Date   

Volunteer Spotlight - Marshall Katz #usa

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear Friends,

With best wishes for a happy and healthy Passover-

Our latest volunteer spotlight has been published on the blog. This
month we honor Marshall Katz, a prolific KehilaLinks contributor, and
Coordinator of the Sub-Carpathia SIG. Please visit

http://jewishgen.blogspot.com/2013/03/volunteer-spotlight-marshall-katz.html

to read the complete profile and be sure to leave a note in the comments
field thanking Marshall for his hard work and extraordinary dedication
to JewishGen.

Avraham Groll, Director of Business Operations


First Day Events at International Conference in Boston #usa

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

SHARE Fair Will Kick Off International Conference

March 20, 2013 Boston -- The first day of this year's International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy will feature a new version of the Special
Interest Groups (SIGs) and Birds of a Feather (BOF) Fair. Now called the
SHARE Fair, an acronym for SIGs and BOFs, Historical Societies, Archives,
Repositories, Eminent Jewish Genealogical Societies, the expanded event
will include a broader range of participants.

The conference will take place in Boston >from August 4-9, at the historic
Boston Park Plaza Hotel. Over 1,000 family researchers, >from beginners to
experts, are expected to attend.

Twenty-one SIGs and nearly 30 BOFs will be participating in the
Conference. The SIGs that will be at the SHARE Fair (as of March 3) are:
Bessarabia SIG, French SIG, GerSIG (German Jewish), Gesher Galicia
(Galicia), H-SIG (Hungarian), JRI-Poland (Jewish Records Indexing -
Poland), Kremenets District Research Group (Ukraine) Litvak SIG
(Lithuania), LARG (Lodz Area Research Group), ROM-SIG (Romania),
Sub-Carpathia SIG, UK SIG (United Kingdom), and Ukraine SIG.

The BOFs are: Bolechow Jewish Heritage Society, Bukovina BOF (Czernowitz -
Sadagora Area), Canadian BOF, DNA Project Administrators BOF, Friends of
Jewish Dokshitsy, Geni.com Jewish Genealogy Portal BOF, IGRA (Israel
Genealogy Research Association), Jewish Polesie BOF, Kobrin Uyezd Jewish
Research Group, Kolbuszowa Region Research Group (Poland), Lublin and
Zamosc Area BOF, Mac Users BOF, Next Generation Jewish Genealogists,
Novogrod-Volhynsky (Zvhil) BOF (Ukraine), Rohatyn District Research Group
(Ukraine), Suchostaw Region Research Group, and Svencionys District BOF.

The Fair will be held on Sunday, August 4th >from 1:30-5:00 pm, so
attendees can find out what is available locally and make plans to visit
the places of interest during the week. Local groups participating include
the New England branch of the American Jewish Historical Society (AJHS),
the New England Historic Genealogical Society, the Boston Public Library's
Map Collection, the Vilna Shul, City of Boston Archives, the Jewish War
Veterans, Documenting Old Maine Jewry, and the Jewish Genealogical Society
of Connecticut partnering with the Godfrey Library.
During the week of the Conference, the SIGs and BOFs will hold individual
meetings for their groups, many with speakers and meals. Some repository
groups like the AJHS will make their restricted databases available in the
Resource Room during the week for attendees to examine their holdings in
detail.

At the opening plenary session on Sunday evening, the keynote speaker will
be Aaron Lansky, founder and president of the Yiddish Book Center. Mr.
Lansky is responsible for revitalizing the study of Yiddish literature and
language and motivating hundreds of young scholars to study and teach
Yiddish. He has saved over a million Yiddish books since he started
collecting them as a 23-year old graduate student in 1980. His mission to
rescue Yiddish literature earned him a MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant
in 1985.

The remaining four and a half days will feature 250 programs on a rich and
varied range of topics. The program Committee is putting the final touches
on these and will announce them shortly.

So plan to arrive in time to enjoy these important first-day events.
Register today to take advantage of the early registration discount, which
expires on April 30th. For more information or to register, visit
iajgs2013.org.

Co-hosts of the conference are the International Association of Jewish
Genealogical Societies and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater
Boston.

