info can be found at the following sites:

http://www.bukovinasociety.org/museum/uniforms-in-bukovina.html

http://www.austro-hungarian-army.co.uk/index.htm

cheers,

Karel Vanek
Belleville
Canada

AUERBACH - Vienna, Becov nad Teplou
HELFGOTT - Vienna, Becov nad Teplou
STEINER - Oschelin


Yizkor Book Project Report for February 2005 #ukraine

Joyce Field
 

We are delighted to report another successful month for the JewishGen
Yizkor Book Project. Two new entries, one new book, and 17 updates
went online in February. All translations can be accessed >from the
index page at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
where all new translations for the month are flagged.

New book:

-Maramures Region

New entries:

-Klimontow,Poland; Pinkas HaKehillot, Poland, volume 7
-Mlawa, Poland; Pinkas HaKehillot, poland, volume 4

Updated Books:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Belzec: Prototype of the Final Solution
-Brest, Belarus
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dereczyn, Poland
-Gorodets, Belarus
-Hlybokaye, Belarus
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kletsk, Belarus
-Lita, Lithuania
-Minsk,Poland
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Radomsko,Poland
-Ryki,Poland (including a necrology)

In addition to the translations, the Yizkor Book Project contains
numerous other resources for researchers: the Database, Infofiles,
Necrology Index, Links, and FAQ. All can be accessed >from the top
of the translations index page. Also, please consider making a
donation to the projects at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html and to
JewishGen,which provides the resources for the Yizkor Book Project.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisition
jfield@...


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Yizkor Book Project Report for February 2005 #ukraine

Joyce Field
 

We are delighted to report another successful month for the JewishGen
Yizkor Book Project. Two new entries, one new book, and 17 updates
went online in February. All translations can be accessed >from the
index page at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
where all new translations for the month are flagged.

New book:

-Maramures Region

New entries:

-Klimontow,Poland; Pinkas HaKehillot, Poland, volume 7
-Mlawa, Poland; Pinkas HaKehillot, poland, volume 4

Updated Books:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Belzec: Prototype of the Final Solution
-Brest, Belarus
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland
-Dereczyn, Poland
-Gorodets, Belarus
-Hlybokaye, Belarus
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kletsk, Belarus
-Lita, Lithuania
-Minsk,Poland
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Radzyn Podlaski, Poland
-Radomsko,Poland
-Ryki,Poland (including a necrology)

In addition to the translations, the Yizkor Book Project contains
numerous other resources for researchers: the Database, Infofiles,
Necrology Index, Links, and FAQ. All can be accessed >from the top
of the translations index page. Also, please consider making a
donation to the projects at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html and to
JewishGen,which provides the resources for the Yizkor Book Project.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Vice President, Data Acquisition
jfield@...


JFRA Israel - Rehovot - Wednesday, 16 March #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

JFRA Rehovot invites all researchers to its next meeting:

8 pm, Wednesday, March 16
Home of Martha & Seymour Pomerantz, Rehovot

Prof. Daniel Wagner, Weizmann Institute, will speak on "Unusual findings in
Zdunska Wola - and a little bit more."
Don't miss Danny's excellent computer-based program on this town's unusual
cemetery and an important project connecting town residents and students to
the history of the Jewish community.

Reservations are essential so the hosts can set up.
Reservations/information/address/directions:
Chair Linda Geffon, linda@...

Best wishes,
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
President, JFRA Israel
schelly@...
schelly@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JFRA Israel - Rehovot - Wednesday, 16 March #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

JFRA Rehovot invites all researchers to its next meeting:

8 pm, Wednesday, March 16
Home of Martha & Seymour Pomerantz, Rehovot

Prof. Daniel Wagner, Weizmann Institute, will speak on "Unusual findings in
Zdunska Wola - and a little bit more."
Don't miss Danny's excellent computer-based program on this town's unusual
cemetery and an important project connecting town residents and students to
the history of the Jewish community.

Reservations are essential so the hosts can set up.
Reservations/information/address/directions:
Chair Linda Geffon, linda@...

Best wishes,
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
President, JFRA Israel
schelly@...
schelly@...