Florence Schumacher, Publicity Chair
33rd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy


Early American SIG #USA Volunteer Spotlight - Marshall Katz #usa

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear Friends,

With best wishes for a happy and healthy Passover-

Our latest volunteer spotlight has been published on the blog. This
month we honor Marshall Katz, a prolific KehilaLinks contributor, and
Coordinator of the Sub-Carpathia SIG. Please visit

http://jewishgen.blogspot.com/2013/03/volunteer-spotlight-marshall-katz.html

to read the complete profile and be sure to leave a note in the comments
field thanking Marshall for his hard work and extraordinary dedication
to JewishGen.

Avraham Groll, Director of Business Operations


Early American SIG #USA First Day Events at International Conference in Boston #usa

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

SHARE Fair Will Kick Off International Conference

March 20, 2013 Boston -- The first day of this year's International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy will feature a new version of the Special
Interest Groups (SIGs) and Birds of a Feather (BOF) Fair. Now called the
SHARE Fair, an acronym for SIGs and BOFs, Historical Societies, Archives,
Repositories, Eminent Jewish Genealogical Societies, the expanded event
will include a broader range of participants.

The conference will take place in Boston >from August 4-9, at the historic
Boston Park Plaza Hotel. Over 1,000 family researchers, >from beginners to
experts, are expected to attend.

Twenty-one SIGs and nearly 30 BOFs will be participating in the
Conference. The SIGs that will be at the SHARE Fair (as of March 3) are:
Bessarabia SIG, French SIG, GerSIG (German Jewish), Gesher Galicia
(Galicia), H-SIG (Hungarian), JRI-Poland (Jewish Records Indexing -
Poland), Kremenets District Research Group (Ukraine) Litvak SIG
(Lithuania), LARG (Lodz Area Research Group), ROM-SIG (Romania),
Sub-Carpathia SIG, UK SIG (United Kingdom), and Ukraine SIG.

The BOFs are: Bolechow Jewish Heritage Society, Bukovina BOF (Czernowitz -
Sadagora Area), Canadian BOF, DNA Project Administrators BOF, Friends of
Jewish Dokshitsy, Geni.com Jewish Genealogy Portal BOF, IGRA (Israel
Genealogy Research Association), Jewish Polesie BOF, Kobrin Uyezd Jewish
Research Group, Kolbuszowa Region Research Group (Poland), Lublin and
Zamosc Area BOF, Mac Users BOF, Next Generation Jewish Genealogists,
Novogrod-Volhynsky (Zvhil) BOF (Ukraine), Rohatyn District Research Group
(Ukraine), Suchostaw Region Research Group, and Svencionys District BOF.

The Fair will be held on Sunday, August 4th >from 1:30-5:00 pm, so
attendees can find out what is available locally and make plans to visit
the places of interest during the week. Local groups participating include
the New England branch of the American Jewish Historical Society (AJHS),
the New England Historic Genealogical Society, the Boston Public Library's
Map Collection, the Vilna Shul, City of Boston Archives, the Jewish War
Veterans, Documenting Old Maine Jewry, and the Jewish Genealogical Society
of Connecticut partnering with the Godfrey Library.
During the week of the Conference, the SIGs and BOFs will hold individual
meetings for their groups, many with speakers and meals. Some repository
groups like the AJHS will make their restricted databases available in the
Resource Room during the week for attendees to examine their holdings in
detail.

At the opening plenary session on Sunday evening, the keynote speaker will
be Aaron Lansky, founder and president of the Yiddish Book Center. Mr.
Lansky is responsible for revitalizing the study of Yiddish literature and
language and motivating hundreds of young scholars to study and teach
Yiddish. He has saved over a million Yiddish books since he started
collecting them as a 23-year old graduate student in 1980. His mission to
rescue Yiddish literature earned him a MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant
in 1985.

The remaining four and a half days will feature 250 programs on a rich and
varied range of topics. The program Committee is putting the final touches
on these and will announce them shortly.

So plan to arrive in time to enjoy these important first-day events.
Register today to take advantage of the early registration discount, which
expires on April 30th. For more information or to register, visit
iajgs2013.org.

Co-hosts of the conference are the International Association of Jewish
Genealogical Societies and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater
Boston.

Florence Schumacher, Publicity Chair
33rd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy


Re: GELLERMAN Last name origin #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Gerhard's answer assumes that the person in question did indeed come
from Germany and was called GELLERMANN before emigrating.
Now, if the person was actually named SCHMIDT, we'd have nowhere to
turn. But some variants should be considered, notably KELLERMANN.

Also, note that many immigrants listed "Germany" instead of eastern
European locations as their origin, and a few listed the place where
they embarked. (Supposedly the vast numbers of Irish -Americans "from"
County Cork include many who literally "came from" there.)

And if "Germany" was a slight westward adjustment of the facts, then the
surnames GELLERMAN, HELLERMAN and KELLERMAN >from Poland or the Pale of
Settlement are a distinct possibility.

Do you know whether the place where this person lived in Nebraska was a
German-speaking community? Was there a Jewish community nearby?

As Gerhard points out, there's nothing about the surname itself that
would point to Jewish origins in Germany. In eastern Europe, on the
other hand, the probability of such a name indicating Jewish origins
would be a little higher.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA Research coordinator, GerSIG

On 3/22/2013 11:16 AM, Gerhard Buck wrote:
Lars Menk does not have the surname GELLERMANN (nor variations of it)
in his "Dictionary of German-Jewish Surnames".

The name means that its first bearer came >from Geldern, a German city
between the Lower Rhine and the German-Dutch border. By assimilition
of the letters l and d Geldermann became Gellerman. The name may also
refer to the Dutch province of Gelderland. Originally the name could
mainly be found in the Rhineland near the Netherlands. (Source: Hans
Bahlow, Deutsches Namenslexikon. 1967)

If you want to see, where this or any other German surname can be
found in Germany nowadays, go to the website of the local (= oertlich)
telephone directory: www.dasoertliche.de <http://www.dasoertliche.de>
and enter the family name on top of the first page. A map will show
you all the places, where persons with this name live.


German SIG #Germany Re: GELLERMAN Last name origin #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Gerhard's answer assumes that the person in question did indeed come
from Germany and was called GELLERMANN before emigrating.
Now, if the person was actually named SCHMIDT, we'd have nowhere to
turn. But some variants should be considered, notably KELLERMANN.

Also, note that many immigrants listed "Germany" instead of eastern
European locations as their origin, and a few listed the place where
they embarked. (Supposedly the vast numbers of Irish -Americans "from"
County Cork include many who literally "came from" there.)

And if "Germany" was a slight westward adjustment of the facts, then the
surnames GELLERMAN, HELLERMAN and KELLERMAN >from Poland or the Pale of
Settlement are a distinct possibility.

Do you know whether the place where this person lived in Nebraska was a
German-speaking community? Was there a Jewish community nearby?

As Gerhard points out, there's nothing about the surname itself that
would point to Jewish origins in Germany. In eastern Europe, on the
other hand, the probability of such a name indicating Jewish origins
would be a little higher.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA Research coordinator, GerSIG

On 3/22/2013 11:16 AM, Gerhard Buck wrote:
Lars Menk does not have the surname GELLERMANN (nor variations of it)
in his "Dictionary of German-Jewish Surnames".

The name means that its first bearer came >from Geldern, a German city
between the Lower Rhine and the German-Dutch border. By assimilition
of the letters l and d Geldermann became Gellerman. The name may also
refer to the Dutch province of Gelderland. Originally the name could
mainly be found in the Rhineland near the Netherlands. (Source: Hans
Bahlow, Deutsches Namenslexikon. 1967)

If you want to see, where this or any other German surname can be
found in Germany nowadays, go to the website of the local (= oertlich)
telephone directory: www.dasoertliche.de <http://www.dasoertliche.de>
and enter the family name on top of the first page. A map will show
you all the places, where persons with this name live.


GerSIG Speakers Fund #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

Always please remember to select

GerSIG ******* Speakers Fund **********

when making contributions to GerSIG.

Thank you!

The Directors and volunteers of the German Jewish SIG
wish all our members a Happy Passover.


German SIG #Germany GerSIG Speakers Fund #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

Always please remember to select

GerSIG ******* Speakers Fund **********

when making contributions to GerSIG.