Re: Pogroms #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

The Bialystok 1905 and 1906 pogroms I think are pretty well documented
and well understood. I think it was before the 1905 pogrom that the
Polish Bialystok Police Chief stated that there would not be a program
against the Jews in Bialystok as long he was Chief. It was only after
his assassination that the pogrom occurred. I don't know of any other
pogroms in Bialystok in the 20th Century. That's not to say that there
wasn't any, but I've never seen any documentation of one. There were
fights. I think it was on Tish b'av that the students of the Bialystok
Hebrew Gymnasium would march. In the 1930's this frequently became an
occasion for a fight with Polish tuffs. I'm sure there must have been
countless "incidents" and various anti semitic acts, but I haven't seen
any evidence of pogroms. I think there were anti Czarist riots and
various political unheavils. Bialystok was somewhat of a hot bed of anti
Czarist activity. There were also threatening times when Jews felt
vulnerable and at risk of violence. I spoke to one woman who told me
that as a girl in the 1930's she experienced quite a bit of fear of rape
by Polish men. It was unclear if this was based on actual incidents.

There were no pogroms carried out by the Soviets during their occupation
of sept. 1939 to June 1941. I'm pretty certain of that. There's no
question that the communists favored the Jews over the local Polish
population for a number of reasons. There's a lot of evidence that a
disproportionate number of Jews became functionaries of the communist
regime, and held positions that they had previously rarely if ever held.
Also a disproportionate number of members of the militia during this
period were Jews. Communist Jews were "imported" >from Belorussia and in
fact took over the Hebrew Gymnasium where they outlawed Hebrew, and
spewed their Stalinist propaganda non-stop. Some of the Shtetls like
Zabludow had Jewish Commissars. They closed the wooden synagogues and
many of them were turned into warehouses. Thousands of Jews were
arrested and sent East into the Gulag where some died. You were
particularly vulnerable if you were >from a certain socio economic class,
had strong Zionist leanings, or were particularly religious in a certain
way. The communists used the Jews to get at a certain element among the
Poles, and at the same time suppressed the Jewish religion, and carried
out their immoral and misguided social engineering projects on Jewish
society. The communists were expert at manipulating this. Jews figured
prominently among both victims and perpetrators under the communists.
1.5 million Polish citizens of all nationalities >from Eastern Poland
were sent into the Gulag during this period. Many died a very horrible
death in Siberia eaten alive by lice, or dead >from dysentery, or starvation.

If anyone else on the list has information on Pogroms in Bialystok or
information on Polish/Jewish relations in the area I'm interested to hear.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com



Suprlmn@... wrote:

Address your forum messages to <bialystok@...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On 02 Mar 2005, Tilford Bartman _bartmant@...
(mailto:bartmant@...) wrote:

<< My impression is that pogroms were not a common feature of Jewish life in
the Bialystok region. ......... I'm told that in Bialystok (the big city)
things were not as good. ..... Also my experience is that some Jews wrongly
attribute some events to the Poles that actually had
at least as much if not more to do with Russian Czarist authorities or
troops. ....... If anyone has another take on this subject ........ I'd be
interested to hear it.>>


== My mother told me of many such attacks as she was growing up (born 1898)
in Bialystok. While they were instigated by the Czar or the local Graf
(count) and later, by the Communist regime, they were invariably carried
out by paid cossacks. Whenever that happened, the family would take
shelter in the cellar of the Polish neighbors, where they sometimes
had to remain hidden for several days. Obviously, when my uncle was
killed, not everyone made it to the shelter on time.

B'shalom, Susan Pearlman, nee SZEJNA-DWERA SZEJNMAN-KOSLOWSKY,
in Bialystok.


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Pogroms #poland

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

The Bialystok 1905 and 1906 pogroms I think are pretty well documented
and well understood. I think it was before the 1905 pogrom that the
Polish Bialystok Police Chief stated that there would not be a program
against the Jews in Bialystok as long he was Chief. It was only after
his assassination that the pogrom occurred. I don't know of any other
pogroms in Bialystok in the 20th Century. That's not to say that there
wasn't any, but I've never seen any documentation of one. There were
fights. I think it was on Tish b'av that the students of the Bialystok
Hebrew Gymnasium would march. In the 1930's this frequently became an
occasion for a fight with Polish tuffs. I'm sure there must have been
countless "incidents" and various anti semitic acts, but I haven't seen
any evidence of pogroms. I think there were anti Czarist riots and
various political unheavils. Bialystok was somewhat of a hot bed of anti
Czarist activity. There were also threatening times when Jews felt
vulnerable and at risk of violence. I spoke to one woman who told me
that as a girl in the 1930's she experienced quite a bit of fear of rape
by Polish men. It was unclear if this was based on actual incidents.

There were no pogroms carried out by the Soviets during their occupation
of sept. 1939 to June 1941. I'm pretty certain of that. There's no
question that the communists favored the Jews over the local Polish
population for a number of reasons. There's a lot of evidence that a
disproportionate number of Jews became functionaries of the communist
regime, and held positions that they had previously rarely if ever held.
Also a disproportionate number of members of the militia during this
period were Jews. Communist Jews were "imported" >from Belorussia and in
fact took over the Hebrew Gymnasium where they outlawed Hebrew, and
spewed their Stalinist propaganda non-stop. Some of the Shtetls like
Zabludow had Jewish Commissars. They closed the wooden synagogues and
many of them were turned into warehouses. Thousands of Jews were
arrested and sent East into the Gulag where some died. You were
particularly vulnerable if you were >from a certain socio economic class,
had strong Zionist leanings, or were particularly religious in a certain
way. The communists used the Jews to get at a certain element among the
Poles, and at the same time suppressed the Jewish religion, and carried
out their immoral and misguided social engineering projects on Jewish
society. The communists were expert at manipulating this. Jews figured
prominently among both victims and perpetrators under the communists.
1.5 million Polish citizens of all nationalities >from Eastern Poland
were sent into the Gulag during this period. Many died a very horrible
death in Siberia eaten alive by lice, or dead >from dysentery, or starvation.

If anyone else on the list has information on Pogroms in Bialystok or
information on Polish/Jewish relations in the area I'm interested to hear.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com



Suprlmn@... wrote:

Address your forum messages to <bialystok@...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On 02 Mar 2005, Tilford Bartman _bartmant@...
(mailto:bartmant@...) wrote:

<< My impression is that pogroms were not a common feature of Jewish life in
the Bialystok region. ......... I'm told that in Bialystok (the big city)
things were not as good. ..... Also my experience is that some Jews wrongly
attribute some events to the Poles that actually had
at least as much if not more to do with Russian Czarist authorities or
troops. ....... If anyone has another take on this subject ........ I'd be
interested to hear it.>>


== My mother told me of many such attacks as she was growing up (born 1898)
in Bialystok. While they were instigated by the Czar or the local Graf
(count) and later, by the Communist regime, they were invariably carried
out by paid cossacks. Whenever that happened, the family would take
shelter in the cellar of the Polish neighbors, where they sometimes
had to remain hidden for several days. Obviously, when my uncle was
killed, not everyone made it to the shelter on time.

B'shalom, Susan Pearlman, nee SZEJNA-DWERA SZEJNMAN-KOSLOWSKY,
in Bialystok.


Staryy Sambor cemetery #galicia

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Does anyone have a list of burials or tombstone inscriptions in the Staryy
Sambor cemetery?

Thanks very much and best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.


Rav Eliyahu Horshowski #galicia

Israel P
 

(This is a correction of yesterday's post. I had the surname wrong. Sorry about
that.)

Rav Juda Gershon Pikholz wrote a lengthy eulogy for Rav Eliyahu Horshowski, av
bet din of Drohobycz who died in 5644 (1883). He refers to him as kin, and more
specifically "shelishi beshelishi im avi." - that is, his father's second cousin.
The eulogy appears as an appendix to his book Hiddushei HaGershunni.

Does anyone have information on how these families might be connected? Rav
Juda Gershon's father was Israel-Yoel ben Pinkas and Sara-Rivka and his mother
was Jutte-Chana, daughter of R' David-Zeev (Ashkenazy?) of Lwow.

Israel Pickholtz