Thank you!

The Directors and volunteers of the German Jewish SIG
wish all our members a Happy Passover.


Re: Stolp / Pommern (Slupsk / Pommerania) #germany

Evelyn Frybort <efrybort@...>
 

Dear Helga and fellow Gersiggers,

Thank you for your message.
I know that the Vital Records for Debrzno (Preussisch Friedland) which are
older than 100 years are archived in the Slupsk State Archives. The only
reason that I discovered that my Debrzno Jewish ancestors' records were
there is because I was informed of this in person by the Head Town Archivist
during my visit to Debrzno last year. Otherwise, it is very difficult to
find out which family records are held in which State Archives. I have
family that lived in various small towns around Pommerania and Westpreussen.
Would it be possible to share your information that you obtained about the
Slupsk Jewish records? With kind regards,

Evelyn Frybort, Sydney Australia efrybort@...


German SIG #Germany RE: Stolp / Pommern (Slupsk / Pommerania) #germany

Evelyn Frybort <efrybort@...>
 

Dear Helga and fellow Gersiggers,

Thank you for your message.
I know that the Vital Records for Debrzno (Preussisch Friedland) which are
older than 100 years are archived in the Slupsk State Archives. The only
reason that I discovered that my Debrzno Jewish ancestors' records were
there is because I was informed of this in person by the Head Town Archivist
during my visit to Debrzno last year. Otherwise, it is very difficult to
find out which family records are held in which State Archives. I have
family that lived in various small towns around Pommerania and Westpreussen.
Would it be possible to share your information that you obtained about the
Slupsk Jewish records? With kind regards,

Evelyn Frybort, Sydney Australia efrybort@...


Re: Stolp / Pommern (Slupsk / Pommerania) #germany

Heinz Radde <radde@...>
 

Hello Helga
Do you know the work "Die einstigen juedischen Gemeinden in Pommern" by
Gerhard Salinger >from Stolp, now New York?
In case I could send you details.
I am very much interested in your records.

Regards, Heinz Radde Zurich/Switzerland, radde@...

hhheilbut@... wrote "When I took part in a meeting
in Kassel last October, I asked what has happened to the Jewish
records of Stolp. I was given the whole data starting in 1839
and ending in 1876. So I started to write the data down into
tables and they are nearly finished...


German SIG #Germany Re: Stolp / Pommern (Slupsk / Pommerania) #germany

Heinz Radde <radde@...>
 

Hello Helga
Do you know the work "Die einstigen juedischen Gemeinden in Pommern" by
Gerhard Salinger >from Stolp, now New York?
In case I could send you details.
I am very much interested in your records.

Regards, Heinz Radde Zurich/Switzerland, radde@...

hhheilbut@... wrote "When I took part in a meeting
in Kassel last October, I asked what has happened to the Jewish
records of Stolp. I was given the whole data starting in 1839
and ending in 1876. So I started to write the data down into
tables and they are nearly finished...


BASSMAN family from Zidikau, Lithuania ---> Connecticut #general

Orly Dar <scherant@...>
 

Hello,
I am looking for a M. Bassman and his three children, Morris b. 1894, Jacob
b. 1887 and Max b. 1891 who settled in Madison, New Haven, Connecticut
around about 1910.

The three brothers were farmers and their father was a M. Bassman. I really
want to know who M. Bassman's wife was, as this would make the connection
I am looking for.

Thanking you in anticipation.

Orly Dar


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BASSMAN family from Zidikau, Lithuania ---> Connecticut #general

Orly Dar <scherant@...>
 

Hello,
I am looking for a M. Bassman and his three children, Morris b. 1894, Jacob
b. 1887 and Max b. 1891 who settled in Madison, New Haven, Connecticut
around about 1910.

The three brothers were farmers and their father was a M. Bassman. I really
want to know who M. Bassman's wife was, as this would make the connection
I am looking for.

Thanking you in anticipation.

Orly Dar


Ladino: Los Barros, Los Patas #general

Jeanne Gold <family@...>
 

I'm looking for a contextual translation of two words. In Monastir (now
Bitola, Macedonia), there were two families with the surname, Camhi.
They differentiated themselves by the appellate, "Los Barros" and "Los
Patas". Online translators have translated these two words to mean "The
Muds" and "The Legs" and that sounds odd to me. I'm wondering, since
these were Ladino speaking families, if their might be a different
meaning for the terms.

If you are interested, I posted some information about the family back
in 2000:
http://boards.ancestry.com/surnames.camhi/1/mb.ashx

Thank you for any suggestions you may have.

Jeanne Gold
Albany, OR, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ladino: Los Barros, Los Patas #general

Jeanne Gold <family@...>
 

I'm looking for a contextual translation of two words. In Monastir (now
Bitola, Macedonia), there were two families with the surname, Camhi.
They differentiated themselves by the appellate, "Los Barros" and "Los
Patas". Online translators have translated these two words to mean "The
Muds" and "The Legs" and that sounds odd to me. I'm wondering, since
these were Ladino speaking families, if their might be a different
meaning for the terms.

If you are interested, I posted some information about the family back
in 2000:
http://boards.ancestry.com/surnames.camhi/1/mb.ashx

Thank you for any suggestions you may have.

Jeanne Gold
Albany, OR, USA


Galician vital records column headings (was Please help with terms) #galicia

Bette Stoop Mas <bette_sscf@...>
 

Yossi Yagur of Israel wrote: "Dealing with German written birth records
of the Austro-Hungarian empire (2nd half of the 19th century), I have
some problems understanding the exact meaning of some terms. One
of the columns headers is: Der Pathen oder Zeugen, des Sandecto(?)
oder Schames. (I hope this is the proper transliteration >from the old
German font). >from old-German dictionary I've learnt that Pathe in
German means Godfather. >from my own knowledge I know that
Sandek in Yiddish also means Godfather."

JRI-Poland has provided examples of Galician Vital Records (birth,
marriage and death before and after 1877) with translations of German,
Polish and Latin column headings to English.

< http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/galicia/GalicianVitalRecords_Titles_Nov2002.pdf >

The column Yossi refers to is translated as "Signature of Official or
Witnesses and place of residence."

Bette Stoop Mas
Florida USA


Legal name change in Pilzno - where would the document be? #galicia

Philip Trauring
 

I have a birth record >from Vienna >from 1892 that states that the
father, Israel Wolf Traurig legally changed his name on April 1, 1873
(file number Z. 21869) to Israel Wolf Trauring. It also says Israel Wolf
Traurig was born in Pilzno in on April 21, 1869. As he was not even
4 years old, presumably that name change occurred in Pilzno, or in a
city nearby. Does anyone know if such a document would still exist,
and if so which archive I should be checking?

Thanks,

Philip Trauring


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Galician vital records column headings (was Please help with terms) #galicia

Bette Stoop Mas <bette_sscf@...>
 

Yossi Yagur of Israel wrote: "Dealing with German written birth records
of the Austro-Hungarian empire (2nd half of the 19th century), I have
some problems understanding the exact meaning of some terms. One
of the columns headers is: Der Pathen oder Zeugen, des Sandecto(?)
oder Schames. (I hope this is the proper transliteration >from the old
German font). >from old-German dictionary I've learnt that Pathe in
German means Godfather. >from my own knowledge I know that
Sandek in Yiddish also means Godfather."

JRI-Poland has provided examples of Galician Vital Records (birth,
marriage and death before and after 1877) with translations of German,
Polish and Latin column headings to English.

< http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/galicia/GalicianVitalRecords_Titles_Nov2002.pdf >

The column Yossi refers to is translated as "Signature of Official or
Witnesses and place of residence."

Bette Stoop Mas
Florida USA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Legal name change in Pilzno - where would the document be? #galicia

Philip Trauring
 

I have a birth record >from Vienna >from 1892 that states that the
father, Israel Wolf Traurig legally changed his name on April 1, 1873
(file number Z. 21869) to Israel Wolf Trauring. It also says Israel Wolf
Traurig was born in Pilzno in on April 21, 1869. As he was not even
4 years old, presumably that name change occurred in Pilzno, or in a
city nearby. Does anyone know if such a document would still exist,
and if so which archive I should be checking?

Thanks,

Philip Trauring

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